Category Archives: Obituaries

Henry Clay Stone Buried At Mt. Gilead Cemetery Mason County

Henry Clay Stone, September 5, 1843 – April 17, 1919.  Sallie E., his wife, December 30, 1848 – January 26, 1923.  Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

Henry Clay Stone was the son of Kinzea Stone and Elizabeth Ann Seamonds, born in Bourbon County, September 5, 1843.  In the 1850 census of that county Kinzea is 37, wife Elizabeth, also 37.  The following children are listed:  Jesse N., 13; Sarah A., 11; Malinda J., 9; Henry Clay, 7; Martha, 5; and Mary E., 3.  Also living in the household are Edward Stone, 33; David Dodge, 17; and Bernard Graham, 25, listed as schoolmaster and born in Ireland.

Henry Clay Stone married Sarah Wallingford about 1870.  In the 1880 census they are 36 and 33, respectively, with daughters Nettie, 4; and Minnie, 3.  In the 1900 census we find the couple has been married for 30 years.  They have had 7 children, but only 3 have survived.  Minnie, 23; Kinzea, 19; and Elizabeth C., 13.  Daughter Nettie was deceased by that date.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 17, 1919

H. Clay Stone Died At Noon of Influenza

County Magistrate and Prominent Citizen of Mt. Gilead Neighborhood Dies of Heart Trouble Developing In Influenza

Mr. H. Clay stone, Magistrate of the Mt. Gilead district, died at his home near that village at noon today of heart trouble brought on by influenza, from which he has been suffering for the past several days.

Mr. Stone was 75 years of age and quite a prominent citizen.  He was a very extensive reader and one of the best posted men in the county on many subjects.  He was a member of he one of the oldest families in Kentucky and a very likable gentleman.

Besides his wife, Mr. Stone is survived by one son, Kinza Stone, who made his home with his parents, and two daughters, Mrs. William Byron, of Mt. Carmel, and Mrs. Minnie Johnson, of Lexington.

Arrangements for the funeral have not as yet been made.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, April 18, 1919

Squire Stone’s Funeral Saturday Afternoon

The funeral of Squire H. Clay Stone will be held from the late home at Mt. Gilead Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock and burial will be made at the Mt. Gilead Cemetery.

 

A Wedding and A Funeral in Clark County

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, June 10, 1896

Joy and Sorrow

In the midst of life we are in death.  Along the pathway of existence the cradle and the coffin jostle each other and the pathway to the bridal altar.  A sad exemplification of the latter fact occurred at the home of John Goff, of Indian Fields, Wednesday.

On this occasion, ‘Edgewood,’ his handsome county home, was the scene of a beautiful wedding.  Owing to the illness of Mrs. Goff the festivities were of a very quiet nature.  However, long before the appointed hour, the spacious rooms were filled with the near relatives who had come to witness the marriage of the youngest daughter of the household, Miss Patsy, to Mr. John R. Downing, of Mason County.

The parlors were brilliantly lighted and decorated, and the dining room, where an elegant luncheon was served, presented a fairy-like appearance.

At 11 o’clock the bridal party entered the parlors.  First came Rev. Mr. McGarvey of Lexington, who performed the ceremony; he was followed by Misses Lillie and Anna Goff, cousin and niece of the bride.  Then came the bride attended by her sister, Miss Margaret Goff, and the groom with his attendant, Mr. Edward Gault, of Mason County.

The bride was gowned in a dainty creation of Paris mull, and valenciennes lace and carried bridal roses.  The maids also wore Paris mull and carried pink mermets.  The bridal party gracefully grouped, with fern-draped window as a background, made a beautiful tableaux.

After luncheon, the happy couple drove to this city where Mr. and Mrs. Downing took the 3 o’clock train for Maysville.

The groom is a cultured gentleman and one of Mason County’s most popular and prosperous farmers.  Clark is losing one of her most lovable daughters but her loss is Mason’s gain.

Mrs. Patsy Goff, the mother of the bride, had been ill for some time, but was thought to be better, but that evening she grew worse and about dark she died.

She was originally Miss Prewitt and was sixty-five years of age.  Funeral at

the residence this morning and burial in the Winchester Cemetery.

She leaves six sons and five daughters, to-wit:  Thomas, Levi, James, John, Elisha and Caswell, Mrs. Henrietta Bedford, Mrs. Emma Browning, Mrs. Lizzie Bedford, Miss Margaret Goff and Mrs. Patsy Downing.

The sympathy of a host of friends go out to the stricken family in this sorrowful ending of a day of joy. – Winchester Democrat.

John Hedges Goff, May 9, 1821 – May 23, 1901.  Martha Chandler Prewitt Goff, December 8, 1830 – June 3, 1896.  Winchester Cemetery, Clark County, Kentucky.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, May 24, 1901

Died Thursday Morning

Father of Mrs. John R. Downing Passes Away at His Home in Clark County

Mr. John Hedges Goff, in his eighty-first year, died early Thursday morning at his home at Indian Fields, Clark County, of old age.  The funeral takes place at Winchester at noon today.

Mr. Goff was the father of thirteen children, ten of whom survive, among those surviving being Mrs. John R. Downing, of Washington.

Mr. Goff was a prominent breeder of Shorthorn cattle and was instrumental in the building of the Kentucky Union railroad.

The Winchester Democrat, Clark County, Kentucky

Friday, May 25, 1901

Mr. John Hedges Goff died shortly after midnight Wednesday at his home at Indian Fields, of old age, he being in his eighty-first year.  The remains were interred in the Winchester Cemetery, with services at the grave.  His wife, formerly Miss Martha Prewitt, died in 1895; three children are also dead, and ten survive, viz:  Thomas Goff, of Lexington; Mrs. H. C. Bedford and Levi Goff, of Winchester; Mrs. Emma Browning and John Goff, of Jackson; Elisha Goff, Caswell Goff and Miss Margaret Goff, of Clark County; Mrs. Lizzie Bedford, of Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Patsy Downing, of Mason County.  Mr. Goff was born at Indian Fields and had lived there all his life.  Although for many years one of the most popular and prominent men in the county, he never held political office, but for many years had been an Elder in Bethlehem Christian Church.  He was devoted to public improvements, and was a prominent breeder of Shorthorn cattle.  He was instrumental in building the Iron Works turnpike and Kentucky Union Railroad, in both of which he lost money, resulting in financial embarrassment later.  He was a good neighbor and a splendid citizen, and his death is a loss to the whole community.  A singular coincidence was that his death occurred on the anniversary of the marriage of his favorite granddaughter, Mattie Bedford.

The Winchester Democrat, Clark County, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 21, 1901

Friday we attended the burial of our old friend and brother and former neighbor, John H. Goff. And while standing near the group of weeping children, and looking down into the empty grave, which would soon receive and for ever hide from view the mortal remains of our dear old friend, our mind wandered back to our boyhood days; we saw in those long bygone years the luxurious, beautiful, prosperous and happy home of John H. Goff. No farm in this entire section of the county was more fertile and kept in a higher state of cultivation. The home was prosperous because intelligence and industry were combined in tilling the soil and in managing its various departments and products. It was a religious home where parents and children were accustomed to meet together around the family altar and enjoy sweet communion with their Maker. The widow and orphan, the poor and needy and distressed never left his home empty handed. The world has in truth been made happier and better by this good man having lived in it. His sons can do no better than emulate the life and character of their father.

 

W. E. Wells Obituary

W. E. Wells, 1830-1907.  Maysville Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 14, 1907

Deaths

The venerable W. E. Wells, died last night at 7 o’clock at his home in Moransburg, with a complication of ailments after an illness of three months, aged 78 years.

He leaves a widow and six children, five boys and a daughter.

He is of a pioneer family and has resided in the house where he died ever since his marriage forty years ago.

Louisa J. Wells, 1845-1913.

William H. Hoover and Sallie Evans Hoover Obituaries

William H. Hoover, 1821-1906.  Sallie E. Hoover, 1841-1914.  William H. Hoover, 1858-1929.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 22, 1906

Wealthy Farmer Dead

Nicholasville, Kentucky, Nov. 21 – The funeral services of William H. Hoover, Sr., were held at 10 o’clock this morning at the residence in the county.  Rev. E. G. B. Mann, of Lexington, Rev. F. M. Fuqua, of the Centenary Methodist Church, and Dr. E. W. McCorkle officiated.  Mr. Hoover was eighty-five years old and was a wealthy farmer.  His wife and two sons, Judge E. B. Hoover and William H. Hoover, Jr., survive him.

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle and Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

William H. Hoover is the son of Peter Hoover, who was of German descent and born near Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1789, immigrated to Kentucky with his parents in 1800 and settled in Jessamine County just west of Nicholasville.  In 1811 he married Miss Eva Nave, removed to the southern portion of the county, and settled in what was then a wilderness, on Hickman Creek.  About this time he was drafted in the War of 1812, which was soon ended.  He resided nearly three-quarters of a century at this same place, making for himself a good name for all that was honorable, truthful and upright, and accumulated a considerable fortune for his children.  He died in 1872, a true and honored member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Eva Nave Hoover, the mother of William H. Hoover, was a native of Estill County, Kentucky, born in 1790, and like her husband lived to a ripe old age, dying in 1876, having made for herself a character for purity and sweetness of disposition seldom equaled.

William H. Hoover is the fourth of eight children, and was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, August 17, 1821.  He spent his youth and early manhood as a teamster, driving a train of wagons from Nicholasville to Louisville, Kentucky, and in assisting his father in partially subduing the great forest that surrounded them.  For many years he had charge of his father’s saw and grist-mill.  When a young man he became a member of the Masonic order and rapidly rose to the high positions of that fraternity, of which he is still a worthy member.  His opportunities for receiving an education were exceedingly limited, there being practically no schools in this then sparsely settled district of Kentucky.  But, being a practical and industrious man, he made the best of his opportunities and gathered knowledge by observation and experience, and today he is a man of good practical education.  He has always been a Democrat in politics, and for more than thirty years a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He has accumulated a nice estate, given his two children good education and a nice start in life, and is now taking his old age quietly and pleasantly on his beautiful blue-grass farm, near his children and grandchildren.

He married Miss Sarah J. Evans, of Garrard County, Kentucky, November 26, 1857.  She was the daughter of Dr. Hezekiah and Nancy (Cole) Evans, and born November 18, 1841.  Her father was assassinated in 1862 on account of his strong Southern sympathy, near his home in Garrard County; her mother died in 1882, aged about seventy years.  To William H. Hoover and wife were born three children: William H. Hoover, Jr., the first, was born September 5, 1858, and received his early training at the district schools, Bethel Academy, Nicholasville, Kentucky, and at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, where he entered in 1877 and remained until he completed his education; he then returned to his father’s farm, where he assumed control until November 10, 1885, when he married Miss Mattie R. Vince, of Jessamine County; he then removed to his own farm adjoining that of his father, where he is now farming and breeding thoroughbred and trotting horses.  Thomas D. Hoover, the second son, was born in 1859, and died in infancy; Everett B. Hoover, the third and youngest child, was born October 21, 1860, and like his brother received his early education in the free schools and at Bethel Academy; in 1877 he entered the Wesleyan College at Millersburg, Kentucky, where he remained until 1879; then entered Vanderbilt University, where he took a special course of study, preparatory to studying law.  In 1880 he entered the Columbia College Law School, New York City, where he remained two years, taking the full law course, graduating in June 1882.  He at once returned to his home and received his license to practice law in August 1882, and has been a continued practitioner ever since.  He married Miss Ella Burnett, of Boyle County, Kentucky, November 21, 1882.  To this union was born Elizabeth Hoover, the first grandchild of William H. Hoover, January 31, 1884.  In April 1886, Everett B. Hoover was elected judge of the city court of Nicholasville, Kentucky, and was re-elected the following year, of which office he is the present incumbent.

The Central Record, Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 2, 1914

Well Known In This County

Mrs. Sallie Hoover died at her home in Jessamine County on last Saturday.  Her death was an unexpected blow to her friends and relatives, as she had been in her usual good health.  She is the mother of Hon. Everett Hoover, the well-known Jessamine County politician.  She was a sister of Dr. Elijah Evans of Lancaster, and was ell known in Garrard County.  She was a most estimable lady.

Garrard County Spanish-American War Soldiers Died of Typhoid

Jefferson Davis Cheatham, March 15, 1876 – October 17, 1898.  Private, Co. L, 2nd KY Vol. Infty. U.S.A., Spanish-American War.  Forks of Dix River Baptist Cemetery, Garrard County, Kentucky.

The Spanish-American War unit from Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky, was comprised of a group of about 42 men.  The Lancaster Company, as it was locally called, Company L (originally C) of the Second Regiment from Kentucky, left for Lexington, Kentucky, on the morning of May 6, 1898.  On May 27, they left for Chickamauga, Georgia.  Overcrowded conditions at the camp led to a typhoid fever epidemic, resulting in the deaths of two of the Lancaster Company’s men – Clarence Parks and Jefferson Davis Cheatham.  The regiment returned to Lexington on September 13, 1898, and were mustered out on October 31, 1898.

The Central Record, Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky

Friday, May 6, 1898

On April 23, Sam McKee Duncan, of this city, received authority from Gov. Bradley to raise a company of volunteers to join the regular army for services in the war with Spain.  In less than forty-eight hours from that time Mr. Duncan had received more than enough signers to his muster roll to form a company.  The company was ordered to Lexington, the place of mobilization, and will leave on a special train for that point early this (Friday) morning.  Mr. Duncan will be elected Captain, John M. Farra, 1st Lieutenant and C. G. Wherritt 2nd Lieutenant.  The non-commissioned officers will be appointed later on.  The company will be lettered ‘C’ and be in the Second regiment.  Following is a list of those composing the company, and their ages.

There were 42 men, between the ages of 18 and 49, on the list, including Jeff Cheatham, aged 22, and Clarence Parks, 25.

The Lancaster company has been ordered to leave on the 8 o’clock train tomorrow (Friday) morning.  They will march to the depot, headed by the Lancaster band.  A large crowd will be present to see the boys off.

Friday, May 27, 1898

The second Regiment, of which the Lancaster Company is a member, was ordered to Chickamauga and went to that point Wednesday afternoon.  The men had not received their uniforms or guns, but will receive these at the new quarters.  Lieut. John M. Farra, who was here Sunday, tells us the general impression is the boys will remain at Chickamauga for at least three months and then probably be ordered to either Marila or Cuba.  He says that if the war is brought to a close even within the next month, that U. S. troops will be needed in Cuba until a stable government is established.  He says our men are all in good spirits and are delighted at the idea of going south.  He says the boys are slightly disappointed at not getting their uniforms, but they are happy as larks.

Friday, July 22, 1898

Mr. Jeff Cheatham has returned to Chickamauga, after a brief visit to his parents.

Friday, August 26, 1898

As stated in the last issue of The Record, Private Clarence Parks was brought home from Chickamauga last week quite ill.  He had typhoid fever and been discharged from the hospital to come home.  We understand, though are not prepared to say for certain, that Parks ate some solid food on the train.  This, together with the jostling of the cars, gave him a back set from which he never rallied.  He reached the home of his parents, on the new Danville Pike, about two miles from town, and died there Sunday night.  Parks was about twenty-two years old and bore a splendid reputation for honesty, sobriety and industry.  He was among the first to enlist and, we learn from an officer, made one of the best soldiers in the company.  The remains were placed in the cemetery vault until Tuesday when they were interred in the family burying ground near Hyattsville.

Friday, September 9, 1898

Mr. Jeff Cheatham, one of the 2nd Kentucky Regiment boys was brought home Sunday, very sick with fever.

Friday, October 21, 1898

Mr. Jeff Cheatham, 23 years of age, died at his father’s half-past 4 o’clock on Monday evening, the interment was at the Fork church.  The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

Friday, June 8, 1899

The Lancaster company, which served in the recent war, did a handsome and noble act in placing tombstones over the graves of their dead comrades, Clarence Parks and Jefferson Cheatham, who died from fever during the company’s stay at Chickamauga.  A sum of money was raised here to buy the company a flag, but the boys concluded to take it, and their share of the profits from the canteen and use it for the purpose above stated.  The two made about $130, which bought handsome monuments for the dead soldiers.

John E. Keith Obituary

J. E. Keith, 1837-1909.  Mary Elizabeth, his wife, 1841-1930.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

John E. Keith was the senior member of the firm J. E. Keith & Sons, marble cutters.  An announcement of his company, less the sons, was in the local newspaper October 3, 1883.  It said he was prepared to do all kinds of marble work, from a $3 tombstone to a $500 monument.  He purchased marble direct from the quarries in Vermont and Marietta, Georgia, and granite from the celebrated Concord quarries in new Hampshire.

John Keith married Mary Elizabeth LaHeist (found on son Clarence’s death certificate).  In the 1880 census for Breckinridge County he was listed as 43, a tombstone agent, with wife Mary, 39.  Children in the census were Jennie, 17; Fannie, 15; Samuel, 12; Clarence, 10; and Proctor, 1.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 3, 1909

Brief Illness For Mr. Keith

Widely Known Citizen and Monument Maker Dies at His Home In This City Saturday Night

Death Lamented By All

The entire town was deeply grieved Sunday morning in learning of the death of Mr. J. E. Keith, who had been ill such a short time.  Wednesday night about one o’clock Mr. Keith was seized with a severe convulsion which was followed one after another until death came at ten o’clock Saturday night.

Mr. Keith was nearly seventy-three years old and was born in Breckinridge County, but was reared in Meade County where he was as well known.  He came to this city in 1856.  Last August Mr. and Mrs. Keith celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, and little did they believe their happiness would so soon be shattered.

In the death of Mr. Keith, Cloverport loses not only one of her best and oldest citizens, but one of the most active and decided men.  He was never on the fence on any question that came up for the welfare of the town, especially for the temperance cause did he stand firm.  He was a member of the Baptist church and his life as a christian was an example to both young and old.  Everybody had faith in Mr. Keith and his character was highly esteemed.

Mr. Keith was engaged in the monument business here with his youngest son, Proctor Keith.

Besides Mrs. Keith he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. William Lusk, of Stonewall, Mississippi, and three sons, Clarence Keith of Elizabethtown, Sam Keith and Proctor Keith of this city.  The latter three were at his bed-side during the last moments of his illness and had entire care of him.

Albert Keith of Florida, was an own brother of the deceased and George Keith of Evansville was a half-brother.  Mrs. Jennie King of Brandenburg, and Mrs. Fannie Hemstetter of Leitchfield, were half-sisters.

Mrs. Lusk arrived from Stonewall, Mississippi, in time to attend the funeral.  Misses Ola and Janie Keith and Robert Keith, of Owensboro; Miss Pauline Moorman, Lonnie and Marion Keith, grandchildren of the deceased were also here yesterday.

The funeral was held from the Baptist church at 2 o’clock yesterday afternoon.  The services were conducted by Rev. Lewis and beautiful music was rendered by friends.  The interment took place in the Cloverport Cemetery.  The pall-bearers were:  Charles Hall, John A. Barry, Charles Lightfoot, Robert Willis, Joe Allen and Marion Weatherholt.

William B. and Mary Angeline Handley

 Mary A., wife of W. B. Handley, born August 23, 1840, died December 28, 1930.  William B. Handley, born January 24, 1836, died December 24, 1904.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 25, 1904

An Aged Citizen Dies – W. B. Handley, Ill Only Three Days At St. Lawrence

W. B. Handley, sixty-eight years of age, died at his home at St. Lawrence, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon  He had been ill for only three days of pneumonia.  The funeral will be held from St. Martin (s/b St. Lawrence) Church at 8 o’clock Monday morning, and interment will be made in the church cemetery.  He is survived by a widow and three children.  They are Mrs. Kate Wood, Mrs. Belle Connor and Mrs. Annie Henning.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 27, 1904

Knottsville – Mr. W. B. Handley, one of the most prominent and highly esteemed citizens of the eastern part of the county, was buried from St. Lawrence Church Monday morning at 9 o’clock.  Father Clements paid a most eloquent tribute to his character as a father, a husband, a citizen and a Christian.  Mr. Handley was in his sixty-ninth year and is survived by his wife and three daughters, Mrs. J. W. Wood, of Owensboro; Mrs. Lee Henning and Mrs. Thomas Connor, of St. Lawrence.  Mrs. J. C. Blandford, of West Louisville, was a sister.  he was stricken with pneumonia on Tuesday afternoon and died the following Saturday at 4 o’clock.

William B. Handley married Mary Angeline Russell in 1860.  The couple had eight children, two boys who died as infants, Martin Kendrick and Charles J., and six girls – Mary Catherine, Isabella Florence, Anna Elizabeth, Rosa Alice, Maria Josephine and Ida J.  Josephine died in 1892 at the age of 17, and Ida died in 1900 at the age of 22.  Rosa died in 1903, aged 32; I’m not sure if she married.  Three married daughters are survivors at the time of their father’s death in 1904.  However, two of those sisters died in 1906 – Mary Catherine Handley Wood, September 9th, of complications of diseases, leaving five children; and Anna Elizabeth Handley Henning, November 18th, of typhoid; she left three children.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1930

Mrs. William B. Handley – Mrs. Mary Angeline Handley, 90 years old, the oldest and one of the best-known women of the St. Lawrence section, died at 11:45 o’clock, Sunday night.  Mrs. Handley had exceptionally good health until a week ago when she contracted bronchial pneumonia.  She was born at Lebanon, Kentucky, August 23, 1840, the daughter of Joseph and Catherine Russell.  In 1861, she was married to the late Esq. William Handley, and to this union eight children were born, all deceased.  she is survived by eleven grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren.  For the past ten years, Mrs. Handley made her home with her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Henderson.  The funeral will be held at 9 o’clock this morning at St. Lawrence Catholic Church with a Requiem High Mass offered by Rev. F. X. Laemmle.  Burial will be in the church cemetery.

Joseph and Catherine Russell, parents of Mary Angeline Russell Handley, are buried in St. Charles Catholic Cemetery in Marion County.