John Wesley Linton’s Old Kentucky Home


John Wesley Linton, the son of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman, was born November 14, 1843, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky.  He was the grandson of Benjamin Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson, who married April 12, 1805, in Fluvanna County, Virginia; and the great-grandson of Captain John Linton, a Revoluationary War soldier, and his wife, Ann Nancy Mason, of Loudoun County, Virginia.


When the Civil War began John Wesley entered on the Confederate side, in Company B, 1st Kentucky Cavalry, Benjamin Hardin Helm’s Regiment, later called The Orphan Brigade.  John was captured January 3, 1863, in Muhlenberg County and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was imprisoned until March 27, 1863.  It is said that he walked home to Logan County, Kentucky, from the prison camp.


I suppose that gave him a long time to think about the war, his family and the soldiers that would never come back.  Many of the men in his unit were killed.  When he returned home he planted cedar trees on the Linton farm, one for each fallen Confederate.  Many of those trees still stand today.  When Ritchey and I were researching in Logan County last week we were fortunate to be able to photograph the line of cedars – and the home where John Wesley lived!  Tall, old cedar trees line both halves of the front of the property, and follow the gravel drive to the house.


After the war John married Emma Adelaide Proctor, November 11, 1869.  They had 5 children:  Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.  If you will remember, my great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, corresponded with her cousin Hugh during the 30’s and 40’s.


The house was passed down to Benjamin Proctor Linton and down through the line until several years ago it was sold out of the Linton family.


We were hopeful to get a photo of the house, and when we knocked on the door were warmly welcomed by the new owner – one of the Linton family, Garwood Linton!  He graciously allowed us to take photos both outside and inside – sharing his knowledge of the family and the house.  We even took photos of the family bible and a picture of John Wesley and Emma Adelaide Linton!


John and Emma, and other Lintons, are buried in Pleasant Run Cemetery, located a mile or so to the back of the house.  John Wesley Linton, November 14, 1843 – July 4, 1930.  Emma Adelaide Proctor Linton, October 11, 1850 – March 3, 1928.  The little shrub beside the stone had grown since our last visit in 2004 – Ritchey had to push it to the side to get the photograph!


Our trip to Logan County was wonderful in many ways, but this, I must say, was my favorite!  And I have found a new cousin!


4 thoughts on “John Wesley Linton’s Old Kentucky Home”

  1. My mother was Elizabeth Linton McCrea. She was born and later married in this house. During my younger years my grandmother, then an aunt and later my cousin lived in this house. I spent many summers on the farm, as it was always called, during my younger years.

      1. Our family moved from Nashville to Phoenix,Az in 1968 both Mom and Dad are gone along with older brother. Younger brother moved back to Cookeville, Tn. 10 years ago. The last sibling of Benjamin Proctor Linton, my grand father passed in 2005.

  2. Phyllis, This is the first time seeing this … months later. This infomation is so wonderful to have and to pass down to relatives and future generations.
    Thank you for taking the time to write and post this.
    It was such a pleasure spending time with you & Richey. I hope you come back to Logan Co soon.
    Always the best cousin !
    Garwood Linton

Any thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s