Tag Archives: J. T. Hamilton

Before The War

This was a newspaper column published in The Springfield Sun in 1926.

Before The War was a newspaper column devoted to gleanings from the lives of citizens of Springfield and Washington County before the War Between the States.

Editor’s Note:  This column will appear as a weekly Sun feature.  Our readers are invited to send copies of old letters, newspaper clippings, or data of historical nature for publication.  The only requirement is that all material sent must apply to events in the lives of citizens of Springfield or Washington County previous to the War Between the States, which began in 1861.

Pottsville Ahoy!

The following advertisement appeared in the Lebanon (KY) Post.  Issue of March 22, 1854:  Notice – The undersigned will at the May term of the Washington County Court move said Court to establish a town on the land where Pottsville is now situated, in Washington County, as shown by a survey and plat now filed in the County Clerk’s office of Washington County, and shall ask the appointment of Trustees, etc.  The boundary of the town will be seen by reference to plat.  This 20th day of February 1854 – William Burns, Johnson Stumph, Samuel Burns, William Spraggins, William Thurman, Henry Pope, Spence & Hord, J. W. Pope, James Burns, R. Jones, George Campbell, M. Martin, William Worshaw.

Time Have Speeded [sic] Up

In 1854 it took two days to get a letter from Springfield to Louisville, and three days from Lebanon to Louisville.  Starting a letter from Lebanon on Monday 12 12 o’clock, it would reach Springfield at 2, where it remained until the next day until 3, at which hour it would move on to Bardstown, and arrive there at 6.  At 10 p.m. it would leave there and arrive in Louisville at 6 o’clock on Wednesday morning.  This schedule, of course, depended upon good time and no delays.

Fire At James Clements

The farm house of James Clements, situated two miles from Springfield, was burned to the ground Sunday morning, April 9, 1854.  The family were absent at church, and when they returned in the evening, they found their dwelling house a heap of smoldering ruin.  It was believed that a hired servant, who had been left in charge, set it on fire.  This was, truly, an unfortunate circumstance as Mr. Clements, a few months before, had let to the altar a fair bride.

Small Child Burned

A small child of Mr. C. Cunningham, of Springfield, got badly scalded on Monday, April 17, 1854, by the overturning of a kettle of boiling water in its lap.  Instant medical care was given the little tot and it was soon out of danger.

Cholera In Springfield

This dread disease raged in Springfield in 1854, and there were ten or more deaths reported by the middle of June.  Citizens were frantic, and many deserted the place.  Warnings to be careful of their diet were issued to the town’s residents.  Cherries and other unhealthy fruit, as well as unripe vegetables, were to be shunned as one would poison.

Died

At his residence in Washington County on Tuesday, the 15th of August 1854, Mr. J. T. Hamilton, after a long and painful illness.  He was a member of the Catholic Church.

Heavy Rain

There was a very heavy rain in the neighborhood of Springfield on Tuesday evening, September 19, 1854.  Old timers could not remember when the community had before been visited by such a veritable cloud burst.  The creeks and branches ran in torrents, even sweeping away fences in places.

Prominent Lawyer Dies

George C. Thurman, Esq., departed this life at 9 o’clock Saturday, September 30, 1854, at his home in Springfield.  He was an excellent lawyer, and a clever, warm-hearted gentleman.  He was attacked by an immense carbuncle between his shoulders, but a week or so before he died, which defied all the acknowledged medical skill which was called to his beside.

Taken from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Cook.