Category Archives: Family Stories

Lipscomb Family of Kenton County

George B. Lipscomb, 1835-1918.  Elizabeth Lipscomb, 1836-1921.  Independence Cemetery, Kenton County, Kentucky.

The Lipscomb family is represented in Independence Cemetery in Kenton County, Kentucky, by the gravestone of the father and mother – George B. Lipscom and Nancy Elizabeth Mardis – and their son, Thomas Lipscomb and his wife, Annie Lipscom.  George B. Lipscomb married Elizabeth Mardis September 13, 1856.

We first find this family in the 1860 census of said county.  George, 24, is a farmer, wife Nancy E. (the only time I found the name Nancy), 23, and son Thomas J., 2.  Elizabeth’s sister, Agnes J. Mardis, 14, also lives with the family at this time.  George Lipscomb’s parents, William, 48, and Elizabeth, 48, live next door.

In 1870, in addition to son Thomas, 13, there is Alice, 11; Samuel, 9; Addie, 6; Merritt, 4; and Charles, 1.  An additional daughter, Lillie, was born in 1880.

George B. Lipscomb died November 21, 1918, of stroke.  His death certificate gives his age as 83, but does not list a date of birth.  His parents were William Lipscomb and Annie Ballinger.  Information was given by his wife, Elizabeth Lipscomb, and he was buried in Independence Cemetery.

Nancy Elizabeth Lipscomb died March 5, 1921, of nephritis, a chronic inflammation of the kidneys.  She was born August 19, 1836, and was 84 years, 6 months and 15 days at the time of her death.  Her father was William Mardis, mother’s name was not given.  She was buried in Independence Cemetery March 8, 1921.

Annie Lipscomb, 1858-1918.

Angeline (Anna) R. Pickett, was wife to Thomas J. Lipscomb, first born child, son of George and Elizabeth.  According to the 1910 census they were married about 1878, since it is listed they had been married for 32 years.  On additional fact from that census is that the couple had four children, but none were living.  So terribly sad to lose all children.  In the 1880 census, shortly after Thomas and Annie were married, they are listed as 22 and 20, with a son – Ernest, 10/12.  That is the only child I could find.  If only the 1890 census had not been destroyed by fire – what treasures we could find there!

This is very hard to write – I found this, after finishing the blog.  Angeline (Anna) Lipscomb died November 3, 1918, from suicide by a sharp instrument.  She was born October 23, 1858, and was 61 years and 10 days of age.  Her parents were Hiram Pickett and Mary A.  Informant was her husband, Thomas Lipscomb.  My heart is hurting and tears are running down my cheeks.  Poor, dear woman.  After losing her children she must have suffered greatly.  How difficult to go on.  But her poor, poor, husband.

Thomas Lipscomb, 1857-1925.

Thomas Lipscomb must have been a very strong man to continue on after the deaths of his children and wife.

Thomas Lipscomb died January 4, 1925, of pneumonia.  He was born July 28, 1859, and was 65 years, 6 months and four days at the time of his death.  His parents were B. G. Lipscomb and a Miss Mardis.

With this blog I wanted to show the importance of death certificates and how they can give information otherwise unknown about our ancestors.  Or they can verify information already known.  Sometimes the information is a little too painful.

 

 

Revolutionary War Veterans In Hardin County

From Two Centuries in Elizabethtown and Hardin County Kentucky 1776-1976, by Daniel Elmo McClure, Jr., we find mention of many, many Revolutionary War veterans that settled in Hardin County.  The following excerpt names just a few.

Kentucky is said to have been settled by a greater proportion of Revolutionary War veterans than any other state west of the original thirteen colonies, and Hardin County shared in the great influx of those hardy men.  Two centuries of time and the incomplete records of that period render difficult any attempts at this time to list all of the old soldiers who came to what is now Hardin County.

Some names are recorded in military records, land grants and pension lists; however, many of the veterans did not apply for pensions, feeling they had only done their duty as citizens and patriots.  The writer recognizes that the following list of Revolutionary veterans is only a partial record and does not have the names of many who served during the long struggle.  In fact, many settlers came into the territory long before the war’s final battle at Yorktown.

Isaac Van Meter was born February 2, 1759, and died November 4, 1840, in Grayson County.  He enlisted in western Pennsylvania in 1778 as a private under Captain William Harrod and Colonel George Rogers Clark, served six months under Harrod, served six weeks in 1780 under Captain John Swan, was under Colonel Lynn in the fall of 1782, and later under Captain John Vertrees and Colonel John Floyd.  He was at Kaskaskia, Vincennes, Chillicothetown and Piqua in the Campaign in the Northwest.

Edward Rawlings, who married Rebecca Van Meter, served in the Revolutionary Army before coming to Elizabethtown.  He was born in 1745, and died in 1796.

Isaac Vertrees, born April 15, 1755, a son of Jacob Vertrees, who with his brother, John, fled from France to America, was a private and fought in the Battle of Brandywine, Pennsylvania, and at Boundbrook.  He died in Meade County in 1822.  John rose to the rank of captain and later settled in Elizabethtown.  Isaac served in the8th Regiment of Pennsylvania Line.

General John Thomas, who rose to major general in the War of 1812, was a captain in the Revolution.

Captain John Vertrees (family name was originally Van Tress) fought at the Battle of King’s Mountain, October 7, 1780.  Prior to that he was one of the 175 Virginia volunteers of George Rogers Clark called by the Indians ‘the Long Knives’ in the campaign of the Northwest.  He took up 1,300 acres of land in Severn’s Valley under Virginia land warrants in 1781.  He died in Elizabethtown in 1803.

Captain John Swan, whose wife was Elizabeth Van Meter, was killed by Indians on the Ohio River enroute to Kentucky.

Colonel Francis Slaughter, who died in Elizabethtown in 1805, was a native of Essex County, Virginia.  Another record shows his birth as 1730 in Culpeper County, Virginia.

Captain Thomas Helm, one of the settlers who built the three forts at the site of Elizabethtown in the fall of 1780, was a lieutenant in the Colonial Army, and was a native of Virginia.

Samuel Haycraft, Sr., another of the builders of forts at Elizabethtown, was likewise a veteran of the Revolution.

Colonel Andrew Hynes, the third builder of a fort in Severn’s Valley, saw Revolutionary service.

 

Woosley Family of Butler County

Today I would like to share information about the Woosley family, originally of Edmonson County, later Butler County.  The Woosley Cemetery is in the most northeastern tip of Butler County, on Hwy 411, near the small community of Decker.  The two oldest graves for the Woosley family are those of Curtis and Elizabeth Jones Woosley.  And that is where we begin our story.

Curtis Woosley is the son of Samuel Woosley, 1802-1865, and Rebecca Blakley, 1808-1890.  In the 1850 census of Edmonson County Samuel and Rebecca are listed as 47 and 43, respectively.  Children listed were Curtis, 17; George, 15; Samuel, 12; Thomas J., 10; and Martha J., 8.  Another individual living in the household is David Woosley, 75, who was born in Virginia.  Quite possibly this is Samuel’s father.  Samuel and Rebecca Blakley Woosley are buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Edmonson County.

Curtis B., husband of Elizabeth Woosley, January 26, 1833 – June 13, 1906.  Woosley Cemetery, Butler County, Kentucky.  ‘He died as he lived – a Christian.’

Curtis Woosley must have been the first of his family to move to Butler County.  We find him there in 1880 with the following children – James S., 24; Winston D., 20; Rody K., 17; Joseph L., 17; Jacob D., 13; Arpy S., 11; and Reason A., 6.  Son John H. Woosley was listed next in the census, 26; with wife Kitty E., 20; and children Solomon, 1; and William B., 7/12.  Son Thomas Jefferson Woosley was listed next, 22, with wife Louisa, 19, and baby son William A., 8/12.  Unfortunately, Louisa A. Cummins Woosley, died the next year.

Elizabeth, wife of C. B. Woosley, October 4, 1830 – July 26, 1918.  ‘A tender mother and a faithful friend.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley next married Dora Alice Wilson, daughter of Solomon and Polly Wilson, with whom he had Estella Pearl, 1885-1918; Rebecca, 1887-1891; Thomas, 1888-1889; McCary Fieldon, 1896-1983; and Janie Alice, 1898-1953.  The 1900 census of Butler County reveals two additional daughters – Willie C., 10; and Polly, 7.  I think one of the most confusing parts of the census is names – in one census the child was called by his first name, the next census he was called by his middle name – or sometimes a nickname!  I try to match ages – how old would that child be ten years from 1880?  That is not an exact science since parents could confuse ages and make the child a little older or a bit younger.  But we try!

Dora A., wife of T. J. Woosley, born April 24, 1862, died April 11, 1907.  ‘Come ye blessed.’

Dora Alice Wilson Woosley died April 11, 1907, age the age of 44, of pneumonia.  Thomas Woosley married Nancy Ann Bryant after her death.  He and Nancy had three children – a son named Goldie, a daughter, Edra, and a son, Clayton.

Nancy Ann Woosley, March 1, 1877 – September 17, 1964.  ‘The Lord is my shepherd.’

Thomas J. Woosley, September 25, 1857 – October 2, 1951.  ‘he was beloved by God and man.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley lived a long life – 94 years!  He is buried in the Woosley Cemetery along with many other members of his family.  In addition to his gravestone, there is a sandstone stile block.  The plaque on the stone reads ‘Handmade by father and son, T. J. Woosley, 1857-1951, W. G. Woosley, 1900-1994.’

Sandstone stile block.

Sandstone stile block from back, between Thomas and Dora Woosley’s gravestones.

I thought this was so impressive – and such a wonderful place to put this stone in the cemetery – otherwise it may be lost and forgotten.  What a wonderful tribute to father and son.  And do you know which son this is?  The one named Goldie in the census!

The Gough Family of St. Mary’s County Maryland and Scott County Kentucky

Gough family gravestones in St. Francis de Sales Cemetery, Scott County, Kentucky.

Our story starts in St. Mary’s County, Maryland, when the William Gough family, including son William, emigrated from Gloucester, England, to the new world around 1650 – give or take a few years.  William Gough died in 1679, naming son Stephen in his will.  Stephen married Sarah Tattershall, and they were the parents of James Gough.  He and his wife Priscilla Heard fathered a child named James.  He was born September 15, 1748, in St. Mary’s County.  When his father died June 19, 1764, son James was given parts of several tracts of land.  I’ve always loved that Marylander’s name their land – much easier to keep up with them!  James Gough and his brother Ignatius were give tracts ‘Lady’ and ‘Margaret’.  He and his brother Stephen were given ‘Gough’s Mill’.  Ten years later when James married Susannah Medley, he was already a landowner.  About twelve years later the couple and their children were ready to make the move from the home they had known and loved for years, to the primitive parts of what was then Virginia, but would eventually become Scott County, Kentucky.

When the band of about 25 Catholic settlers reached Kentucky in 1786.  After traveling down the Ohio River in flatboats they were expected to continue on to the Washington/Nelson county area of central Kentucky, where many other Marylanders had made their home.  They were so enraptured with the beautiful, fertile land east of the Kentucky River they decided to build their homes here – now in area of Georgetown and Midway.

I would like to share with you today the gravestones of these brave pioneers.  The first church of St. Francis de Sales was built in 1794, and the Gough family worshiped here, along with many others who made that early journey with them – families by the names of Jenkins, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, James and others.

To the memory of James Gough.  he was born September 15th 1748 and departed this life September 27th 1826 aged 78 years, 22 days.

James Gough – father, husband and pioneer.

Susanna Gough born 15th August 1746, died 13th January 1795.

Susanna Gough was wife to James Gough; her maiden name was Medley.

Sacred to the memory of John B. Gough who was born February 29th 1767 and departed this life February 19th 1839 aged 72 years.

John Baptist Gough was the eldest son of James and Susannah.

Mary Gough died 16th June 1809 aged 31 years.

Mary Gough was the wife of John Baptist Gough.

To the memory of James Gough.  he was born February the 14th in the year of 1775 and died the 24th day of May 1828 aged 53 years.

James Gough was a son of James and Susannah Gough.

Ignatius Gough born the 28 day of march 1784 and died the 23rd day of March 1825.

Ignatius Gough was a son of James and Susannah Gough.

Ann Gough born the 22nd day of April AD 1768, died 7th January AD 1814.

I believe Ann Gough was a daughter of James and Susannah.

Ann’s stone has the most beautiful script for her dates of birth and death.  I’ve never seen anything quite like it!

George Gough born the 22nd day of may 1798, died the 23rd day of April 1821, aged 23 years.  ‘He lived beloved.’

George Gough was possibly a grandson of James and Susannah.  I love his epitaph – He lived beloved.  What more could you ask?

Henry Gough born the 26th of April 1800, died May 1819.

Possibly another grandson?

Sacred to the memory of Stephen T. Gough who was born October 15th 1818 and departed this life December 4th 1831 aged 13 years.

Stephen was probably a grandson of James and Susannah.

It would be nice to know exactly how all the members of the Gough family fit together – especially the ones who are probably grandchildren.  At least we know they all sleep together as a family.

Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter

Last weekend my son, Linton, and I had a day together in Louisville.  He lives in Indianapolis, not the ends of the earth, but not an easy day trip.  When our weekend was planned I told Ritchey and Kate he was mine on Saturday, but I would share him with the rest of the family on Sunday!  We had a huge family dinner and Julian had quite a day with Uncle Linton.

Most of our day together was spent at bookstores, record shops, eating and talking.  Beforehand I searched for those rare and used bookstores and the first we visited was A Book By Its Cover on Dartmouth.  When we turned in it was a residential area.  We searched again and came up with the same place.  Linton called, and, yes, we were in front of the business!  The gentleman told us most of his business is online, but he welcomes those who want to come and peruse.  And he had one room of Kentucky history and county histories – I was in heaven!

One book I found was Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter (1787-1827) by E. A. Jonas.  The book is in excellent condition, being No. 264 of 500 copies of the first edition.  About forty of his portraits are reproduced in the book.  Being a Mercer County resident and having a little knowledgeable about the history of our county, I recognized the last name as the same as the wife of Thomas Allin, our first county clerk.  Thomas Allin married Mary Jouett on February 16, 1789, at the home of her brother, Captain John Jouett, Jr.  Their parents were John Jouett, Sr., and Mourning Harris.  Captain John Jouett, Jr., better known as ‘Jack’, was the father of Matthew Harris Jouett.  Matthew was born in 1787, two years before his aunt’s marriage.

After a local education, Matthew’s father sent him to Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, to be educated as a lawyer.  He studied and became a lawyer, but his free time was spent painting.  In 1812 he married Miss Margaret Allen of Fayette County.

He could not continue his law profession, gave up his business and started painting portraits as his livelihood.  His father was not happy, and that is an understatement.  The War of 1812 changed everyone’s lives, and Matthew Jouett volunteered his services and served valiantly.  He enlisted in Captain Robert Crockett’s Company, Third Mounted Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Allen commanding.  July 13, 1814, he was appointed paymaster, with the rank of captain of the 28th United States Infantry by President Madison.  At the battle of the River Raisin the payrolls and papers, in his care as paymaster, fell into enemy hands and were never recovered.  He found himself in debt to the War Department for $6,000.  That doesn’t sound like a huge sum today, but it would be about a million dollars.  This was not due to negligence or lack of prudence, just a fortune of war.  He was determined to pay the money back – and he did so through painting portraits.  His father was furious and called him a ‘sign-painter’, never realizing how great his talent truly was.

Matthew Jouett went to Boston in 1817 and studied for a year with Gilbert Stuart – who painted the famous George Washington portrait.  Back in Kentucky Matthew painted assiduously.  Those who sat for him sound like a Who’s Who of history – Henry Clay, Judge John Rowan, Andrew Jackson, Hon. George M. Bibb, Mr. Justice Thomas Todd, Captain Robeson DeHart, Colonel Edmund Taylor, Sr., General LaFayette, Hon. John Brown, Hon. Robert S. Todd, George Rogers Clark and many, many others.  It is said that in the ten years of his career he produced over 400 portraits – and there could be more.  In 1964, at an auction in Lexington, a gentleman bought a portrait of a child for $22 – and afterwards found out it was a Matthew Jouett painting, worth $1600-$2000!

Matthew Jouett died after a short illness, August 10, 1827, in his fortieth year and at the top of his professional success.  It is said he accomplished as much in ten years as many others were able to do only in a lifetime.  His fame as a great painter truly began at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago.  His paintings were given the best place in the gallery by the Hanging Committee because of their recognized merit.  In 1928 fifty to sixty of Matthew Jouett’s portraits were exhibited at the J B Speed Museum in Louisville.  Some of his work is in the Hall of Governors at the Kentucky History Center, and I believe one hangs in a New York museum.

Matthew and his wife are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.  I think there’s another road trip to plan – to the cemetery, J B Speed Museum in Louisville, and the old state house in Frankfort where the life-size portrait of General LaFayette hangs!  I will keep you updated!

The Edward Palmer Torian Family of Trigg County

Edward Palmer Torian was the son of George and Martha Palmer Torian, born in Christian County March 22,1820, the ninth child out of ten.  He moved to Trigg County and became a merchant.  On November 10, 1848, he married Martha L. Durall.

Infant daughter of E. P. and M. L. Torian, born and died April 26th 1850.  Pioneer Cemetery, Cadiz, Trigg County, Kentucky.

In the 1850 census of Trigg County the couple were living with the D. B. Carson family, also a merchant.  Edward was 30, and Martha was 22.  No children were listed, but the sad fact is they had a daughter, Molly, who born and died the same day, April 26, 1850.  Martha soon followed her daughter to the grave on September 23, 1850.

Mrs. Martha L. Torian, consort of E. P. Torian, born September 29th 1827, died September 23rd 1850.

The beautiful sentiment written on the stone gives us an idea of Edward’s grief –

When evening shadows gather round, And sleep our eyelids seal, The memory of departed friends, Will o’er our spirits steal.  Again we press a loving lip –

And the rest is beneath ground!  How I wish I could read the full verse!

Infant son of E. P. & M. E. Torian, born and died May 3, 1855

Three years later Edward marries Mary E. McAllister on December 18, 1853.  Again his marriage ends in tragedy.  An infant son was born and died May 3, 1855.  Mary died eighteen days later, May 21st, of puerperal fever.  This fever killed so many women in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries I had to do a little research.

Puerperal fever is an infection of some part of the reproductive organs following childbirth, resulting in high fever, chills and lower abdominal pain – generally resulting in death.  Since many doctors at the time did not believe hand washing was necessary, many cases were caused by the doctors themselves.  The prior health of the mother was also a determining factor.

Edward marries a third time – to Mary E. Allegree.  In the 1860 Trigg census they are living with the E. A. Slaughter family, a druggist.  Edward was 37, merchant, with $8000 in personal estate, and Mary was 26.

Edward P. Torian, born March 22, 1820, died November 20, 1861.

Edward Palmer Turian died November 20, 1861.  I could find no cause of death.  His widow lived less than three years after his death.  Such a shame that no one from this family has descendants living today to keep their memories alive.  We shall remember and mourn them.

The Flanagan Family of Marion County

James Tarrence Flanagan and Elizabeth Roney

James Tarrence Flanagan was born in Cork County, Ireland, in 1760.  His oath of Fidelity is recorded in Baltimore County, Maryland, in 1778.  He married Elizabeth Roney about 1786, and by 1790 they were living in Kentucky.  The Flanagans first moved to Mercer County, and in 1797 moved to Washington County, the area that would become Marion County in 1834.  James Flanagan bought a small farm of 107 acres between the small towns of St. Joe and Raywick.  Tarrence and Elizabeth had ten children:  Patrick married Catherine French; Mary married James McAlister; James remained single; John married Sussana Buckman; Margaret remained single; Nancy married John Mills, Jr.; Stephen remained single; Elizabeth married George Buckman; Catherine became Sister Bibanna; and Benedict married Mary Jane Russell.

Benedict Joseph Flanagan and Mary Jane Russell

Benedict J. Flanagan, born February 8, 1812, died April 30, 1874.  St. Charles Catholic Cemetery, St. Mary, Marion County, Kentucky.  ‘A faithful husband by my side, he filled our house with glee, but now our homes are on distant tides and as a far distant be.’

According to tax records, Benedict Joseph Flanagan, Sr., purchased a farm two and one half miles from St. Mary, Kentucky, on Hardins Creek, in 1844.  It is the Flanagan farm located now on Sam Browning Road.  Benedict married Mary Jane Russell in 1845, daughter of James and Nancy (Mudd) Russell.

Mother, Mary J. Flanagan, December 3, 1825 – July 18, 1894.  At rest.

Ten children were born of this union:  James Tarrence married Eliza Walker

James T. Flanagan, August 13, 1847 – February 27, 1919.  Anna Eliza, his wife, March 13, 1859 – August 6, 1944.

William Patrick married Mildred Hollis; John Albert married Eliza Hamilton; Amanda Catherine married William C. Hamilton; Elizabeth Frances married Jim Ed Mattingly; Benedict Jr., married Nannie Pike

Benedict J. Flanagan, 1864-1935.  Nannie V. Pike, his wife, 1866-1934.

Annie Mary married Bernard Mattingly; Charles Kendrick married Florence Clayton; Sarah Eliza remained single and Thomas David married Louise Cynthia Pike.

Thomas David Flanagan and Louise Cynthia Pike

Thomas D. Flanagan, 1869-1947.  Lula C. Pike, his wife, 1870-1921.

Thomas David Flanagan married Cynthia Louise Pike, daughter of John Pike and Anna Minerva (Vittitow) Pike.  Six children were born to this union:  Mary Lea became Sister Mary Angela; Joseph Elbert married Mary Burke; Joseph Edward married Catherine Roberta Mudd; Althea David married Joseph William Ray; John Thomas married Roberta O’Bryan and Ida married Ernest Byrley.

Joseph E. Flanagan, Sr., June 18, 1900 – August 8, 1988.  Catherine Roberta, September 29, 1909 – March 30, 1993.

In 1947, Thomas David Flanagan deeded to his son, Joseph Edward, the farm.  Joseph Edward Flanagan, Sr., married Catherine Roberta Mudd, daughter of Martin John and Teresa Barbara Blandford Mudd, on November 25, 1937.  Their eight children include:  Joseph Edward, Jr., married Carolyn Hardy; Francis Jerome married Mary Ann Rice; Mary Cecilia married Kenneth Slater; Frances Patricia married David Langley; Barbara Alice married Benedict Miles; Charles Louis married Alice Peters; Dorothy Jean married David Kehm; Teresa Martin married Larry Richard Hawkins.

A later descendant, Charles Gerard Flanagan, bought the Flanagan farm and built a new home on the location of the original Flanagan homestead.  The Flanagan farm has been in the same name for 156 years.

Information from History of Marion County Kentucky Volume I, compiled by the Marion County Historical Society.  All photos taken by Ritchey and Phyllis Brown, Kentucky Kindred Genealogy, at St. Charles Catholic Cemetery in St. Mary, Marion County, Kentucky.  This was my home parish for many years.