Tag Archives: Ballard Count Kentucky

Andrew Lovelace of Ballard County

The first white men in Ballard County came in 1780, when General George Rogers Clark came with about 200 soldiers to establish a military outpost at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, laying claim of the United States to the Mississippi River as its western boundary.  Fort Jefferson was established with about 200 soldiers, which was a mile and a half south of what is now the town of Wickliffe.  The Chickasaw Indians considered this their territory and were anything but happy that their land had been invaded by the white man.  A few settlers came down the river to the fort after it was established, but the Indians attacked and killed them mercilessly.  Soon the fort was abandoned and any remaining settlers left also.  Until the purchase of this area of Kentucky in 1819, there were no permanent settlers.

Of the settlers who came in around 1818/1819 were John Humphrey, Solomon Redferrin, Robert Crafton and William Crafton, Daniel Doolin, John Weaver, James Talbott, William Rush, William Holman, Samuel Wilson, Andrew Lovelace, the Ewell family, the Newman family, Benjamin Kimmell, Samuel Saruthers, Penuel Billington, James Ashley, Israel Linn, William Linn, the Stovall family, the Unsell family.

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1885

Ballard County, Kentucky

Andrew Lovelace

Upon the crest of a high hill overlooking the village of Lovelace, and commanding a magnificent view of the valley of the Mayfield Creek, rests a substantial brick residence, the home of a bright and sturdy old pioneer, the worthy subject of this sketch.  Andrew Lovelace was born February 12, 1811, in Butler County, Kentucky, and came with his parents, in 1822, to what is now Ballard County, where he has since resided.  His father, Captain Andrew Lovelace, Sr., a native of Rowan County, North Carolina, was born in 1776, removed to Kentucky in an early day, and died here in 1863.  He was the son of Elias, a soldier of the Revolution, who also died at this place about 1833.  He was the son of John, an Englishman.  Subject’s mother, Rebecca, daughter of William Holman, of North Carolina, died in 1834.  To her and husband were born:  Elizabeth (Hall), Nancy (Lynn), Elias, Archibald, subject, Rebecca (Humphrey), Isaac and William.  Subject was married November 5, 1833, to Miss Eleanor, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Shelton) Ashley, of Butler County (born May 15, 1815), and his union has been blessed by the birth of Virgil S., Martha J. (Howard), John H., Freeman B., James M., Mary E. (Elsey), William A., Eliza B. (Trice), and Susan V. (Henderson).  Subject is a farmer, has prospered in his business and now owns 400 acres of well improved and valuable land which is in a fine state of cultivation.  In politics he still clings to the tenets of the old line Whigs.

Andrew and Eleanor Lovelace are buried in the Lovelace Family Cemetery in the town of Lovelace.