Category Archives: Family Stories

Brothers John Linton Edwards and William Mason Edwards in Union Army During the War Between the States

Two brothers, John L. and William M. Edwards entered the Union army November 21, 1861, at Lebanon, Marion County.  They entered service as privates, and were in Captain Bevill’s Company E, 10th Regiment of the Kentucky Volunteers.  John was 26 and William was 21.  The two brothers were sons of Jonathan and Nancy Linton Edwards.  The other five children were Alfred, Lucretia, Susan, Edward and Benjamin.  Their parents were part of the Linton/Edwards move to Kentucky in 1816-1818.

During the Civil War John and William remained in the same unit.  May 6, 1863, John was detailed as a brigade teamster.

August 10, 1863 he was sent to a hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, and was later moved to the hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.  This was during the occupation of middle Tennessee.

Again, June 16, 1864, he was sent to the hospital in the present campaign.  This was during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in Marietta, Georgia.

John Edwards appears on the Company Muster-out Roll, dated December 6, 1864, in Louisville.  He was due $100 plus $26.32 for clothing in kind.

William Edwards was sent to the hospital at Lebanon, Kentucky, October 26, 1862.  It is very likely William was wounded during the Battle of Perryville earlier in the month, and was sent to recuperate in nearby Lebanon.

On June 10, 1864, he was sent to the hospital on the present campaign, again at Kennesaw Mountain.

William Edwards was captured at Columbia between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863; was confined by General Morgan.  He was paroled between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863.

September 19-20, 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga, William was wounded, a contusion in the back.  He was mustered-out the same date as his brother, August 6, 1864, and was due $100 plus $40.62 for clothing in kind.  I am sure John was horribly worried when William was wounded and taken prisoner by John Hunt Morgan.

J. L. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry, Cemetery Hill, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky.

After the war John and William came back to Washington County to live with their parents.  In fact, six of he seven children lived with their parents, and never married.  Youngest children, Benjamin Edwards, married his first cousin, Lucy Edwards, only children of John L. Edwards and Milly Linton.  They had no children.  Alfred, Lucretia and Edward died before 1870.  In the 1880 census for Washington County, John L, Susan and William lived at home.  John L. died between 1880 and 1900, since he does not appear in that census; only William and Susan still lived on the old home place.  William died June 10, 1903.

W. M. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry. 

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, June 18, 1903

W. M. Edwards Dead

Mr. William M. Edwards, one of the county’s best citizens, died at his home two miles from Springfield on last Wednesday night after a long illness of a complication of diseases.  The deceased was about 63 years of age and was born and reared in Washington County.  He was never married and lived with a sister on a small farm near town.  He was an upright and honorable man, and none stood higher in the estimation of his neighbors than he.

Shortly after the war broke out Mr. Edwards enlisted in the cause of the Union, and was mustered in Company E, Tenth Kentucky Infantry at Lebanon, November 21, 1861.  He followed the fortunes of that regiment of which Col. John M. Harlan was first commander, and who was afterwards succeeded by Col. W. H. Hays, through three years of hard campaigning.  He was in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Jonesboro, and other famous engagements.  On December 6, 1864, Mr. Edwards was mustered out of the army at Louisville, and returned to Springfield and soon engaged in farming.  He was a member of the Bevil Palmer Post G. A. R., and always took an interest in the affairs of that organization.  He was a good Christian man and joined the Presbyterian church during the war.

The funeral took place at the Springfield Presbyterian Church on Friday morning last and was conducted by Rev. G. A. Strickland.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 9, 1903

Public Sale

On the premises of the old Edwards place, the former home of the late W. M. Edwards beginning at 1 o’clock on Wednesday, July 15th, there will be sold three horses, two first class Jersey milk cows and calves, two heifers, a Jersey bull, sow and seven shoats, a crop of oats, farming implements and household and kitchen furniture.

Also, at the same time and place the Edwards farm containing about 75 acres will be offered for sale to the highest bidder on easy terms.

Ben Edwards, Agent

Col. R. E. Whane, Auctioneer

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 23, 1903

The sale of the personal property of the late Wm. Edwards took place on last Wednesday and was well attended, everything bringing good prices.  The Edwards farm containing about 75 acres of land was sold to Mr. Benedict Janes for $1692.

Many of the other siblings of these two brothers lie buried close by in Cemetery Hill.

McElroy Gravestones in Cemetery Hill

The McElroy family has lived in Washington County about as long as there has been a Washington County.  Many members of the family are buried in Cemetery Hill – name of the city cemetery for the town of Springfield.  Many of my mother’s family are buried here – those relations who did not attend the two Catholic churches in the area – St. Rose and St. Dominic.  Those long-dead relatives are rightly buried in the cemetery of their respective church.

About 1788 Hugh McElroy, Sr., with two younger brothers, Samuel and James, moved from Campbell County, Virginia, to what would become Washington County, Kentucky.  The McElroy’s of the county sprang from the descendants of these three brothers.  As part of the family settled in the part of the county which became Marion County, you can see they were spread throughout the area.

Four children of Hugh McElroy, Sr., and Nancy Esther Irvine, his wife, are remembered by one gravestone in Cemetery Hill.  John McElroy,  married Mary Hundley, November 6, 1794.  James McElroy married Rosanna Hardin the same day.  Abraham McElroy married Disey Hundley, May 27, 1802.  Elizabeth McElroy never married.

John McElroy, born March 10, 1772, died June 23, 1833.  Mary, wife of John McElroy, born March 3, 1777, died July 12, 1856.

James McElroy, born September 15, 1764, died October 10, 1836.  Rosanna, wife of James McElroy, born November 5, 1773, died December 16, 1822.

Abraham McElroy, born 1774, died July 5, 1834.  Disey McKinney, widow of Abraham McElroy and wife of Arthur McKinney, born 1780, died September 24, 1857.

Elizabeth McElroy, born March 15, 1787, died February 10, 1855.

Three children of John and Mary McElroy are also buried in this cemetery.  Hugh McElroy married Susan Cocke, June 6, 1826.  Anthony McElroy married Ann Garland Rice, November 25, 1824.  Sallie McElroy married John Crawford, March 10, 1817.  Brothers Hugh and Anthony were also partners in a merchandising business for many years in Springfield, under the name H & A McElroy.

Hugh and Anthony McElroy Family Stone

Affectionately dedicated to our wives and children by H. & A. McElroy, Partners in business since 1810 until the present day.

Ann Garland, wife of Anthony McElroy, born in Louisa County, Virginia, February 7, 1807, died in Springfield, Kentucky, October 23, 1864.  ‘An affectionate wife, a fond mother and a devoted Christian.’  Anthony McElroy, born March 17, 1797, died September 25, 1886.  ‘Unto you that fear my name shall the Son of righteousness arise with healing in his wings.  And they shall be mine, saith the Lord of Hosts in that day when I make up my Jewels.’

Susan Frances, wife of Hugh McElroy, born December 29, 1807, died June 22, 1844.  ‘She had a smile for the joyous, a tear of sympathy for the ill, and an act of kindness for all within her reach.’  Hugh McElroy, born September 19, 1795, died February 8, 1877.  ‘He’s gone to his grave in a full age . . .’

Sallie, wife of John Crawford, born September 20,1799, died February 6, 1864.

John Crawford, born December 20, 1794, died February 10, 1857.

Hugh L. McElroy, July 2, 1832 – December 17, 1918.  Mary Handy McElroy, April 30, 1844 – May 1, 1912.

Hugh L. McElroy is a son of Anthony and Ann.

 

 

 

 

Golden Wedding Anniversary Celebrated In Danville In 1910

Newspaper articles from years ago give us a good insight into the lives of the citizens of its reach.  Wedding anniversaries are always a favorite of mine since they generally give much family information along with the happy occasion.

This particular one does not give information on the couple that reached the milestone anniversary of fifty years.  With just a bit of research it was easy to turn up the information.

Nicholas McDowell and Elizabeth McElroy received their marriage bond from Washington County on May 1, 1860, and married that day or shortly afterwards.  They appear in the 1860 census of Boyle County, Nicholas aged 26 and Elizabeth, 19 (not quite the 25 at her marriage as listed in the article!).  The couple had five children.  Annie, Nicholas, Susan and Bessie are listed in the census records with their parents, and to my knowledge never married.  In the latter census records it was listed that Nicholas and Elizabeth had five children, five living.  Finally, in the obituary for Nicholas, this fifth child is listed as Mrs. Carl J. McKnight, a daughter.  The couple lived in Shanghai, China, at one time, as well as New Jersey and New York, as mentioned in other articles.  I did find that this daughter was named Sallie, more formally, Sarah McDowell.

After celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary, Nicholas McDowell lived another three years, passing away March 7, 1913, at the age of 79.  He was born February 6, 1834, the son of Samuel McDowell and Martha Hawkins.

Elizabeth McElroy McDowell, lived on until January 6, 1922, dying at the age of 81.  She was born January 10, 1841, the daughter of Anthony McElroy and Ann Rice (not Sarah as listed in the article).

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, May 27, 1910

Fiftieth Anniversary

Of the Marriage of Colonel and Mrs. Nicholas McDowell Fittingly Celebrated at Their Hospitable Home on Maple Avenue, This City, Yesterday Afternoon

Like the horizon that is gilded by the rays of the declining sun on the evening of some perfect Autumn day, when a holy calm pervades the atmosphere and the face of Nature is as peaceful as that of a sleeping infant, are the lives of those whom God hath joined together in the holy bonds of matrimony and who have journeyed the rugged road of life’s pathway peacefully and lovingly together until the fiftieth milestone of the highway is reached, blessed with the affection and adoration of loving and dutiful children and crowned with the respect and the esteem of true and devoted friends.

And such is the record of Col. and Mrs. Nicholas McDowell, who on yesterday afternoon, at their beautiful home on Maple Avenue, this city, surrounded by their children and kinspeople and friends from this and other states, fittingly celebrated their Golden Wedding.

Fifty years ago, in the county of Washington, a double ceremony was pronounced which united in marriage two brothers, Nicholas and Samuel McDowell, and two sisters, Elizabeth and Martha McElroy, the first named of the brothers passing into the great beyond more than twenty years ago.

No less a rare occurrence than a golden wedding anniversary is the fact that Mrs. Nicholas McDowell is one of a family of ten children, born to Anthony and Sarah McElroy, of Springfield, Kentucky, all of whom are now living.  Mrs. McDowell being the fifth child, now in her seventy-fifth year, and seven of them being present at the happy occasion of yesterday afternoon.  Mrs. Mary McElroy Hughes, of Bloomfield, is the oldest, eighty-five, and John T. McElroy the youngest, sixty-three.

This is the fourth golden wedding that has been celebrated in this family within the last ten years, namely:  Charles McElroy, of Springfield, and his wife, who was Miss Mary Shuck; Sarah McElroy Grundy, of Springfield, and her husband, Palmer Grundy; Anthony McElroy, of Springfield, and his wife, Margaret Irvine, who was a native of Boyle County.

Mr Hugh McElroy, of Kansas City, had manufactured to his order ten cut glass tumblers, and under each glass at the wedding yesterday afternoon he caused to be placed fifty dollars in gold, a present to each of the brothers and sisters with their names in letters of gold upon the tumblers.  This unique remembrance was one of the features of the anniversary.

At least one hundred and fifty guests assembled at the hospitable mansion to offer Colonel and Mrs. McDowell their congratulations and best wishes on this memorable occasion, and each and every one departed with the feeling that it was good to have been there and to have witnessed this anniversary of the blending of fifty years into two happy, well-spent and venerated lives, and with the sincere hope that their declining days may still be illumined with the sunshine of love and affection, knowing that their children and their children’s children will rise up and call them blessed, and that the divine plaudit awaits them when life’s fitful fever is o’er – ‘Well done, good and faithful servants, enter thou into the joys of they Lord.’

Stephen L. Chasteen – Civil War Soldier – Dies At 81 Years of Age

Stephen L. Chasteen, 1845-1926.  His wife, Millie Ann Davis, 1849-1924.  Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

Sunday, October 17, 1926

Stephen Chasteen was a bugler in Company A, 6 Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, Union Army, during the Civil War.

According to the Company Descriptive Book he was 18 years of age when he joined the Union Army, six feet tall, of fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  Stephen was born in Rockcastle County, Kentucky.  He was a farmer.

Stephen Chasteen was captured at Woodville, Alabama, August 25, 1863, and confined at Richmond, Virginia, September 26, 1863.  He was paroled at City Point, Virginia, March 7, 1864; reported at C. B. Maryland, March 9, 1864, sent to C. P. Maryland November 1864, where he reported the same day.  Sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, March 9, 1864.

Stephen mustered out December 23, 1864, at Louisville, Kentucky.  He was a soldier for three years, including one being prisoner of war.

Isn’t it impressive that he was with the Regimental Brass Band from August to November of 1864?

 

 

A Few Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Who Settled in Nicholas County

William Bartlett, son of Samuel and Mercy (Seeley) Bartlett, was born October 11, 1750 in New Canaan, Connecticut.  He lived for some years in Orange County, New York.  In Volume 1, page 48 of Associators of the 4th Militia Company of Brookham is shown William Bartlett – June 8, 1775 – Data taken from:  Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to the Revolutionary War in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany, New York, in two volumes – published in 1868.

He probably first married in Virginia and had the following children: Joseph Bartlett; Polly Bartlett married Ashford Prather; Marcie Bartlett married James Buchanan; Dorcas Bartlett married George Swarts; Samuel Bartlett; Ebenezer Bartlett and William Bartlett.  He came to Kentucky very early and is shown as a tax payer in Nicholas County in 1800.  In 1820 he died in Nicholas County.

Major George Michael Bedinger was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia, December 10, 1756.  He served in the Militia in the siege of Yorktown in 1781.  He was a major at the Battle of Blue Licks.  He lived most of his adult life in Nicholas County near Lower Blue Licks Springs.  He was a Kentucky Legislator 1792-1794 and was a representative in Congress 1803-1807.  The first County Seat of Nicholas County was established at his home (Bedinger’s Mill) on Licking River at Elk Creek in 1800.  He died in 1843 and was buried near his home at Blue Licks Springs.

John Caughey was born in Pennsylvania about 1747.  He enlisted in the Revolutionary War in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1776.  He was under the command of Col. William Irvine in the Sixth Battalion.  They first went to St. John’s, Quebec, to reinforce the tired and ragged troops at St. John’s.  At Crown Point he first heard the Declaration of Independence read to the troops.  They left Crown Point with the American withdrawal to Ft. Ticonderoga.  The Sixth Pennsylvania Battalion spent the winter there, but the lack of food, medicine and bedding tormented the troops, but when the enlistment was up in January, they did not return to their homes but chose to continue to guard the northern gate until replacements came in spring.  He came to Kentucky between 1782 and 1790.  In 1800 he leased 100 acres of land on the Licking River and not only raised food for his family but assisted in surveying and building roads in that section of Nicholas County.  He died in 1826 and lies buried in a grave no longer marked, in that vicinity.

Andrew House was born December 1, 1747/48 in Frederick County, Maryland, but spent his early life in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.  It was here that he married Hannah Snap, daughter of George Snapp, in 1783.  He entered service at Montour’s Bottom on the Ohio River, 11 miles below Pittsburgh about the year 1779, as an Indian Spy under the command of Captain David Ritchie and as private in Captain Nathan Ellis’ company and Colonel Broadhead’s regiment, during which time he marched up the Allegheny River and was in an engagement with the Indians, many of their number being killed.  The summer following, he served one month as a private in Captain David Ritchie’s company between Pittsburgh and Wheeling.

After his marriage, he moved from Pennsylvania to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and was again drafted to go with George Rogers Clark for three months on the Wabash Campaign, but he hired a substitute to take his place, paying him $20.00, saying that he had to raise a crop to support his family and could not get anyone to do his plowing, but could hire a man to fight without difficulty.  He applied for a pension in Bourbon County but later moved to Nicholas County where he died in August 1843.  In 1855 his wife, at the age of 94, made application and received 160 acres of Bounty Land.

David Kennedy was born in Scotland July 22, 1764 and died in Nicholas County September 8, 1824.  When quite young, he came to Virginia and served in the Revolutionary War for about three years.  About 1790 he migrated to that part of Virginia that later became Nicholas County, and bought a ½ interest in 545 acres of land, which today is located between Headquarters and Mt. Carmel.  He married Hannah Kassaneur of Aberdeen, Ohio.  Their children were James, William Elizabeth Cassandra, Thomas, Sarah, Harriet, Polly and Clairborne.  He and his wife and some of his children are buried on the farm that he owned.

History of Nicholas County, Joan Weissinger Conley, 1976.

Confederate Soldier Buried In Green Lawn Cemetery Simpson County

H. D. Wade, 1861-1865, C.S.A.

According to his death certificate, Harvey David Wade was born in Allen County, Kentucky, February 17, 1836, and died September 22, 1911, due to heart problems.  Harvey and his family are buried in the Wade plot in Green Lawn Cemetery in Franklin, Simpson County, Kentucky.  His death certificate gives us little other information.  Both mother and father are listed as unknown.

Let’s move further back in time to see what we can discover.  In the 1860 census, Henry David Wade (H. D.) is living in Newton County, Missouri, with Henry Wade, aged 40, and Martha Wade, 38, with their six children.  Henry was born in Kentucky, Martha in Tennessee.  Remember that Simpson County is located on the Tennessee border.  The four older children were born in Kentucky.  Amanda, age 6, was born in Missouri, as well as younger sister, Eliza.  From Amanda’s date of birth of 1854, and her brother Henry’s birth in Kentucky in 1851, we can surmise the family moved to Missouri between those two dates – 1852-1854.  Next listed in the census record as living with the Wade family is Franklin Keath, 22, a farm laborer born in Georgia.  The last person living with the family is H. D. Wade, 23, a school teacher, born in Kentucky.  Some researchers believe Henry and Martha to be Harvey’s parents, but I do not.  If Harvey were their son the couple would have married very young, Martha being approximately 15 when Harvey was born.  Another consideration is the fact he is listed last in the census record, after a farm laborer.  If he were the first-born son he would have been named after his parents, not last in line.  I feel Henry was either an uncle, or an older brother, of Harvey.  But this gives a good reason for Harvey to have enlisted in the Confederate States Army in Newton County, Missouri.

This service record for H. D. Wade shows he is listed as an Ordinance Sergeant.  Since he dealt with weapons and ammunition he would have been a very valuable person within the regiment.

And from this record we find that H. D. Wade was on the roll of prisoners of war – ‘Company F, 8th Regiment Missouri Infantry, Confederate States Army, commanded by 2d Lieutenant Paul F. Peete, surrendered at New Orleans, Louisiana, to Maj. Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U.S.A., May 26, 1865, and paroled at Alexandria, June 7, 1865.  The date May 26, 1865 is significant since it was after Lee’s surrender.  Notice that his residence is given as Simpson County, Kentucky.

Mary Neely Wade, October 1, 1841 – September 12, 1868.

After the war Harvey Wade married Mary Neely, but she died within a year or two.  Could this have been during childbirth?

After the death of his first wife Harvey married Pauline Mahin.

Naomi M. Wade, October 12, 1873 – January 29,1880.

They were the parents of three children.

Tho’s M. Wade, April 13, 1875 – April 18, 1875.

All three died at less than eight years of age.

Charles D. Wade, June 22, 1877 – January 25, 1882.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

Harvey, D. Wade, February 17, 1836 – September 22, 1911.

Harvey David Wade is buried between his two wives, his children beside their mother Pauline.

Pauline Wade died April 24, 1929.

Pauline Mahin Wade lived an additional 18 years, dying in 1929.

Is the Death Date Correct?

Oswell B. Dorsey, born January 15, 1818, died March 22, 1854.  Machpelah Cemetery, Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Kentucky.

I believe most of us would conclude when looking at an ancestor’s gravestone, that the death date listed would be a good indication of when our loved one died.  Today while looking through photos taken at Machpelah Cemetery in Mount Sterling, Montgomery County, I found that not quite the case.  Not daily, but quite often I add a gravestone photo on my Kentucky Kindred Facebook page.  I chose the stone of Oswell and Virginia Dorsey since, according to the dates on the stone, both died in 1854, about six months apart.  Very unusual for a young couple to pass away so soon after the other.  The detective wheels started turning.

Virginia M., wife of O. B. Dorsey, born February 24, 1824, died September 28, 1854.

I put the two names in ancestry, with the dates of birth and death for Oswell Dorsey.  The first item I looked at was Montgomery County deaths for the year 1854.  Now this is when it got interesting.

According to their gravestone, Oswell died March 22, 1854, and wife Virginia died September 23, 1854.  Looking at the death records that was not the case.  They both died in July of 1854, both of fever and they were cared for by Dr. Benford.  There were quite a few deaths during the month of July – fever, flux and cholera listed as causes of death.  This changed their death dates from six months apart to a few days, possibly the same day.

Other information in the death records gave us the name of their parents.  Oswell was born in Fleming County, the son of John and Nancy Dorsey.  He was a merchant.  Virginia, born in Montgomery County, was the daughter of Edward and Mary Stockton.

Hm.  Next, I checked for a will for Oswell Dorsey.  His will was dated March 22, 1854.  The date on his gravestone.  Since the will wasn’t probated until the October 1854 term of court, it isn’t likely Oswell died the day he wrote it.  According to the will, everything was ‘to be managed and controlled by my friend and brother-in-law, George J. Stockton, for the exclusive use, enjoyment and benefit of my beloved wife, Virginia Dorsey.’  Of course, by the time the will was probated, Virginia Dorsey was dead.

One other reference on Ancestry was made to Genealogies of Kentucky Families Volume I.  I checked my copy and found the Dorsey’s came from Calvert County, Maryland, one group of whom settled in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, which was at that time called Stockton Station.  Larkin Dorsey, whose grandfather was in the Revolution, came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, founder of Stockton Station.

‘Larkin Dorsey, who came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, married Elizabeth Ingram, in 1780 at Hagerstown, Maryland.  He was born August 24, 1784 [must be 1748], and died February 22, 1822, in Flemingsburg, Kentucky.  He was a cadet in the 9th company of Light Infantry, January 3, 1776.  Commissioned Ensign in Army, June 18, 1778.  His children were:  Edward, John, Joshua, Rachel, Sarah, Robert, Amelia and Joseph.

‘John Dorsey married Nancy Spiers, Edward – Juliet McDowell, Joshua – Nancy Williams and Milly Alexander, Rachel – C. V. Anderson, Sarah – Thomas Wallace, Robert died in infancy, Amelia – Thomas Andrews and Joseph married Mary Wheatley and Ann Threlkeld.

‘The children of John Dorsey, who was born April 19, 1783, and died November 5, 1847, were – Oswell Burns Dorsey, Elizabeth Ingram Dorsey, Martha Ann Dorsey, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, John Edmondson Dorsey, Rachel Anderson Dorsey, Robert Stockton and Jeremiah Spiers Dorsey.’

Virginia Stockton Dorsey was a descendant of Major George Stockton, in whose company Larkin Dorsey came to Kentucky.  George Stockton married Larkin Dorsey’s sister, Rachel Dorsey; their son Edward Stockton married Mary Allin Jouett (of the Mercer County families of those names).  George Jouett Stockton and Virginia Margaret Stockton were two of their children.

In conclusion we can say the dates on the gravestone for Oswell and Virginia Stockton Dorsey are incorrect – but why?  If we look a little closer to the death records for Montgomery County for 1854, we find that George J. Stockton is listed just under the name of Virginia Dorsey.  George is listed as 40, a merchant (were he and Oswell Dorsey business partners as well as brothers-in-law?), parents were Edward and Mary Stockton (same as Virginia) and he died of cholera, cared for by Dr. Nelson.  Under his name is William Stockton, 14, son of George and Gusta [Augusta] Ann Stockton, who also died of cholera.  And below his name is Gusta A. Stockton, 36, daughter of Francis Somersall, who died of fever.  Oswell and Virginia Dorsey had no children.  George and Augusta Stockton had four – William Edward who died in 1854 with his parents, Robert Henry, Mary Somersall Stockton and Augusta George Stockton, who was born in February of 1854, a babe of five months when her parents died, and who lived just until the age of three.  With so many deaths in one family, it was quite likely several years before gravestones were purchased.  This could have led to the mix-up in death dates.  Always check several sources, if possible.