Category Archives: Family Stories

An Important Piece of the Puzzle

How many times in your research have you searched and searched for that one piece of the puzzle?  If you knew that little bit of information relationships would fall into place, questions would be answered and all would be right in the genealogy world.  I know you have!  I am sharing with you today that ‘Aha!’ moment from about 40 years ago.

My dear great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, as I have mentioned many times, was the genealogist in the family during the first 40 decades of the twentieth century.  She wrote letters to cousins, had information handed down for generations, old tax receipts, etc.  But the biggest mistake she made was in Captain John Linton’s father and grandfather.  According to Frances, William de Linton I and II were these persons.  In the respect of William II, he married Susannah Monroe, who, after William II’s death, married Charles Tyler, then Benjamin Grayson.  In those first years of research I found nothing about William de Linton – I or II!  There was a William Linton who married Susannah Monroe, then Charles Tyler and Benjamin Grayson, but this William Linton’s son, named John, was born in 1730 and died in 1775 – couldn’t be my Captain John.

In the Release of Rights dated January 30, 1775, in Loudoun County (earlier Prince William and Stafford counties), Virginia, John Linton releases any rights to his father’s estate (Moses Linton), or the right of any estate from his mother Susanna, to his stepfather, John Berkeley, for the sum of 300 pounds current money of Virginia.  The estate was given up ‘in consideration of  my education and maintenance by John Berkeley’.  Okay, this information gives the name of Captain John’s father – Moses.  The William Linton mentioned above was the son of John Linton and Ann Barton.  In addition to son William, sons Moses and John are listed in his will.  The only other Moses Linton listed in Prince William or the surrounding counties at that time was the elder John Linton’s brother – who married Margaret Barton, sister to Ann.  This led me to conclude that Moses Linton, son of John Linton and Ann Barton, was father to my Captain John.  How about his mother?

Moses Linton was married twice – first to Susanna Harrison, with whom he had at least two sons, William and Thomas Linton.  After the death of Moses, these sons were given to the guardianship of their uncle, Burr Harrison.  Unfortunately nothing further is heard of the two boys, and it is assumed they died before 1775, the date of release of rights by Captain John Linton, since he is considered ‘the only surviving son and heir at law to my father, Moses Linton.’

Moses Linton married as his second wife Susannah, with whom he had three children – Catharine Jennings Linton, my John Linton and Moses Linton.  Moses, who was quite a bit older than Susannah, died in 1752, just after the birth of his son Moses.  Susannah, a young widow of about 22 years, quickly married John Berkeley, he being a widower (his first wife was Elizabeth Longworth) and also the father of young children, John Longworth Berkeley and George Berkeley.

But who was Susannah, mother of Captain John Linton?  In my wonderful correspondence with Dorothy Thrawley in the years before my marriage, and afterwards, she gave me that important piece of the puzzle – the one that made everything fit together.  Dorothy’s ancestor was Catherine Jennings Linton – Captain John Linton’s sister.  Catherine married William Joseph Lewis, the son of Vincent Lewis and Ann Longworth – hm, that name sounds familiar – as in sister to Elizabeth Longworth, first wife of John Berkeley?  Shall I just say this is a tangled family?  Anyway, Catherine Linton and Joseph Lewis had a daughter Susan Lewis, who married her cousin, Daniel Lewis.  Susan Lewis had the wonderful foresight to purchase a bible and write down not only the information for the children she had with hubby Daniel Lewis, but information about her ancestors.  And in that bible is a note that reads, ‘Catherine Linton’s mother before marriage, Susan Hancock.’  Finally, finally we know the name of Captain John Linton’s mother – Susannah Hancock, second wife of Moses Linton.  In the photo this information is underlined in red.  Sorry the copy is not the best.

And the final question – who is Susannah Hancock?  Moses Linton owned land adjoining his friend Scarlett Hancock.  Scarlett died at the young age of thirty in 1740.  He was the son of John Hancock and Catherine Smith.  He was given the name Scarlett for his step-great-grandfather, Martin Scarlett, who married his widowed great-grandmother, Ann, Mrs. William Green.  His grandmother was Lettice Green who married Edward Smith.  Susannah Hancock is his younger sister, who lived with Scarlett after the death of her parents, John Hancock and Catherine Smith.

Ann Barton, wife of the elder John Linton, parents of Moses Linton, was the daughter of Edward Barton and Ann Green – sister to Lettice Green who married Edward Smith.  We have come complete circle.  Moses Linton and Susannah Hancock both descend from William and Ann Green, coming down the line from different daughters.

Is anyone confused?  It’s certainly a crazy patchwork quilt of genealogy, with intermarrying families and more than one marriage on most lines.  But it has been a fascinating ride – and I will always be indebted to my dear friend Dorothy Thrawley, without whose help I could not have come to this conclusion.  This is why it is so important to share genealogy information, and my purpose exactly for this blog!  Have a wonderful day!

 

Dexter Mausoleum in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati

While in Cincinnati last month, Ritchey and I visited the beautiful Spring Grove Cemetery.  It was established in 1845, and contains 733 acres of beautiful trees, lakes and walkways.  One could spend days, walking around, looking not only at the gravestones, but the natural habitat as well.

Today I want to share with you photos of the Dexter Mausoleum.  It is so huge that many people mistake it for a chapel.  Designed by the architect James Keys Wilson in the late 1860’s for the Edmund Dexter family, it was not finished until 1870.  The inspiration was the beautiful Sainte-Chapelle in Paris – particularly the sides with the flying buttresses.  The mausoleum cost $100,000 to build in the 1860’s.  Can you imagine what the cost would be today?

Edmund Dexter was born in England in 1801 and came to the United States at an early age.  In the 1820’s he moved to Cincinnati, and in 1829 married Mary Ann Dellinger of New York.  The couple had five sons – Charles, Edmund, George, Julius and Adolphus.  Edmund was a whisky baron and an extremely wealthy man.  His will lists shares of stock in all the important Cincinnati companies.  Mary Ann Dexter died in 1875.Kentucky

About twenty family members are buried in the crypt of the mausoleum.

A Father’s Day Poem By Maurice Linton

A good friend, Garwood Linton, entrusted some of the Linton information from his family into my keeping for awhile.  This is the information gathered by Adelaide Linton Cartier, daughter of Hugh Walter Linton and Eliza Belfield Garnett.  You have heard me speak of the letters written by my great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, to Hugh Linton.  They loved genealogy and family!

In the files in my possession I found a poem written by Maurice Ragland Linton, Sr.  Maurice was the son of Benjamin Linton and Florence Vitula Ragland, born in 1898 and died in 1980 at the age of 82.  The older I get, the more I realize life is indeed short.  This isn’t meant to be a sorrowful post, but one to incite us to live life to the fullest and enjoy our family members while they are here!

Father’s Day

By Maurice Linton, Sr.

I sit in the shade on a summer’s day;

Perhaps I start dreaming the hours away,

For it seems I hear voices loud and clear;

And the children are gathering from far and near

To play beneath the trees.

Where are those children of yesteryear?

Who played and sang with voices clear;

I must be dreaming for it seems just a day.

How can it be, they have all gone away,

And left our lives lonely,

In the shade of the trees.

But again I hear voices of children at play.

Can they be echoes from a bygone day?

Games, I remember in a wistful way;

Childish things they used to say.

I wake from my dream voices draw near;

Thank God, we have our grandchildren here,

To play beneath the trees

The Wallace Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

The Wallace family is represented in Maple Grove Cemetery, on Main Street in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, with several gravestones.  The two oldest are for Joseph and Sarah Wallace.  You can see them beside/slightly behind the large Wallace stone.

Joseph Wallace was born March 9, 1779, and died February 19, 1855.  Joseph’s parents were John Wallace and Jane Finley.  John Wallace was an ensign in 1776, in Captain James Moore’s company, 5th Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Anthony Wayne’s command.  He was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died in Fayette County, Kentucky.

In Joseph Wallace’s will, dated April 21, 1853, he gives his daughter, Mary J. Brown, ‘undivided interest in and to three slaves, namely Sam, Eliza and Solomon, purchased of Briers Heirs and now in the hands of Mary J. Brown, administrator of Thomas J. Brown, deceased, my interest in said slaves being one fifth part of the same, also her note executed by her as administrator for one hundred and fifty dollars, together with whatever interest may be due thereon, at the time of my death.  Also, one thousand dollars in cash.’

Son James Wallace received his father’s tract of land in Jessamine County, where the father resided, about four hundred and sixty acres, also four Negroes, his selection, out of all the slaves.

Two Negroes are given in trust to his executor, for the use and benefit of my daughter, Margaret Harris, Emily and Nancy, 13 and 7 years old, respectively, who are now with the said Margaret in Boyle County, also one half of a tract of land in Boyle County, containing about one hundred and eighty one acres, upon which Nathaniel Harris now lives, land and Negroes to remain in the hands of my executor for the use and benefit of daughter Margaret – perhaps he didn’t trust his son-in-law.

All slaves, land, chattel, etc., are to be sold and the money divided between my daughter, Mary J. Brown, and the share to my executor, in trust for my daughter Margaret Harris.  Thomas E. West was named executor.

Sarah Barr, wife of Joseph Wallace, was born February 1, 1780, and died September 16, 1852.  She and Joseph married June 23, 1809, in Fayette County, Kentucky.

James Wallace, son of Joseph and Sarah, left a very impressive monument in the cemetery – or it could have been his children since there is ‘Our Father’ and ‘Our Mother’ above their names on the stone.  James married Margaret Mays, May 2, 1850.  Due to the date of marriage, tiny Anna Wallace must have been their first child.

James Wallace was a rather wealthy man.  In the 1860 Census of Jessamine County he is listed as a farmer, with real estate valued at $27,000, and personal estate at $15,000.  In the census James is 48, Margaret is 36, Joseph is 7, Sarah is 4, and Virginia is 8/12.  Mother-in-law Anna Mays, 67, is living with the family.  She was born in North Carolina.

In the 1870 census James is 58.  His property is valued at $34,000, with personal estate of $10,000.  Margaret is 44, Joseph is 17, Sidia (Sarah) is 15, and Virginia is 12.

James died in 1875 and, Margaret, less than a year later.

James Wallace, born February 8, 1812, died June 25, 1875. Margaret Mays Wallace, born September 29, 1826, died April 10, 1876. Maple Grove Cemetery, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

 

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

Mitchell Family Buried In Maysville Cemetery

A lovely gravestone in the Maysville Cemetery, located in Mason County, holds the records of the Mitchell family.  Charles S. Mitchell was born in 1792 in the county, a life-long resident, the son of Ignatius Mitchell and Mildred Smith.  Ignatius was born in Baltimore County, Maryland, was a Sergeant in the Revolutionary War and received a land patent in Mason County (at that time Bourbon County).  His name appears on a company muster roll for May 1788, dated Valley Forge, June 1, 1778.

In this article from The Daily Public Ledger, Maysville, Kentucky, May 1, 1912, it tells of the exploration in the mountains of South America by Gerard Fowke – a grandson of the ‘famous duelist, Charles Mitchell.’  In 1812 a duel was fought in Sprigg Township, Adams County, Ohio, between Thomas Marshall and Charles Mitchell, son of Ignatius Mitchell and brother of Dick Mitchell, from The History of Adams County, Ohio, Nelson W. Evans, 1900.  This makes me wonder of Charles Mitchell was in the War of 1812.  I wonder what circumstance caused the duel?  It was before his marriage to Elizabeth Fowke.

Charles Mitchell married Elizabeth Fowke, September 2, 1821, a daughter of Roger and Susannah Fowke

‘Know all Men by these Presents, That we, Charles Mitchell and Susannah Fowke, are held and firmly bound unto The Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, for the payment of which well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals, and dated the 2nd day of September, 1821.  The condition of the above obligation is such, that, whereas a marriage is intended to be had and solemnized between the said Charles S. Mitchell and Elizabeth Fowke.  Now if there be no legal cause to obstruct the same, then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.’  Signed by Charles  Smith Mitchell and Susan Fowke, mother of Elizabeth.

In the 1840 Census of Mason County we find Charles Mitchell listed with 1 male under five, 1 five to ten, and one 30 to 40; 2 females under five and 1 female 20 to 30.

In the 1850 census we find Charles aged 57 and wife Elizabeth aged 45.  Children are Richard P, 25; Sibella, 23, Ignatius W., 20; Susan C., 18; Charles S., 15; David R., 13; Theobald, 11; Harrison Clay, 9; Joseph O., 6; and Elizabeth M., 6 – a set of twins.  Charles was a farmer.  Elizabeth, his wife, was born in Pennsylvania, the rest of the family were born in Kentucky.

In the 1860 census Charles is 68 and Elizabeth is 55.  Children listed in the household are Richard P., 36; Ignatius W., 30; Susan K., 28; Theobald, 21; Harrison C., 18; Joseph O., 16; and Elizabeth M., 16.

Children of C. S. and E. F. Mitchell.  Roger F., died February 27, 1826, aged 3 years.  Mary E., died December 1, 1840, aged 9 years.  Martha Ann, died June 26, 1849, aged 23 years.  R. P. Mitchell, 1824-1885.  H. C. Mitchell, 1841-1868.

Three children died previous to the 1850 census – Roger F., in 1826; Mary E., in 1840; and Martha Ann in 1849.  Two other children who died after their parents are listed on this side of the stone, Richard P., who died in 1885, and Harrison Clay, who died in 1868.

John D. Smith, died near Murfresboro, Tennessee, April 9, 1870, aged 51 years.  Sibella M. Smith, died December 29, 1863, aged 35 years.  Children of J. D. and S. M. Smith.  James L., died May 31, 1862, aged 5 years; Nannie J., died March 9, 1865, aged 5 years; Willie, died in Nashville, Tennessee, July 17, 1862, aged 2 years. 

John D. Smith married Sibella Mitchell.  They both died at a young age, as well as three of their children, who are buried in the Mitchell plot.

Charles died June 12, 1861, of dropsy.  He was listed as 69 years of age, a farmer, and his parents were Ignatius and Mildred Mitchell.

Charles S. Mitchell, died June 12, 1861, aged 69 years.  Elizabeth F. Mitchell, died January 19, 1879, aged 74 years.

Elizabeth Mitchell lived another 18 years, passing away at the age of 74 on January 19, 1879.

Theobald Mitchell, 1839-1882.  Richard Mitchell, 1875-1909.

Son, Theobald, and grandson, Richard, died after Charles and Elizabeth.  Generations buried together in Maysville Cemetery.

1819 Tax Receipt For Edward Barbour Edwards

Today I have an original 1819 tax receipt for Edward Barbour Edwards to share with you.  Edward was my fourth great-grandfather, the eldest son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, born in Maryland, April 21, 1768.  The family moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, where Edward sold purchased from Elizabeth Pitzer in 1792, to George Smith in 1795.  This was about the time he married Nancy Linton, daughter Captain John Linton and his wife Ann Mason.

Edward B. Edwards moved with his family to Washington County, Kentucky, in November of 1816 – two years before his father-in-law, John Linton, makes the move.  On November 27, 1816, Edward B. Edwards made oath ‘he removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with him four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Poland and Charles, and not with intent to sell.’  These must be the four Negro slaves he paid taxes on in the above tax receipt.

When Edward and Nancy Edwards moved to Washington County in 1816, they brought six children with them – Susan ( my third great-grandmother), the eldest, was 19, John was 16, Catherine was 12, Jonathan was 11, Benjamin was 7, and Mary Jane was 2.  Two more children were born in Kentucky, Martha, the next year, 1817, and Sarah five years later.

Now let’s examine the tax receipt.  There are three tithes at 62 1/2 cents each – Edward, son John and ?  Perhaps a brother or nephew of Edward came to Kentucky with them.  Edward owns four horses that are taxed, and 1,706 acres of 3 rate land.  I’m not sure what that means – good or bad!  A middle of the road standard?  The total valuation is 18,960 dollars.  I wish this number were broken down a bit more, but the total tax due was 13 dollars and 75 cents.  Thomas Hind, D.S.W.C. signed the receipt for A. E. Gibbons, S.W.C.

On February 4th of last year I shared a tax receipt of Edward Barber Edwards from 1816 – for Loudoun County, Virginia.  Click here to view that post.