Category Archives: Obituaries

William Goebel Darland Obituary – Mercer County

William Goebel Darland, 1900-1923.  Bruner’s Chapel Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, March 16, 1923

Mr. William Darland, aged 23, died Sunday night, March 4, after a long period of ill health.  He was the son of Mr. Walker Darland, and a young man much liked by all who knew him.  Several days before the end he told the family that he was not afraid to go.  He was a member of the Baptist church and his funeral was held Tuesday afternoon at Bruner’s Chapel with services by Rev. C. W. Knight.  The interment was in the cemetery beside the church.  Surviving him are his father and the following brothers and sisters: Messrs. Oscar Darland, of Wisconsin; Dee Darland, Illinois; Omar, John Grover Darland, Mrs. John Yeast, Mrs. Hannah Donovan, Mrs. James Jackson, all of this county, and Mrs. W. M. Casey, of Washington County.

Brother and Sister Die of Tuberculosis – Washington County

B. F. Crowe, born August 8, 1842, died November 22, 1908.  Nancy, his wife, born May 16, 1849.  New Hope Baptist Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky.

Susie B. Crowe was the daughter of Mansfield and Sarah Mattingly Crowe.  Her paternal grandparents were Benjamin F. and Nancy Strange Crow.  She is listed in the 1900 and 1910 censuses of Washington County, living with her parents, and her siblings – Clarence M., Sada R., Lena, Zora E., Iven Leslie, and Mary Ardie Crowe.

Susie B. Crowe, 1894-1911.  Clarence M. Crowe, 1890-1915. 

Brother Clarence Crowe will follow her to the grave in five years.  Their death certificates reveal that both died of tuberculosis.  Both parents are listed on the death certificates, both born in Washington County.

I think it interesting that this family added an ‘E’ to their last name.  My Crow family – no E – is the same line.  This was not unusual that a different spelling would occur somewhere in the line.  Benjamin F. Crowe, Susie’s grandfather, was a brother to my Mansfield Crow, children of Mansfield Crow and Mary Ann Rigdon.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

June 29, 1911

Death of a Young Lady

Susie Crowe was born April 26, 1894 and departed this life June 17, 1911.  She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield F. Crowe, who, with her five sisters and two brothers and a host of relatives and friends mourn her death.  She professed faith in Christ and joined the New Hope Baptist Church September 1909 and has lived a complete Christian live ever since.  At the time of her going from us, she was the beloved teacher of the primary class in our Sunday School and wrought well in that capacity.  We will miss her in all of our church work as when was present at all ministries, but in the midst of our sorrow, we console ourselves with the fat that our loss is her gain, and bid the family to weep not as those who have no hope for, ‘They that trust in the Lord shall be as Mount Zion, which can not be moved, but abideth forever.’

One who knew her

Christopher and Angeline Peavler Obituaries – Mercer County

Christopher Columber Peavler was the son of Joseph Peavler and Mary Ann Ridge.  Angeline Vandivier Peavler was the daughter of William and Catherine Vandivier.  The couple were married September 1, 1845 in Mercer County.  According to the Mercer County census, 1850-1910, their children were Sarah, Amanda, George G., William, Merrell, Henry, Mary and Georgia.  By 1900 three of these children had died.  Christopher and Angeline Peavler were married 68 years!

Christopher Peavler, 1822-1915.  Angeline Peavler, 1826-1913.  Bruner’s Chapel Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, June 13, 1913

Mrs. Angeline Peavler, aged eighty-eight years, died last Friday.  She was a splendid motherly Christian woman who had been a member of the Methodist Church for 72 years, having her membership at Oakland Church in this county.  Her maiden name was Angeline Vandivier and she had been married sixty-six years, her aged husband, who is ninety-one years old, surviving her, besides five children.  The funeral services were held Saturday at Bruner’s Chapel, conducted by Rev. F. T. McIntire, assisted by Rev. W. D. Moore, and the interment was in the cemetery adjacent to the church.

 

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, April 9, 1915

Mr. Christopher Peavler died at his home in the West End last Thursday.  He was probably the oldest man in the county, being 93 years of age.  He was a native of this county and a gentleman who was highly esteemed by all who knew him.  For 62 years he had been a member of Oakland Methodist Church and had lived on the place where he died for 58 years.  He leaves 8 children, 36 grandchildren and 39 great-grandchildren.  His funeral services were held Saturday at Bruner’s Chapel, conducted by Rev. W. D. Moore, and the interment was in the adjacent cemetery.

Rev. Philip W. Taylor Dies At The Age Of 93 – Shelby County

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 6, 1856

A correspondent of the Frankfort Commonwealth furnishes that paper the following:

Rev. Philip W. Taylor, a native of Caroline County, Virginia, a soldier of the Revolution, and one of the early pioneers of Kentucky, died on the 24th, in Shelby County, Kentucky.  He was present at the surrender of Cornwallis, a soldier in Col. Mathews’ regiment.  In 1781 he came to Kentucky.  On his way down the river his boat was attacked by the Indians twenty miles above Louisville, and several of his companions killed and wounded, himself among the latter.  he knew, personally, Boone, Kenton, Todd, Harlan, and indeed all the pioneer heroes who settled the state.  He was for many years a justice of the peace in the county of Shelby, for two years its high sheriff, and for sixty years a minister of the gospel.  He was, perhaps, the last of the pioneer fathers, and in him was severed the last link that bound the busy, bustling generation of today to that stern old warrior race who conquered and settled our beautiful state.


Mr. Taylor’s death was listed in the deaths of 1856 for Shelby County.  Philip W. Taylor, 93, January 24th.  Cause of death – fell off porch?  The last word is very hard to read.

Thank goodness for old newspapers who have been saved – they give us glimpses of life from long ago.

The Kentucky Giant Dies in 1859

James D. Porter was not only Kentucky’s tallest man, but during his lifetime the tallest man in the world.  At seven feet nine inches he towered over everyone else in the city of Louisville.  Mr. Porter was a hackney driver and served as coachman to Charles Dickens, the famous English author, during his time in the city.

The Louisville Dailey Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday, April 26, 1859

Death of James D. Porter, The ‘Kentucky Giant’

We regret to learn that our distinguished fellow-citizen, James D. Porter, widely known as the ‘Kentucky Giant,’ died at his residence in Portland, on Sunday night, the 24th inst., in the fiftieth year of his age, having been born in 1810.  For some time, Mr. Porter had been in delicate health, but his last illness was of but few days’ duration.  The disease which terminated his life, we are informed, was an affection of the heart, to which he had been frequently subject.

Few men have been more widely known than Mr. Porter.  His extraordinary height, being about seven feet nine inches, ranked him as the tallest man In the world.  He seemed to labor under the consciousness that he was an object of universal curiosity and shunned rather than sought the public gaze.  He was modest and retiring – the very soul of honor and honesty.  His social feelings were elevated and refined, his affections strong and marked.  He was a gentleman of intelligence and wielded a considerable influence among his neighbors and friends.

He has resided here since early manhood.  In his early life he was warmly attached to the political fortunes of Mr. Clay, was a Whig of the old school, and never forgot his associations with that party.  He always gloried in his Whig name and principles and clung to them to the last.  When, however, the Whig party was disbanded, and new parties were organized, he ranged himself, like thousands of other patriotic Old-Line Whigs, with the Constitutional Democracy, and labored earnestly and successfully in its behalf.

His death will be universally deplored.  He was a useful citizen, an honest man and fulfilled, with fidelity, all the duties and responsibilities of his life, alike to his fellow-men and his country.

His funeral will take place at two o’clock this afternoon, at his residence in Portland.  His remains will be conveyed thence to Cave Hill Cemetery.

James D. Porter, born December 15, 181, died April 26, 1859.  Heighth 7 feet 8 inches.  Cave Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

Hon. Jasper W. Muir Obituary – Nelson County

Jasper W. Muir was the son of William Locke Muir and Mary E. Hester, born December 11, 1828, in Clark County, Indiana.  His family moved to Nelson County, Kentucky, the next year.  Jasper and Mary Elizabeth Wickliffe were married about 1850 and had six sons before her death in 1868:  Nathaniel Wickliffe, William Logan, Joseph Halstead, Jasper W. Jr., Charles Wickliffe and James D., who lived only eight months.  Nine years after Mary Muir’s death Jasper married a widow, Florida Sloan Talbott.  The couple had three children:  Joseph A., Mary and Henry Louis Muir.  William Logan Muir and James D. Muir predeceased their father.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 11, 1907

Hon. Jasper W. Muir Dies at Bardstown

Pioneer Lawyer of Nelson County Passes Away In His Eighty-fourth Year

Bardstown, Ky., April 10 – Hon. Jasper W. Muir died at his residence here at an early hour this morning as a result of a stroke of apoplexy suffered three years ago.  He was eighty-four years old and was one of the most prominent men in this community.  He was a pioneer lawyer of the Bardstown bar, having been a partner of the celebrated Ben Hardin when that lawyer was at the height of his fame.  Mr. Muir was a veteran of the Mexican War, was formerly school superintendent of Nelson County, and was a member of the last constitutional convention.  He relinquished the practice of law about thirty years ago, and since that time had been engaged in the banking business.  He was one of the wealthiest men in Nelson County.  He is survived by his widow and seven children, one of whom is Mrs. Mary Hagan, wife of Robert J. Hagan, of Louisville.  The funeral will take place Friday afternoon.

Jasper W. Muir, December 11, 1823 – April 10, 1907.  St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Dr. Aquilla Talbott Obituary – Fayette County

Dr. Aquilla Talbott, December 17, 1838 – September 3, 1907.  Sallie J. Head, his wife, January 13, 1839 – August 2, 1909.  Lexington Cemetery, Fayette County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 4, 1907

Dr. Aquilla Talbott, one of the best-known physicians of Lexington, and an ex-Confederate soldier, died at his residence in this city at 6 o’clock this morning.  Dr. Talbott had been in bad health from a complication of kidney and stomach diseases for several months.  Yesterday afternoon he felt so ill that he went home about 1 o’clock and retired, hoping that he would feel better after a night’s rest.  he, however, grew gradually worse until he expired this morning.  Dr. Talbott was born in Bourbon County in 1838.  When he was seventeen years old the family moved to Franklin County, where he grew to manhood.  When Bragg’s army invaded Kentucky he joined Scott’s Louisiana cavalry and served with that organization until the close of the war.  In 1870 he came to Lexington and began the practice of medicine, in which he gained a wide acquaintance and popularity.

The funeral services will be held at the family residence tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock, the Rev. Preston Blake officiating.  The interment will be in the Lexington Cemetery.  The pallbearers will be as follows:  W. H. Snyder, Shelby Kinkead and Ben T. Head, of Lexington; J. S. Head, Jr., Ashland, Ky.; R. C. Head, of Louisville and Augustus Talbott of Paris, Ky.

The Frankfort Roundabout, Franklin County, Kentucky

Saturday, September 7, 1907