Tag Archives: Kentucky Kindred Genealogy

New CD – Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery List and Photos

Click to purchase using Paypal.

This is the CD I promised from last week.  Included on this CD are 856 names, 740 photos. Included is an alphabetical listing of those buried at Pleasant Grove, Washington County, Kentucky, including birth and death dates, and sometimes additional information.  Just click on the number in the photo column and the photo will pop up.  Adding those hyperlinks took forever!  But I hope you will enjoy and that it will be very useful.  I have been told that my cemetery photos have been used to verify information for DAR applications!

An Important Piece of the Puzzle

How many times in your research have you searched and searched for that one piece of the puzzle?  If you knew that little bit of information relationships would fall into place, questions would be answered and all would be right in the genealogy world.  I know you have!  I am sharing with you today that ‘Aha!’ moment from about 40 years ago.

My dear great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, as I have mentioned many times, was the genealogist in the family during the first 40 decades of the twentieth century.  She wrote letters to cousins, had information handed down for generations, old tax receipts, etc.  But the biggest mistake she made was in Captain John Linton’s father and grandfather.  According to Frances, William de Linton I and II were these persons.  In the respect of William II, he married Susannah Monroe, who, after William II’s death, married Charles Tyler, then Benjamin Grayson.  In those first years of research I found nothing about William de Linton – I or II!  There was a William Linton who married Susannah Monroe, then Charles Tyler and Benjamin Grayson, but this William Linton’s son, named John, was born in 1730 and died in 1775 – couldn’t be my Captain John.

In the Release of Rights dated January 30, 1775, in Loudoun County (earlier Prince William and Stafford counties), Virginia, John Linton releases any rights to his father’s estate (Moses Linton), or the right of any estate from his mother Susanna, to his stepfather, John Berkeley, for the sum of 300 pounds current money of Virginia.  The estate was given up ‘in consideration of  my education and maintenance by John Berkeley’.  Okay, this information gives the name of Captain John’s father – Moses.  The William Linton mentioned above was the son of John Linton and Ann Barton.  In addition to son William, sons Moses and John are listed in his will.  The only other Moses Linton listed in Prince William or the surrounding counties at that time was the elder John Linton’s brother – who married Margaret Barton, sister to Ann.  This led me to conclude that Moses Linton, son of John Linton and Ann Barton, was father to my Captain John.  How about his mother?

Moses Linton was married twice – first to Susanna Harrison, with whom he had at least two sons, William and Thomas Linton.  After the death of Moses, these sons were given to the guardianship of their uncle, Burr Harrison.  Unfortunately nothing further is heard of the two boys, and it is assumed they died before 1775, the date of release of rights by Captain John Linton, since he is considered ‘the only surviving son and heir at law to my father, Moses Linton.’

Moses Linton married as his second wife Susannah, with whom he had three children – Catharine Jennings Linton, my John Linton and Moses Linton.  Moses, who was quite a bit older than Susannah, died in 1752, just after the birth of his son Moses.  Susannah, a young widow of about 22 years, quickly married John Berkeley, he being a widower (his first wife was Elizabeth Longworth) and also the father of young children, John Longworth Berkeley and George Berkeley.

But who was Susannah, mother of Captain John Linton?  In my wonderful correspondence with Dorothy Thrawley in the years before my marriage, and afterwards, she gave me that important piece of the puzzle – the one that made everything fit together.  Dorothy’s ancestor was Catherine Jennings Linton – Captain John Linton’s sister.  Catherine married William Joseph Lewis, the son of Vincent Lewis and Ann Longworth – hm, that name sounds familiar – as in sister to Elizabeth Longworth, first wife of John Berkeley?  Shall I just say this is a tangled family?  Anyway, Catherine Linton and Joseph Lewis had a daughter Susan Lewis, who married her cousin, Daniel Lewis.  Susan Lewis had the wonderful foresight to purchase a bible and write down not only the information for the children she had with hubby Daniel Lewis, but information about her ancestors.  And in that bible is a note that reads, ‘Catherine Linton’s mother before marriage, Susan Hancock.’  Finally, finally we know the name of Captain John Linton’s mother – Susannah Hancock, second wife of Moses Linton.  In the photo this information is underlined in red.  Sorry the copy is not the best.

And the final question – who is Susannah Hancock?  Moses Linton owned land adjoining his friend Scarlett Hancock.  Scarlett died at the young age of thirty in 1740.  He was the son of John Hancock and Catherine Smith.  He was given the name Scarlett for his step-great-grandfather, Martin Scarlett, who married his widowed great-grandmother, Ann, Mrs. William Green.  His grandmother was Lettice Green who married Edward Smith.  Susannah Hancock is his younger sister, who lived with Scarlett after the death of her parents, John Hancock and Catherine Smith.

Ann Barton, wife of the elder John Linton, parents of Moses Linton, was the daughter of Edward Barton and Ann Green – sister to Lettice Green who married Edward Smith.  We have come complete circle.  Moses Linton and Susannah Hancock both descend from William and Ann Green, coming down the line from different daughters.

Is anyone confused?  It’s certainly a crazy patchwork quilt of genealogy, with intermarrying families and more than one marriage on most lines.  But it has been a fascinating ride – and I will always be indebted to my dear friend Dorothy Thrawley, without whose help I could not have come to this conclusion.  This is why it is so important to share genealogy information, and my purpose exactly for this blog!  Have a wonderful day!

 

Susan B. Curd Interred at Shawnee Run Baptist Cemetery

Susan B. Curd, November 13, 1846 – March 27, 1921, Shawnee Run Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, April 1, 1921

Curd

Mrs. Susan Curd, a venerable and beloved woman of the Burgin section, passed away Sunday afternoon after a lingering illness at the home of her son, Mr. Luther T. Curd, where she had lived for a number of years. Mrs. Curd was first stricken with paralysis several years ago while returning from the funeral of her grandson. Since then her health has never been robust. She was a splendid Christian woman, a worthy daughter of her venerated father, Rev. Strother Cook, who was a prominent Baptist minister of the Burgin section for many years. Early in life she united with the Shawnee Run Baptist Church and has “truly walked in the faith of her Lord” ever since. She is survived by two children, Mr. L. T. Curd, of Burgin, and a daughter, Mrs. J. W. Ison, of Norwood, Ohio. Five sisters also survive, Mrs. J. W. Voris, Mrs. Elizabeth Litteral, Mrs. S. D. King, Mrs. Emma Rose and Mrs. Julie Stone, and one brother, Mr. James Curd, of Mississippi. The funeral was held at Shawnee Run Church Tuesday afternoon, conducted by her pastor, Rev. W. D. Moore, and the interment was at Shawnee Run Cemetery.

 

Mumony-Linn 1783 Lincoln County Marriage

Know all men by these presents that we, William Mumony and Thomas Denton, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 10th day of September 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound William Mumony and Susannah Linn, for which a license has issued.  Now, if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

William Momoney, Thomas Denton

Sealed and Delivered in presence of Willis Green

This is to certify to all people it may concern, that I, Hannah Welch, does give William Momoney my consent to obtain a license according to law to marry my daughter, Susannah Linn, September the tenth one thousand seven hundred eighty three.  Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of Thomas Denton and Sarah Denton

Hannah Welch

Dexter Mausoleum in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati

While in Cincinnati last month, Ritchey and I visited the beautiful Spring Grove Cemetery.  It was established in 1845, and contains 733 acres of beautiful trees, lakes and walkways.  One could spend days, walking around, looking not only at the gravestones, but the natural habitat as well.

Today I want to share with you photos of the Dexter Mausoleum.  It is so huge that many people mistake it for a chapel.  Designed by the architect James Keys Wilson in the late 1860’s for the Edmund Dexter family, it was not finished until 1870.  The inspiration was the beautiful Sainte-Chapelle in Paris – particularly the sides with the flying buttresses.  The mausoleum cost $100,000 to build in the 1860’s.  Can you imagine what the cost would be today?

Edmund Dexter was born in England in 1801 and came to the United States at an early age.  In the 1820’s he moved to Cincinnati, and in 1829 married Mary Ann Dellinger of New York.  The couple had five sons – Charles, Edmund, George, Julius and Adolphus.  Edmund was a whisky baron and an extremely wealthy man.  His will lists shares of stock in all the important Cincinnati companies.  Mary Ann Dexter died in 1875.Kentucky

About twenty family members are buried in the crypt of the mausoleum.

Lace, Ruffles and More Lace

I purchased this wonderful photo just today at J. Sampson Antiques and Books on Main Street in Harrodsburg – another of our treasures!  As I walked through the store after checking through the books (found one on Scott County history, the Wilderness Road, Shakertown and the old Mud Meeting House), I saw this picture and fell in love!

This woman is quite beautiful – a classic beauty with a romantic hair style.  But her dress steals the show.  The high collar, ruffled cuffs, the entire dress is lace, lace and more lace.  And in the beautiful white of the turn of the 20th century.  How I wish we knew her name.  I suppose she will remain the beautiful mystery woman!

Have a wonderful Friday!

A Father’s Day Poem By Maurice Linton

A good friend, Garwood Linton, entrusted some of the Linton information from his family into my keeping for awhile.  This is the information gathered by Adelaide Linton Cartier, daughter of Hugh Walter Linton and Eliza Belfield Garnett.  You have heard me speak of the letters written by my great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, to Hugh Linton.  They loved genealogy and family!

In the files in my possession I found a poem written by Maurice Ragland Linton, Sr.  Maurice was the son of Benjamin Linton and Florence Vitula Ragland, born in 1898 and died in 1980 at the age of 82.  The older I get, the more I realize life is indeed short.  This isn’t meant to be a sorrowful post, but one to incite us to live life to the fullest and enjoy our family members while they are here!

Father’s Day

By Maurice Linton, Sr.

I sit in the shade on a summer’s day;

Perhaps I start dreaming the hours away,

For it seems I hear voices loud and clear;

And the children are gathering from far and near

To play beneath the trees.

Where are those children of yesteryear?

Who played and sang with voices clear;

I must be dreaming for it seems just a day.

How can it be, they have all gone away,

And left our lives lonely,

In the shade of the trees.

But again I hear voices of children at play.

Can they be echoes from a bygone day?

Games, I remember in a wistful way;

Childish things they used to say.

I wake from my dream voices draw near;

Thank God, we have our grandchildren here,

To play beneath the trees