Tag Archives: genealogy research

McElroy Gravestones in Cemetery Hill

The McElroy family has lived in Washington County about as long as there has been a Washington County.  Many members of the family are buried in Cemetery Hill – name of the city cemetery for the town of Springfield.  Many of my mother’s family are buried here – those relations who did not attend the two Catholic churches in the area – St. Rose and St. Dominic.  Those long-dead relatives are rightly buried in the cemetery of their respective church.

About 1788 Hugh McElroy, Sr., with two younger brothers, Samuel and James, moved from Campbell County, Virginia, to what would become Washington County, Kentucky.  The McElroy’s of the county sprang from the descendants of these three brothers.  As part of the family settled in the part of the county which became Marion County, you can see they were spread throughout the area.

Four children of Hugh McElroy, Sr., and Nancy Esther Irvine, his wife, are remembered by one gravestone in Cemetery Hill.  John McElroy,  married Mary Hundley, November 6, 1794.  James McElroy married Rosanna Hardin the same day.  Abraham McElroy married Disey Hundley, May 27, 1802.  Elizabeth McElroy never married.

John McElroy, born March 10, 1772, died June 23, 1833.  Mary, wife of John McElroy, born March 3, 1777, died July 12, 1856.

James McElroy, born September 15, 1764, died October 10, 1836.  Rosanna, wife of James McElroy, born November 5, 1773, died December 16, 1822.

Abraham McElroy, born 1774, died July 5, 1834.  Disey McKinney, widow of Abraham McElroy and wife of Arthur McKinney, born 1780, died September 24, 1857.

Elizabeth McElroy, born March 15, 1787, died February 10, 1855.

Three children of John and Mary McElroy are also buried in this cemetery.  Hugh McElroy married Susan Cocke, June 6, 1826.  Anthony McElroy married Ann Garland Rice, November 25, 1824.  Sallie McElroy married John Crawford, March 10, 1817.  Brothers Hugh and Anthony were also partners in a merchandising business for many years in Springfield, under the name H & A McElroy.

Hugh and Anthony McElroy Family Stone

Affectionately dedicated to our wives and children by H. & A. McElroy, Partners in business since 1810 until the present day.

Ann Garland, wife of Anthony McElroy, born in Louisa County, Virginia, February 7, 1807, died in Springfield, Kentucky, October 23, 1864.  ‘An affectionate wife, a fond mother and a devoted Christian.’  Anthony McElroy, born March 17, 1797, died September 25, 1886.  ‘Unto you that fear my name shall the Son of righteousness arise with healing in his wings.  And they shall be mine, saith the Lord of Hosts in that day when I make up my Jewels.’

Susan Frances, wife of Hugh McElroy, born December 29, 1807, died June 22, 1844.  ‘She had a smile for the joyous, a tear of sympathy for the ill, and an act of kindness for all within her reach.’  Hugh McElroy, born September 19, 1795, died February 8, 1877.  ‘He’s gone to his grave in a full age . . .’

Sallie, wife of John Crawford, born September 20,1799, died February 6, 1864.

John Crawford, born December 20, 1794, died February 10, 1857.

Hugh L. McElroy, July 2, 1832 – December 17, 1918.  Mary Handy McElroy, April 30, 1844 – May 1, 1912.

Hugh L. McElroy is a son of Anthony and Ann.

 

 

 

 

Damaged Stones Area of Holy Cross Cemetery – Marion County

Holy Cross Catholic Church and Cemetery.

In Marion County, Kentucky, we find Holy Cross Catholic Church, the oldest Catholic church in the state.  The historical marker tells us ‘Basil Hayden, Sr., led 25 Maryland Catholic families to settle near here, on Pottinger’s Creek, 1785.  Father Whelan said first Mass in Kentucky here in 1787.  First Catholic church west of Alleghenies built here in 1792.  First monks, 1805, Trappist Fathers (Cistercians).  Present church erected in 1823, under direction of famous Belgian missionary, Charles Nerinckx.’  Many of the remains of these old settlers lie in this cemetery and have lain here a good two hundred years or more.

As with all cemeteries, due to weather and time, some of the stones are broken or uprooted.  The good people of the area have made a place in the cemetery for these stones.  Some are fragments of stones, some are intact, some readable, others not so much.  I want to share with you today photos taken in this area of the cemetery.  Much valuable information is here for those who cannot find their loved ones in the cemetery proper.

Ann C. Hagan, died February 20th 1849 in the 40th year of her age.

Robert Greenwell, born in 1792.

An old, unreadable stone.  Elizabeth J., wife of James M. Sims, born December 16, 1811, died June 30, 1863.

Ann, wife of Raphael Heard, died October 3, 1847, aged 82 years (born 1765).  Sacred to the Memory of Milly A. Hagan, who departed this life January 13, 1800, in the ___ year of her age (portion has flaked off stone).

Thomas Greenwell died April 11, 1843, aged 30 years, 4 months.

James Green, born May 10, 1825, died January 19, 1865.

Nancy, wife of John Pike, born January 8, 1805, died May 10, 1865.

Mary, wife of William Lush, died June 6, 1852, aged 81 years (born 1771).

Felix C. Roberts, born September 26, 1860, died July 8, 1889.

 

Inventory of Edward Barber Edwards – Washington County

Edward Barber Edwards is my 4th great-grandfather.  He married Nancy Linton, a daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.  Edward moved his family to Washington County, Kentucky, two years before the captain, perhaps making plans and preparing for their removal from Loudoun County, Virginia, two years later.  When he arrived in Springfield, the county seat, on November 27, 1816, he made oath the he ‘removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with him four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Polly and Charles.’  The four slaves that are listed on this inventory.

Edward was the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, born April 21, 1768.  Of their eight children six were born in Virginia – Susan Clark, John L., Catherine Kitural, Jonathan Joseph, Benjamin Mason, Mary Jane – and the last two in Kentucky – Martha L. and Sarah Barber Edwards.

Wife Nancy Linton Edwards lived another 36 years, passing away in 1861.

I’m always fascinated to read an inventory, see what was owned.  This inventory seems normal, stock, farming implements, dishes, furniture.  I’m not sure about the tea board – was this a small table or buffet holding a teapot and cups?  Since I enjoy my cup of tea so very much, I hope so!

I took photos of the original inventory to give a good idea of what it looked like – the coloring of the paper, the ink and the handwriting.  The names of the appraisers are all familiar to me – John Rudd’s family married into the Montgomery family; Thomas Janes’ son married Edward’s daughter, Mary Jane Edwards; and Thomas Hagan married a Linton.

Washington County, Kentucky

Will Book D, Pages 21-22

An Inventory of the Estate of Edward B. Edwards, deceased, taken at his late dwelling house on the 13 March 1824 by Thomas Janes, Thomas Hagan and John Rudd.

  • Slave Stephen – $200
  • Slave Charles – $250
  • Slave Polly – $150
  • Slave Hannah – $200
  • Wagon and gear – $80
  • One horse – $3
  • One horse – $40
  • One horse – $25
  • One horse – $6
  • One horse – $5
  • One horse – $5
  • One horse – $30
  • Twelve head of cattle – $60
  • Five calves – $7.50
  • Forty-four hogs – $44
  • Eight sheep – $8
  • Three sows and pigs – $9
  • Wheat fan – $5
  • Four shovel plows – $4
  • Two barshear plows and four single trees – $3
  • Two iron wedges – $0.75
  • Grindstone – $1.50
  • Three scythes and cradles – $4
  • Lot of old iron – $1.50
  • Five axes – $5
  • Seven hoes and mattock – $3
  • Crosscut saw and file – $4
  • Hand saw, drawing knife and two augers – $2
  • Three linen wheels – $3
  • Three large wheels – $3
  • Eight tubs – $2
  • Wooden ware – $0.75
  • Two kettles and hooks – 44
  • One loom – $5
  • Cupboard and furniture – $8
  • Six Windsor chairs – $6
  • Six chairs – $1
  • Knives and forks – $0.75
  • Pewter – $1.50
  • Two tables – $4
  • Looking glass – $0.75
  • Tea board – $1.50

  • One real – $0.50
  • One bedstead and furniture – $20
  • Two bedsteads and furniture – $40
  • Three trunks – $0.37
  • One teakettle and shovel – $1.50
  • One basket – $0.25
  • One chest – $1.50
  • Bed covering – $30
  • One bedstead and furniture – $15
  • Two bedsteads and furniture – $15
  • Three stays – $0.75

John Rudd, Thomas Janes, Thomas Hagan

At a County Court began and held for Washington County at the Court House in Springfield, on Monday the 14th day of June 1824.

This Inventory and appraisement of the Estate of Edward B. Edwards, deceased, was returned and ordered to be recorded which has accordingly been recorded in Will Book D, Page 21.

Att. John Hughes, Jr., W. C. C.

Golden Wedding Anniversary Celebrated In Danville In 1910

Newspaper articles from years ago give us a good insight into the lives of the citizens of its reach.  Wedding anniversaries are always a favorite of mine since they generally give much family information along with the happy occasion.

This particular one does not give information on the couple that reached the milestone anniversary of fifty years.  With just a bit of research it was easy to turn up the information.

Nicholas McDowell and Elizabeth McElroy received their marriage bond from Washington County on May 1, 1860, and married that day or shortly afterwards.  They appear in the 1860 census of Boyle County, Nicholas aged 26 and Elizabeth, 19 (not quite the 25 at her marriage as listed in the article!).  The couple had five children.  Annie, Nicholas, Susan and Bessie are listed in the census records with their parents, and to my knowledge never married.  In the latter census records it was listed that Nicholas and Elizabeth had five children, five living.  Finally, in the obituary for Nicholas, this fifth child is listed as Mrs. Carl J. McKnight, a daughter.  The couple lived in Shanghai, China, at one time, as well as New Jersey and New York, as mentioned in other articles.  I did find that this daughter was named Sallie, more formally, Sarah McDowell.

After celebrating their 50th wedding anniversary, Nicholas McDowell lived another three years, passing away March 7, 1913, at the age of 79.  He was born February 6, 1834, the son of Samuel McDowell and Martha Hawkins.

Elizabeth McElroy McDowell, lived on until January 6, 1922, dying at the age of 81.  She was born January 10, 1841, the daughter of Anthony McElroy and Ann Rice (not Sarah as listed in the article).

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, May 27, 1910

Fiftieth Anniversary

Of the Marriage of Colonel and Mrs. Nicholas McDowell Fittingly Celebrated at Their Hospitable Home on Maple Avenue, This City, Yesterday Afternoon

Like the horizon that is gilded by the rays of the declining sun on the evening of some perfect Autumn day, when a holy calm pervades the atmosphere and the face of Nature is as peaceful as that of a sleeping infant, are the lives of those whom God hath joined together in the holy bonds of matrimony and who have journeyed the rugged road of life’s pathway peacefully and lovingly together until the fiftieth milestone of the highway is reached, blessed with the affection and adoration of loving and dutiful children and crowned with the respect and the esteem of true and devoted friends.

And such is the record of Col. and Mrs. Nicholas McDowell, who on yesterday afternoon, at their beautiful home on Maple Avenue, this city, surrounded by their children and kinspeople and friends from this and other states, fittingly celebrated their Golden Wedding.

Fifty years ago, in the county of Washington, a double ceremony was pronounced which united in marriage two brothers, Nicholas and Samuel McDowell, and two sisters, Elizabeth and Martha McElroy, the first named of the brothers passing into the great beyond more than twenty years ago.

No less a rare occurrence than a golden wedding anniversary is the fact that Mrs. Nicholas McDowell is one of a family of ten children, born to Anthony and Sarah McElroy, of Springfield, Kentucky, all of whom are now living.  Mrs. McDowell being the fifth child, now in her seventy-fifth year, and seven of them being present at the happy occasion of yesterday afternoon.  Mrs. Mary McElroy Hughes, of Bloomfield, is the oldest, eighty-five, and John T. McElroy the youngest, sixty-three.

This is the fourth golden wedding that has been celebrated in this family within the last ten years, namely:  Charles McElroy, of Springfield, and his wife, who was Miss Mary Shuck; Sarah McElroy Grundy, of Springfield, and her husband, Palmer Grundy; Anthony McElroy, of Springfield, and his wife, Margaret Irvine, who was a native of Boyle County.

Mr Hugh McElroy, of Kansas City, had manufactured to his order ten cut glass tumblers, and under each glass at the wedding yesterday afternoon he caused to be placed fifty dollars in gold, a present to each of the brothers and sisters with their names in letters of gold upon the tumblers.  This unique remembrance was one of the features of the anniversary.

At least one hundred and fifty guests assembled at the hospitable mansion to offer Colonel and Mrs. McDowell their congratulations and best wishes on this memorable occasion, and each and every one departed with the feeling that it was good to have been there and to have witnessed this anniversary of the blending of fifty years into two happy, well-spent and venerated lives, and with the sincere hope that their declining days may still be illumined with the sunshine of love and affection, knowing that their children and their children’s children will rise up and call them blessed, and that the divine plaudit awaits them when life’s fitful fever is o’er – ‘Well done, good and faithful servants, enter thou into the joys of they Lord.’

Stephen L. Chasteen – Civil War Soldier – Dies At 81 Years of Age

Stephen L. Chasteen, 1845-1926.  His wife, Millie Ann Davis, 1849-1924.  Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

Sunday, October 17, 1926

Stephen Chasteen was a bugler in Company A, 6 Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, Union Army, during the Civil War.

According to the Company Descriptive Book he was 18 years of age when he joined the Union Army, six feet tall, of fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  Stephen was born in Rockcastle County, Kentucky.  He was a farmer.

Stephen Chasteen was captured at Woodville, Alabama, August 25, 1863, and confined at Richmond, Virginia, September 26, 1863.  He was paroled at City Point, Virginia, March 7, 1864; reported at C. B. Maryland, March 9, 1864, sent to C. P. Maryland November 1864, where he reported the same day.  Sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, March 9, 1864.

Stephen mustered out December 23, 1864, at Louisville, Kentucky.  He was a soldier for three years, including one being prisoner of war.

Isn’t it impressive that he was with the Regimental Brass Band from August to November of 1864?

 

 

Cemetery Hill in Springfield Final Resting Place of Anthony C. and Margaret Irvine McElroy

Anthony C. McElroy, August 14, 1835 – January 5, 1918.  His wife, Margaret C. Irvine, January 2, 1841 – May 1, 1913.  Cemetery Hill, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, May 3, 1913

Springfield, Kentucky, May 2 – The funeral of Mrs. Margaret Irvine McElroy, 72, wife of A. C. McElroy, cashier of the First National Bank of this place, was held this afternoon, the funeral services being conducted at the residence by the Rev. R. E. C. Lawson, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, of which Mrs. McElroy had for many years been a member.  The services were attended by relatives from throughout Central Kentucky and Louisville.  Mrs. McElroy died Thursday morning from an apoplectic stroke suffered at a Louisville infirmary, where she was undergoing treatment.  Prior to her marriage she was Miss Margaret Irvine.  She was married to Mr. McElroy in 1860.  she is survived by her husband and three sons – Lee, Ed and Emmet F. McElroy, all of Mason City, Nebraska.  Mrs. Emmet Field, of Crescent Hill, is a sister.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, January 7, 1918

Springfield, Kentucky, January 6 – Anthony C. McElroy, 86 years old, died this morning at his home in Springfield of paralysis.  He will be buried in the family lot at this place after services at the Presbyterian church.  He was a son of Anthony McElroy, one of the pioneer business men and financiers of this section of Kentucky, and a member of one of the old families of Central Kentucky.  For over forty years he was cashier of the First National Bank of this place, and retired from active service a few years ago.  Mr. McElroy was a Mason and a member of the Presbyterian church.  He is survived by two sons, Lee and Emmett McElroy, of Kansas City, and by the following brothers and sisters:  W. T. McElroy and Col. John I. McElroy, of Springfield; Mrs. Sam McDowell and Mrs. Nicholas McDowell, of Danville; Mrs. Emmett Field, of Crescent Hill, and Mr. Hugh L. McElroy of Kansas City, W. H. Field, of Louisville, is a nephew.

Wedding Announcements In The Hazel Green Herald – Wolfe County

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 9, 1887

The Caudill Twin Brothers are United to the Wells twin Sisters Under One Marriage Ceremony

Rev. W. R. Davis, of Morgan County, on Thursday, the third institute, officiated at one of the most remarkable weddings which ever took place in this section.  On that day he solemnized the right of matrimony between Robert Lee and John T. Caudill, of the first part, twins and sons of Abel Caudill, Rowan County, and Misses Mahala and Kalah Wells, of the second part, twins and daughters of William Wells, of Caney, Morgan County; Robert Lee married Miss Mahala and John T. united in the holy banns with Miss Kalah.  There were present about two hundred persons to witness the nuptials, and everything went merry.  This was truly a double wedding in every sense, except that Mr. Davis did not get a double fee.  Indeed, he would not accept any fee whatsoever, as the young brides were his nieces.  Brides and grooms were as happy as it is possible to be, but it is safe to predict that they have already gone to Rowan or soon will.  To prevent any serious trouble, therefore, we wish them abundant success in life, and modestly suggest that each of the grooms present his bride with a year’s subscription to The Herald, which insures happiness and long life in every household.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, December 19, 1895

Quite a romantic marriage took place in our quiet little village last Monday.  As per announcement in our last issue, Tom Lee, of Midland, Texas, and Miss Lucy Wallis, of near Daysboro, in this county, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  The bride and groom and the attendants were on horseback when the ceremony was pronounced by Elder J. T. Pieratt, after which the party galloped away.  The attendants were John Cecil and Miss Martha Byrd, George Byrd and Miss Minnie Wallis, Andy Blankenship and Miss Florida Gillaspie.  The party had dinner at the hospitable home of our fellow-countyman, Ed. F. Cecil, by way of an infair, and then dispersed with hands shaking and protestations of love and friendship for the future.  Mr. Lee and his wife left Tuesday for their western home, and all who know them join with us in the wish that they may have a long life of pleasure and prosperity.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, October 2, 1902

A Wedding and Wedding Feast

Married, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Roe Nickell, of our town, on Thursday, September 25th, Nick Bailey and Miss Eliza Nickell.  The bride is a very distant relative of mine host, where the ceremony was performed, and an orphan girl, both her parents being dead.  The groom is a young widower with three children, but a prosperous farmer of Morgan County.  Mr. Nickell and wife, F. M. Long and wife, Oscar Fallen and wife, and perhaps others of the good citizens of Dickville, for the nonce formed a trust by pooling their dinner-pots and honored the bridal couple with a dinner worthy of the occasion, after which the “two souls with but a single thought, two hears that beat as one,” left for their home on Tom’s Branch.