Wayne N. Stevens Obituary

The Ohio County News, Hartford, Kentucky

Wednesday, June 12, 1918

Bright’s Disease Fatal

To Wayne N. Stevens, Who Passed Away at Battle Creek, Michigan, Thursday Night

Thursday night about 12 o’clock death claimed Wayne N. Stevens, age 55, one of the best known farmers of Ohio County, when he succumbed to Bright’s disease at a sanatorium in Battle Creek, Michigan, where he had gone about three weeks before in an effort to get relief from the malady which was sapping his life away.

Mr. Stevens had been a sufferer from the ailment which ultimately caused his death, for quite a while, but he had been confined to his bed only a short time.

He was a member of Hartford Lodge No. 675, F. & A.M., and also a Knight Templar and a Shriner.

Besides his wife, who before her marriage was a Miss [Magnolia] Renfrow, he is survived by his mother, Mrs. Creasy Stevens, and one brother, Lon Stevens.

The funeral, which occurred at the Stevens home, a few miles north of town, and the burial at Alexander school house, was attended by one of the largest crowds ever brought together on a similar occasion in Ohio County.  Fully five hundred people were present to pay the last tribute of respect and honor to this well-known and well-beloved Ohio County citizen.

The funeral at the home was conducted by Rev. A. D. Litchfield, pastor of the Hartford Methodist Church, after which the remains were taken in charge by the Hartford Lodge of Masons, assisted by Masons from various lodges over the county, and laid to rest with Masonic honors by the side of loved ones in Alexander Cemetery.

Wayne N. Stevens, November 9, 1863 – June 17, 1918.  Alexander Cemetery, Ohio County, Kentucky.

1866 Wedding of George T. Hord and Miss Jane Steele

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 25, 1866

A Diamond Wedding in Woodford

The quiet of our happy village was dispelled on the evening of the 19th by the hurrying to and fro of carriages, hacks and every conceivable kind of vehicle, and greeting the ear of every passer-by was the cheerful inquiry, ‘Shall we meet you at the wedding tonight?’  Mr. George T. Hord, a most elegant and highly cultivated banker, of the firm of Hord and George, and Miss Jane Steele, one of Kentucky’s rarest and most beautiful fair ones, were married by Mr. Venable, our most worthy and greatly beloved Episcopal minister.  The wedding was regal, the scene attendant upon it truly imposing, the beautiful church was brilliantly lighted, and strains of soul-searching music welcomed many distinguished and magnificently dressed guests.

On they came until every seat and aisle were crowded, and after merry greetings, they waited in breathless anxiety the coming of the happy pair.  Intense the excitement grew, until, at last, to the tune of a grand march, entered first the graceful bride and groom, accompanied by ten beautiful attendants, led to the altar by so many gallant cavaliers, magnificently attired.  The bride, as blushing as a May-day rose, was half concealed ‘neath the mazes of a costly and long flowing veil, her dress of the most gorgeous rep silk, handsomely decorated with point lace, and hung in massive folds superbly around her matchless form.  The diamonds sparkling from her queen-like neck and fairy ilugers, made a most brilliant display of a handsome bridal gift of her generous husband.  Her presents were many and mostly of silver.  The groom, the very essence of gallantry and elegance, wore a few gems of the purest water, but rarer far than all, there seemed to be enshrined within his bosom a heart all wreathed with rare and tender buds of love and joy.  So soon as the beautiful ceremony was performed the bridal party were followed by the happy guests to the residence of the bride’s father, Judge William Steele, whose courtesy, coupled with that of his estimable lady, could not have been excelled.  The supper gotten up in good taste, with almost unlimited labor and cost was indeed sumptuous.

The evening passed delightfully, and to the music of Saxton’s band through the mazes of the merry dance we glided until the wee hours of the night, when, with light hearts, we repaired homeward to invoke a prayer for the loving pair, and to mingle with our dreams thoughts of the grand entertainment of the evening.

Versailles, Dec. 20th

According to the census records George and Jane Steele Hord did not have children.  In 1900 they had been married for 35 years.  George was born in Virginia and Jane in Alabama.  George died January 16, 1901, of pneumonia.  According to Jane’s death certificate, she died July 31, 1918.  Her parents are listed as W. J. Steele, born in Kentucky, and Mary D. Winston, born in Alabama.  Jane was born February 14, 1839.

1856 Will of William Linton Lewis of Hancock County

William Linton Lewis is my first cousin five times removed.  He was the nephew of my fifth great-grandfather, Captain John Hancock Linton, the son of his sister Catherine Jennings Linton.  Catherine married William Joseph Lewis.

William Linton Lewis married Ann Winter Dunnington November 18, 1806.  Together they had nine children, and all were given the middle name Dunnington!  They were Francis (married his cousin, Hannah Ann Lewis), Hiram (who died before his father), George (married Caroline Harris), Catherine (married James E. Stone, Hancock County Court Clerk), Frederic (married Pauline Chrisler), William (who died before his father), Elizabeth, Joseph (married Mildred Willian) and Ann (married Porterfield Harrison Hodges).

Hancock County Will Book 4, Pages 32-36

Will of William Linton Lewis

In the name of God, amen.  I, William L. Lewis, of the County of Hancock and State of Kentucky, being of sound mind and disposing memory, doth make this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.

First. I commit my soul to God and my body to the earth, to be buried in a decent Christian manner.

Second.  It is my will and desire and I give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Ann Lewis, my home farm on which we live, which includes all the trace conveyed to me by William L. Boothe, trustee of N. B. Beall, except those parts thereof conveyed by me to Joseph D. Lewis and Frederick D. Lewis, and except the one hundred acres hereinafter given to my son, George D. Lewis, for and during her natural life, together with such of the necessary farming utensils, plows

wagons, horses, stock of cattle and hogs, necessary to carry the farm on.  Also, such of the house and kitchen furniture as she may select, as well as the produce of the farm that may be on hand at my death.  This desire is for the use and benefit of my said Ann and also for my daughter Elizabeth, who is to live with my wife until she should marry and until the death of my wife.

Third.  It is my will and desire at the death of my wife Ann that my daughter Elizabeth shall have the above named tract of land, given as above to my said wife, and also such of the property, stock and farming utensils, household and kitchen furniture, etc., etc., remaining at the death of my wife as she, the said Elizabeth, may select.  The land to be to her, the said Elizabeth, and the heirs of her body.  If she should die without issue, then the land to be equally divided amongst my other children and their heirs as hereinafter named.

Fourth.  I give and bequeath to George Lewis one hundred acres of land to be laid off of the tract on which I now live, on the northeast end and northeast of the tracts heretofore conveyed to my sons Joseph D Lewis and Frederick D. Lewis, and a line running from the northern corner of Joseph D. Lewis to the east corner of Frederick D. Lewi.  Said 100 acres to be laid off in one body as said George D. Lewis may request, so that it may be by a line running northeast on southeast to him and his heirs forever.

Fifth.  I have given to my son Joseph D. Lewis one hundred acres of land and to my son Frederick D. Lewis one hundred acres of land per deeds executed to them.

Sixth.  I give, desire and bequeath unto my beloved wife Ann Lewis, for use and benefit of my daughter Elizabeth Lewis, to hold, govern, manage and use as she, the said Ann may think best, except that she is not to sell any during her natural life, such of the slaves that I have or may have at hand to assist her and Elizabeth and carry on the said home place and farm given to her above.

Seventh.  As respects the slaves of mine that now are in possession of my children.  It is my will that they

remain in their possession if they see fit to keep them, and my wife Ann may deliver to the other children to keep such of those slaves as she may not wat to keep, as above sixth, division and named, my said children to hold the said slaves and use them for their benefit until the death of my wife.

Eighth.  It is my will and desire that at the death of my wife that all my children then living and the children of these that may be dead to have a general division of my real estate and salves, as well that which hath been heretofore advanced to each respectively, but what may be in this will devised once all be made equal.  The children of those that may be dead taking the share of their parent and to be charged with the advancements their parents have received.

Ninth.  As to the personal property that may not be taken and necessary to be used for the benefit of my wife and daughter Elizabeth in the second devise herein and all other property not herein named, to be sold by my executor and the proceeds applied to the payment of my debts.  If not sufficient then such other property as may best spared.

Tenth.  It is my understanding that those of my children who have had the use of any of my slaves or who may have the use of any under the seventh devise herein and shall not have paid for their services to me during my life are to account in the general settlement for a reasonable value for the services of such and in the equal division contemplated in the either devise above a fair value is to be put on the slaves and land in such way as may be deemed right by my executors, to carry out the intentions therein expected to make all my children equal.

Lastly, I appoint George D. Lewis, Frederick D. Lewis, without security, my executors of this my last will and testament.

In witness whereof, I have set my hand and seal this first day of February A.D. 1856.

William L. Lewis

Done and published as the last will and testament of the testator by him in our presence who subscribe our names

in his presence and in the presence of each other on the date above.

Teste.  Will. S. Bates, T. P. William

Codicil.  In explanation of my intentions respecting the land given to my wife Ann and my daughter Elizabeth, if they choose they may have the lines of the home tract extended back from Joseph D. Lewis’ north corner and Frederick D. Lewis’ east corner as much as twenty poles northeast, and then connected by a line parallel to the northeast line of the tract and then for George D. Lewis to have his 100 acres laid off as in the foregoing will is named, but giving a right of way for my wife and daughter Elizabeth from the home tract to any part that may not be included in said George D. Lewis’ 100 acres, which is devised to them – done and signed this 10th day of February A.D. 1856 by the testator in the presence of us, Will S. Bates, Thomas Morgan

William L. Lewis

State of Kentucky, Hancock County

At a Court held in and for the County of Hancock aforesaid at the Courthouse in Hawesville.  On Monday the 22nd day of October 1860, the instrument of writing purporting to be the last will and testament of William L. Lewis, deceased, and the codicil proved by the oath of William S. Bates, one of the subscribing witnesses to the will and also to the codicil, said Bates testifying on oath that the testator did sign, seal, publish and declare that said instrument to be his last will and testament in presence of said Bates and Thomas P. William, that the said Bates and William subscribed their names as witnesses in presence of the testator and in the presence of each other.  Said Bates also testified that the testator also signed, sealed and published and declared the codicil thereunder written to be a part and parcel of this said last will and testament, in the presence of the said Bates and Thomas Morgan.  That the

said Bates and Thomas Morgan, subscribed their names as witnesses to said codicil in presence of the testator and in presence of each other.

That at the time of the publishing of said will and codicil, the testator, William L. Lewis, was, as he believed, of sound and disposing mind and memory, whereupon the said instrument of writing and codicil thereunder written were established as the last will and testament and codicil of said William L. Lewis, deceased, and ordered to be recorded.

Whereupon the same hath been truly recorded in my office.

Attest.  James E. Stone, Clerk, Hancock County Court

Crain-Reynolds 1836 Marriage Bond and Consent – Garrard County

Know all men by these presents, that we, Eli B. Crain and James H. Sterman, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the just and full sum of fifty pounds, current money, to which payment well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 30th day of January 1836.

The condition of the above obligation is such, that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound Eli B. Crain and Mary Jane Reynolds of Garrard County.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the same, then the above obligation to be void, else to be and remain in full force and virtue.

Eli B. Crain, J. H. Stirman

This is to certify that the Clerk of the Garrard County Court is hereby authorized to issue license to Eli B. Crain to marry my daughter, Mary Jane Reynolds, given under my hand this 30th January 1836.

David Reynolds

Attest.  James H. Stirman, Moses Reynolds

I certify that the foregoing certificate was known to be the act and deed of David Reynolds by the oath of James H. Stirman, a subscribing witness thereto, January 30, 1836.

A. N. McKee, D. C

1808 Will of James Cunningham of Breckinridge County

Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Will Book 1, Pages 3-4

Will of James Cunningham

In the name of God, amen.  I, James Cunningham, of the County of Breckinridge and State of Kentucky, being sick and weak in body but of sound mind and memory, but growing old in age, and well knowing the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, do make this my last will and testament.  First of all, my soul I leave to the mercy of God, my body to the earth from whence it came.

Item.  The land whereon I now live, containing two hundred acres by survey, I leave to the support of my well beloved wife, Jany Cunningham, should she survive me, and during her widowhood and should she survive me, at her death it is my will and desire that the above land to be divided in the following manner between my two sons, Matthew Cunningham and John Cunningham.  To Matthew Cunningham I leave that part of the above two hundred acres of land included in the following bounds to wit.  Beginning at the mouth of a spring branch that breaks out on the south ride of the ridge that divides the two improvements of said land and

returning up the said spring branch to the head, including the spring and running on to the top of the ridge and then with the top of the ridge to the lower line of said land.  The residue of said two hundred acres of land I leave to John Cunningham and should John or Matthew Cunningham die without issue it is my will and desire that my son William Cunningham should have the part of the land I have given to them.

Item.  My personal estate I divide in the following manner after paying all my just debts and paying my funeral expenses, it is my will and desire that it be equally divided among my surviving children at my death or the death of my wife should she survive me.  My personal estate, should my wife survive me, is to remain in her possession during her life or during her widowhood.  I do nominate, constitute and appoint my son, Andrew Cunningham, Joseph Cunningham and William Levi my executors and revoking all other wills do make this my last will and testament.  In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-sixth day of March eighteen hundred and eight.

James Cunningham

Teste.  William Levi, John Tharp, Christopher Stone

At a County Court held for Breckinridge County on Monday the 15th day of May 1809.

The within writing purporting to be the last will and testament of James Cunningham, deceased, was proven by the oaths of John Tharp and Christopher Stone, witnesses thereto and sworn to by William Levi, executor and ordered to be recorded.

Attest. John Allen, Clerk

Siblings Photo

This is such a cute photo of three siblings.  The boy looks a bit bored with the whole process – even though he is cute in his Little Lord Fauntleroy outfit!  The suit dates this photo to the late 1880’s or early 1890’s.  Since the girls have the beginning of the large leg ‘o mutton sleeves of the 1890’s, that’s a closer bet for this photo.

Rice Photography of North Manchester, Indiana, took the photo.  The embossed name of the photographer puts this into at least 1894, and so does the even scalloping along the edges of the card.  No design on back of the card puts us to 1898.

Vernon E. Riley Obituary

Vernon E. Riley, October 23, 1908 -March 22, 1914.  ‘Budded on earth to bloom in heaven.’  Bruner’s Chapel Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, March 27, 1914

Little Vernon, aged 5 years, died last Sunday at the home of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Bottom, near Jenkinsville. He was the only child of Mrs. Ida Riley, widow of the late Mr. Sydney Riley. The bright little fellow was ill but a short while with pneumonia. The funeral service was held at Bruner’s Chapel, conducted by Rev. Willis, and the interment was in the cemetery there. The bereaved mother has the sympathy of many friends.