Tag Archives: Cemeteries

Final Resting Place of R. T. Thornton

My posts have been meager the past few days – it is a busy time.  Our living room, kitchen, entry, hall and office were painted last week.   The office consists of three walls of bookcases – filled with books.  All those books were packed in totes, stacked in other rooms – books were everywhere!  Now I’m in the process of putting them back on the shelves – at least this has given me an excuse to sort!  More in-depth posts will hopefully come later in the week – or whenever the house is in order again!

R. T. Thornton, Standard Bearer in the 6th Reg. KY Volunteers, born October 10, 1811, fell at the Battle of Shiloh, April 7, 1862.  Versailles Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

A Visit to St. Francis de Sales Catholic Cemetery in Scott County

Saturday Ritchey and I visited the beautiful St. Francis de Sales Catholic Cemetery in Scott County, Kentucky.  It was an absolutely beautiful day, as you can see from the photos – deep blue skies, white fluffy clouds and lots of sunshine, but a moderate temperature of about 80 degrees.

The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Doesn’t that sound amazing in today’s world?  This is the oldest parish in the Covington Diocese, and was a pioneer mission for East Kentucky.  The parish, second oldest in the state, was formed by Maryland settlers who arrived in 1786; the first church was built about 1794.

The cemetery is across the road from the church – small, but very beautiful.  Trees and several benches give visitors the chance to sit and enjoy the cool breeze while contemplating all those who have gone before.

I was amazed at how old the stones are – there are several Revolutionary War soldiers buried here.  I share with you today seven gravestones representing some of the oldest people buried in this cemetery.

Sacred to the memory of Bennett Greenwell, born December 7, 1761, died July 12, 1838, aged 77 years.  Revolutionary War soldier.

Sacred to the memory of Allouisa Gough Greenwell, consort of Bennett Greenwell, born November 28, 1784, died May 8, 1842, aged 58 years.

In memory of Mrs. Matilda Combs, consort of James Combs, born 28th January 1788, and departed this life 8th February 1839, aged 51 years and 11 days.

James Combs, born August 7, 1772, died April 13, 1852.

Sacred to the memory of John B. Gough, who was born February 29th, 1767, and departed this life February 19th, 1839, aged 72 years.

Sacred in memory of James Twyman, born June 17, 1761, died February 22, 1834, aged 73 years.  Revolutionary War soldier, orderly, sergeant, guard and Indian spy, Virginia.

Elizabeth Jenkins, born June 25, 1785, died November 9, 1862, aged 77 years.

George Brown and Anne Hemphill Buried In Maple Grove Cemetery

George Brown, February 28, 1819 – October 30, 1897, aged 78 years, 8 months.  Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

from The History of Jessamine County, Kentucky, Young, 1898

George Brown was born in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, February 28, 1819, and died October 30, 1897.  He first attended school at St. Joseph’s, Bardstown, Kentucky, afterward at Centre College, Danville, and finally at Transylvania University in Lexington.  Upon leaving college he at once engaged in the business of the manufacture of hemp.  His father had been one of the pioneers in hemp manufacture in Lexington and the son acquired a practical knowledge of the business early in life.  Owning a large number of slaves, which he used in his business, he made it extremely profitable and he continued in the manufacture of hemp for many years.  In the fall of 1853 he moved to a farm on Jessamine Creek, about two miles from Nicholasville, and in conjunction with his farm operated a hemp manufactory.  He married Anne M. Hemphill in 1843, who proved to him an affectionate, faithful and helpful wife.  She was one of the model housekeepers of Jessamine County and as neighbor and friend had no superior.

Mr. Brown was a man of intense activity; domestic in his taste, he loved his home and added to it those things which made it attractive.  He was a model husband and father.  When twenty-two years of age, he united with the Nicholasville Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which he continued to the end of his life, and at his death he was the oldest living member of the organization.  He was converted under the preaching of Rev. David Todd.  He was efficient and earnest in his Christian work and was always one of the liberal and helpful members of the congregation.  He was a pure, good man; long president of the Jessamine County Bible Society, he was not only active but useful in the Bible work and has left behind him no enemies and host of friends.

While in Maple Grove Cemetery in Nicholasville, earlier this year, we came across the beautiful stone for Anne Hemphill Brown.  This is one of the most beautiful stones I’ve encountered. 

Buried between her husband, and son, Victor, the carving of the image of the woman is amazing.  The flowers, lace, details of the dress and cross she wears around her neck is extremely vivid and clear.

In memory of Anne M. Hemphill, wife of George Brown, June 9, 1826 – March 29, 1888.  ‘A kind and true wife, a dear and fond mother and a faithful friend.  We cherish her memory.’

The love and regard held for Anne is definitely evident in the carving on the front of the stone.  The sentiment on the back of the stone just reinforces this.

Carother’s Infants Buried In Old Presbyterian Cemetery In Nelson County

Emmelene, daughter of J & R Carothers, born August 18, 1841, died October 30, 1845.  Old Presbyterian Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Sunday Ritchey and I were out early for a day in the cemeteries of Nelson County.  We went to early Mass, had a glorious pancake breakfast at Cracker Barrel, and were in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery in Bardstown by 11:00.  We also visited Pioneer Cemetery and the old Presbyterian Cemetery – also in Bardstown.

Our last stop was the Presbyterian Cemetery, just a small lot with the remains of about fifty people.  Today I want to share a beautiful stone dedicated to two infants – Emmelene and Joseph Lewis Carothers.  Since many of the stones in the cemetery are very faded and unreadable, this one stands out both in clarity and color.

Joseph Lewis, son of J & R Carothers, born March 25, 1845, died June 26, 1845.

As there are no other Carothers in this cemetery, at least of the readable stones, research gave us more information about this family.  A DAR lineage for a woman in Bardstown listed James Carothers (1738-1826), who served as a private in the 2nd battalion of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in the the militia in 1781.  He was born in Scotland and died in Huntington County, Pennsylvania.  His son James Carothers married Nancy Neely.  Their son, Samuel Carothers, married Ann Simmerman.  Their son, James Carothers, married Rebecca Massie.  Their son, William Burke Carothers, married Sue Yager.

In the 1850 Census of Nelson County, James Carothers, 51, is listed as a bridge builder, born in Pennsylvania.  Wife Rebecca, 36, was also born in Pennsylvania, as well as the oldest daughter, Hannah, 16.  Three other children were born in Kentucky, A. R., 11; William B., 7; and Josephine B., 4.  Of course there is no listing for the two infants who died in 1843 and 1845.

This is the last census record for James Carothers, since he died in 1851.

The will of James Carothers is in Will Book 6, Page 553, of the Nelson County Clerk’s Office. 

In the name of God, Amen.  I, James Carothers, being persuaded in my own mind that it would redound to the interest of my wife and children to make a disposition of my property, do make, publish and declare the following as my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others made by me.

It is my will that all my just debts be paid and after they are paid off I desire my wife to have the use of all my estate so long as she remains my widow, with power to sell and convey any of my property to pay debts or to reinvest in other property or to use for her support and that of her family of children.  Should she marry than I desire that my property to be disposed according to law of the state.  I desire my boys to be put to trades so soon as they arrive at proper age.

I constitute and appoint  my wife sole executrix to carry out this will.  Witness my hand this 19 day of May 1851.

                                                          James Carothers

Attest.  P. B. Muir, J. Wood Wilson

A writing purporting to be the last will and testament of James Carothers, deceased, was produced in Court and duly proven by the oaths of Peter B. Muir and J. Wood Wilson, subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

                Att. J. Danosin Elliott, Clerk, N.C.C.

In the 1860 Census of Nelson County, Rebecca Carothers, 45, born in Pennsylvania, with children William B., 17, and Josephine, 14.  In the 1870 census Rebecca, 59, is living alone; she lived until 1890.

The death of two infants within two years was a terrible tragedy – unfortunately one endured by many parents during the 1800’s.  The love for these children is evident in the beautiful stone erected in their honor – and the beautiful verse written on it.

So fades the lovely blooming flower, Frail smiling solace of an hour.  So soon our transient comforts fly, And pleasure only blooms to die.

Sweet flower, transplanted to a clime, Where never come the blight of time.  Sweet voice which hath joined the hymn of the undying seraphim.

Young wanderer who hath reached thy rest, With everlasting glory blest.  Thy little bark in life’s dark sea, Has anchored in eternity.

Oh who would not thy brief career, With lamentation’s selfish tear.  Or who would stay thy upward flight, To the bright realms of perfect light.

Come gentle patience smile on pain, Till dying Hope shall live again.  Hope wipes the tear from sorrows eye, And faith points upward to the sky.

Gravestones From St. Charles Catholic Cemetery In Marion County

St. Charles, located at St. Mary in Marion County, Kentucky, was my home parish for many years before my marriage.  To tell you the truth, I didn’t realize the amount of history there at the time – isn’t that the way?  Today I share nine photos of gravestones from this cemetery.

Mother – M. Harriet Hamilton, 1857-1901.  Resting in Peace.

Richard Bowman, October 22, 1915 – September 27, 1918.  ‘A precious one from us has gone, A voice we love is stilled.  A place is vacant in our home, Which never can be filled.  Mama’s Babe.’

W. B. Higdon, 1842-1923.  Emma O’Bryan, his wife, 1847-1933.

Andrew Jackson Mudd, born June 9, 1815, died October 11, 1883.  ‘The just shall be everlasting remembrance.’

S. A. Buckman, relict of B. Spalding, wife of A. J. Mudd, born March 12, 1827, died September 15, 1873.

Cynthia Ann, wife of C. Cissell, born June 15, 1825, died January 7, 1872.

Mahala A., wife of G. L. Hamilton, born May 15, 1824, died September 2, 1876.  ‘Bereft of thee, mother dear, Thy grave will be a holy spot.  But still we’ll think that thou art near, For thou art not to be forgot.’

William Logsdon, 1799-1880.  Alice Logsdon, 1818-1903.

John Lancaster, born in Charles County, Maryland, January 27, 1766, died April 24, 1838.  Catherine Lancaster, born March 29, 1773, died June 29, 1847.

New CD – Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery List and Photos

Click to purchase using Paypal.

This is the CD I promised from last week.  Included on this CD are 856 names, 740 photos. Included is an alphabetical listing of those buried at Pleasant Grove, Washington County, Kentucky, including birth and death dates, and sometimes additional information.  Just click on the number in the photo column and the photo will pop up.  Adding those hyperlinks took forever!  But I hope you will enjoy and that it will be very useful.  I have been told that my cemetery photos have been used to verify information for DAR applications!

Dexter Mausoleum in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati

While in Cincinnati last month, Ritchey and I visited the beautiful Spring Grove Cemetery.  It was established in 1845, and contains 733 acres of beautiful trees, lakes and walkways.  One could spend days, walking around, looking not only at the gravestones, but the natural habitat as well.

Today I want to share with you photos of the Dexter Mausoleum.  It is so huge that many people mistake it for a chapel.  Designed by the architect James Keys Wilson in the late 1860’s for the Edmund Dexter family, it was not finished until 1870.  The inspiration was the beautiful Sainte-Chapelle in Paris – particularly the sides with the flying buttresses.  The mausoleum cost $100,000 to build in the 1860’s.  Can you imagine what the cost would be today?

Edmund Dexter was born in England in 1801 and came to the United States at an early age.  In the 1820’s he moved to Cincinnati, and in 1829 married Mary Ann Dellinger of New York.  The couple had five sons – Charles, Edmund, George, Julius and Adolphus.  Edmund was a whisky baron and an extremely wealthy man.  His will lists shares of stock in all the important Cincinnati companies.  Mary Ann Dexter died in 1875.Kentucky

About twenty family members are buried in the crypt of the mausoleum.