Tag Archives: genealogy research

Bowman’s Celebrate Golden Wedding in 1892

Funny that I should find the golden wedding anniversary of a couple from Mercer County in the Mount Sterling newspaper!  But then, good things are sometimes found when searching for something else!  Bellevue, home of the Bowman family, is located on Hwy 152 just outside the city of Burgin. 

The Mt. Sterling Advocate, Montgomery County, Kentucky

Tuesday, October 11, 1892

Mr. Dudley Mitchem Bowman and Mrs. Virginia Smith Bowman, of Mercer County, celebrated their ‘golden wedding’, on Thursday, September 29th, at their home, Bellevue, near Burgin.  From the Danville correspondent of the Louisville Times, we extract the following:

September 29, 1842, a large and fashionable assemblage met at Avondale, in Mercer County, the home of Abram Smith, Esq., to witness the marriage of his daughter, Virginia, then in her seventeenth year, to Dudley Mitchem Bowman, the son of a neighbor, the Hon. John Bowman.  Avondale was then, as it is now, a lovely country home, where a bounteous, graceful hospitality was dispensed, and it is interesting to know that it yet remains in the family and is none the less celebrated for perpetuating its old-time reputation.

The ceremony of fifty years ago was spoken by the Rev. Thomas Smith, one of the pioneers in Campbell and Stone’s reformation, then just beginning.  The bridesmaids were Miss Peachy Smith, now Mrs. Simeon Drake, of Chicago, and Miss Johanna Smith, a sister of the bride who married Mr. McCann.  The groomsmen were Abram Hite Bowman, brother to the groom, and Ben Campbell, yet living in Mercer County.

This marriage united two of the most widely known and respected families of the Commonwealth, names associated with the early conquest of the land from the savages and identified with its erection into an independent state.

In the colonial annals of Virginia are found their names in places of civil and military distinction.  They came from the Shenandoah Valley, in Virginia, and Zachariah Smith and Abram Bowman were among the first to make a new home in the wilderness of Kentucky; the former at ‘Ingleside’, near Danville, and Bowman in Fayette County, only a few miles further away.

A few years thereafter the estate known as ‘Bellevue’, the present town, came into the possession of John Bowman, father of the present owner, by bequest from an uncle.  John Bowman was a man or more than ordinary culture for his time, a lawyer by education and a pupil of Henry Clay.  His wife was Sarah Mitchem, of Woodford County, daughter of Dudley Mitchem, from whom have come the Woolfolk’s, Hayden’s, Bannon’s and other families well-known in Louisville, Lexington and the southwest.  Their children were the late John Bryan Bowman, for many years Regent of Kentucky University; the late Abram Hite Bowman, many of whose descendants now live in Louisville and various parts of the state, and Dudley Mitchem Bowman, the present owner of ‘Bellevue’.  It is a rarely beautiful old country home, nearly a century old and substantially built.  The arched windows and picturesque fans over the doors, beautiful hand-carved wood mantels and window frames, take one back to the architecture and house decorations of old Colonial days.  The walls are covered with portraits of the former owners and occupants of the home.  Mr. Bowman tells with justifiable pride that only Indians and Bowman’s ever owned the place.  It has been for a century the seat of a princely hospitality, and it was an interesting occasion, the celebration of a golden wedding, that brought under its roof the descendants of the pioneers of a century ago.

A notable feature of this delightful reunion was the singularly appropriate remarks of the Rev. Owsley Goodloe.  Two conspicuous figures were Uncle Louis and Aunt Caroline, former slaves, whose marriage antedated that of Mr. and Mrs. Bowman by six years.  At the wedding fifty years ago Uncle Louis had the distinction of driving the carriage and Aunt Caroline was the maid in waiting to the bride.

Owing to the death of a lovely daughter, Mrs. Caroline Bowman Ringo, the guests were limited to the family and a few intimate friends.  Among those present were:  Mrs. Mary Watters Bowman, widow of the eldest son; John Bryan and son and daughter; Mrs. Jennie Bowman Cassell ad two daughters, Dudley M. Jr., and wife, nee Mary Dunlap; Mrs. Nannie Bowman Moore and five children, and Mr. Abram Smith Bowman of Fairlawn, Lexington; Miss Nannie Smith, sister of Mrs. Bowman; Mrs. Mary D. Bowman, Mrs. John Augustus Williams, Mr. Phil B. Thompson, Rev. Strother Cook, Mr. Ben C. Allin and wife, who have been married nearly sixty-five years; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Riker, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Bowman, Mrs. Rebecca Jones, Mr. and Mrs. James Kunniano, Mr. and Mrs. William Roland and Miss Vivion.

Mr. and Mrs. Bowman, though rapidly approaching that age which marks the evening of life, are yet hale and hearty, and give promise of being able to celebrate many more anniversaries of their marriage.

At their deaths, Dudley Mitchem Bowman and Virginia Smith Bowman were buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Henry Clay Stone Buried At Mt. Gilead Cemetery Mason County

Henry Clay Stone, September 5, 1843 – April 17, 1919.  Sallie E., his wife, December 30, 1848 – January 26, 1923.  Mt. Gilead Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

Henry Clay Stone was the son of Kinzea Stone and Elizabeth Ann Seamonds, born in Bourbon County, September 5, 1843.  In the 1850 census of that county Kinzea is 37, wife Elizabeth, also 37.  The following children are listed:  Jesse N., 13; Sarah A., 11; Malinda J., 9; Henry Clay, 7; Martha, 5; and Mary E., 3.  Also living in the household are Edward Stone, 33; David Dodge, 17; and Bernard Graham, 25, listed as schoolmaster and born in Ireland.

Henry Clay Stone married Sarah Wallingford about 1870.  In the 1880 census they are 36 and 33, respectively, with daughters Nettie, 4; and Minnie, 3.  In the 1900 census we find the couple has been married for 30 years.  They have had 7 children, but only 3 have survived.  Minnie, 23; Kinzea, 19; and Elizabeth C., 13.  Daughter Nettie was deceased by that date.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 17, 1919

H. Clay Stone Died At Noon of Influenza

County Magistrate and Prominent Citizen of Mt. Gilead Neighborhood Dies of Heart Trouble Developing In Influenza

Mr. H. Clay stone, Magistrate of the Mt. Gilead district, died at his home near that village at noon today of heart trouble brought on by influenza, from which he has been suffering for the past several days.

Mr. Stone was 75 years of age and quite a prominent citizen.  He was a very extensive reader and one of the best posted men in the county on many subjects.  He was a member of he one of the oldest families in Kentucky and a very likable gentleman.

Besides his wife, Mr. Stone is survived by one son, Kinza Stone, who made his home with his parents, and two daughters, Mrs. William Byron, of Mt. Carmel, and Mrs. Minnie Johnson, of Lexington.

Arrangements for the funeral have not as yet been made.

The Public Ledger, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, April 18, 1919

Squire Stone’s Funeral Saturday Afternoon

The funeral of Squire H. Clay Stone will be held from the late home at Mt. Gilead Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock and burial will be made at the Mt. Gilead Cemetery.

 

Confederate Soldiers Martyrs Monument In Eminence Kentucky

In the cemetery, of the small town of Eminence, Kentucky, stands a monument to three Confederate soldiers.  These men were not killed during battle, but were murdered due to the orders of Brevet Major General Stephen Gano Burbridge – also known as the ‘Butcher of Kentucky’.

During the Civil War Stephen Burbridge was Kentucky’s most controversial military commander.  After serving as colonel during the early part of the war, in 1864 he returned to Kentucky where he fought against Confederate raiders, including John Hunt Morgan.  At that time he was placed in command in Kentucky, but his harsh tactics won him no friends and many enemies.  In July 1864 he issued Order No. 59 which included ‘Wherever an unarmed Union citizen is murdered, four guerrillas will be selected from the prisoners in the hands of the military authorities and publicly shot to death in the most convenient place near the scene of the outrage.’

The three CSA soldiers who were shot November 3, 1864, at Pleasureville by order of Gen. Burbridge in pretense of retaliation of two Negroes that were killed near Port Royal.  ‘Sleep on ye braves for you have got our sympathy to our latest breath.  We would not have thee buried on a lot with him who caused they death.’

On August 12, 1864, four guerrillas were taken from the city of Eminence to some point in the Henry County, and were shot.  On November 3, 1864, four more were sent from Lexington to Pleasureville (a small town in Henry County) to be executed.  Sixteen hours after the execution their bodies were still lying on the floor of the depot where they were shot.  A few hours later three of these men were buried in Eminence Cemetery – William Tighe, R. W. Yates and William Darbro – the fourth man, William Long, was buried in Maysville by his family.

The executions were carried out by Co. C. 54th Reg. Infantry, led by Captain Emzy W. Easley.  Captain Easley was to execute four more Confederates about January 15th for the killing of Preston Sparks, and three more on February 2.  ‘I was heartsick over the task assigned me, and would rather have gone into battle against any force than execute those men.  Just one hour before the time set, I received a telegram signed by Abraham Lincoln.  It ordered the execution of Waller deferred, and that he be sent back to Lexington until further orders.  When I saw the contents of the message at first glance I was so overjoyed that I thought it referred to all of the men.  I did not read it again, but sent back all three – the execution thus delayed never took place, and in a few months the war was over.’  Three lives were saved that day, although only one man was to be sent to Lexington.  Captain Easley didn’t read the telegram carefully and assumed all men were reprieved.

Burbridge also directed the imprisonment and execution of numerous people in the state, including public figures, charging them with treason and other high crimes, many of which were falsely charged

Brevet Maj. Gen Stephen Burbridge quickly lost support of Kentuckians due to his harsh measures and was replaced in February 1865, and at the end of the war he moved to New York.

The lives of four men and their families were forever changed that day in November 1864.  William Darbro had a wife, Mary Ann Bruce, and three babies – Permelia, Catherine and John, all under the age of four.  R. W. Yates was a resident of Hart County and William Tighe of Grant County.

This Confederate Soldiers Martyrs Monument was placed on the National Register of Historic Places July 17, 1997.

William Tighe, aged 30 years.  R. W. Yates, aged 30 years.  William Darbro, aged 20 years.  Eminence Cemetery, Henry County, Kentucky.

Nicholas County Marriages

Nicholas County Marriages

1802-1805

  • Robert Stephenson married Martha McAnully, by John P. Campbell, on April 6, 1802.
  • John McNide married Susannah Barnett, by John Barnett, December 15, 1803.
  • John Swinny married Priscilla Potts, by Bartholomew W. Stone, November 24, 1803.
  • Sampson Archer married Polly Kineart, by Bartholomew W. Stone, December 22, 1803.
  • James Collins married Mary McDowell, by John Barnett, September 29, 1803
  • John Benson married Sally Musich, by John Barnett, November 3, 1803.
  • Peter Ireland married Ann Allen, by Bartholomew W. Stone, September 28, 1804
  • Robert McCune married Phoebe Ray, by Bartholomew W. Stone, December 27, 1804
  • Gaven Mathers married Peggy McCune, by Bartholomew W. Stone, February 21, 1805.
  • John Scott  married Elizabeth Caldwell, by Bartholomew W. Stone, July 4, 1805.
  • Aaron Wiggins married Elizaeth Inard, by Caleb J. Taylor, September 23, 1804.
  • Alexander Allerson married Elizabeth Taylor, by Caleb J. Taylor, June 2, 1805.
  • John Ellis married Lucrece Wells, by Caleb J. Taylor, June 20, 1805.
  • Thomas Harney married Mary Grosvenor, by John Barnett, December 19, 1804.
  • Andrew Burns married Hannah Adams, by John Persons, September 20, 1804.
  • James Ishmael married Mary McFerrin, by John Person, June 21, 1804
  • Parker Brown married Sarah Bell, by John Barnett, January 17, 1805.
  • William Landers married Rebecca Plugh, by John Persons, January 5, 1804
  • George Eidson married Mary Lilly, by John Barnett, October 11, 1804.
  • Abraham Dorlan married Sally Brown, by John Barnett, November 29, 1804.
  • Thomas Davis married Elizabeth Grosvenor, by John Barnett, July 5, 1804.
  • Samuel Long married Susannah Barlow, by John Barnett, March 15, 1804.
  • Jacob Fight married Peggy Cotrill, by John Barnett, June 6, 1805.

A Wedding and A Funeral in Clark County

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, June 10, 1896

Joy and Sorrow

In the midst of life we are in death.  Along the pathway of existence the cradle and the coffin jostle each other and the pathway to the bridal altar.  A sad exemplification of the latter fact occurred at the home of John Goff, of Indian Fields, Wednesday.

On this occasion, ‘Edgewood,’ his handsome county home, was the scene of a beautiful wedding.  Owing to the illness of Mrs. Goff the festivities were of a very quiet nature.  However, long before the appointed hour, the spacious rooms were filled with the near relatives who had come to witness the marriage of the youngest daughter of the household, Miss Patsy, to Mr. John R. Downing, of Mason County.

The parlors were brilliantly lighted and decorated, and the dining room, where an elegant luncheon was served, presented a fairy-like appearance.

At 11 o’clock the bridal party entered the parlors.  First came Rev. Mr. McGarvey of Lexington, who performed the ceremony; he was followed by Misses Lillie and Anna Goff, cousin and niece of the bride.  Then came the bride attended by her sister, Miss Margaret Goff, and the groom with his attendant, Mr. Edward Gault, of Mason County.

The bride was gowned in a dainty creation of Paris mull, and valenciennes lace and carried bridal roses.  The maids also wore Paris mull and carried pink mermets.  The bridal party gracefully grouped, with fern-draped window as a background, made a beautiful tableaux.

After luncheon, the happy couple drove to this city where Mr. and Mrs. Downing took the 3 o’clock train for Maysville.

The groom is a cultured gentleman and one of Mason County’s most popular and prosperous farmers.  Clark is losing one of her most lovable daughters but her loss is Mason’s gain.

Mrs. Patsy Goff, the mother of the bride, had been ill for some time, but was thought to be better, but that evening she grew worse and about dark she died.

She was originally Miss Prewitt and was sixty-five years of age.  Funeral at

the residence this morning and burial in the Winchester Cemetery.

She leaves six sons and five daughters, to-wit:  Thomas, Levi, James, John, Elisha and Caswell, Mrs. Henrietta Bedford, Mrs. Emma Browning, Mrs. Lizzie Bedford, Miss Margaret Goff and Mrs. Patsy Downing.

The sympathy of a host of friends go out to the stricken family in this sorrowful ending of a day of joy. – Winchester Democrat.

John Hedges Goff, May 9, 1821 – May 23, 1901.  Martha Chandler Prewitt Goff, December 8, 1830 – June 3, 1896.  Winchester Cemetery, Clark County, Kentucky.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, May 24, 1901

Died Thursday Morning

Father of Mrs. John R. Downing Passes Away at His Home in Clark County

Mr. John Hedges Goff, in his eighty-first year, died early Thursday morning at his home at Indian Fields, Clark County, of old age.  The funeral takes place at Winchester at noon today.

Mr. Goff was the father of thirteen children, ten of whom survive, among those surviving being Mrs. John R. Downing, of Washington.

Mr. Goff was a prominent breeder of Shorthorn cattle and was instrumental in the building of the Kentucky Union railroad.

The Winchester Democrat, Clark County, Kentucky

Friday, May 25, 1901

Mr. John Hedges Goff died shortly after midnight Wednesday at his home at Indian Fields, of old age, he being in his eighty-first year.  The remains were interred in the Winchester Cemetery, with services at the grave.  His wife, formerly Miss Martha Prewitt, died in 1895; three children are also dead, and ten survive, viz:  Thomas Goff, of Lexington; Mrs. H. C. Bedford and Levi Goff, of Winchester; Mrs. Emma Browning and John Goff, of Jackson; Elisha Goff, Caswell Goff and Miss Margaret Goff, of Clark County; Mrs. Lizzie Bedford, of Columbia, Mo., and Mrs. Patsy Downing, of Mason County.  Mr. Goff was born at Indian Fields and had lived there all his life.  Although for many years one of the most popular and prominent men in the county, he never held political office, but for many years had been an Elder in Bethlehem Christian Church.  He was devoted to public improvements, and was a prominent breeder of Shorthorn cattle.  He was instrumental in building the Iron Works turnpike and Kentucky Union Railroad, in both of which he lost money, resulting in financial embarrassment later.  He was a good neighbor and a splendid citizen, and his death is a loss to the whole community.  A singular coincidence was that his death occurred on the anniversary of the marriage of his favorite granddaughter, Mattie Bedford.

The Winchester Democrat, Clark County, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 21, 1901

Friday we attended the burial of our old friend and brother and former neighbor, John H. Goff. And while standing near the group of weeping children, and looking down into the empty grave, which would soon receive and for ever hide from view the mortal remains of our dear old friend, our mind wandered back to our boyhood days; we saw in those long bygone years the luxurious, beautiful, prosperous and happy home of John H. Goff. No farm in this entire section of the county was more fertile and kept in a higher state of cultivation. The home was prosperous because intelligence and industry were combined in tilling the soil and in managing its various departments and products. It was a religious home where parents and children were accustomed to meet together around the family altar and enjoy sweet communion with their Maker. The widow and orphan, the poor and needy and distressed never left his home empty handed. The world has in truth been made happier and better by this good man having lived in it. His sons can do no better than emulate the life and character of their father.

 

Couple Celebrating Anniversary?

Isn’t this an excellent photograph?  The older couple is still very handsome.  Due to the flowers pinned to their clothes I feel this must be an important event for them – such as an anniversary celebration.

From their clothing I would date this photo to late 1880’s or early 1890’s – the high collar of the woman’s dress, and her slightly enhanced upper sleeves are from that date, as well as the man’s high-buttoned suit coat.  From the bottom of the card we see they were from Geneva, Indiana.  A Mr. Gregg took the photo, but I could find nothing about him.

The foil stamped imprint of the photographer’s name dates this photo to 1890-1900, which corresponds to the date of their clothing.

Death of John K. Wickliffe – Civil War Soldier From Muhlenberg County

John Kincheloe Wickliffe was the son of Moses Wickliffe and Nancy Young.  His siblings were Aaron, William Y., Susan Jane (who married William Y. Cundiff), Benjamin Singleton and Robert McLean (twins, who remained bachelors), Moses (also served in the Civil War), Agnes Elizabeth (who married John F. Davis), Charles Bryant, and Mary Frances.

John K. Wickliffe was listed as killed in the Maysville Weekly Bulletin, of July 7, 1864.  Listed were those men who were killed or wounded from the Ninth Kentucky Infantry, from May 9th to June 1st, 1864, Colonel J. W. Caldwell, commanding.

A History of Muhlenberg County by Otto A. Rothert, 1913

In this connection it may be well to refer to John K. Wickliffe, another of the Muhlenberg soldiers who lost his life fighting for the South.  John K. Wickliffe was a son of Colonel Moses Wickliffe, and one of the most popular men in the county.  He was born in 1834 near Bevier, enlisted in Company C, Ninth Kentucky Infantry, fought at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Hartsville, Stone River, Jackson, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, and Rocky Face Gap, and was killed at Resaca, Georgia, May 14, 1864.  No soldier’s death was more keenly deplored in the county, by both Northern and Southern sympathizers, than John K. Wickliffe, who had won his way into the hearts of all with whom he had come in contact.  Lycurgus T. Reid, of Rockport, Ohio County, writing to me in July, 1912, relative to the death of this brave man, says:

‘Although I may have forgotten some of my war experiences, I remember the time John K. Wickliffe was killed.  I had my hand on his back when the fatal ball struck him.  This incident, in all its detail, is as clear in my mind today as it was the day he was shot.  I need but close my eyes to see the whole scene reenacted.  It will be impossible for me to picture to you all the details of the event.  However, I will attempt to give an outline of the facts.

‘We were at Resaca.  We had dug out shallow trenches and on top of the low embankment and the lower side of the log, through which to shoot at the Yankees should they attack us.  We had left our arms back of the breastworks while we were working on this embankment.  Suddenly the rally to arms was sounded and every mother’s son of us made for our guns.  I, being a small man, was posted on the left of Company C (the color company of the Ninth Regiment), near the flag and John K. Wickliffe, who was our second sergeant and left company guide.  Something, at times, makes me think he was color sergeant that day, but if he was he held on to his gun and accoutrements.  We fell into the slight works and began to arrange ourselves for a good, square fight.  The Yankees were in sight and coming fast.  Wickliffe lay down on his stomach and, finding his cartridge box under him, asked me to push it up on his back.  While I was attempting to do so a minie ball from the Yankee column struck the lower edge of the log, just above our heads, and glanced down, striking Wickliffe in the forehead, a little to the right of the center, passing through his head.  He suddenly rose to his feet and fell backward, outside of the works, a dead man.  He scarcely moved a muscle after he fell.  I fired a number of shots over his prostrate body at the approaching enemy.  During the course of the fight that followed I was obliged to change my position, but before doing so I took another look at my old friend and then covered his face with a blanket.  That was the last I saw of John K. Wickliffe.’