Tag Archives: obituaries

Michael and Ann Foley of Limerick County, Ireland

Michael Foley, 1829-1904.  Ann, his wife, 1817-1895, of Co. Limerick, Ireland.  St. Patrick Catholic Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, April 27, 1895

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Tuesday, November 15, 1904

 

Colonel Cuthbert Bullitt – Louisville’s Oldest Citizen in 1899

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 31, 1899

Louisville’s Oldest Citizen

Louisville’s oldest citizen of prominence is, without doubt, the notable figure, Col. Cuthbert Bullitt.  Col. Bullitt was born January 12, 1810, in the city of Louisville.  His birthplace was a substantial house which then stood on the corner of Fifth and Main Streets in the city which was then a small village.  Col. Cuthbert Bullitt’s father was also named Cuthbert Bullitt, and another brother, William, lived on the corner of Bullitt and Main Streets.  Col. Bullitt was one of eight children and the youngest of four sons.

He was educated at St. Joseph’s College, Bardstown, and in his young manhood went to New Orleans, where he remained until 1870.  In that city he married a daughter of Col. Maunsel White, a prominent man of Louisiana, a merchant and sugar planter.  Col. Cuthbert Bullitt was for a number of years a member of the great firm of Maunsel White & Co., extensive dealers in cotton and sugar.  He was formerly an old-line Whig, and as a sequence became a very prominent Union man.  He was always individual, always courageous, and, after Louisiana seceded from the Union, he placed in front of his house a motto which could be seen at the City Hall of New Orleans and all over Lafayette Square.  It was as tall as a man and it read: ‘Kentucky:  United we stand, divided we fall.’  For his too ardent expressions of opinion he was advised by his many friends to leave the state, and soon after acted upon their advice.  After the capture of New Orleans by the Federal troops, and before the Mississippi was opened, President Lincoln sent Col. Bullitt to that city by sea, and afterward made him Collector of the port.  In 1870 her returned to Louisville, where he was always well known and since he has resided here.  During the winter months he goes to New Orleans.  He has ever been a great social favorite, a typical club man, an authority on questions of etiquette and good living, and he has ever been popular.  He is a successful write of newspaper articles and within the past few years his series of articles, ‘Tales of Two Cities,’ in the Courier Journal, have attracted not a little attention.  Well versed in the news and social gossip of New Orleans and Louisville, he interested many people.  Col. Bullitt’s handwriting, memory, carriage, appearance and conversation are marvelous for a man of his age.  He is handsome, erect and dignified, and travels about alone.  Recent letters from New Orleans to friends in Louisville describe, in a graphic manner, his present life as full of winter gayeties, the opera, parties, balls, etc., particularly a ‘mystery party’ where the ladies go masked and the gentlemen unmasked.  It is safe to say that Col. Bullitt has kept up the social whirl longer than any other man in the country, for he will be ninety years old next month, and is as great a society man as he was seventy years ago.  Louisville citizens of note quote him and tell of him in other cities as the most wonderful example of the ‘old citizen’ that any city in the country can produce.

A portion of the article on Col. Cuthbert Bullitt’s death:

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, August 5, 1906

After an eventful life of almost ninety-seven years, Col Cuthbert Bullitt, the oldest native -born resident of Louisville, died at 7:15 o’clock yesterday morning in his apartments at St. Joseph’s Infirmary.

During his stay in New Orleans, Col. Bullitt became enamored of a beautiful girl, Miss Eliza White, the daughter of Col. Maunsel White, a distinguished and wealthy merchant of New Orleans.  Col Bullitt, in an interview given out by him several years before his death, said that Miss White inspired the one perfect love in his long life.  They were married in the early thirties, and as a result of the union five children were born.  All of these children have died, one son living until he was eighteen years old.

During the Revolution, General William Bullitt, Col. Bullitt’s grandfather, was on the staff of Gen. LaFayette.  It was this General William Bullitt who was the founder of the family in Kentucky.  He built a house near the river at a point near which the pumping station of the Louisville waterworks now stands.

Although the brothers and immediate relatives of Col. Bullitt have preceded him to the grave, he is survived by many nephews, nieces and cousins.

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery – Logan County

I found little information on this family, other than obituaries.  They are listed in the 1880 Logan County census.  Robert R. Brown is 48, a farmer.  Mary, his wife, is 47.  Two sons are listed – Robert W., 17; and Joseph A., 14.  It is possible this family moved to Logan from Hardin County since the father lived there when the couple married in 1864, or Breckinridge County since that was where the mother lived before marriage.  Even though both sons were married, their wives are not buried in this cemetery.

Sacred to the Memory of Robert R. Brown, born January 29, 1832, died May 8, 1894.  ‘Servant of God, well done.’  Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.

Sacred to the memory of Mary E. A. Brown, born October 8, 1828, died February 24, 1910.  ‘One little hour and then the glorious crowning.’

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 2, 1910

Venerable Mother

of Robert W. Brown Is Summoned – Was a Member of the Old Lewis Family of Breckinridge

Mrs. Mary E. A. Brown, the mother of R. W. Brown, managing editor of The Louisville Times, and of Joseph A. Brown, of Nashville, Tennessee, died at the home of the latter Thursday evening February the twenty-fourth.  Her final illness started from the pricking of her thumb with a needle last Friday.  Erysipelas developed and caused her death.  Mrs. Brown was nearly eighty-three years of age and her life was beautiful and interesting.  In her early womanhood days she lived in Breckinridge County with Dr. Thomas J. Lewis, the father of the Rev. James T. Lewis, of Basin Springs.  In 1864 she married Robert R. Brown of Hardin County.

Mrs. Brown was a woman remarkable in many ways and was greatly talented in music and literature.  She was a member of the Broadway Methodist Temple Church of Louisville.

It is said, during the last twenty-five years her older son, Robert, never failed to spend Christmas with her.

Robert W. Brown, born November 13, 1862, died December 28, 1924.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1924

Joe A. Brown, born December 9, 1866, died January 22, 1939.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee

Monday, January 23, 1939

 

 

James Marshall and Jennie Lee Rankins Buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery

James M. Rankins, 1844-1917.  Jennie Lee, his wife, 1854-1918.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Robertson County, Kentucky.

James M. Rankins was the son of Marshall Rankins and Mary Steel, born June 4, 1844, according to his gravestone, 1849 according to his death certificate.  He died September 25, 1917 of stroke.

Jennie Lee was the daughter of E. A. Lee and Mary Lee, born December 3, 1853, according to her death certificate, 1854 on her gravestone.  She died November 18, 1918, from diabetes.

In the 1860 census of Mason County James M. was 15 years of age, living with his parents, and three older brothers – John A., 23; Thomas J., 19; and George W., 17.  In the 1870 census of Fleming County, Jennie, 16, is living with her mother, Mary, 48, and sisters Sarah, 19; Emma, 14; and Mary, 8.  Her father, E. A. Lee, must have died about 1862/1863 – possibly during the Civil War?

James and Jennie married after the 1880 census was taken, since she still lived with her mother at that time.  From a short notice in the newspaper we can estimate that marriage in March of 1882.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, March 30, 1882

There are three children of the couple listed in census records – James L., Grover C., and Louise N.  In the 1900 census, when these three are listed with their parents, Jennie is listed as having five children, three living; the couple is shown as married 18 years.

In The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, of Monday, February 13, 1893, is a notice that ‘Morris, the four-weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. James Rankins, died Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock, of pneumonia, and was buried yesterday.  The parents have the sympathy of their friends in their loss.’  I found nothing about the fifth child.

In 1910, only James and Jennie are in the census records for Robertson County .

In one newspaper article I found James Rankins was noted as ‘Colonel’.  Was he in the Spanish-American War?  He would have been an extremely young colonel for the Civil War.

James drove what was known as a ‘bus line in Maysville.  In January of 1903 the icy roads were hazardous and he and his passengers narrowly escaped injury.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, January 12, 1903

He purchased Mr. C. T. Anderson’s interest in this line in 1895, and was then known as Trigg & Rankins.  In other articles I found that he owned a livery stable on Third Street, which he sold in 1885.  in 1886 he was Deputy Marshall.

In 1885 he and several others helped Charles Johnson, an ex-confederate, renting a house for Mr. Johnson and his family during their time of need.  Evidently James Rankins was very conscious of helping others, as well as being civic minded.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, November 21, 1885

James Rankins also carried the mail between Mt. Olivet and Maysville.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, February 15, 1904

In a 1906 article about his son Grover, he is also noted as Colonel.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, February 17, 1906

I could not find an obituary for James M. Rankins, but did find one for Jennie Lee Rankins.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, November 25, 1918

 

 

 

Burials In Cloverport Cemetery – Breckinridge County

Mark Wedding, August 26, 1820 – February 25, 1894.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 28, 1894

An Old Resident Dead

Mr. Mark Wedding, seventy-two years of age, died of consumption at his home in this city at 1 o’clock p.m. Sunday, February 25.  His remains were interred in the Cloverport City Cemetery yesterday.

Mr. Wedding had been in bad health for some time, and his death was not a surprise to those who were acquainted with his condition.  He has been a respected citizen of Cloverport for many years and his death is regretted by many friends.  He raised a family of four sons, who are filling lucrative and honorable positions in other parts of the country.  He leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a good husband.

Dudley Hambleton, 1821-1898.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 28, 1898

Two Old Citizens Pay Nature’s Debt

Hon. Dudley Hambleton Passes Away

Represented Breckinridge Twice in the Legislature

Was a Consistent Member of the Baptist Church

Hon. Dudley Hambleton, a man who was loved by all who knew him, died early Tuesday morning.

For a week he has been hovering between life and death, and although his precarious condition was known to almost everyone in the county, the news of his final passing away came like a shock.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton has always been prominently identified with Cloverport.  He was born in this county, April 19, 1821.

He was married to Jane Watkins in November, 1843, and the following children were the result of the union:  James Hambleton, Samuel Hambleton, Mrs. Courtney Babbage, and Mrs. Martin S. Whitford, now living in England.

For many years Mr. Hambleton was regarded as a leading business man of Breckinridge County.  He practically bought all the tobacco that was brought to Cloverport for sale and was the largest buyer until the war came on.

At the close of the Civil War he purchased the A. A. Gordon farm at Holt’s paying $25,000 cash for it and engaged in farming.

He was always a man of affairs and stood high in the estimation of all who knew him.  He was twice elected to the legislature by the Democratic Party.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton was one of the best men Cloverport ever had.  During the days of his prosperity he was known as the young man’s friend and his purse was always ready to back some poor young fellow struggling for a foothold on the ladder to success.  He was charitable to a fault.

He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church, also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

His funeral took place today and was largely attended, the remains being interred according to the rites of Masonry.

Julius Hardin Has Been Laid to Rest

Was a Prominent Democratic Worker

A Man of Strong Convictions and Fine Character

By the death of Julius Hardin, Breckinridge County has been deprived of one of her most substantial citizens.

The deceased had been suffering for some time with a carbuncle on the back of his neck and his death was looked for daily for a week or more before the end came.

He passed away Friday, September 23rd, with hardly a struggle.

Julius Hardin was born in this county October 9, 1846.

He was a man of strong character and firm convictions.  He took an active interest in politics during his life and for years was regarded as one of the staunchest Democrats in the county.

While he was a hard worker for party success he never sought office or preferment of any kind.

He was honest, sincere and his agreeable personality won for him a host of warm friends.

He was a scion of the noted Hardin family, coming from the pioneer stock that settled Breckinridge County over a century ago.

The deceased leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place Saturday, the services being conducted by Rev. Sneed, of Hardinsburg, who preached a sermon eloquent in its sympathy for the bereaved wife and children and rich with its tributes to the character of the dead.

The remains were interred in the Cloverport Cemetery and were followed to their last resting place by one of the largest funeral corteges that has ever been seen in the city.

The News with the whole community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.

Peter Dhonau, born January 30, 1812, died September 13, 1899.  Mary Elizabeth Dhonau, born January 1, 1815, died March 27, 1896.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 20, 1899

Peter Dhonau

An Old Resident of the County Passes Away

Mr. Peter Dhonau, one of the county’s oldest citizens, died at his home near Balltown last Wednesday.  He had not been confined to his bed and death was due to the sudden giving away of his constitution.

Mr. Dhonau was born in Sobenheim, Prussia, January, 1813.  He came to this country in 1844, and located at Rome, Indiana, on a farm.  He continued farming until the year of 1869, when he moved to this part of Kentucky where he has resided ever since.

His most estimable wife departed this life in March, 1896, leaving eleven children to mourn her loss.  Two died in infancy, one at nine years and one at mature age.  Seven children are still living who are, Mrs. Michael Hamman, Mrs. Phillip Dick, Mrs. Charles Fuchs, Mrs. William Sanders, Miss Harriet Dhonau and William and Albert Dhonau.  There are twenty-seven grand-children and twelve great-grandchildren.

Mr. Dhonau was probably one of Breckenridge County’s most prosperous farmers, and was well liked by everyone.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  His remains were laid to rest in the cemetery near Rome, Indiana.  [Although this gravestone leads us to believe he was buried in Cloverport Cemetery.]

Burials At Bells Run Baptist Cemetery – Ohio County

Wilson Chapman, born February 4, 1844, died January 4, 1904.  Bells Run Baptist Cemetery, Ohio County, Kentucky.

The Hartford Republican, Ohio County, Kentucky

Friday, January 8, 1904

Claude E. Ware, born September 1, 1878, died July 5, 1917.

The Messenger Inquirer, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Friday, June 16, 1917

Isaac N. Jeffries, December 27, 1870 – August 18, 1920.  Lizzie K., his wife, October 25, 1876 – July 2, 1949.

The Messenger Inquirer, Owensboro, Daviess County, Kentucky

Friday, August 27, 1920

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Sunday, July 3, 1949

Anderson S. Daniel, born June 2, 1831, died December 23, 1911.  ‘Erected by his Grand Son, David Ewing (?)

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Friday, December 22, 1911

Elijah P. Barnett Dies of Dropsy

The Hartford Republican, Ohio County, Kentucky

Friday, July 30, 1915

Death of E. P. Barnett

Elijah P. Barnett died Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock, at the home of Mr. Joseph Thomasson, on lower No Creek, of dropsy.  He had been an invalid for thirty years, caused by a horse falling upon him.  His fatal illness lasted about six weeks.  He was a son of Robert E. and Amanda Barnett, both of whom have been dead many years.  He was 64 years of age.

The funeral services were conducted at Alexander graveyard by Rev. R. D. Bennett Monday morning at 10 o’clock, after which the burial took place there.

Mr. Barnett was highly educated and seemingly had a bright future before him as a young man when the accident mentioned overtook him, blasting all his plans for life.  He was surveyor of Ohio County one term and gave splendid satisfaction as an official.  Peace to his ashes.

Elijah Phipps Barnett, January 19, 1852 – July 23, 1915.  Alexander Cemetery, Ohio County, Kentucky.

Note:  There are several names on this stone, most likely siblings.