Category Archives: Old Photos

1870’s Women’s Fashions

I’m so excited to share this photo!  This is a wonderful example of the 1870’s style of women’s fashions.  Seven subjects give us seven examples of how the bustle and narrower form of dress was used during this decade.  Skirts moved from the voluminous hoop fashion, to the narrow skirt, especially in front, and the bustle and a bit of train in back.  Each of these woman give us an example of this style, but they are quite independent of each other.  The white and print dresses give us a glimpse of the bustle in back.  Of the other five, notice the difference in front buttons.  Two have buttons spaced very close, two others have buttons a bit further apart, and one has a quirky bodice cut that looks slashed!  Bits of lace and collars are seen at the throat, fastened with a brooch.  Some of the skirts are simple, but the two in front exhibit pleats, one with a corresponding color of fabric.  Is this a photo of sisters, school mates?  It gives us a striking example of the myriad of women’s fashions of the day.

Photo was taken by Lindsay in Robinson, Illinois.

Let Me Introduce You to the Linton Family!

While visiting the Linton house in Logan County, my cousin, Garwood Linton, let me look through all the old family photographs.  As with most, few were named.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy them!  Today I share a few with you from Garwood’s collection – with my guesses for who they may be.

This is a beautiful photograph of an older woman.  Notice her fine features, her sweet face – and her hands!  She holds her spectacles in one, and a book in another.  They look like they’ve worked hard during her years of life.

This photograph is a cabinet card – 6.5″ x 4.25″.  It was made in Bowling Green, Kentucky, not far from Russellville, by Bettison’s Studio.  This is an early cabinet card, no frills, that I would date to about 1872.  If we check the family tree, this could possibly be Garwood’s 3rd great-grandmother, Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1822, died 1879, who married Benjamin Burkett Linton.

Isn’t this a beautiful woman?  This is a tintype photo, taken about 1885, my guess.  Tintypes do not have the name of the photographer listed.

A handsome gentleman is next.  This is a carte de visite, 2.5″ x 4″.  The photographer was L. D. Robertson, South Side Public Square, Franklin, Kentucky.  The Linton family lived in Logan County between the towns of Russellville and Franklin (in Simpson County).  Due to the large sleeves and lapels of the coat, this photo was most likely taken in the 1860’s.   Could this be a young Thomas Alney Linton?

This is an 1870’s gent – the lapels of his coat are smaller, and buttoned at the top.  He wears a very  nice watch chain!  Another tintype, but I can’t say who this man might be.

Here we have a photo of a handsome couple.  The bustle lets us know this is from the 1870’s.  The man wears a slightly larger jacket than this time period, but it could have been held over from previous years.  This tintype has just a bit of color added to the cheeks.

Next we have this cherub!  What adorable sweetness!  The tiny feet and hands, hair sticking up – and sitting in a tiny chair!  This is a very old carte de visite, perhaps taken in 1862.  There is no border or photographer’s name on the card.  This child is obviously a year of age or younger.  Checking the data base for Linton descendants from the patriarch, Benjamin Franklin Linton, one child does fit this age – his granddaughter, Louella C. Linton, daughter of Benjamin Burkett Linton – and sister to John Wesley Linton who owned this home.  Unfortunately Louella lived only a year or two.  If this is her photo, it’s probably the only one taken of her.

What a treat to look through a large drawer of photos from another time period!  Thank you, Cousin!

Whyte and Sons Photography

Not only did Ritchey and I walk through many cemeteries on our trip, we did walk through one antique mall to look for old photos.  The above postcard photo shows three woman – Jean, Nellie and Bella.  Isn’t it nice to know their names?

Postcard photos were introduced in 1903, and became quite popular by 1906.  Many of the old postcards have a design in the area to attach a stamp for mailing, and the design can be used to date the card.  This particular postcard has no such designation, but it does have the name and address of the photographer – Whyte & Sons, 20 Union St., Glasgow, Scotland.  Originally this company began with the father, James Whyte, and after 1906 it became known as Whyte and Sons.  I would probably date this photo to about 1910.

Carnival Era Tintypes

This photograph is a tintype, of the same size as a carte-de-visite photograph on a card – 2 1/2 x 4 1/2 inches.  The very early tintypes were encased in little black cases lined with red velvet.  From about 1864 to 1900 it was realized that tintypes could survive without the case, so many were delivered in decorative paper covers or envelopes.  This is the case with this photo, as shown below.  Out of the case you can see the wear and tear on the photo over the years.

By the 1890s, many tintypes were taken at seaside resorts, county fairs and carnivals.  Since they were produced so quickly, these tintypes became a popular memento of a favorite outing.  And, of course, they could also be made in a photographer’s studio.

Unfortunately we do not know the woman’s name shown here.  She has a rather old-fashioned hair style, but looks very neat in her over-sleeves trimmed with lace, and the same bit of lace on the collar.  It is difficult to impossible to date these tintypes without a cover sleeve.  Since this photo does have a sleeve, we know the photographer is Ritter L. C. Rambo, Practical Photographer, 4080 Lancaster Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Couple Photo From Around 1900

Isn’t this a lovely couple from the very early 1900’s?  They look a bit shy – could this have been their wedding day?  No veil or flowers, though.  I particularly love the woman’s hairstyle and the gentleman’s mustache.  Mr. Charlie and wife is written on back.

This photo was taken by A. H. Houff, in Henderson, North Carolina.

May I Introduce Elmina Walmer

This is one of the few photographs I have that has a name listed on back.  This is Elmina Walmer.  At first I thought it was a maiden name, but you can see a wedding ring on her left hand, so perhaps she married a Walmer.  Either way, she wears an 1886 dress (give or take a few years!).  I found a photo in my copy of Joan Severa’s Dressed for the Photographer with the pleated underskirt, overskirt raised in the back, tight sleeves and bodice – and a multitude of buttons down the front.  An almost exact replica of the dress Elmina is wearing and the photo is dated 1886.

This photograph was taken by M. E. Bare, Photographer, in Hummelstown, Pennsylvania (Dauphin County).

Handsome Wedding Party

What a handsome wedding party!  The bride and her ladies in their beautiful white lace and ruffles.  The men in their dark jackets and boutonnieres.  Unfortunately there are no names, and not even the name of the photographer – this photo has been trimmed.  However, we can still enjoy this happy memory from a bygone day!