Category Archives: Family Stories

John Trotter Langhorne – Victim of Cholera

John Trotter Langhorne, born January 4, 1779, died June 30, 1833.  Elizabeth Baxter, wife of John Trotter Langhorne, born November 26, 1798, died February 5, 1879.  Maysville Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

This beautiful stone stands in the Maysville Cemetery in Mason County in honor of John Trotter Langhorne, and his wife, Elizabeth Baxter Payne.  John was born too late to fight for freedom in the Revolutionary War, but both had veterans in their families.  Maurice Langhorne was John’s grandfather; William Payne was Elizabeth’s grandfather.  The Cincinnati Enquirer of Sunday, September 1, 1929, contains an article on the Langhorne family.  From it we find that William Payne was a member of the House of Burgesses, ‘who met at Raleigh Tavern, May 18, 1769, and May 27, 1774, to protest against the importation and purchase of British manufacturers.’  On a granite boulder at the old capitol at Williamsburg, Virginia, is engraved the names of the members who were there on those dates.  Along with Peyton Randolph, Speaker of the House, is the name of William Langhorne, among others.

William Langhorne’s son, Maurice Langhorne married Elizabeth Trotter, parents of John Trotter Langhorne.  Col. Duvall Payne married Hannah Brent, parents of Elizabeth Baxter Payne.

John and Elizabeth’s children were Elizabeth Baxter, Maurice, Sarah Bell, John Duvall, Judith Fry, Penelope Vertner, William David and Thomas Young Langhorne, almost all given a name from their ancestral families for their middle name.

From The History of Maysville and Mason County, by G. Glenn Clift, we find that John Trotter Langhorne was the landlord of the Eagle Tavern in Maysville.  In a letter dated August 20, 1833, after cholera had abated, ‘I have been spared by the good will of the Lord and in good health at the time.  Mr. Stockwell you spoke of is alive and well.  James, his brother, is dead, the one that lived with Messrs. Poyntz and Co. since the death of Mr. J. T. Langhorne.’  I felt sure cholera was the cause of John’s death simply because he died in June 1833.

Elizabeth Baxter Payne Langhorne lived another 46 years.  She is listed in the 1840 census as head of household, but with the number living there she must have had children and grandchildren living with her.  By 1850 she is living with her daughter and son-in-law, Judith Fry Langhorne and Charles Marshall.  Elizabeth died February 5, 1879, at the age of 80.

 

 

 

 

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery – Logan County

I found little information on this family, other than obituaries.  They are listed in the 1880 Logan County census.  Robert R. Brown is 48, a farmer.  Mary, his wife, is 47.  Two sons are listed – Robert W., 17; and Joseph A., 14.  It is possible this family moved to Logan from Hardin County since the father lived there when the couple married in 1864, or Breckinridge County since that was where the mother lived before marriage.  Even though both sons were married, their wives are not buried in this cemetery.

Sacred to the Memory of Robert R. Brown, born January 29, 1832, died May 8, 1894.  ‘Servant of God, well done.’  Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.

Sacred to the memory of Mary E. A. Brown, born October 8, 1828, died February 24, 1910.  ‘One little hour and then the glorious crowning.’

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 2, 1910

Venerable Mother

of Robert W. Brown Is Summoned – Was a Member of the Old Lewis Family of Breckinridge

Mrs. Mary E. A. Brown, the mother of R. W. Brown, managing editor of The Louisville Times, and of Joseph A. Brown, of Nashville, Tennessee, died at the home of the latter Thursday evening February the twenty-fourth.  Her final illness started from the pricking of her thumb with a needle last Friday.  Erysipelas developed and caused her death.  Mrs. Brown was nearly eighty-three years of age and her life was beautiful and interesting.  In her early womanhood days she lived in Breckinridge County with Dr. Thomas J. Lewis, the father of the Rev. James T. Lewis, of Basin Springs.  In 1864 she married Robert R. Brown of Hardin County.

Mrs. Brown was a woman remarkable in many ways and was greatly talented in music and literature.  She was a member of the Broadway Methodist Temple Church of Louisville.

It is said, during the last twenty-five years her older son, Robert, never failed to spend Christmas with her.

Robert W. Brown, born November 13, 1862, died December 28, 1924.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1924

Joe A. Brown, born December 9, 1866, died January 22, 1939.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee

Monday, January 23, 1939

 

 

James Marshall and Jennie Lee Rankins Buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery

James M. Rankins, 1844-1917.  Jennie Lee, his wife, 1854-1918.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Robertson County, Kentucky.

James M. Rankins was the son of Marshall Rankins and Mary Steel, born June 4, 1844, according to his gravestone, 1849 according to his death certificate.  He died September 25, 1917 of stroke.

Jennie Lee was the daughter of E. A. Lee and Mary Lee, born December 3, 1853, according to her death certificate, 1854 on her gravestone.  She died November 18, 1918, from diabetes.

In the 1860 census of Mason County James M. was 15 years of age, living with his parents, and three older brothers – John A., 23; Thomas J., 19; and George W., 17.  In the 1870 census of Fleming County, Jennie, 16, is living with her mother, Mary, 48, and sisters Sarah, 19; Emma, 14; and Mary, 8.  Her father, E. A. Lee, must have died about 1862/1863 – possibly during the Civil War?

James and Jennie married after the 1880 census was taken, since she still lived with her mother at that time.  From a short notice in the newspaper we can estimate that marriage in March of 1882.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, March 30, 1882

There are three children of the couple listed in census records – James L., Grover C., and Louise N.  In the 1900 census, when these three are listed with their parents, Jennie is listed as having five children, three living; the couple is shown as married 18 years.

In The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, of Monday, February 13, 1893, is a notice that ‘Morris, the four-weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Rankins, died Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock, of pneumonia, and was buried yesterday.  The parents have the sympathy of their friends in their loss.’  I found nothing about the fifth child.

In 1910, only James and Jennie are in the census records for Robertson County .

In one newspaper article I found James Rankins was noted as ‘Colonel’.  Was he in the Spanish-American War?  He would have been an extremely young colonel for the Civil War.

James drove what was known as a ‘bus line in Maysville.  In January of 1903 the icy roads were hazardous and he and his passengers narrowly escaped injury.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, January 12, 1903

He purchased Mr. C. T. Anderson’s interest in this line in 1895, and was then known as Trigg & Rankins.  In other articles I found that he owned a livery stable on Third Street, which he sold in 1885.  in 1886 he was Deputy Marshall.

In 1885 he and several others helped Charles Johnson, an ex-confederate, renting a house for Mr. Johnson and his family during their time of need.  Evidently James Rankins was very conscious of helping others, as well as being civic minded.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, November 21, 1885

James Rankins also carried the mail between Mt. Olivet and Maysville.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, February 15, 1904

In a 1906 article about his son Grover, he is also noted as Colonel.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, February 17, 1906

I could not find an obituary for James M. Rankins, but did find one for Jennie Lee Rankins.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, November 25, 1918

 

 

 

Author of A Knight Templar Abroad

W. Harlan Cord, son of W. H. & V. R. Cord.  March 10, 1850 – November 29, 1885.  ‘A Knight Templar Abroad’.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

When I first saw this gravestone in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in Flemingsburg, Fleming County, I knew there had to be a story behind it.  And yes, I found one.

William Harlan Cord was the son of William Hough Cord and Virginia R. Dupuy.  His father was born in Mississippi, his mother, Virginia.  The two met and married in Mason County, just north of Fleming County May 31, 1849.  I could not find the couple in the 1850 census, but in 1860 the family is living in Fleming County.  William is 37, a lawyer.  Virginia passed away in 1855.  Children listed are William H., 10; Irene, 8; and Mary, 5.  Also living in the household is Mary F. Dupuy, sister of Virginia, living there to help care for the children.  She is listed as 32, born in Virginia.

In 1870 William and Mary have married.  Children listed are William H., 20; Mary, 15; and Clarence, 3, evidently a child of this second marriage.  Also living in the household is Eliza Dupuy, 45, her occupation – authoress.  She is another sister of Virginia and Mary Dupuy.  In 1880 everyone except Mary Cord live together.

With just a bit of research I found that Eliza Ann Dupuy, 1814-December 29, 1880, was a short-story writer and novelist.  She was born in Petersburg, Virginia, the daughter of Jesse Dupuy, a shipowner, and Mary Anne Thompson Sturdevant.  Jesse Dupuy died at an early age and Eliza helped support her mother and younger siblings, which included working as governess and tutor for several prominent southern families.  She lived in New Orleans during the Civil War.  She wrote thirteen novels, many under the pen name Annie Young.  She returned to Kentucky after the war and died on a visit to New Orleans January 15, 1881.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, April 3, 1885

Perhaps having an aunt that was a published author – or authoress as she proclaimed herself – helped William Harlan Cord take up his pen and paper.  Harlan studied law, to follow in the footsteps of his father, but perhaps writing was his passion.  His book, A Knight Templar Abroad, is a record of his visit to Europe in 1883.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, May 15, 1885

The Evening Bulletin of Maysville said in their December 15, 1884, edition, that Harlan had sold $500 worth of his book in three weeks!  The books were priced at $1.50.  He sold about 335 copies during that time period.  Unfortunately. he did not live long enough to achieve the fame that could have been his.  In the November 30, 1885, edition of the same newspaper it is mentioned that ‘Mr. W. Harlan Cord of Flemingsburg is dangerously ill.’  W. Harlan Cord died the day before the newspaper was printed, November 29, 1885.

The beautiful stone that was made specifically for Harlan has a knight on horseback, with the name of his book above.  The cross and crown at the top of the stone is a Christian symbol of the sovereignty of the Lord.  When the crown is combined with a cross, the crown means victory and the cross means Christianity.  The cross with a crown also denotes a member of the York Rite Masons.  As with all types of crowns used by the Masons, it symbolizes the power and authority to lead or command.

Mothers, Grandmothers and Great-Grandmothers

Couldn’t help but think about my maternal grandmother today.  Mary Alice Montgomery Carrico was a lovely person, but as a grandmother she was rather stilted.  When we came to visit she was always sitting in her rocking chair and offered her cheek for us to kiss.  There were no big hugs.  We were expected to sit on the couch and behave.  The cherry tree in the back yard always drew our attention, and we eagerly climbed the small tree to eat all the tart cherries we could pop in our mouths.  Outside we could run and play and wear off some of the energy that was not allowed inside.  Back inside it was more time on the couch, hopefully with a book.  Grandmother Alice was a fabulous cook – everything was just perfection – especially her baked chicken and dressing.  Although long before my time, mom talked of the butter she made from their cream, decorating it with flowers and designs.  Cottage cheese was also homemade.  Bread puddings, cakes and pies were all on the menu.

In contrast Grandmother Alice’s mother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, was quite the opposite.  Unfortunately, I did not know her, she died in 1945, years before my birth.  Mom told all the wonderful stories of good times at her grandmother’s house, always met at the door with hugs and kisses.  During their weekly stay in the summer Great-grandmother Frances let her seven grandchildren play with her canned food and pantry items in the living room on tables and bookshelves.  Frances would don her best hat and with purse on her arm go through the stores and purchase items for five cents each.  At the end of the week she held a big party, in the dining room, with lace tablecloth and many goodies and desserts on glass dishes.  Mom always talked about what a treat it was.  At Easter the grandchildren would find baskets on the porch, with eggs and other items.  And at Christmas the girls received a doll and the boys a ball.  Since this was during the Depression these items were very precious.  Another thing that was special each year was the fair.  Grandmother Frances love the fair and took a picnic lunch for her children and grandchildren to enjoy.  She died the week of the fair, and everyone was encouraged to go since it was a yearly event she dearly loved.

My mother, Catherine Lyons Carrico Hill McIlvoy, was more like her Grandmother Frances.  Mom always met you at the door, hugs and kisses, and, ‘Are you hungry?  Can I fix you something to eat?’  Her children and grandchildren were her pride and joy.  My children love to tell the story that one day, when they were small, Gran, as they called her, asked if they would like to see a flying saucer.  With their eyes big and watching her every move, she took one of the glass saucers they were drying and gave it a whirl into the dining room.  It landed on the carpet and turned and rolled into the living room.  Linton and Kate, of course, said, ‘Do it again!  Do it again!’  When Kate was in middle school mom picked her up every day – and was usually talked into going for ice cream.  Myself, I remember coming home from school and having a treat in the Lazy Susan on the table – exactly four spots for four children (little sister Laura came much later!).

My paternal grandmother, Nannie Bell Coulter Hill, was a very quiet woman.  She rarely spoke to anyone.  But she loved us dearly, loved to give kisses and hugs.  She was such a good cook – and cooked on a wood stove all her life.  I still remember the smells from her kitchen, and how much everyone loved to sit at her table for a meal.  One of my earliest memories was at Easter.  When we drove in, the yard was filled with suckers standing straight up, eggs and other goodies.  There was a garden to explore and every time we left during season we were given a brown bag to hold some of the fresh vegetables on the back porch – our own tomato, potato, zucchini, etc.

I did not know Grandmother Nannie’s mother – Mary Elizabeth Crow Coulter.  But I was told she loved to dance and smoked a corn cob pipe!  How could she have been so full of life and not her daughter?

Now that I am Nana, I fall into the line of my mother and great-grandmothers.  Julian and Percy are met at the door with kisses and hugs.  Julian has a basket with Kit-Kats and M&Ms.  We play wild games like Old McJulian Had A Beach – where we sing and run after him, our fingers a crab’s claw trying to catch hold.  We sit in the floor and make traffic jams with his cars.  Play color games out on the porch.  Blow bubbles.  Casper Babypants is our favorite music to listen to when he’s here.  How different will Percy be?  It’s hard to say since she’s just two weeks old.  But I’m sure she will be a match for her brother, and an individual to boot!

What wonderful memories do you have of your mother, grandmothers or great-grandmothers?  Remember to write them down for future generations.  Precious memories made and to be made.

My Birthday Gift – McIntire Family Treasures

As any good sister would do, Donna knocked my birthday gift out of the park!  She kept telling me I could never guess in a million years what she had found for me, and, that is very true.  She bought a box of old books at an auction, and in one of the books were four very old receipts that she just knew I would love!  Have I mentioned she is my favorite sister?  And not only because of her gift!  We are the two oldest and have spent more time together than the rest of my siblings.

The first is a receipt that says, ‘Received Flemingsburg, December 8, 1804, of Captain Aaron McIntire, one pound three shillings and seven pence in full of all accounts up to this day, William Jacobs.’  What a remarkable find!  Flemingsburg is in Fleming County.

The next reads, ‘Lexington, April 6, 1810, Received of Captain Aaron McIntire five dollars and seventy-two cents, for Daniel Bradford, Charles Bradford.’

Of course, my first thought – who was this Captain Aaron McIntire?  Was he a captain from the Revolutionary War or perhaps the War of 1812?  I was in research mode.

But, wait.  There is more.  Two more old receipts.

‘Mr. Thomas B. McIntire, 1870, to W. J. Ross & Co.

July/August 20.  1 bbl 35 100 pounds sugar at 14 cents, $14.35, 50 pounds sugar at 14.2 cents, $7.25.  10 pounds coffee at 25 cents, $2.50, 10 pounds granulated sugar at 16 cents, $1.60, for a total of $25.70.

If you can send us the above next week it will be quite an accommodation.  Respectfully, W. J. Ross & Co.’

And –

‘Mr. Bennett McIntire, to John F. Fleming, Dr.

To this amount for medical services from July 27th, 1878 to July 1st 1879 inclusive, $9.00.

June 11 to visit and medicate Charles Jones $2.50.  Amount due $11.50.

Received payment October 3, 1881.  John F. Fleming per G. W. Fleming.’

Now we are on a quest.  The boxes purchased were from Frances Moore’s family.  Frances married William Joseph Peterson in 1975, Donna’s husband’s older brother.  I found a marriage announcement in The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Sunday, January 12, 1975.  It said that Miss Frances May Moore was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. McIntire.  Our first clue – the McIntire line comes from her step-father.  The wedding took place at the Flemingsburg Christian Church.

With a bit of search through old newspaper articles and the census records of Fleming County, I found that O. W. McIntire was the son of Oscar W. McIntire.  In the 1940 census the elder Oscar is 64, wife Pearl is 55 and son Oscar is 22.  Living in the household are James Planck, father-in-law, and Alice L. Planck, mother-in-law.  From the 1880 census A. James McIntire, 44, and wife Nancy, 35, have a son W. Oscar, aged 4 (father in the 1940 census).  In the 1850 census A. James McIntire is listed as son, aged 14, to parents Thomas B., 42, and Mary, 37.  Also living in the household is Aaron McIntire, aged 77.

Therefore, our four old receipts are for Aaron McIntire, 1773 – April 3, 1856, and his son, Thomas Bennett McIntire, March 8, 1808 – June 27, 1886.  Someone thought them important enough to keep until this year when they were eventually sold at auction.  It is quite amazing to think that I am now the proud owner of this history.

When Ritchey and I were in Fleming County on Saturday we tried to find Johnson’s Fork Presbyterian Cemetery where Aaron McIntire, Mary McIntire and John McIntire are buried.  We searched but it could not be found.  Ancestry gives the direction of ‘two miles north of Elizaville’.  We drove northeast on Hwy 170 but could find nothing.  Another day we will go to Fleming County Library or the historical society and get proper directions.  We did find the gravestones for James A. and Nancy Catherine McIntire, and their son Oscar W. and his wife Pearl Planck McIntire in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in nearby Flemingsburg.  I will save those photos for another day.  I’m in the process of going through McIntire wills, deeds and other information from Fleming County.  There is much information on this McIntire family.

I’m sure Donna didn’t realize quite how happy I would be with her birthday gift, or what a great genealogy adventure it has been!  Can she top this next year?  We’ll have to wait and see.

Was Captain J. M. White Buried Standing?

Captain J. M. White, born October 25, 1823, fell asleep, January 16, 1880.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The gravestone of Captain James Moorman White stands in Cloverport Cemetery in Breckinridge County.  At first glance I thought perhaps Captain White was in the Civil War, but he was a riverboat captain, sailing his vessels down the Mississippi to Vicksburg and New Orleans.  He was very famous during his day, and it is said he was buried standing, facing the bend of the Ohio River.

The Kentucky New Era

April 2, 1992

Captain’s gravesite headstone still stirs up debate

Cloverport, Ky. – One gravestone in the hilltop cemetery faces the Ohio River with its granite cut to resemble two steamboat smokestacks.

Buried beneath is James M. White, a riverboat captain, who was known around river communities during his lifetime, but gained even more notoriety after his death.

Stories passed down over the years say the captain was buried standing, ready to take the helm.

Searches through local historian’s papers turned up newspaper clippings that mention White and his unusual manner of burial, which he had requested.

Newspaper clippings in the Breckinridge County Archives say the captain, born in Joeville – which was renamed Cloverport in the early 1880s – died in January 1880 in New Orleans and his body was shipped back to Breckinridge County for burial.

Captain White’s grave is near the crest of a high hill, just a short distance from the Ohio River.  According to tradition, he was buried facing the west bend of the river.

‘Hands on the wheel, eyes on the bend,’ writes Margarete G. Smith, a Cloverport historian.

Smith, who is now in a nursing home, was acquainted with White’s son and two daughters, and her father was a friend of White.  She kept records on the river town for nearly 50 years, taking over for her father, who was the town historian for about 40 years.

Smith has said White was well liked and had a good personality.  In a 1973 interview, she said White is the only known riverboat captain to be buried in an upright position.

The large stone, designed to resemble two smokestacks from a steamboat, cost $375 at the time it was constructed.  Over the years, weather has grayed the once white stone, but White’s name is still easily legible.

The stone simply states ‘Captain James M. White, born October 23, 1823, died January 16, 1880.’

Not everyone is in agreement about just how the captain was buried.

An article in the S & D Reflector, a magazine for the Sons and Daughters of River Pioneers, calls the story that he was buried standing up as being in error but gives no reason for the statement.  And now, 112 years after the burial, no witnesses to the burial remain.

So, the believers and nonbelievers will probably continue the debate without coming to any real conclusion.

One thing is for sure though, and that is a riverboat, described as one of the most elaborate of the times, was named for White.

Dorothy Rees of Hawesville has many pictures and information about steamboats, including the J. M. White.  Rees’ husband, Arthur, was chief engineer on the Belle of Louisville and the Delta Queen.

Among Rees’ materials are writings by William H. Tippitt, an Ohio River buff, Dorothy Rees said.  In his writings, Tippitt describes Captain White as ‘a most able man when in command of someone else’s steamer but very poor manager of his own boats.’

White went to work for a Captain John Tobin after losing his own boat, the Katie, to the U.S. Marshall.  He turned what had been a low profit vessel to a success and made the money used to build the boat named for White.

The White was built in 1878 in Jeffersonville, Indiana, and was designed to carry 10,000 bales of cotton.  The cabin areas contained gilded chandeliers and were built with walnut, ash, mahogany, rosewood and ebony.  Stained glass was also used throughout.

The ship burned December 13, 1886 at St. Maurice Plantation Point, Louisiana, nearly seven years after the captain’s death.

His life was such that is inspired Will S. Hays to write a poem about him.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, December 29, 1882

This poem was reproduced in The Richmond Climax in 1896 at the request of a lady, then in Richmond, who often traveled on Captain White’s boat.

What an exceptional extravagance to ride the waters in a ship like Captain White commanded.  The following are a few other websites with pictures of the captain’s home in Cloverport, a photograph of the captain, and a story about the burning of the J. M. White.

Captain J. M. White’s imposing gravestone.