Two Weddings and A Funeral

The Mt. Sterling Advocate, Montgomery County, Kentucky

Tuesday, September 4, 1894

Silver Wedding

For twenty-five years Peter Greenwade and wife have walked together down life’s rugged path.  In adversity and prosperity they have been the same congenial two and have gotten out of life all the happiness in store for them, and on last Friday, August 31, in commemoration of their twenty-fifth anniversary they celebrated their silver wedding.  A host of friends were present and numerous were the gifts.  The dinner was a most delightful spread and the two were as happy as they were twenty-five years ago when Miss Mollie Ramey became the bride of Peter Greenwade.  May their lives be together many, many years more and be crowned with blessings not a few.

It is our pleasant duty to announce to the readers of the ADVOCATE the coming nuptials of Mr. Courtland Prentice Chenault, one of the most brilliant young lawyers at our bar, and Miss May Hocker Hazelrigg, the beautiful and accomplished daughter of Judge Jas. H. Hazelrigg, of the Appellate Court.

This wedding, which is to take place Thursday, September 6, at the Christian Church in this city, has caused a great deal of commotion among our young people on account of both parties being so well known and liked here.  Miss Hocker is one of the sweetest and most accomplished, and at the same time one of the most popular young ladies it has ever been our pleasure to meet.  We have known her nearly her whole life, and from childhood up to the present time she has always been the same sweet Christian girl, and in winning her Mr. Chenault has won one of the grand prizes in the lottery of life.  Of Mr. Chenault we have to say he is ‘a Christian and a gentleman,’ and in those words we have said more than we could in whole volumes.  He is the junior partner of the law firm of Woodford and Chenault, and although one of the youngest attorneys in this district, already has a large and growing practice and we predict for him a brilliant and successful future.  Courtland has a host of friends throughout Kentucky, and as far as we know not a single enemy.  He is a man whom any woman should be proud to call husband.

Young people, we tender to you our sincerest regards and wish you a happy and prosperous journey down the highway of life in the gilded chariot of pleasure.

In speaking of the wedding the Lexington Transcript says:  ‘Miss Hazelrigg is the daughter of Judge Jas. H. Hazelrigg, of the Court of Appeals, and is quite a social favorite in this city, where she has many relatives and friends.’

Died, on Sunday morning, September 2, 1894, L. D. Wilson, aged 78 years.

for some time past Mr. Wilson has been in failing health and the tottering old remnant of his once stalwart frame was not an unusual sight, as the old man who knew everyone and was liked by old and young, was seen making his uneasy way along the street.  Uncle Dud was for many, many years a member of the Methodist Church.  He loved her service and her songs and the old paths and achievements of his church in the day when the ‘circuit rider’ was in the land.  Uncle Dud was a benevolent man, but not in an ostentatious way.  He never thrust his charities before the public gaze.  He was in a large sense a grateful man.  He never forgot a kindness done him.  Only yesterday a life-long friend said of him: ‘Dudley never tired of wanting to do me a kindness and to show me accommodations because of some kindness my father had shown to his mother when she was a widow with small children dependent upon her.’  Uncle Dudley was a successful businessman and was long identified with the business interests of this town.  His wife, the well-beloved Eliza, preceded him to the beyond by several years, and since then Uncle Dud’s chief wish has been to join her.  His desire has been gratified; and yesterday afternoon he was laid to rest by her side in our beautiful Machpelah.

 

Dudley M. and Johanna Chrisman Ball Obituaries

Dudley M. Ball, Versailles Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

Dudley M. Ball, March 29, 1824 – April 19, 1900

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, April 21, 1900

Dudley M. Ball Dead

A Wealthy Farmer and Descendant of a Famous Virginia Family

Versailles, Ky., April 20 – Mr. Dudley Mitchum Ball, aged seventy-six years, a prominent and wealthy farmer and stock raiser of this county, died last midnight of pneumonia, after only a few days’ illness.  Mr. Ball was a descendant of the historic family of that name, of which the mother of George Washington was a member, and the farm upon which he died was settled more than one hundred years ago by Mr. Ball’s maternal grandfather, Dudley Mitchum, of Virginia.

Mr. Ball is survived by a widow, three daughters and four sons, viz: Mrs. Minnie Moore, the wife of the Hon. D. L. Moore, of Harrodsburg; Mrs. Josephine Harris, Miss Susan Ball, Messrs. John, Dudley, Howard and Ernest Ball.

The funeral services will be held at Mr. Ball’s late residence, on the Nicholasville turnpike, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Joanna Chrisman, wife of Dudley M. Ball, December 8, 1833 – June 18, 1915.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, June 18, 1915

Was Well-Known Here

Versailles, Ky., June 16 – Mrs. Johanna Chrisman Ball, eighty years old, widow of Dudley M. Ball, died this morning at her home, Maple Hill, on the Nicholasville turnpike, after an illness of seven weeks.  She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Josie Ball Harris, of this county; Mrs. D. L. Moore, of Harrodsburg, and Mrs. Charlton Alexander, of Paris, and three sons, John, Dudley M. and Howard Ball, of this county.

 

Delightful Photographs

Our first photo today is a mother and daughter.  Isn’t the little girl sweet?  With her large bow and necklace she is ready to be photographed.  Her mother has the beautiful upswept hair that I love!  This is a postcard photo.  The AZO stamp on the card tells us it was made by Eastman Kodak between 1904 and 1918.

Our second photo is also a postcard, but has been trimmed to fit in a frame.  Do you think the little boys are twins?  They’re certainly adorable!  And the wee one in the old pram!  On back I see that it was sent to Mrs. Charles ? in Lansing Michigan.  The postmark is Hammond, Indiana, June 10, 1915, and the scrap of message I can read says they are coming Sunday the 13th.

In the late 1890’s this diamond shaped photo was very popular.  I think it must have been difficult to frame or put in a photo album!  This handsome gent looks very dashing.  On back we find this photo was taken by H. Mueller, No. 1129 Vine St., below 12th, Cincinnati, Ohio.  You could purchase a life-size photo and 1 dozen cabinets for $3.75!

Our last photo is of a lovely woman who looks ready for a dance!  She is Mrs. J. F. Porter – so rare to have a name!  Her lovely shoulders are shown off by the black lace and ruffles of her gown.  This photo was taken by Roshon’s Studio, 832 Broad St., Augusta, Georgia.

Early Mercer County Marriages by William Bottom

Mercer County marriages from November 23, 1814 to October 12, 1815

  • November 23rd, 1814, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony John Bruce and Barthenia Casey.
  • December 8th, 1814, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Joseph Files and Patsey Martin.
  • December 8th, 1814, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Thomas Bottom and Nancy Thompson.
  • May 23rd, 1815, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Elijah Moore and Lydia Hendrixson.
  • June 23rd, 1815, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Aaron Hendrixson and Polly Moore.
  • July 4th, 1815, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Berryman Harreld and Polly Parr.
  • July 20th, 1815, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony Austin Moore and Patsey Goldman.
  • September 1st, 1815, I joined together in the holy estate of matrimony David Casey and Elizabeth Whoberry.

By me, William Bottom

Thomas Allin, County Clerk

Obituaries From the Ottenheim Area of Lincoln County – German Reformed Cemetery

John Jufer, 1856-1932.  Pauline E. Jufer, 1875-1931.  German Reformed Cemetery, Ottenheim, Lincoln County, Kentucky.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 11, 1931

Good Woman Passes

Mrs. Pauline Jufer, aged 65, wife of Mr. John Jufer, died at her home near Ottenheim Friday night, after suffering from heart trouble for some time.  As a member of the Reform Church she was ever willing to do her part for the betterment of the community and in her passing the community is made poorer.  Surviving her besides her husband are three sons and three daughters.  Services were conducted at the Reform Church, Ottenheim, at 10 o’clock Sunday morning, by Rev. Burlap, after which the body was laid to rest in the church cemetery.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, January 19, 1932

Aged Man Dead

Mr. John Jufer, well respected farmer living near Ottenheim, died Thursday morning of a complication of troubles, from which he had suffered for some time.  Burial took place in the cemetery of the Reform Church, Ottenheim, Friday afternoon.

John F. Naef, May 23, 1891 – May 25, 1935. 

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Friday, May 31, 1935

A gloom was cast over our entire community Saturday morning when it became known that the spirit of Mr. John Naef had taken its flight to mansions in the sky.  He saw several months on the battlefields of France. John was big-hearted, kind, honest as the days are long.  He had been a citizen of Ottenheim for some time and this community had none better.  He was liked by all.  He leaves, besides a host of relatives and friends two brothers, Fred, with whom he lived since the death of his parents; another brother, Emil Naef, of Indianapolis; two sisters, Mrs. Jim Purdeci, of Georgetown, and Mrs. Wiseman, of Louisville.  Funeral services were held at the Reform Church here at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. Burlepp, of Greenheim.  Burial followed in the cemetery near the church.  A very large crowd followed the remains to their last resting place.  In their irreparable loss the brothers and sisters have the sympathy of their many friends.

Joseph and Mary Jane Lillard Buried in New Providence Cemetery

Joseph Lillard, born June 27, 1827, died August 9, 1898.  New Providence Presbyterian Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, August 12, 1898

Mr. Joseph Lillard, an influential farmer of the McAfee neighborhood, died Tuesday night of a complication of diseases. Mr. Lillard was seventy-one years of age and was highly respected. He leaves a wife and several grown children. Funeral services were conducted at Providence church yesterday afternoon by his pastor, Rev. S. F. Taylor, and the interment took place in Providence Cemetery, a large number of his friends and neighbors attending.

Mary Jane, wife of Joseph R. Lillard, January 22, 1832 – August 16, 1910. 

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

 Friday, August 19, 1910

Mrs. Mary Jane Lillard, one of the most venerable and highly respected women of the county died Tuesday night at the home of her son, Mr. Will Lillard, near McAfee. She was seventy-nine years of age and the widow of the late Joseph Lillard. She was a lovable Christian character and had been for years a devoted member of New Providence church, where her funeral was held on Thursday morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Harvey Glass, and the interment was in the adjacent cemetery. The deceased leaves three sons, all substantial and well-known citizens of this county. They are Messrs. William, James and David Lillard.

The Small Area of Ottenheim In Lincoln County

Hanging in the Lutheran Church – old photo of church, postcard from Ottenheim and old photo of the area.

A few years ago, Ritchey and I visited the small area of Ottenheim in Lincoln County.  At one time it was a bustling area with many immigrants from Germany and Switzerland.  It is now a very quiet place, very beautiful, with three churches and cemeteries within sight of each other.  Follow US 127 south of Stanford, take a left onto Hwy 643; this will take you to Ottenheim.

In the 1880’s, Jacob Ottenheimer, of New York, purchased land in Lincoln County, with the intention of drawing immigrants to this Kentucky, as well as Americans from outside the state.  There were originally over one hundred families from overseas.  The occupants of this small area worshiped at the Lutheran Church, the German Reform Church and St. Sylvester Catholic Church (the only church still having weekly worship).

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1886 Ottenheim, Kentucky.

The Lutheran Church was purchased by the historical society and is used for annual gatherings, weddings and other occasions.  Ritchey and I were fortunate to meet the caretaker of the church, who lived across the street.

He showed us inside the beautiful building, with many of its original features.  His relatives lie in the cemetery beside the church.

The Last Supper engraving above the altar is exactly the same as that which hung in my grandmother’s kitchen for as long as I can remember – and now hangs in my kitchen!

A portion of the Lutheran Church Cemetery.

The German church, originally known as the Dutch Reform Church, is no longer used.

Rosa Platzeck, March 17, 1902 – August 15, 1986.

The cemetery for the German, or Dutch, Reform Church, is very small.

St. Sylvester Catholic Church is still used for weekly Mass.

St. Sylvester Catholic Cemetery.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 15, 1911

In 1884, J. Ottenheimer, a German colonization agent, founded Ottenheim.  Here in the solitude of a forest primeval these hardy German pioneers carved out a home and farmlands and now are prosperous.  A nice little town of 109 souls is Ottenheim.  There are three churches, Catholic, Lutheran and Dutch Reformed, Father Leo, pastor of the first named, Rev. C. J. Mehrtens the pastor of the Lutheran church has the nicest library we have ever seen.  The Dutch Reformed has no pastor at present but hopes to get one soon.  Two very good stores here, John Wentzel and the store conducted by W. T. White.  Mr. White is conducting the public school, with an average attendance of fifty pupils, 100 being in the district.  A new addition has recently been built under the supervision of Mr. Wm. Landgraf, which will comfortably accommodate the increasing attendance.  This is one of the best districts in the county.  Mr. W. is teaching a good school and the patrons are satisfied.