All posts by Kentucky Kindred Genealogical Research

I am a family historian, a genealogist, one who puts families together, who finds those who have been lost for many years and acquaints modern day generations with their ancestors. There's nothing like having a full family tree! Email me at phyrit@roadrunner.com

1870’s Women’s Fashions

I’m so excited to share this photo!  This is a wonderful example of the 1870’s style of women’s fashions.  Seven subjects give us seven examples of how the bustle and narrower form of dress was used during this decade.  Skirts moved from the voluminous hoop fashion, to the narrow skirt, especially in front, and the bustle and a bit of train in back.  Each of these woman give us an example of this style, but they are quite independent of each other.  The white and print dresses give us a glimpse of the bustle in back.  Of the other five, notice the difference in front buttons.  Two have buttons spaced very close, two others have buttons a bit further apart, and one has a quirky bodice cut that looks slashed!  Bits of lace and collars are seen at the throat, fastened with a brooch.  Some of the skirts are simple, but the two in front exhibit pleats, one with a corresponding color of fabric.  Is this a photo of sisters, school mates?  It gives us a striking example of the myriad of women’s fashions of the day.

Photo was taken by Lindsay in Robinson, Illinois.

Death of Dr. Curran Cassius Smith

Curran C. Smith, eldest son of J. Speed and Eliza Smith, born Jun 12, 1822, entered into rest, August 13, 1896.  ‘And his children rise up and call him blessed.’  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, August 19, 1896

The fearfully sudden death on last Thursday, August 13th, of Dr. Smith again demonstrates that in the midst of life we are in death.  Just before noon he was on the streets in apparently good health, but remarked that he felt a pain in his chest.  At dinner, he passed away without the slightest . . . the Second Presbyterian Church, the remains being deposited in the family lot in the cemetery.  Rev. Owsley Goodloe, brother-in-law of the deceased, and Rev. Dr. McCown, pastor of the Baptist Church, were the ministers.  A long procession followed the remains to the grave.

Sallie W. Goodloe, wife of Dr. Curran C. Smith, November 8, 1834 – December 18, 1909.

Curran Cassius Smith was born in Richmond, Kentucky, on June 12th, 1822.  His father was a distinguished member of Congress and Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge of Kentucky.  His mother was a daughter of Brig. Gen. Green Clay, of the War of 1812, and a sister of Gen. Cassius M. Clay, Mr. Lincoln’s Minister to Russia.  Rev. Green Clay Smith, recently deceased, Ex-Governor of Montana and Brigadier General of the U.S. Volunteers, and Ex-Representative J. Speed Smith, this place, were brothers, Mrs. Goodloe, mother of the late William Cassius Goodloe, Minister to Belgium, and Major Green Clay Goodloe, U.S. Marines, was a sister.  Dr. Smith married in 1854 a daughter of Judge William Goodloe of the Madison Circuit Court, she survives.  Their six children survive him, never having lost one.  They are Mrs. Alma Rogers, of Ohio, Mrs. Bessie Benton, of Winchester, Misses Mary Spencer, Willie C. and Curraleen, of Richmond, and J. Speed Smith, of the U.S. Pension Service, now stationed at Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Smith graduated at St. Mary’s, then a noted school; thereafter from the Louisville Medical College of which faculty the subsequently celebrated Dr. Gross was a member.  He practiced 53 years, mostly in Madison County.  For a brief period he lived at Lebanon where he was Collector by appointment of Andrew Johnson, which was the only office he ever held, except when Pension Examiner by appointment of Harrison.

During the war, it was the effort of the Confederates to capture Dr. Smith and others to hold as hostages in lieu of several men who had been carried away to northern prisons.  The Federal commandant at Lexington sent an officer with men who rescued the men in hiding.  At the battle of Richmond, Dr. Smith volunteered on the staff of Gen. Manson, as surgeon, and placed in charge of the Mt. Zion Hospital.  Among the wounded, he found the captain who had rescued him.  Him, with two others, he took to his home and treated free of charge until able to go home.

Dr. Smith was utterly devoid of egotism and vanity.  He was a true man, courageous but quiet, and in every respect a good citizen.

To the memory of J. Speed Smith, born July 31, 1792, married July 31, 1815, died June 6, 1854.  Erected by his widow, Eliza L. Clay Smith, born March 29, 1798, died October 14, 1887.

William Ryan Buried In Albany Cemetery

This is the gravestone for William Ryan, son of William and D. Ryan, born December 24, 1781, and died December 12, 1855.  Generally when parents names are added the person who died is a young child, but this gentleman was 74 years of age.  This is Albany Cemetery, in the town of the same name, in Clinton County, on the Tennessee border.  Albany is centered in the county as far as east-west goes, but a little south on US 127.  Now if you were to head north from Albany you would drive to Harrodsburg, and our home is just a few streets off the main road.  Dale Hollow Lake is shared with Tennessee, and it is a marvelous place to visit – lots of fishing and boating, and the lodge serves wonderful meals!

As you can see the stone is on a raised foundation.  Usually there is either the raised stone or a standing stone, not both.

And from a side angle you can see it also has a foot stone.  There are others that are similar in this cemetery.  There is an old section and a very new section, telling us this cemetery has been used for a long time, and will continue to be used in the future.

Back to William Ryan.  I did find him in the 1850 census of Clinton County.  He is listed as 64, a farmer, born in Virginia.  His wife, Keziah, was 59, also born in Virginia.  Living with them was Susannah Miller, 19, and her one year old son, William M.  Probably a daughter and grandson.

William Ryan and Keziah Blevins were married March 30, 1807, in Wayne County.  Clinton did not become a county until 1835, and was formed from parts of Wayne and Cumberland counties.

Hill-Hamilton 1798 Marriage Bond and Consent

Thomas Hill and Thomas Hamilton are the fathers of our bride and groom.  Both came from Maryland in the latter part of the 18th century to settle in Washington County, Kentucky.  Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton are said to have been the parents of seventeen children!  Think of the number of their descendants now!

Know all men by these presents that we, Clement Hill and John B. Speaks, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of November 1798.  The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

Clement Hill, John B. Speaks

Witness, Moses Rice

The Clerk of Washington County is hereby directed to issue a license for Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton to be married.  Given under my hand and seal this 9th day of November 1798.

Thomas Hamilton

Teste.  John Speaks, Jeremiah Harbert

 

Round Steak Supper – Recipe From the 1950’s

I am so excited to share a page from a notebook I found in the ‘drawer’ of photos and writings at the Linton house in Logan County.  This is the notebook of Mrs. Thomas Densmore Linton – Sallie Ruth Price, the daughter of Edward C. Price and Cora Hutchinson.

Sallie was a teacher – and you can see her lovely handwriting in the recipe above.  I remember teaching my second-graders cursive, watching them grow in their abilities, and now there is talk of doing away with cursive in schools.  Such a shame!

The Round Steak Supper listed above sounds so good I set out to re-create this recipe from years ago.  As a true cook, used to making her meals daily, there are not exact directions.  Just a jot of the important steps.

I had a great tenderized round steak from my sister, who keeps me supplied with tasty meat.  I cut the steak into hand size pieces, added salt and pepper, and lightly floured before putting into a hot skillet with a little olive oil.  It browned beautifully.  I added the onion soup mix, a can of tomatoes and almost a can of vegetable broth.  I covered the skillet, turned it down low, and let it cook about two hours, checking every 20 minutes or so.  The aroma was wonderful!

After two hours I added carrots and potatoes and cooked another 25 minutes until tender.

Oh, my!  Was Ritchey a happy man!  The steak was fork tender, the carrots sweet and potatoes yummy!  A meal in a skillet!  Some lovely bread and we had a feast.

I love finding recipes used by my ancestors and others.  Just looking at this recipe gave me such a sense of the woman who used it.  Such love must have gone in to every dish, such planning.  This is what family love is all about!  Try something new – or old – today!

Bartholomew Wood – Patriot, Pioneer, Frontiersman, Farmer, Tavern Keeper

Anytime one hears the name ‘Pioneer’ cemetery it should be visited!  And the same can be said for the Pioneer Cemetery in Hopkinsville in Christian County.  A small park where many of the original citizens of Christian County are buried, it is nicely maintained and contains lots of history in one small area.  Today I would like to concentrate on Bartholomew and Martha Wood and their family.

This pioneer graveyard was used from 1812 to 1858.  Within this enclosure are buried 185 named persons, and many more unknown, all early settlers of Christian County.  The land for this cemetery was donated in 1812 by Bartholomew Wood, the first settler in Hopkinsvile.  He also donated land and timber for the first public buildings 1797.  He died in 1827 and was buried here.

Bartholomew Wood was the town founder – in 1796, frontiersman, a farmer, a tavern keeper in the town of Hopkinsville.  The Christian County Court House was built in 1797 upon land supplied by Bartholomew and with his lumber.  The town was originally known as Elizabeth in 1799, but was later changed to Hopkinsville in 1804.  Bartholomew Wood died here November 26, 1827.

A soldier in in the South Carolina Militia during the war, Bartholomew Wood was part of Colonel Robertson’s Regiment in 1779.

Martha Ann was the wife of Bartholomew Wood.  She was born in Virginia June 27, 1763, married in Jonesborough, North Carolina (now Tennessee) July 20, 1780, and died at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, November 9, 1846, outliving her husband by almost twenty years.

Children of Bartholomew and Martha Ann Wood were Elizabeth Wood Douglass, Mary (Polly) Wood Gist, Sarah (Sally) Wood Cornelius, Temperance (Tempy) Wood Roberts, Patsy Wood Millholland, Bartholomew T. Wood, Carter T. Wood, Curtis Davenport Wood, William J. Wood, Letitia Charlotte Wood and Hardin J. Wood.

Revolutionary War Veteran John Alexander – Will 1830

Cumberland County, Kentucky, was formed in 1798 from portions of Green County, and named for the Cumberland River.  It shares the border with Tennessee.  Cumberland County is actually larger than my home county of Mercer, but much smaller in population – about 22 people per square mile.  It is a lovely county, much farmland, and we found the small Alexander/Davis Cemetery just south of Hwy 90 on Hwy 100. 

Buried there is Revolutionary War veteran John Alexander and his family.  John was from Goochland County, Virginia, and was a captain in Lee’s Continental Troops.  John moved his family to Cumberland County about 1805.

John Alexander’s will was written in 1825, and he died five years later.  His wife, Lucy, died in 1815.  Eleven children and two grandsons were named in his will.  Given the amount of slaves he owned he must have been a wealthy man.  He died October 17, 1830.

Cumberland County Will Book B   Page 427-428

I, John Alexander, of the county of Cumberland and state of Kentucky, being weak in body but of a perfect and sound mind, do make this my last will and testament.  After my just debts being paid I do hereby dispose of all my worldly goods in the following manner.  To wit, I give to my son Thomas Alexander, two Negroes named Isaac and Polly.  I give to my son John M. Alexander, two Negroes named Jacob and Lewis.  I give to my daughter Sarah C. Barton, two Negroes named Agnes and Jarret, one feather bed and furniture and bedstead.  I give to my son Ingrum Alexander, one Negro man named Peter.  I give in trust to my son John M. Alexander and Reuben Alexander, for the use and benefit of my daughter Elizabeth Smith, one tract of land whereon she now lives containing one hundred and twenty-five acres, more or less, and two Negroes named Jim and Jack Jr., and one featherbed and furniture and one bedstead, and at the decease of Thomas Smith, and his present wife Elizabeth, the said land to be equally divided between his two sons, John M. Smith and Thomas Smith.  I give to my son Robert Alexander, two Negroes named David and Bayson.  I give to my daughter Obediance Gearheart, one Negro man named Jack, Sr., and thirty-five dollars in lieu of one feather bed and furniture.  I give to my son Reuben Alexander, one Negro man named Patrick, and that part of my tract of land whereon I now live, that lies on the upper or west side of the creek that divides the plantation, and my family Bible, and one fourth part of my stock of cattle and one third part of my stock of sheep and one third part of my stock of hogs, in quality.  I give to my son Joseph Alexander, one Negro man named Adam, one cow and calf now in his possession and two hundred dollars in the hands of J M P V R Alexander.  I give to my son Philip Alexander, one Negro man named Valentine and all that part of my tract of land that lies on the south end side of the creek that runs through the plantation whereon Robert Alexander formerly lived.  I give to my daughter Susanna Hall, one Negro woman named Suda, her two children, with all her future increase during her natural life, and at her death to be equally divided amongst the heirs of her body,

one cow and calf, and two ewes, or the value thereof, and two feather beds and furniture, now in her possession.  It is my will and desire that the Negroes hereafter to be devised should not be sold out of the family, and if there should be any money due from one legatee to another in the divisions, the money so coming from one legatee to another shall have the indulgence of the payment thereof eighteen months, and the balance of my estate that is not given away in this instrument of writing shall be equally divided so as to make all their proportions equal with what they have had, equally amongst the following named persons – Thomas Alexander, J. M. Alexander, Sarah C. Barton, Ingrum Alexander, Obediance Gearheart, Susan W. Hall.  It is my will and desire that all the within named legatees should be in harmony amongst themselves, but if any of them attempts to overset or destroy this my last will and testament, he or she or anyone for them, that legatee so attempting shall forever forfeit his or her legacies given them in the above instrument and the same shall be equally divided amongst those peaceful legatees.  I do hereby appoint John Wash, Sr., and James Baker and John M. Alexander to execute this my last will and testament in every part and particular thereof or any two of them, witness my hand this fifteenth day of February one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five.

John Alexander

Test. Isaac McBee, John Wash, Sr., Longston Pace

Kentucky, Cumberland County

I, Milton King, Clerk of the county court for said county, do certify that the foregoing last will and testament of John Alexander, deceased, was produced in open court at the November term, 1830, proven by the oaths of the two subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to record, and the same is truly copied of record in my office in Will Book B, Page 427.  Given under my hand this 6th of January 1831.

Milton King

John Alexander, Kentucky.  Sgt. Lee’s Legion, Continental Troops, Revolutionary War, October 17, 1830.  Alexander/Davis Cemetery, Cumberland County, Kentucky.