Tag Archives: Nicholasville Kentucky

William H. Hoover and Sallie Evans Hoover Obituaries

William H. Hoover, 1821-1906.  Sallie E. Hoover, 1841-1914.  William H. Hoover, 1858-1929.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 22, 1906

Wealthy Farmer Dead

Nicholasville, Kentucky, Nov. 21 – The funeral services of William H. Hoover, Sr., were held at 10 o’clock this morning at the residence in the county.  Rev. E. G. B. Mann, of Lexington, Rev. F. M. Fuqua, of the Centenary Methodist Church, and Dr. E. W. McCorkle officiated.  Mr. Hoover was eighty-five years old and was a wealthy farmer.  His wife and two sons, Judge E. B. Hoover and William H. Hoover, Jr., survive him.

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle and Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

William H. Hoover is the son of Peter Hoover, who was of German descent and born near Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1789, immigrated to Kentucky with his parents in 1800 and settled in Jessamine County just west of Nicholasville.  In 1811 he married Miss Eva Nave, removed to the southern portion of the county, and settled in what was then a wilderness, on Hickman Creek.  About this time he was drafted in the War of 1812, which was soon ended.  He resided nearly three-quarters of a century at this same place, making for himself a good name for all that was honorable, truthful and upright, and accumulated a considerable fortune for his children.  He died in 1872, a true and honored member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Eva Nave Hoover, the mother of William H. Hoover, was a native of Estill County, Kentucky, born in 1790, and like her husband lived to a ripe old age, dying in 1876, having made for herself a character for purity and sweetness of disposition seldom equaled.

William H. Hoover is the fourth of eight children, and was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, August 17, 1821.  He spent his youth and early manhood as a teamster, driving a train of wagons from Nicholasville to Louisville, Kentucky, and in assisting his father in partially subduing the great forest that surrounded them.  For many years he had charge of his father’s saw and grist-mill.  When a young man he became a member of the Masonic order and rapidly rose to the high positions of that fraternity, of which he is still a worthy member.  His opportunities for receiving an education were exceedingly limited, there being practically no schools in this then sparsely settled district of Kentucky.  But, being a practical and industrious man, he made the best of his opportunities and gathered knowledge by observation and experience, and today he is a man of good practical education.  He has always been a Democrat in politics, and for more than thirty years a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He has accumulated a nice estate, given his two children good education and a nice start in life, and is now taking his old age quietly and pleasantly on his beautiful blue-grass farm, near his children and grandchildren.

He married Miss Sarah J. Evans, of Garrard County, Kentucky, November 26, 1857.  She was the daughter of Dr. Hezekiah and Nancy (Cole) Evans, and born November 18, 1841.  Her father was assassinated in 1862 on account of his strong Southern sympathy, near his home in Garrard County; her mother died in 1882, aged about seventy years.  To William H. Hoover and wife were born three children: William H. Hoover, Jr., the first, was born September 5, 1858, and received his early training at the district schools, Bethel Academy, Nicholasville, Kentucky, and at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, where he entered in 1877 and remained until he completed his education; he then returned to his father’s farm, where he assumed control until November 10, 1885, when he married Miss Mattie R. Vince, of Jessamine County; he then removed to his own farm adjoining that of his father, where he is now farming and breeding thoroughbred and trotting horses.  Thomas D. Hoover, the second son, was born in 1859, and died in infancy; Everett B. Hoover, the third and youngest child, was born October 21, 1860, and like his brother received his early education in the free schools and at Bethel Academy; in 1877 he entered the Wesleyan College at Millersburg, Kentucky, where he remained until 1879; then entered Vanderbilt University, where he took a special course of study, preparatory to studying law.  In 1880 he entered the Columbia College Law School, New York City, where he remained two years, taking the full law course, graduating in June 1882.  He at once returned to his home and received his license to practice law in August 1882, and has been a continued practitioner ever since.  He married Miss Ella Burnett, of Boyle County, Kentucky, November 21, 1882.  To this union was born Elizabeth Hoover, the first grandchild of William H. Hoover, January 31, 1884.  In April 1886, Everett B. Hoover was elected judge of the city court of Nicholasville, Kentucky, and was re-elected the following year, of which office he is the present incumbent.

The Central Record, Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 2, 1914

Well Known In This County

Mrs. Sallie Hoover died at her home in Jessamine County on last Saturday.  Her death was an unexpected blow to her friends and relatives, as she had been in her usual good health.  She is the mother of Hon. Everett Hoover, the well-known Jessamine County politician.  She was a sister of Dr. Elijah Evans of Lancaster, and was ell known in Garrard County.  She was a most estimable lady.

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

George Brown and Anne Hemphill Buried In Maple Grove Cemetery

George Brown, February 28, 1819 – October 30, 1897, aged 78 years, 8 months.  Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

from The History of Jessamine County, Kentucky, Young, 1898

George Brown was born in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, February 28, 1819, and died October 30, 1897.  He first attended school at St. Joseph’s, Bardstown, Kentucky, afterward at Centre College, Danville, and finally at Transylvania University in Lexington.  Upon leaving college he at once engaged in the business of the manufacture of hemp.  His father had been one of the pioneers in hemp manufacture in Lexington and the son acquired a practical knowledge of the business early in life.  Owning a large number of slaves, which he used in his business, he made it extremely profitable and he continued in the manufacture of hemp for many years.  In the fall of 1853 he moved to a farm on Jessamine Creek, about two miles from Nicholasville, and in conjunction with his farm operated a hemp manufactory.  He married Anne M. Hemphill in 1843, who proved to him an affectionate, faithful and helpful wife.  She was one of the model housekeepers of Jessamine County and as neighbor and friend had no superior.

Mr. Brown was a man of intense activity; domestic in his taste, he loved his home and added to it those things which made it attractive.  He was a model husband and father.  When twenty-two years of age, he united with the Nicholasville Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which he continued to the end of his life, and at his death he was the oldest living member of the organization.  He was converted under the preaching of Rev. David Todd.  He was efficient and earnest in his Christian work and was always one of the liberal and helpful members of the congregation.  He was a pure, good man; long president of the Jessamine County Bible Society, he was not only active but useful in the Bible work and has left behind him no enemies and host of friends.

While in Maple Grove Cemetery in Nicholasville, earlier this year, we came across the beautiful stone for Anne Hemphill Brown.  This is one of the most beautiful stones I’ve encountered. 

Buried between her husband, and son, Victor, the carving of the image of the woman is amazing.  The flowers, lace, details of the dress and cross she wears around her neck is extremely vivid and clear.

In memory of Anne M. Hemphill, wife of George Brown, June 9, 1826 – March 29, 1888.  ‘A kind and true wife, a dear and fond mother and a faithful friend.  We cherish her memory.’

The love and regard held for Anne is definitely evident in the carving on the front of the stone.  The sentiment on the back of the stone just reinforces this.

1799 Sagacer/Bruner Marriage

The following marriage bond is from Jessamine County, Kentucky.  At the courthouse in Nicholasville all early marriage records have been scanned and can be brought up on the computer a moment’s notice.  Unfortunately this one was not lying flat – there is a crease at the bride’s first name!  It looks like Hetty, but I cannot be sure.  Evidently it was her brother or father that was the bondsman.  Within the bond he is listed as Henry Bruner, but when he signed at the bottom it doesn’t look exactly like Henry – and notice the word Dutch in parenthesis.

scan029Know all men by these presents that we Frederick Sagacer and Henry Bruner are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esq., Governor of Kentucky, and his successors in the sum of fifty pounds to which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs and firmly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our hands and dated this 28th of September 1799.  The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Frederick Sagacer and Hetty(?) Bruner.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then the above obligation to remain in full force and virtue, otherwise to be void.

Frederick Sagacer

(Dutch)               Henry Bruner (?)

Jessamine County, Kentucky