Category Archives: Family Stories

Henry M. and Susan Wise Buried in Ghent Cemetery – Carroll County

Henry M. and Susan Wise.  Ghent Cemetery, Carroll County, Kentucky

Henry Maurice Wise and Susan Roberts were married in Carroll County, September 11, 1851, by the Reverend C. B. Tharp of the Christian Church.  Their marriage bond was procured the day before.  Benjamin Roberts, father of the bride, gave his consent and was also bondsman.  Henry was the son of Henry Wise and Sarah Bargo.

In the 1860 census of Carroll County, Henry, a merchant, and Susan had three children – Emma, 7; Charles A., 3; and Frances H., 7/12.  Frances is not in the 1870 census leading us to believe she died before that date.  Bertie, 10; Willie, 7; Ella, 6, and twins Carrie and Susan, 8/12 are the newest members of the family.  In 1880, Carrie has died, and Joseph is 6.  Henry became a farmer in 1870 and continued through 1880, although in that census he is listed as a cripple – was this because of an accident or illness?

Henry Maurice Wise passes away September 5, 1884, at the age of 59.

Henry M. Wise, born March 12, 1825, died September 5, 1884.

Susan lives another 25 years.

Susan Wise, born December 14, 1835, died July 15, 1909.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, July 16, 1909.

Emma Wise, the oldest child, never married.  She is buried beside her parents.

Emma Wise, born June 5, 1852, died September 6, 1886.

Sue Wise, daughter of Henry and Susan, also remained single.  The papers give snippets of times she entertained, when she visited relatives, or took trips with friends.  In 1905 from The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, ‘Miss Susan Wise entertained a hundred ladies Wednesday evening complimentary to Mrs. John Davis, of St. Louis.’  This was in the Carrollton section.

Her death certificate says she was an organist.  I believe she must have been quite good to have been listed as her occupation.

James Madison Colson – War of 1812 Veteran – Bell County

In memory of James Madison Colson, member of the 54th Knox County Regiment in War of 1812.   Born (1770-1775) died (1845-1846).  Amelia Tinsley Colson, born (1774-1800) died (1845-1846).  And their unknown grandson.  Middlesboro Cemetery, Bell County, Kentucky.

I believe James Madison Colson was born in North Carolina.

Moved from their home place on Cannon Creek on July 16, 1973.

In 1812 Knox County comprised most of the areas today in the counties of Harlan, Bell, Whitley and Laurel.

A History of My Edwards Family – From Maryland to Virginia to Kentucky

$300 one day after date I promise to pay Nancy Edwards three hundred dollars for value received this 15th 1840                             Benjamin Edwards

Received of Theodore Clarkson and Martha his wife, late Edwards, Catherine Edwards and Sarah Edwards, heirs and devisees of Benjamin M. Edwards, deceased, three hundred dollars in full of a note for that sum heretofore appended, which I held on said B. M. Edwards and on which I have not exacted or charged any interest, the same has not been paid to me in money but by the receipts of said devisees and heirs to me for so much as advanced and paid to them in part of their share of the estate in my hands as widow of their father, Edward B. Edwards, deceased, August 9, 1855.

                                                                  Nancy Edwards

Attest.  J. L. Edwards

This old document was part of my grandmother’s genealogy – some of the best things were handed down and saved!  It concerns money from the estate of Edward Barber Edwards – husband to Nancy, and father to Benjamin, Martha, Catherine and Sarah, heirs mentioned in this note and the will of Edward Barber Edwards.

Edward Barber Edwards and Nancy Linton were pioneers to Washington County, Kentucky, arriving in 1816.  Edward was the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, born in Maryland April 21, 1768.  His family moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, about the time of the Revolution where he met and married Nancy, daughter of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Mason.  Nancy was born about 1778.

Five of Edward and Nancy Edwards’ children were born in Loudoun County – Susan Clark in 1797, John L. in 1800, Catherine Kitural in 1805, Jonathan Joseph in 1805, Benjamin Mason in 1809 and Mary Jane in 1814.  The last two daughters were born in Washington County – Martha L. in 1817 and Sarah Barber in 1822.

Edward Edwards died in 1824.  His will was written January 16th of that year and proved in court March 8th.  Nancy lived another 37 years, raising the children.  She died July 2, 1861.

Five of their children married, four producing grandchildren for Edward and Nancy.

Susan Clark Edwards married John Compton Taylor November 25, 1828.  They are my 3rd great-grandparents.  They had four children before her death in 1836 – Catherine Elizabeth Taylor (my 2nd great-grandmother), Edward Edwards Taylor, Benjamin Springer Taylor and Margaret Ann Taylor.

John L. Edwards married Mildred L. Linton, a cousin, October 13, 1831, in Logan County.  John brought his bride back to his home in Washington County.  They had one daughter, Lucretia Edwards.

Jonathan Joseph Edwards married Nancy Millie Linton (a cousin – must have been confusing since both brothers’ wives went by Millie!) July 20, 1829.  They had seven children – Alfred, Lucretia, John L., Susan, Edward, William and Ben Edwards.  To make things even more confusing Ben married his cousin, Lucretia, better known as Lucy.

Mary Jane Edwards married James Caleb Janes May 29, 1832.  They had no children but helped raise great-nieces and nephews.

Martha L. Edwards married Stephen Theodore Clarkson June 19, 1848.  The couple had five children – Edwin Barber Clarkson, Francis Polin Clarkson, Annie Clarkson, Margaret Mason Clarkson and Sidney Albertus Clarkson.

This photograph was made in 1901 during an Edwards, Linton, Clarkson reunion.  The three older women seated in the middle of the photograph are Mary Jane Edwards Janes (in the high back chair), to her left is her sister Sarah Barber Edwards and to her right is Catherine Elizabeth Taylor Linton, their niece and child of their sister, Susan Clark Edwards Taylor.  Three of Catherine Taylor Linton’s children are in the photo – the man standing directly behind her is son John Edgar Linton and to his right, daughter Alice Clark Linton.  The woman standing at the extreme left of the photo, as you look at it, is youngest daughter Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, my great-grandmother, with husband Robert E. Lee Montgomery, and daughters Alice, my grandmother, the oldest, standing in front of her father, and Margaret, Laura and Lillie.  The woman seated close to the Linton/Montgomery family is Lucy Edwards, a niece of the two Edward sisters and wife of Ben Edwards, and the man standing behind her is Bill Edwards.  Susie Edwards, another niece, is seated behind Sarah Barber Edwards.  The Clarkson family is on the right of the photo as you look at it.

William B. Wallace – Revolutionary War Veteran

William B. Wallace, 1st Lieut, Woodford’s 1 VA Brigade, Revolutionary War, July 8, 1765 – Jun 21, 1833.  Salt River Baptist Cemetery, Anderson County, Kentucky.

William B. Wallace was a First Lieutenant in Woodford’s First Virginia Brigade in the Revolutionary War.  In a letter dated October 28, 1938, to Mrs. L. Prentice Bradley of Morganfield, Kentucky, from A. D. Hiller, Executive Assistant to the Administrator of the Kentucky Agency, he states that William B. Wallace was a Lieutenant in the 1st Regiment of Artillery, also in September 1775, in Colonel William Woodford’s Second Virginia Regiment.  He was allowed two hundred acres of bounty land for his service during the Revolutionary War (Warrant #2441 – 200 acres – issued March 27, 1794), and was also allowed a pension at the rate of $400 per year, under the Act of May 15, 1828 (Certificate #153, issued August 3, 1829), at which time he was a resident of Kentucky.

William Brown Wallace died June 21, 1833, during the cholera epidemic; his wife, Barbara Fox Wallace, followed him within a few or hours or days.

Revolutionary War Soldiers of Pulaski County

This beautiful plaque honoring Revolutionary soldiers from Pulaski County sits in front of the courthouse, attached to a mill stone.

In memory of those Revolutionary Soldiers who contributed to the establishment and development of Pulaski County, Kentucky

  • Robert Adams
  • Francis Aldridge
  • Robert Anderson – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 70-80 age range
  • Samuel Allen, Jr.
  • Thomas Asman
  • William Barron
  • John Barker
  • Henry Baugh
  • Michael Beakman
  • Ichabod Blacklege
  • Robert Buchanan
  • Michael Burton
  • Andrew Cowan

  • Elijah Denny
  • John Dick
  • Lovel H. Dogan
  • Josiah Earp
  • John Edwards
  • John Evans
  • Job Gastineau, Sr.
  • James Gilmore
  • Richard Goggins
  • William Hansford
  • James Hamilton
  • James Harrell
  • William Hays
  • William Heath

  • John Hopper
  • Nicholas Jasper
  • Thomas Kelly
  • James Kennedy
  • James Lee
  • Moses Martin
  • John Mayfield
  • Joseph McAllister
  • Barnabus Murray – listed in 1840 census, aged 80, head of household
  • Samuel Newell
  • John Newby
  • William Owens
  • John Perry

  • James Rainey
  • Michael Reagan
  • David Roper
  • Robert Sayers – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 80-90 age range
  • Thomas Seaton
  • Dorson Sewell
  • Richard C. Swearingen
  • William Sweeney
  • Peter Tartar
  • Nathaniel Tomlinson
  • William Trimble
  • Martin Turpin
  • John Wilson – listed in 1840 census, no age given, head of household, in the 70-80 age range
  • Michael Young

Erected by Somerset Chapter Daughters of the American Revolution

Pulaski County Courthouse

Martin Family Buried In Red Hill Cemetery – Larue County

One more post on the Martin family of Larue County, who first lived in Green County when they came to Kentucky in 1805.  Red Hill Cemetery is located in the county seat of Hodgensville.

William L. Martin, born May 26, 1782, in the State of Virginia, in Charles City County, on the waters of the James River and came to Green County, Kentucky in 1805, was married there October 17, 1807, and departed this life November 10, 1857, in the 76th year of his age.

Williams’ wife, Sarah Shofner.

Sally, wife of William L. Martin, born June (?) 25, 1792, died September 30, 1886, aged 94 years.

Mary E. Dearen, wife of Henry Martin, son of William L. and Sarah Martin.

Mary E., wife of Henry Martin, born August 14, 1812, died January 17, 1863.

Eliza Dearen, second wife of Henry Martin and sister to his first wife.

Eliza, second wife of Henry Martin, born August 27, 1813, died January 7, 1886.

Sally, daughter of H. & M.E. Martin, born January 1, 1851, died January 1, 1875.

Harriet, another daughter of Henry and Mary Martin.

Harriet A. Martin, born June 27, 1833, and departed this life April 15, 1858, in the 19th year of her age.

William L. Martin Buried in Red Hill Cemetery – Larue County

This is the way all of our ancestors should have engraved their tombstones!  William L. Martin gives not only the dates of his birth and death, but his marriage.  He is very specific about where he was born and where he died.  It would have made life so much easier for genealogists!  On his stone it lists Green County as place of death, but he is buried in Larue County.

William L. Martin, born May 26, 1782, in the State of Virginia in Charles City County, on the waters of the James River, and came to Green County, Kentucky, in 1805, was married there October 17, 1807, and departed this life November 10, 1857, in the 76th year of his age.  Red Hill Cemetery, Larue County, Kentucky.

We will learn more about William L. Martin later in the week.