Family Stories

July 25th 1859 Two Irishmen Became Citizens – Mason County

While looking for a will in the Order Books of Mason County, I came across the following two notices of citizenship given to Thomas Fury and John Maloney, both natives of Ireland.  In 1859 Victoria, Queen of England and Ireland, and their sovereign, had ruled for 22 years.

Mason County Court Book 51, Page 357

July Term 1859, 1st Day, 25th July 1859

At a Court began and held for the Mason Circuit, at the courthouse thereof in the City of Maysville, on Monday the 25th day of July 1859.

Elijah C. Phister, Circuit Judge

This day Thomas Fury, a native of Ireland, came into Court, and produced the records of this court, showing that he had on the 22nd day of April 1857 made the necessary declaration of his intention to become a citizen of the United States; and declared upon his solemn oath, that he will support the Constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure, all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, State or Sovereignty whatever, and particularly to Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, of whom he was before a subject:  And having adduced satisfactory proof that he has resided in the United States five years at least, and in this state one year last past, and that during that time, he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same:  It is therefore ordered that said Thomas Fury be, and he is hereby, duly admitted and declared to be a citizen of the United States of America.

This day John Maloney, a native of Ireland, came into Court, and produced a certificate of the Mason County Court, duly authenticated, showing that he had on 8th day of August 1853, in that Court, made the necessary declaration of his intention to become a citizen of the United States; and declared upon his solemn oath, that he will support the Constitution of the United States and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, State or Sovereignty whatever, and particularly to Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland of whom he was before a subject:  And having adduced satisfactory proof that he has resided in the United States five years at least, and in this state one year last past, and that during that time he has behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the same.  It is therefore ordered that said John Maloney be, and he is hereby duly admitted and declared to be a citizen of the United States of America.

In the 1860 Census of Mason County we find Thomas Fury, aged 30, a farm worker, with $200 personal estate, born in Ireland.  His wife, Mary, 25, was also born in Ireland.  The couple had three children, Anna, 3; John, 2; and Patrick, 3/12; all born in Kentucky.

In 1870, in Mason County, Thomas and wife Mary are listed as born in Galway County, Ireland.  Anna is 13, John and Patrick are not included in the family.  Did they die from a disease or illness?  Martin, 8; Mary L., 5; and Charles, 3.

The 1880 census shows the three younger children living with their parents, with Thomas, 7.  The family lives next door to the parish priest.

The 1900 census brings a surprise.  Thomas, 73, and Mary, 65, have been married 44 years.  Mary had eight children, four are now living.  Thomas immigrated to the United States in 1849, Mary in 1850.  He is a naturalized citizen, as we found in court records.  Son John, who was not in the 1860 census, is living with his parents, aged 45.  He was born in New York!  The family must have met and married there (why I could find no marriage record in Mason County) and moved to Kentucky shortly afterward.

October 21, 1903, daughter Mary Fury married Patrick Mackey.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Saturday, October 24, 1903

Prosperous Young Farmer Married at Mayslick Wednesday at Noon

St. Rose of Lima Church, Mayslick, was the scene of quite a pretty wedding Wednesday at high noon when Mr. Patrick Mackey led to the altar one of Mill Creek’s pretty young ladies, Miss Mary Fury.  At a quarter of 12 o’clock to the strains of the wedding march, played by Miss Alice Walton, the bridal couple entered accompanied by Miss Mae Brannon, Miss Maguerite Lally and Mrs. Goodman.  Marching slowly to the altar the bride and groom knelt and the sacred rights were performed by the Rev. DeBruyn.  The attendants were Mr. Philip Cummins, of Maysville and Mr. Martin Fury, brother of the bride.

The bride wore a gown of blue broadcloth with hat and gloves to match, and carried Bride roses.  The happy couple left immediately after the ceremony amid showers of rice and the good wishes of their many friends.

Thomas Fury died March 5, 1907, in Maysville.  He was buried in St. Patrick Cemetery.  Wife Mary must have died previous to this date as she is not listed in the obituary.  From daughter Anna’s death certificate we learn her mother’s maiden name – Mary Fay.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 6, 1907

Thomas Fury

Thomas Fury died last night at 8:15 o’clock, at the home of his son-in-law, Patrick Mackey, in Washington, of asthma, aged 80 years.

He was born in County Galway, Ireland.

He leaves four children – Charles Fury of Lexington; Martin of Los Angeles, California; Mrs. Thomas Collins of Helena and Mrs. Patrick Mackey.

Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Now let us search for information on the Maloney family.  John Maloney met and married Johanna Quarney in Mason County, and procured a marriage bond there June 26, 1856.

Marriage Bond

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, John Maloney as principal, and Patrick Ryan as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of One Hundred Dollars.

The Condition of this Bond is as follows:

That, Whereas, Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound John Maloney and Johanna Quarney.

Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Date at Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky, this 26th day of June 1856.

John Maloney, Patrick Ryan

In the 1860 census we find John Maloney, 36, a farmer, born in Ireland, with wife Joanna, 26, also born in Ireland.  Children Joanna, 3; Katy, 2; and Bridget, 8/12; all born in Kentucky, live with their parents, as well as Bridget Quarney, 60, Mary’s mother.

By 1880 the family had moved to Fleming County.  John was 60, Johanna was 45.  The following children lived in the household – Johanna, 22; Kate, 21; Bridget, 20; John, 17; James, 15; Thomas, 13; Mary, 12; Martin, 11; twins Annie, 10, and Maggie, 10; Ella, 7; Bettie, 5; Nora, 4; and Dennis 6/12.  Fourteen children and all living – quite a feat for this time period when life was uncertain.

I could find the family in no other census, but they must have lived close to Mason County, as Johanna Quarney Maloney died February 8, 1908, at her home in Mayslick, a small town in Mason County.  According to the following obituary husband John died 29 years ago.  His death must have occurred just after the 1880 census.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Monday, February 10, 1908

Mrs. John Maloney

Mrs. John Maloney died at her home in Mayslick Saturday night at 12 o’clock with cancer of the stomach, aged. 80 years.

She was born in County Tiperary, Ireland, and came to Kentucky in 1848.

She was preceded to the grave by her husband 29 years ago.  Ten children – seven daughters and three sons survive.

Funeral tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock from Mayslick Catholic Church.  Interment at Washington.

We started with a record of naturalization in the Mason County Order Book.  Two men who became citizens of the United States on the same day.  And within a couple of hours of research found much about these two Irish American families.

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