Tag Archives: Bourbon County Kentucky

Dr. Aquilla Talbott Obituary – Fayette County

Dr. Aquilla Talbott, December 17, 1838 – September 3, 1907.  Sallie J. Head, his wife, January 13, 1839 – August 2, 1909.  Lexington Cemetery, Fayette County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 4, 1907

Dr. Aquilla Talbott, one of the best-known physicians of Lexington, and an ex-Confederate soldier, died at his residence in this city at 6 o’clock this morning.  Dr. Talbott had been in bad health from a complication of kidney and stomach diseases for several months.  Yesterday afternoon he felt so ill that he went home about 1 o’clock and retired, hoping that he would feel better after a night’s rest.  he, however, grew gradually worse until he expired this morning.  Dr. Talbott was born in Bourbon County in 1838.  When he was seventeen years old the family moved to Franklin County, where he grew to manhood.  When Bragg’s army invaded Kentucky he joined Scott’s Louisiana cavalry and served with that organization until the close of the war.  In 1870 he came to Lexington and began the practice of medicine, in which he gained a wide acquaintance and popularity.

The funeral services will be held at the family residence tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock, the Rev. Preston Blake officiating.  The interment will be in the Lexington Cemetery.  The pallbearers will be as follows:  W. H. Snyder, Shelby Kinkead and Ben T. Head, of Lexington; J. S. Head, Jr., Ashland, Ky.; R. C. Head, of Louisville and Augustus Talbott of Paris, Ky.

The Frankfort Roundabout, Franklin County, Kentucky

Saturday, September 7, 1907

1786 Smith – Mosby Marriage – Bourbon County

Know all men by these presents, that we, Charles Smith Jr., and Daniel Mosby, of Bourbon County, are held and firmly bound unto Edmund Randolph, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and his successors, in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the which payment well and truly to be made to the said Randolph and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 26th day of December 1786.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, Clerk of the County Court of Bourbon, have this day issued a license for the marriage of the above bound Charles Smith, Jr., and Elizabeth Mosby of said county.  Now if there is no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage and no damage accrue by means of said license being issued, then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force, power and virtue.

Charles Smith, Jr., Daniel Mosby

Bourbon County Will of Thomas Champ

It appears this will was hastily written.  There is no flowery beginning about death being certain or mention of sound mind.  There is mention of Thomas Champ’s mother, Sarah, but although his wife is mentioned she is not named.  Four sons are listed, but no daughters.  Did he have daughters, or perhaps they received no legacy?

Will of Thomas Champ, Bourbon County, Kentucky, Will Book J, Pages 82-83

This my last will and testament made the twenty-fifth day of June 1832.  To all whom it may come ?  I leave to my eldest son, Robert, one hundred and twenty-seven and a half acres of land willed to him heretofore by his grandfather.

I also will to my son Thomas the plantation where my mother, Sarah Champ, now resides, at her death.  Those two pieces of land to be valued by two disinterested persons appointed by the County Court.

I also will to my wife one third of plantation and house where she now resides, all during her lifetime.  The balance of the property lands and Negroes to be

equally divided amongst my four sons, Robert, Thomas, George and Henry, after the price of Robert and Thomas’ land heretofore mentioned is deducted out of said remainder.

I also will all my just debts to be paid out of my personal estate.  I also wish my wife to finish the house in decent manner.

I wish to have George Hughes and George Redmon appointed executors to my estate.

To which I hereunto fix my hand and seal this 25 day of June eighteen hundred and thirty-two.

Thomas Champ

Teste. B. H. Hall, James H. Gentry

Commonwealth of Kentucky and County of Bourbon

I, Thomas P. Smith, Clerk of the County Court of said county, do certify that his last will and testament of Thomas Champ, deceased, was proven in open court by the oath of James H. Gentry, a subscribing witness thereto and sworn to by George Hughes and George Redmon, the Executors therein named and presented to be recorded.  Whereupon the same, with this certificate has been duly recorded in my office.  Given under my hand this third day of September 1832.

Thomas P. Smith, Clerk

Ravenscraft-Hinkson 1786 Marriage – Bourbon County

Know all men by these presents that we, Thomas Ravenscraft and Robert Hinkson, of the County of Bourbon, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Patrick Henry, Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the which payment well and truly to be made to the said Patrick Henry, Esquire, or his Successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, Executors and Administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this sixth day of September 1786.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas I, John Edwards, Clerk of the County Court of Bourbon, have this day issued a license for the marriage of the above bound Thomas Ravenscraft and Margaret Hinkson, of the county.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage and that no damage accrues by means of the said license being issued, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Thomas Ravenscraft, Robert Hinkson

September the 6th 1786

Sir, you will please to issue license for my daughter Peggy to be married to Thomas Ravenscraft, from yours, John Hinkson

Witnesses, Robert Hinkson, John Edwards

 

1788 Will of Francis Lucas Jacoby

Francis Lucas Jacoby, born in Germany, came to America about 1764 via England.  Married Frederica Lotspeich, a fellow passenger, in 1764 in London.  The family lived in Culpeper County, Virginia, during the Revolutionary War, in which Francis was part of the militia.  Moved to Kentucky after 1783.

Bourbon County, Kentucky – Will Book A, Pages 8-9

In the name of God, amen.  I, Francis Lucas Jacoby, of the County of Bourbon and State of Virginia, of sound sense and memory, do make, constitute and ordain this my last will and testament, and hereby revoke all and every will heretofore by me made or ordered to be made.  I first desire that all the debts which I justly owe to all men be faithfully paid agreed to contract.  I secondly dispose of my worldly property, both real and personal,in the following manner.  I leave in possession of my beloved wife, Frederica, during her real life, the plantation whereon I now live, with the appurtenances thereon for the purpose of raising my small children.

Item.  It is my will that my hereafter mentioned shall proceed to have all my personal estate, valued immediately after my death.  And after giving my wife her first choice of a part equal to that the estimate be equally made and that each of my following children as respectively come of age and choose shall of my Executor hereafter named the sum such valuation shall amount to provided that no such demand during the natural lifetime of my wife as it is my will that all the property she is to keep for the purpose of raising my small children, be continued in her possession, disposal at will.

Item.  It is my will and desire that my lands be equally as near as may be in value among all my children, viz., Katrina, Elizabeth,

Susanna, Ralph of ?, Frank, Henry, Frederick, Daniel, Betsey, Jacob, Rachel, John and Adam, and that after such division each legatee as they come of age may have full and free possession of such part as shall fall to their respective lot.  I further constitute and appoint as Executor, to this my will for the sole purpose of executing the true intent and meaning thereof, my beloved wife, Frederica, my trusty friends, John Grant and William Butler.  In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal this twenty-seventh day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight.

Francis Lucas Jacoby

Signed in the presence of John Hopper, Joe Mosby, Catherine Butler

At a Court held for Bourbon County at the Courthouse on Tuesday the 15th day of July 1788.

The last will and testament of Francis Lucas Jacoby, deceased, was proved by the oaths of John Hopper and Catherine Butler, witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.  And on the motion of Frederica Jacoby, named and appointed executrix in the last will and testament of Francis Lucas Jacoby, and also John Grant, gentleman, and William Butler, who were also named executors in said will, they having agreeable to law qualified as Executors of said Jacoby, deceased, and together with John Hopper, their security, entered into and acknowledged bond in the penalty of one thousand pounds.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining Probate thereof in due form.

Test. John Edwards, Cl. B. C.

1787 Will of Charles Allison of Bourbon County

Bourbon County, Kentucky Will Book A, Pages 5-6

In the name of God amen.  I, Charles Allison, of the County of Bourbon and State of Virginia, being in imperfect health but of sound memory and understanding, calling to mind the uncertainty of this transitory life, knowing it’s appointed unto all men to die and for settling my temporal affairs and directing the distribution of my worldly estate it hath pleased almighty God to bless and bestow upon me, I do make and ordain this my last will and testament, revoking all other will or wills, by me heretofore made, ratifying and confirming this to be my last will and testament in manner and form following, but principally and first of all recommending my soul to almighty God who gave it, hoping through the merits of my blessed redeemer, Jesus Christ, to find redemption of my former sins and wickedness.

Imprimis.  It is my will and desire that all just debts should be paid out of the moneys due me and if there should not be a sufficiency then and in that case so much of my personal estate may be sold at the discretion of my Executors hereafter named, as will make up the deficiency.

It is my will and desire, I do give and bequeath unto my beloved wife, Jane Allison, during her natural life, the plantation I now live on, together with the stock and farming utensils and at her decease, the land to be equally divided between my two sons, John and Alexander, giving unto John his choice of such division.  It’s my further desire that my said wife Jane do provide in such manner that after her

decease the stock belonging or then appertaining unto the estate may be equally divided among my children.  It’s my further desire that there shall be title made for two hundred acres of land as per agreement with Michael Hogg, that said land may be sold for stock – horse, cows and sheep – which said stock I desire may be equally divided among my children.  It’s my further desire that when a lawsuit depending now between myself and Colby Ship is determined that whatever money may arise to me therefrom may be applied to the purpose of perchance clothing necessaries for my wife and children at the discretion of my Executor, unless applied to the discharge of debts as above specified.

And I do constitute and appoint my beloved wife, Jane Allison, and my beloved son, John Allison, Executors to this my last will and testament, in testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand and seal this second of October in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven.

Charles Allison

In the presence of Benjamin Harrison, Mary Allison

At a Court held for Bourbon County at the Courthouse thereof on Tuesday the 8th day of December 1787

The last will and testament of Charles Allison, deceased was proved by the oaths of Benjamin Harrison and Mary Allison, witnesses thereto, and on the motion of Jane Allison, Executrix therein named was entered into and acknowledged bond in the penal sum of five hundred pounds, together with Benjamin Harrison, Esq., her security, and oath according to law.  Certificate is granted for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.

Test.  John Edwards, Cl. B. C.

Missourian with Kentucky Ties – Marriage and Death

The Washington Herald, Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, June 24, 1908

James W. Zevely Weds

Former Washingtonian Takes Miss Janie Clay as Bride

Mexico, Missouri, June 23 – Miss Janie Clay, the only daughter of Col. and Mrs. Green Clay, of Mexico, and James William Zevely, of Muskogee, Oklahoma, were married at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church here tonight.  The ceremony was performed by Rev. Leslie M. Potter, of Kirkwood, Missouri, and was witnessed by about 200 guests, many of whom were from other states.

Miss Clay is a tall, slender blonde of pronounced beautify, a graduate of an Eastern college, and an expert horsewoman.

She is a member of an old Southern family, and her father, Col. Green Clay, has served in the Missouri senate on two different occasions.

Mr. Zevely was special agent of Indian Affairs for the Interior Department under ex-Gov. Francis, and was reappointed.  He also served as Missouri State Librarian.  He is now a practicing attorney of Muskogee.

Among the guests were Samuel G. Blythe, of Washington, and Louis Seibold, of The New York World.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 22, 1912

A great number of newspapers in Oklahoma and the adjoining states have been boosting Col. J. W. Zevely, of this city, for the position of Secretary of the Interior.  Col. Zevely is a Missourian, but is by marriage a Kentuckian, having married, some four years ago, Miss Clay, daughter of Green Clay, from Paris, Kentucky, and Mexico, and a niece of Ezekiel Clay, one of the best-known men in the Bluegrass.

Mrs. Zevely and the Colonel spend much of their time in Kentucky, and Mrs. Zevely never lets a summer go by without making a visit to her Kentucky relatives.  As Miss Janie Clay she was as well known as any of the Kentucky girls, and was always counted as one of the ‘fair daughters of Bourbon County.’

Besides having married a Kentucky, Col. Zevely has been for years the law partner of James M. Givens, born and reared in western Kentucky, and is perhaps closer to him, personally and politically, than any man living.

William Clay Zevely, January 29, 1911 – May 7, 1922.  ‘A perfect soul asleep.’  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

The Washington Post, Washington, D.C.

Monday, May 8, 1922

Col. J. W. Zevely’s Son Dead

Funeral Tomorrow at Paris, Ky., Grandson of Senator Clay

William Clay Zevely, son of Col. J. W. Zevely, 2029 Connecticut Avenue, died yesterday at the Children’s Hospital, where he had undergone an operation for mastoiditis.  Col. And Mrs. Zevely will leave with the body at 4:35 this afternoon for Paris, Kentucky, where the funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.  Interment will be at Runnymede, the old homestead near Paris of Mrs. Zevely’s father, the late Senator Green Clay, of Mexico, Missouri.

The Zevely’s are both natives of Missouri, but they have homes at Muskogee, Oklahoma, and in Washington.

James William Zevely, October 8, 1861 – June 10, 1927.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, June 12, 1927

Buried In Paris

Attorney to Harry F. Sinclair Dies at Home in East Hampton, L. I.

New York, June 11 – Funeral services for Col. James W. Zevely, 66 years old, will be held at Paris, Kentucky, it was learned today.  Colonel Zevely, personal attorney to Harry F. Sinclair, died at his home in East Hampton, Long Island, last night.  Burial will be beside the body of his son, Billy, 10, who died three years ago.  Mrs. Zevely, a daughter, Miss Jane Clay Zevely, and Earl W. Sinclair were at his bedside when Colonel Zevely died.  Mr. Sinclair arrived after his death.

The body is to be placed aboard Mr. Sinclair’s private car, Sinco, and is to leave for New York City tonight.  The car is to leave Now York tomorrow morning for Kentucky.  Mrs. Zevely and her daughter, Harry F. Sinclair and his brother are to accompany the body to Paris.

Born in Linn, Missouri, he received his education in the public schools, the Christian Brothers’ College in St. Louis and the University of Virginia.  Following his graduation from the Virginia University he was appointed Missouri State Librarian.  He began his activity in politics in 1888, when he was elected secretary of the Missouri Democratic Committee.

Colonel Zevely was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Muskogee, Oklahoma, from 1902 until 1917.  From Oklahoma he went to Washington, later coming to New York.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Wednesday, April 18, 1928

Left Good Estate

Associated Press

New York, April 17 – Col. James W. Zevely, attorney from 1917 for the Sinclair Consolidated Oil Corporation and attorney for Harry F. Sinclair, who thought so much of the Colonel that he named the pride of his stables Zev, left

His entire estate when he died last June 10, to his wife and daughter.

Janie C. Zevely and Jane C. Zevely, who live at No. 1107 Fifth Avenue, share equally in the Zevely holdings, which may exceed $500,000, it was estimated yesterday.  Daniel F. Cohalan of No. 43 Cedar Street, attorney for Mrs. Zevely, was named executor in the will, drawn November 12, 1924, and filed for probate yesterday.

Col. Zevely entered the Teapot Dome spotlight when his ‘loan’ of $25,000 to Albert B. Fall, then Secretary of the Interior became public.  He died in his home at East Hampton, Long Island, and his body was transported in a special train under the guidance of his friend Sinclair to Paris, Kentucky, where burial took place beside the grave of a son, James W. Zevely.

Janie Clay Zevely, February 22, 1886 – October 16, 1976.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.