Tag Archives: Eastman Kodak

Delightful Photographs

Our first photo today is a mother and daughter.  Isn’t the little girl sweet?  With her large bow and necklace she is ready to be photographed.  Her mother has the beautiful upswept hair that I love!  This is a postcard photo.  The AZO stamp on the card tells us it was made by Eastman Kodak between 1904 and 1918.

Our second photo is also a postcard, but has been trimmed to fit in a frame.  Do you think the little boys are twins?  They’re certainly adorable!  And the wee one in the old pram!  On back I see that it was sent to Mrs. Charles ? in Lansing Michigan.  The postmark is Hammond, Indiana, June 10, 1915, and the scrap of message I can read says they are coming Sunday the 13th.

In the late 1890’s this diamond shaped photo was very popular.  I think it must have been difficult to frame or put in a photo album!  This handsome gent looks very dashing.  On back we find this photo was taken by H. Mueller, No. 1129 Vine St., below 12th, Cincinnati, Ohio.  You could purchase a life-size photo and 1 dozen cabinets for $3.75!

Our last photo is of a lovely woman who looks ready for a dance!  She is Mrs. J. F. Porter – so rare to have a name!  Her lovely shoulders are shown off by the black lace and ruffles of her gown.  This photo was taken by Roshon’s Studio, 832 Broad St., Augusta, Georgia.

Adorable Stairsteps

I have the cutest photo to share with you today!  Fourteen children evidently born one just after the other!  Can you imagine all those little boots lined up at night!  The oldest is possibly fifteen or sixteen – the others are stairsteps down the line to the infant held by one of the girls.  All the older children are girls – it is always harder to tell with the little ones since they were usually dressed the same from about three or four and younger.  Do you think their mother made their clothes?

This is a postcard photo.  On back, in the area where it says ‘Place stamp here’, in the corners around it are four triangles, face up, with AZO in lettering, on each side, between the triangles.  This actually tells the postcard stock used.  This particular paper was from Eastman Kodak, and was used for 1904-1918.

What a wonderful glimpse of a bygone era!