Tag Archives: Cemeteries

William M. Irvine Obituary

William M. Irvine, born June 1, 1825, died February 23, 1891.  Also his wife, Elizabeth S., born May 6, 1829, died November 25, 1920.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 25, 1891

William M. Irvine died in Richmond, Kentucky, on Monday afternoon, February 23rd, 1891, aged 65 years and 8 months.  The exact nature of his disease has not been announced by his physicians, but a marked decline in his physical condition had been noticeable for several months.  The funeral will take place in Richmond Cemetery tomorrow at 3 p.m.

William M. Irvine was born in Richmond June 1st, 1825, was educated at Transylvania, and took the junior law course in that school under the tutelage of Robertson, Wooley and Marshall.  He also studied law at Harvard, and obtained license to practice, but became interested in farming and declined to practice law.  Was elected cashier of the Farmers National Bank, which he left to organize the First National, then the Second National, acting as its President for a number of years, returning to the First.  Took an active part in the affairs of Central University and became a curator.  He was a successful financier and leaves a large fortune.  Was a consistent member of the First Presbyterian Church, and a progressive and valuable citizen and a Democrat.  Was a grandson of William Irvine, a native of Virginia, who was desperately wounded at the so-called Estill’s Defeat, 1782, carried from the field by Joe Proctor, and afterwards became a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1799, and the first County and Circuit Clerk of Madison County.  The deceased leaves no children, but his wife survives him.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 4, 1891

A Lesson In War

The writer will never forget his first meeting with Col. William M. Irvine, whose death occurred last week.  On the morning of the 31st of August 1862, the writer, a mere boy, left his home out in the country, and came to Richmond to see about the battle that was fought the day before between the Confederates under Kirby Smith, and the Federals under Nelson.  Coming across the country, we reached the battle-field near where the last stand was made.  At this moment, several citizens came up on horseback and paused a moment in conversation.  One of them, a fine-looking man with a pathetic cast of countenance, remarked: ‘Gentleman, something must be done.  There are several hundred dead men lying around here!’  This was a startling revelation to us.  We had seen pictures of battles in which a dozen or more fallen could be counted, but to think that we had come upon a scene of carnage where three or four hundred men lay dead and promiscuously scattered about, was, to say the least, startling.  But we took in the field from Richmond to Mt. Zion Church, and it was a day never-to-be-forgotten.  Upon inquiry, we learned that the gentleman who made the remark that gave us an idea of war, was Col. William M. Irvine, a man whose self-possession, dignity and consideration of others were marked characteristics.

Some Members of the Todd Family Interred in the Lexington Cemetery

Today I would like to share with you a few photos taken at the Lexington Cemetery in Fayette County, Kentucky.  These are members of the Todd family, beginning with David Todd and wife, Hannah Owen.

David Todd, born April 8, 1723, died February 3, 1785.

David Todd was born in Ireland in 1723.  He served as a private in the Pennsylvania State troops, 6th and 9th battalions, 4th and 5th Lancaster County PA militia, 1775-1780.  He died in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.

Hannah Owen, wife of David Todd, born June 3, 1729, died May 16, 1805.

David Todd married Hannah Owen in 1749.  She was born in 1729 and died in Lexington in 1805.

General Levi Todd, born October 4, 1756, died September 6, 1807.  ‘A youthful adventurer to Kentucky, and active in its defense in the most perilous times.’

General Levi Todd was the son of David Todd and Hannah Owen.  He first married Jane Briggs, in 1779.  After her death, in 1800, he married Jane Holmes.

Levi Todd was a defender of the fort at Harrodsburg; was in the battle of Blue Licks and aide to General George Rogers Clark.  He was born in Montgomery County, PA; died in Lexington, Kentucky.

Jane Briggs, wife of General Levi Todd, born June 3, 1761, died July 22, 1800.

Jane Holmes, wife of General Levi Todd, born August 7, 1770, died March 19, 1856.

James Clarke Todd, born August 9, 1802, died June 15, 1849.

James Clarke Todd was the son of Levi Todd and Jane Holmes.  He married Maria Blair August 6, 1829.  Before her death in 1834 they had two sons – Lyman Beecher Todd and Levi Holmes Todd (1834-1834).

Maria Blair, wife of James C. Todd, died March 8, 1834, aged 30 years; also, Levi Holmes, her infant son.

Lyman Beecher Todd, M.D.  April 1832 – May 1902.  In loving memory of a life that was a constant inspiration to truth and honor.

Lyman Beecher Todd was evidently a beloved human being.  When he died in 1902, The Kentucky Advocate, from Danville, Boyle County, gave the following information:

Dr. Lyman Beecher Todd, aged 70, senior physician of Lexington, died Tuesday night.  He was a first cousin of President Lincoln’s wife and was present both when Lincoln was short and at his deathbed.  He was a member of the Filson Club, of Louisville, and had in articles made valuable contributions to Kentucky history.  He was the former postmaster of this city.

Cornelia VanArsdall Obituary

Cornelia B. VanArsdall, August 27, 1861 – March 20, 1919.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, March 28, 1919

VANARSDALL

Thursday night, after several weeks of suffering from a complication of diseases, death laid his hand upon Miss Cornelia VanArsdall at her home on  College Street in this city. She had been for a long time a member of the Christian church and had lived faithfully according to the Master’s teaching. She was of a retiring disposition, a woman who loved her home and her friends, big hearted, hospitable and thoughtful of others, and she will be greatly missed by those nearest and dearest with whom she was content to spend her life. The funeral service was held at her home Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, conducted by her pastor, Rev. E. B. Bourland, assisted by Rev. M. S. Clark, of the Methodist church and she was laid to rest in the family lot in Spring Hill Cemetery beneath a wealth of flowers, sent by sympathetic friends of the family. None will miss her more sadly than the mother whom she leaves, whose constant companion she has been. The brothers and sisters who survive are Messrs. J. F., John I., Muscoe, E. Buford and D. P. VanArsdall, all of this city; Mrs. Thomas VanArsdall, Mrs. Abe Sharp and Mrs. Margaret Owens, of Wichita, Kansas; Mrs. J. B. Anderson, of Chanute, Kansas, and Miss Minnie VanArsdall, of this place.

 

Greathouse Cemetery in Hancock County

Isaac N. Greathouse, born November 18, 1792, died October 21, 1832.  Greathouse Family Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

The Greathouse family cemetery is located on Hwy 1957, also known as Lee Henderson Road, close to where it T’s with Hwy 1605.  It is very close to the Henderson family cemetery, and both are marked with a road sign – although the cemeteries are easily visible from the road.

Isaac Newman Greathouse was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, November 18, 1792.  He was the son of Harmon Greathouse and Marcia Buche (she was also called ‘Mercy’ and her last name has been written as Bukey).  Harmon and Mercy moved from Frederick County, Maryland, to Nelson County, Kentucky.

Elizabeth B., wife of Isaac N. Greathouse, born July 14, 1799, died April 4, 1879.

Isaac Newman Greathouse married Elizabeth Berkeley Lewis in 1818.  Elizabeth was the daughter of John Lewis and his cousin, Hannah Lewis.  Hannah’s parents were William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton (a sister to my Captain John Linton).

Original stone for Isaac Greathouse.  To the memory of Dr. I. N. Greathouse who departed this life October 21, 1832, aged 40 years.

Hannah Amanda Linton Greathouse was a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth.  She lived only fifteen years.

Hannah A. L. Greathouse, born April 15, 1821, died June 11, 1839.

William Linton Greathouse was a son of Isaac and Elizabeth.  He was born in 1832, either just before or after his father died.

William L. Greathouse, died July 16, 1901, aged 69 years.

Rodolphus B. Greathouse was a brother to Isaac Newman Greathouse.  He was born in 1801, probably in Nelson County, Kentucky.

In memory of Rodolphus B. Greathouse died 10 April 1838 in his 37th year.

Susannah E. Greathouse was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse.

Susannah E. Greathouse, died September 26, 1846, aged 21 years, 1 month and 18 days.

Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse had four other children for whom we do not have gravestone photos.  Son John L. Greathouse was born in 1819, and died two years later.  Harmon Bukey Greathouse was born in 1822 and died 1889.  Joseph Linton Greathouse was born 1828 and died 1891.  John Fletcher Greathouse was born in 1830; in the Hancock County death records he is listed as dying November 11, 1852, in Rolls County, Missouri, of typhoid fever.  I do not know if they brought his body back to Kentucky for burial.

These photos were taken in the rain – we will return one day for sunshine and blue skies and retake!

 

 

 

Gilbert Ratcliff Buried in Grove Hill Cemetery

Gilbert Ratcliff, Co. L, 11th U.S. Infantry, born August 22, 1890, killed November 10, 1918, in Argonne Forest, France.  Hill Grove Cemetery, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Gilbert Ratcliff was the youngest son of John Logan Ratcliff and Lucinda A. Sleadd, born August 22, 1890.  His parents were married in 1867.  Gilbert’s grandparents were William Sleadd and Sophie Vannatta.

In the 1900 census for Shelby County, Logan Ratcliff was 56, married for 33 years, and a farmer.  Lucinda was 52, a mother of 14 children, with 11 living.  The following children lived in the household – William, 28; Jessie, 21; Homer, 20; Newel, 17; Virginia, 15; and Gilbert, 9.

Gilbert’s draft registration card for World War I lists his home address as R.F.D. #3, Waddy, in Shelby County, Kentucky.  He was a natural born citizen, a farmer and worked for his father.  He was single.  Gilbert was medium tall, stout, with blue eyes and light hair.

How tragic that Gilbert died the day before the Armistice was signed.  How many lives were lost in that last day before the World War I ended?

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

Calien Crosby Family Buried at Grove Hill Cemetery in Shelbyville

Calien Crosby, 1806-1893.  Eliza Crosby, 1815-1908.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Calien Crosby and Eliza Mount were married on June 2, 1843, in Oldham County, Kentucky.  Calien was the son of John Uriel Crosby, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and Nancy Ashby Peters.  Eliza was the daughter of John Mount and Lydia Jennings.  The following license gives much pertinent information.

State of Kentucky

Oldham County Court Clerk’s Office

To any minister of the Gospel, or other person legally authorized to celebrate the rites of Matrimony –

You are hereby authorized to join together in the Holy bond of Matrimony, according to the usages and customs of your church, Mr. Calien Crosby and Miss Eliza Mount, of this county, daughter of John Mount, deceased, she being of lawful age.

The said Calien Crosby having executed Bond with security, in my office, according to law.

Witness my hand as Clerk of said Court, this 29th day of May 1843.

William D. Mitchell, per Brent Hopkins

In 1850 the couple and their children are residing in Shelby County, and that is where they remain for the rest of their lives.  In the 1850 census Calien is 43, a farmer, with parents born in Virginia.  Eliza is 32, her parents also born in Virginia.  Children Mary Frances, 5; Lydia A., 3; and John Mount, 2, are living in the household.  Calien’s parents live with the family, John, 93; and Nancy, 84.

John Uriel Crosby, as mentioned before, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, born in Fauquier County, Virginia, in 1755.  From The History of Shelby County Kentucky, by George L. Willis, Sr., it says that John Crosby and wife, Nancy, were among the thirteen charter members of the Antioch Church, located in Shelby County, about three and one-half miles north of Simpsonville.  John and Nancy are buried in what was called the Crosby Cemetery in that area.  Only two others are buried in this cemetery, son Gnoaeth Crosby, and Andrew Todd.

In the 1860 census there is an additional child, Charles Peters Crosby, who is 5.  In 1870 the two daughters have married, leaving John, 21; and Charles, 15; in the household.

In 1880 Charles, 24, remains with his parents.  Daughter Lydia A. Payne, 32, is also living with them, along with her children – Eliza, 10; Carrie, 8; Lulie, 6; and Robert C., 3.

John Mount Crosby died in 1891, leaving a young wife, Mary.  He is followed two years later by the death of Calien Crosby.

In his will, Calien Crosby left wife Eliza 150 acres and any other land remaining after the children receive their shares.  This included the home residence and outbuildings.  She was also to receive one third of all personal property in addition to 45 head of sheep, 25 head of hogs, 18 head of cattle and 4 head of horses and colts.

Daughter Mary Frances Crosby married Steven Henry McMakin.  She was to receive 101 acres of land to be used by the couple during their natural lives, then return to the original Crosby estate.

Daughter Lydia Payne and her children received 100 acres of land.

The heirs of son John Mount Crosby were to receive 64 acres of land.  This ‘in addition to what I have previously paid for him on his home tract makes him equal with my other children’.  The land will remain in the hands of the executors until the children come of age.

Son Charles Peters Crosby was to receive 115 acres of land, and will be able to purchase the land left to wife Eliza at a private sale after her death.

Son Charles, and son-in-law Steven McMakin, were named executors.  The will was written September 5, 1891, two years before he died.

It was previously mentioned that daughter Lydia, and her children, lived in her parents household during 1880.  She married Jilson H. Payne October 22, 1868.   In the 1910 census she is listed as divorced – perhaps the reason for living with her parents in earlier years.  In 1910 she is 63, living on her own income.  Daughter Eliza is 39, and is a dressmaker.  Son Robert, 32, and brother, Charles Peters Crosby, 54, are both farmers.

Lydia Crosby Payne died September 3, 1923, of tuberculosis.  She was 77 years of age.  Both parents are listed on the death certificate, as well as place of burial, Grove Hill Cemetery.  Son Robert Payne was the informant.  On the death certificate it says she was a widow.

The Crosby family is buried in a beautiful plot in Grove Hill Cemetery.  The trees are tall and old, their branches surrounding part of the gravestone.  Notice the smaller stones in back of the large one – those are for Lydia Crosby Payne, some of her children, and other members of the Crosby family.  With such shade they were too difficult to photograph.