Category Archives: Marriage Records

Wedding Announcements In The Hazel Green Herald – Wolfe County

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 9, 1887

The Caudill Twin Brothers are United to the Wells twin Sisters Under One Marriage Ceremony

Rev. W. R. Davis, of Morgan County, on Thursday, the third institute, officiated at one of the most remarkable weddings which ever took place in this section.  On that day he solemnized the right of matrimony between Robert Lee and John T. Caudill, of the first part, twins and sons of Abel Caudill, Rowan County, and Misses Mahala and Kalah Wells, of the second part, twins and daughters of William Wells, of Caney, Morgan County; Robert Lee married Miss Mahala and John T. united in the holy banns with Miss Kalah.  There were present about two hundred persons to witness the nuptials, and everything went merry.  This was truly a double wedding in every sense, except that Mr. Davis did not get a double fee.  Indeed, he would not accept any fee whatsoever, as the young brides were his nieces.  Brides and grooms were as happy as it is possible to be, but it is safe to predict that they have already gone to Rowan or soon will.  To prevent any serious trouble, therefore, we wish them abundant success in life, and modestly suggest that each of the grooms present his bride with a year’s subscription to The Herald, which insures happiness and long life in every household.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, December 19, 1895

Quite a romantic marriage took place in our quiet little village last Monday.  As per announcement in our last issue, Tom Lee, of Midland, Texas, and Miss Lucy Wallis, of near Daysboro, in this county, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  The bride and groom and the attendants were on horseback when the ceremony was pronounced by Elder J. T. Pieratt, after which the party galloped away.  The attendants were John Cecil and Miss Martha Byrd, George Byrd and Miss Minnie Wallis, Andy Blankenship and Miss Florida Gillaspie.  The party had dinner at the hospitable home of our fellow-countyman, Ed. F. Cecil, by way of an infair, and then dispersed with hands shaking and protestations of love and friendship for the future.  Mr. Lee and his wife left Tuesday for their western home, and all who know them join with us in the wish that they may have a long life of pleasure and prosperity.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, October 2, 1902

A Wedding and Wedding Feast

Married, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Roe Nickell, of our town, on Thursday, September 25th, Nick Bailey and Miss Eliza Nickell.  The bride is a very distant relative of mine host, where the ceremony was performed, and an orphan girl, both her parents being dead.  The groom is a young widower with three children, but a prosperous farmer of Morgan County.  Mr. Nickell and wife, F. M. Long and wife, Oscar Fallen and wife, and perhaps others of the good citizens of Dickville, for the nonce formed a trust by pooling their dinner-pots and honored the bridal couple with a dinner worthy of the occasion, after which the “two souls with but a single thought, two hears that beat as one,” left for their home on Tom’s Branch.

Allen – Cambron 1799 Marriage Bond and Consents Washington County

Know all men by these presents that we, David Allen and James Cambron, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment where of well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 25th day of November 1799.  The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound David Allen and Rebekah Cambron, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then this obligation to be void, else to remain in full force.

David Allen, James Cambron

Witness, John Reed

November the 25th 1799  This is to certify that Thomas Cambron doth agree, and his wife Nancy, to give their daughter Rebekah in the Bonds of Matrimony unto David Allen.  Given under our hands and seals the date above written.

Thomas Cambron, Nancy Cambron

Test.  John Cambron, James Cambron

November 25th 1799  This is to certify that Sarah Mattingly agrees to give her son, David Allen, in the Bonds of Matrimony unto Rebekah Cambron, given under my hand and seal the day above written.

Sarah Mattingly

Test.  John Cambron, James Cambron

 

Vanmetre-Hoglan 1783 Marriage Bond – Lincoln County

Another of the very old marriage bonds from Lincoln County.  1783 – Lincoln had been a county for only three years.  In 1790 the census was about 6,500, leaving us to believe it was much less in 1783!

Know all men by these presents that we, Isaac Vanmetre and Andrew Lair, are held and firmly bound unto His Excellency, Benjamin Harrison, Esquire, Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment where of to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our Heirs, Executors and Administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 29th day of July 1783.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Isaac Vanmetre and Martha Hoglan, for which a license has issued.  Now, it there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, the this obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

Isaac Vanmetre, Andrew Lair

Sealed and Delivered in presence of Willis Green.

Wheatley-Riney 1798 Marriage Bond – Washington County

Know all men by these presents that we, James Wheatley and Joseph Riney, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 4th day of January 1798.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound James Wheatley and Susannah Riney, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void, else to remain in full force.

James Wheatley, Joseph Riney

Witness, John Reed

I am willing for a marriage intended between James Wheatley and my daughter, Susannah, given under my hand and seal this 4th day of January 1798.

Thomas Riney

Test. Joseph Riney, Stanish Langston

Henry-Hardin 1794 Washington County Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents, that we, Barnabas M. Henry and Martin Hardin, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 20th day of May 1794.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Barnabas . Henry and Sarah Hardin.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then this obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

B. M. Henry, Martin Hardin

Teste. John Reed

1866 Wedding of George T. Hord and Miss Jane Steele

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 25, 1866

A Diamond Wedding in Woodford

The quiet of our happy village was dispelled on the evening of the 19th by the hurrying to and fro of carriages, hacks and every conceivable kind of vehicle, and greeting the ear of every passer-by was the cheerful inquiry, ‘Shall we meet you at the wedding tonight?’  Mr. George T. Hord, a most elegant and highly cultivated banker, of the firm of Hord and George, and Miss Jane Steele, one of Kentucky’s rarest and most beautiful fair ones, were married by Mr. Venable, our most worthy and greatly beloved Episcopal minister.  The wedding was regal, the scene attendant upon it truly imposing, the beautiful church was brilliantly lighted, and strains of soul-searching music welcomed many distinguished and magnificently dressed guests.

On they came until every seat and aisle were crowded, and after merry greetings, they waited in breathless anxiety the coming of the happy pair.  Intense the excitement grew, until, at last, to the tune of a grand march, entered first the graceful bride and groom, accompanied by ten beautiful attendants, led to the altar by so many gallant cavaliers, magnificently attired.  The bride, as blushing as a May-day rose, was half concealed ‘neath the mazes of a costly and long flowing veil, her dress of the most gorgeous rep silk, handsomely decorated with point lace, and hung in massive folds superbly around her matchless form.  The diamonds sparkling from her queen-like neck and fairy ilugers, made a most brilliant display of a handsome bridal gift of her generous husband.  Her presents were many and mostly of silver.  The groom, the very essence of gallantry and elegance, wore a few gems of the purest water, but rarer far than all, there seemed to be enshrined within his bosom a heart all wreathed with rare and tender buds of love and joy.  So soon as the beautiful ceremony was performed the bridal party were followed by the happy guests to the residence of the bride’s father, Judge William Steele, whose courtesy, coupled with that of his estimable lady, could not have been excelled.  The supper gotten up in good taste, with almost unlimited labor and cost was indeed sumptuous.

The evening passed delightfully, and to the music of Saxton’s band through the mazes of the merry dance we glided until the wee hours of the night, when, with light hearts, we repaired homeward to invoke a prayer for the loving pair, and to mingle with our dreams thoughts of the grand entertainment of the evening.

Versailles, Dec. 20th

According to the census records George and Jane Steele Hord did not have children.  In 1900 they had been married for 35 years.  George was born in Virginia and Jane in Alabama.  George died January 16, 1901, of pneumonia.  According to Jane’s death certificate, she died July 31, 1918.  Her parents are listed as W. J. Steele, born in Kentucky, and Mary D. Winston, born in Alabama.  Jane was born February 14, 1839.

Crain-Reynolds 1836 Marriage Bond and Consent – Garrard County

Know all men by these presents, that we, Eli B. Crain and James H. Sterman, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the just and full sum of fifty pounds, current money, to which payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 30th day of January 1836.

The condition of the above obligation is such, that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound Eli B. Crain and Mary Jane Reynolds of Garrard County.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the same, then the above obligation to be void, else to be and remain in full force and virtue.

Eli B. Crain, J. H. Stirman

This is to certify that the Clerk of the Garrard County Court is hereby authorized to issue license to Eli B. Crain to marry my daughter, Mary Jane Reynolds, given under my hand this 30th January 1836.

David Reynolds

Attest.  James H. Stirman, Moses Reynolds

I certify that the foregoing certificate was known to be the act and deed of David Reynolds by the oath of James H. Stirman, a subscribing witness thereto, January 30, 1836.

A. N. McKee, D. C