Tag Archives: Cemeteries

James Marshall and Jennie Lee Rankins Buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery

James M. Rankins, 1844-1917.  Jennie Lee, his wife, 1854-1918.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Robertson County, Kentucky.

James M. Rankins was the son of Marshall Rankins and Mary Steel, born June 4, 1844, according to his gravestone, 1849 according to his death certificate.  He died September 25, 1917 of stroke.

Jennie Lee was the daughter of E. A. Lee and Mary Lee, born December 3, 1853, according to her death certificate, 1854 on her gravestone.  She died November 18, 1918, from diabetes.

In the 1860 census of Mason County James M. was 15 years of age, living with his parents, and three older brothers – John A., 23; Thomas J., 19; and George W., 17.  In the 1870 census of Fleming County, Jennie, 16, is living with her mother, Mary, 48, and sisters Sarah, 19; Emma, 14; and Mary, 8.  Her father, E. A. Lee, must have died about 1862/1863 – possibly during the Civil War?

James and Jennie married after the 1880 census was taken, since she still lived with her mother at that time.  From a short notice in the newspaper we can estimate that marriage in March of 1882.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, March 30, 1882

There are three children of the couple listed in census records – James L., Grover C., and Louise N.  In the 1900 census, when these three are listed with their parents, Jennie is listed as having five children, three living; the couple is shown as married 18 years.

In The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, of Monday, February 13, 1893, is a notice that ‘Morris, the four-weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Rankins, died Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock, of pneumonia, and was buried yesterday.  The parents have the sympathy of their friends in their loss.’  I found nothing about the fifth child.

In 1910, only James and Jennie are in the census records for Robertson County .

In one newspaper article I found James Rankins was noted as ‘Colonel’.  Was he in the Spanish-American War?  He would have been an extremely young colonel for the Civil War.

James drove what was known as a ‘bus line in Maysville.  In January of 1903 the icy roads were hazardous and he and his passengers narrowly escaped injury.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, January 12, 1903

He purchased Mr. C. T. Anderson’s interest in this line in 1895, and was then known as Trigg & Rankins.  In other articles I found that he owned a livery stable on Third Street, which he sold in 1885.  in 1886 he was Deputy Marshall.

In 1885 he and several others helped Charles Johnson, an ex-confederate, renting a house for Mr. Johnson and his family during their time of need.  Evidently James Rankins was very conscious of helping others, as well as being civic minded.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, November 21, 1885

James Rankins also carried the mail between Mt. Olivet and Maysville.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, February 15, 1904

In a 1906 article about his son Grover, he is also noted as Colonel.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, February 17, 1906

I could not find an obituary for James M. Rankins, but did find one for Jennie Lee Rankins.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, November 25, 1918

 

 

 

Two Counties, Six Cemeteries, Four Covered Bridges and a Battlefield

Yesterday was a glorious day in Kentucky.  A reprieve from the 90+ temperatures we’ve had in the last several weeks – and no rain!  The high managed to get to 82, the skies were a bright blue, grass and trees wonderful shades of green.  We left at 8:00 a.m.

Our goal was to visit Robertson and Fleming counties and take photos in several cemeteries each.  You know how much Ritchey loves geocaching.  There are four covered bridges in the two counties – those beautiful, historic structures that are slowly dwindling in our country – and they each had geocaches hidden in them!  They were added to the list.  And on the way home, we planned to visit Blue Licks Battlefield State Park – what some have called the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought in Kentucky on August 19, 1782.  The British and Indian forces slaughtered many of the Kentuckians.  I have posted several wills written by men from Mercer County that did not survive the battle.

We began at Piqua Methodist Church in Robertson County, a small, rural cemetery.  While there, the gentleman who takes care of the cemetery stopped by.  He showed me a list of those buried here, useful since many did not have gravestones, or have long since broken.  He related that the last person buried in this cemetery was his elementary school teacher, Gladys Shepherd, who passed away in 2004 at the age of 104.

Ritchey finding a geocache at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge in Robertson County.

Just about a mile north on Highway 165 was the small church and cemetery of Piqua Christian.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, just outside the town of the same name, was our last cemetery for this county.  On the way to neighboring Fleming County we stopped at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge, and Ritchey found his first geocache of the day.  Sitting in the middle of the bridge eating a chicken salad and croissant sandwich, the breeze was heavenly.  Butterflies were plentiful, and there was no noise, just an occasional moo or bird chirp.

Top stone – In Memory of Edward Dulin, Sen., Born in Virginia, August 6, 1769, and Died in Kentucky, September 25, 1830.  Lower stone – In Memory of George, twin son of John W. and Elizabeth D. Dulin, Born October 23, 1851, died July 30, 1852, age 9 months and 7 days.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

In Fleming County we visited Elizaville Cemetery, a lovely small town, only few miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery was quite impressive with its old stones.  I wanted to share this one with you today since it was so unusual.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen an old above ground stone with writing on the side.  There were at least ten or twelve in this cemetery.  Other beautifully carved stones were for cholera victims in 1833.

Goddard White Bridge

On to the three covered bridges in Fleming County – Goddard White, Grange City and Ringo Mills.  One more cemetery stop in this county – Mt. Pisgah on Oakwood Road.

It was about 6:00 p.m. and we still had one more stop – Blue Licks Battlefield – in Nicholas County.  I was so impressed with the granite monument that names those who fought and died in this battle.  After taking photos we had a picnic supper before starting home.  It was a full day but so much fun!  And think of all the great information I have to share with you!

Burials In Cloverport Cemetery – Breckinridge County

Mark Wedding, August 26, 1820 – February 25, 1894.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 28, 1894

An Old Resident Dead

Mr. Mark Wedding, seventy-two years of age, died of consumption at his home in this city at 1 o’clock p.m. Sunday, February 25.  His remains were interred in the Cloverport City Cemetery yesterday.

Mr. Wedding had been in bad health for some time, and his death was not a surprise to those who were acquainted with his condition.  He has been a respected citizen of Cloverport for many years and his death is regretted by many friends.  He raised a family of four sons, who are filling lucrative and honorable positions in other parts of the country.  He leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a good husband.

Dudley Hambleton, 1821-1898.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 28, 1898

Two Old Citizens Pay Nature’s Debt

Hon. Dudley Hambleton Passes Away

Represented Breckinridge Twice in the Legislature

Was a Consistent Member of the Baptist Church

Hon. Dudley Hambleton, a man who was loved by all who knew him, died early Tuesday morning.

For a week he has been hovering between life and death, and although his precarious condition was known to almost everyone in the county, the news of his final passing away came like a shock.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton has always been prominently identified with Cloverport.  He was born in this county, April 19, 1821.

He was married to Jane Watkins in November, 1843, and the following children were the result of the union:  James Hambleton, Samuel Hambleton, Mrs. Courtney Babbage, and Mrs. Martin S. Whitford, now living in England.

For many years Mr. Hambleton was regarded as a leading business man of Breckinridge County.  He practically bought all the tobacco that was brought to Cloverport for sale and was the largest buyer until the war came on.

At the close of the Civil War he purchased the A. A. Gordon farm at Holt’s paying $25,000 cash for it and engaged in farming.

He was always a man of affairs and stood high in the estimation of all who knew him.  He was twice elected to the legislature by the Democratic Party.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton was one of the best men Cloverport ever had.  During the days of his prosperity he was known as the young man’s friend and his purse was always ready to back some poor young fellow struggling for a foothold on the ladder to success.  He was charitable to a fault.

He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church, also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

His funeral took place today and was largely attended, the remains being interred according to the rites of Masonry.

Julius Hardin Has Been Laid to Rest

Was a Prominent Democratic Worker

A Man of Strong Convictions and Fine Character

By the death of Julius Hardin, Breckinridge County has been deprived of one of her most substantial citizens.

The deceased had been suffering for some time with a carbuncle on the back of his neck and his death was looked for daily for a week or more before the end came.

He passed away Friday, September 23rd, with hardly a struggle.

Julius Hardin was born in this county October 9, 1846.

He was a man of strong character and firm convictions.  He took an active interest in politics during his life and for years was regarded as one of the staunchest Democrats in the county.

While he was a hard worker for party success he never sought office or preferment of any kind.

He was honest, sincere and his agreeable personality won for him a host of warm friends.

He was a scion of the noted Hardin family, coming from the pioneer stock that settled Breckinridge County over a century ago.

The deceased leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place Saturday, the services being conducted by Rev. Sneed, of Hardinsburg, who preached a sermon eloquent in its sympathy for the bereaved wife and children and rich with its tributes to the character of the dead.

The remains were interred in the Cloverport Cemetery and were followed to their last resting place by one of the largest funeral corteges that has ever been seen in the city.

The News with the whole community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.

Peter Dhonau, born January 30, 1812, died September 13, 1899.  Mary Elizabeth Dhonau, born January 1, 1815, died March 27, 1896.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 20, 1899

Peter Dhonau

An Old Resident of the County Passes Away

Mr. Peter Dhonau, one of the county’s oldest citizens, died at his home near Balltown last Wednesday.  He had not been confined to his bed and death was due to the sudden giving away of his constitution.

Mr. Dhonau was born in Sobenheim, Prussia, January, 1813.  He came to this country in 1844, and located at Rome, Indiana, on a farm.  He continued farming until the year of 1869, when he moved to this part of Kentucky where he has resided ever since.

His most estimable wife departed this life in March, 1896, leaving eleven children to mourn her loss.  Two died in infancy, one at nine years and one at mature age.  Seven children are still living who are, Mrs. Michael Hamman, Mrs. Phillip Dick, Mrs. Charles Fuchs, Mrs. William Sanders, Miss Harriet Dhonau and William and Albert Dhonau.  There are twenty-seven grand-children and twelve great-grandchildren.

Mr. Dhonau was probably one of Breckenridge County’s most prosperous farmers, and was well liked by everyone.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  His remains were laid to rest in the cemetery near Rome, Indiana.  [Although this gravestone leads us to believe he was buried in Cloverport Cemetery.]

Joseph and Mary Jane Lillard Buried in New Providence Cemetery

Joseph Lillard, born June 27, 1827, died August 9, 1898.  New Providence Presbyterian Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, August 12, 1898

Mr. Joseph Lillard, an influential farmer of the McAfee neighborhood, died Tuesday night of a complication of diseases. Mr. Lillard was seventy-one years of age and was highly respected. He leaves a wife and several grown children. Funeral services were conducted at Providence church yesterday afternoon by his pastor, Rev. S. F. Taylor, and the interment took place in Providence Cemetery, a large number of his friends and neighbors attending.

Mary Jane, wife of Joseph R. Lillard, January 22, 1832 – August 16, 1910. 

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

 Friday, August 19, 1910

Mrs. Mary Jane Lillard, one of the most venerable and highly respected women of the county died Tuesday night at the home of her son, Mr. Will Lillard, near McAfee. She was seventy-nine years of age and the widow of the late Joseph Lillard. She was a lovable Christian character and had been for years a devoted member of New Providence church, where her funeral was held on Thursday morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by Rev. Harvey Glass, and the interment was in the adjacent cemetery. The deceased leaves three sons, all substantial and well-known citizens of this county. They are Messrs. William, James and David Lillard.

The Small Area of Ottenheim In Lincoln County

Hanging in the Lutheran Church – old photo of church, postcard from Ottenheim and old photo of the area.

A few years ago, Ritchey and I visited the small area of Ottenheim in Lincoln County.  At one time it was a bustling area with many immigrants from Germany and Switzerland.  It is now a very quiet place, very beautiful, with three churches and cemeteries within sight of each other.  Follow US 127 south of Stanford, take a left onto Hwy 643; this will take you to Ottenheim.

In the 1880’s, Jacob Ottenheimer, of New York, purchased land in Lincoln County, with the intention of drawing immigrants to this Kentucky, as well as Americans from outside the state.  There were originally over one hundred families from overseas.  The occupants of this small area worshiped at the Lutheran Church, the German Reform Church and St. Sylvester Catholic Church (the only church still having weekly worship).

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1886 Ottenheim, Kentucky.

The Lutheran Church was purchased by the historical society and is used for annual gatherings, weddings and other occasions.  Ritchey and I were fortunate to meet the caretaker of the church, who lived across the street.

He showed us inside the beautiful building, with many of its original features.  His relatives lie in the cemetery beside the church.

The Last Supper engraving above the altar is exactly the same as that which hung in my grandmother’s kitchen for as long as I can remember – and now hangs in my kitchen!

A portion of the Lutheran Church Cemetery.

The German church, originally known as the Dutch Reform Church, is no longer used.

Rosa Platzeck, March 17, 1902 – August 15, 1986.

The cemetery for the German, or Dutch, Reform Church, is very small.

St. Sylvester Catholic Church is still used for weekly Mass.

St. Sylvester Catholic Cemetery.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 15, 1911

In 1884, J. Ottenheimer, a German colonization agent, founded Ottenheim.  Here in the solitude of a forest primeval these hardy German pioneers carved out a home and farmlands and now are prosperous.  A nice little town of 109 souls is Ottenheim.  There are three churches, Catholic, Lutheran and Dutch Reformed, Father Leo, pastor of the first named, Rev. C. J. Mehrtens the pastor of the Lutheran church has the nicest library we have ever seen.  The Dutch Reformed has no pastor at present but hopes to get one soon.  Two very good stores here, John Wentzel and the store conducted by W. T. White.  Mr. White is conducting the public school, with an average attendance of fifty pupils, 100 being in the district.  A new addition has recently been built under the supervision of Mr. Wm. Landgraf, which will comfortably accommodate the increasing attendance.  This is one of the best districts in the county.  Mr. W. is teaching a good school and the patrons are satisfied.

A Morning At New Providence Presbyterian Cemetery In Mercer County

Yesterday was a perfect early summer day – I follow the meteorologist’s yearly calendar – summer starts June 1!  A perfect day for a visit to a cemetery.  Living in Mercer County gives the opportunity to visit many old cemeteries and we chose New Providence.  We’ve been there several times.  Almost all stones have been photographed, but one section was taken with the sun in the wrong position; we were there about four in the afternoon.  Ten o’clock is a perfect time for good photos, and that’s when we arrived.

Ritchey and Julian came with me today.  They ran around the cemetery five times – the three-year-old is quite a runner.  Nothing like getting rid of a little excess energy!  And I was left to get the best photos I could.  I share the following with you.

Samuel Bunton, born February 10, 1783, died October 22, 1858.

Rachel, wife of Samuel Bunton, born September 1, 1786, died July 9, 1859.

Mandy C., wife of J. B. Compton, born September 21, 1839, died February 1, 1862.  Our infant son Henry born December 23, 1861, died September 20, 1862.

Detail at top of stone.

A small stone added for the infant Henry.  Several in stones in a line had the grave with sides and a foot stone.

Henry P., son of J. B. and M. C. Compton, born December 23, 1861, died September 29, 1862.

Susan, wife of James H. Voorhies, born May 13, 1824, died December 8, 1862.  Notice the beautiful wreath of flowers at the top.

Shot of Susan Voorhies gravestone and foot stone.

Stephen Lyen’s stone has broken off and was leaning on the base.  Ritchey held it to take photos.

Stephen Lyen, born May 18, 1793, died May 31, 1863.

Nancy, wife of Stephen Lyen, born December 10, 1798, died May 4, 1863.  Husband and wife died within a month.  Did they contract a fever or pneumonia?  I doubt we’ll ever know.

 

Husband and Wife? Brother and Sister?

Samuel N. Caldwell, December 15, 1857 – February 9, 1922.  Bettie A. Caldwell, September 2, 1849 – November 22, 1918.  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

At first glance this gravestone looks like any other.  A couple with their births and dates; most would think it husband and wife.  I did – until I searched for obituaries for them.  Now we would all be forgiven for thinking that, but Samuel and Bettie are actually brother and sister – children of James Barnes and Sarah J. (Crawford) Caldwell – old bachelor and maid that lived their lives together – with two other siblings.  The single life just seems to run in some families – such as my Linton and Montgomery lines.  The point I would like to make today, check original sources.  So important.  But a little more about Samuel and Bettie.

James B. Caldwell, September 16, 1822 – February 12, 1911.  Sarah J. Caldwell, December 26, 1823 – June 9, 1903.

Bettie was the first born of her parents.  She is listed in the Marion County births, born June 17, 1853, in that county near Cartrites Church (probably Cartright).  I’ve not heard of this church, although there were early settlements on Cartwright’s Creek.  There could have been a church there at one time.  Samuel was the fifth child, born December 15, 1857.

Sarah J. Crawford was born in Marion County, her husband in Green County.  Before the 1870 census the couple and their family of seven moved to Boyle County, where they spent the remainder of their days.  A daughter, Maggie, is listed in the 1870 and 1880 census, but I could find no further information.  Daughter Kate married Wood Walker.  Daughter Harriet (Haggie in the census) lived at home.  Daughter Susan married a Newbolt.

After the deaths of their parents John Crawford, Samuel Nelson, Harriet and Bettie A., lived together, until their end days.  John Crawford Caldwell was the last to pass away, in 1938.

Harriet E. Caldwell, December 12, 1860 – May 27, 1912.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 28, 1912

Miss Harriet Caldwell died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, yesterday.  She was in the fifty-third year of her age.  The funeral will be at the residence at 4 o’clock this afternoon, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.  Deceased was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church and the funeral will be conducted by the pastor.  She is survived by three sisters and two brothers, Miss Bettie Caldwell, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt, Mrs. W. B. Walker, Mr. John C. Caldwell and Mr. S. N. Caldwell.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, November 22, 1918

Miss Bettie A. Caldwell died in a Lexington Hospital this morning.  The body will be brought to Danville and funeral services will be held at the grave in Bellevue Cemetery tomorrow (Saturday) at 2:30 p.m.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, February 10, 1922

The Advocate deeply regrets to chronicle the death of Mr. Samuel Nelson Caldwell, which occurred last night at 6 o’clock at the home of his brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Pike, where he had made his home for the past several years.  For a number of years the deceased was in the grocery business in Danville, where by his universal courteous treatment and square dealing he won for himself a host of staunch friends, all of whom will read of his demise with the deepest regret.  The funeral will be held at the home tomorrow morning on the Alum Springs Pike at eleven o’clock and will be conducted by the Rev. Frank J. Cheek, of this city, who has been a friend of the family since boyhood.  The deceased was a member of long standing of Old Caldwell Church and always lived up to the Presbyterian faith.  He was in his sixty-fourth year and had lived all of his splendid life in this county, where he was born.  He is survived by one brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, and two sisters, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt and Mrs. W. D. Walker, both of whom live in this county.  After the funeral ceremony the burial will follow in Bellevue Cemetery.

Sue C. Newbolt, June 17, 1863 – July 1, 1933.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Monday, July 3, 1933

Mrs. Newbolt Is Taken By Death

Mrs. Sue C. Newbolt, 80 years old, died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, at 8 o’clock Saturday night after an illness of some duration, brought on by advanced years.

Funeral services were held at 10 o’clock this morning by Dr. George E. Sweazey, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery here.  Casketbearers were:  Sam C. Walker, George l. Mahan, Ben Clark, Will Caldwell, S. H. Nichols, Ned Wiseman.

Mrs. Newbolt, who was a member of an old and distinguished Boyle County family, is survived by one brother, Mr. Caldwell, and one sister, Mrs. W. D. Walker, of Perryville.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, December 16, 1938

John C. Caldwell Is Buried Today

Funeral services for John Crawford Caldwell, 87 years old, former Danville merchant and Boyle County farmer, who died at 1:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Danville and Boyle County hospital, were conducted at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon in the chapel of Stith Funeral home on West Main Street by Dr. William E. Phifer, Jr., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.

The deceased was in the dry goods and notion business in Danville under the firm name of Roberts and Caldwell.  both gentlemen were held in highest esteem in this city by all who did business with their house, which was that now occupied by Dr. M. D. Spoonamore, local druggist.

Bearers were:  Ben Clark, William Caldwell, J. B. Nichols, Sr., Nicholas McDowell, Joseph Irvine and Charles Caldwell.

Mr. Caldwell was born November 27, 1851, in Boyle County, the son of the late James Barnes Caldwell and Sarah Jane Crawford Caldwell of Marion County.  He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Danville.

Surviving are two nieces and two nephews, Miss Maude W. Adams, Amityville, R.I., Mrs. J. W. Craft, Hazard, Kentucky, James B. Walker, Flint, Michigan, and J. C. Brown, Atlanta, Georgia, and one great-nephew, Marshall Mahan of Wheelwright, Kentucky.