Tag Archives: Bellevue Cemetery

Thomas Madison Lillard and Mary Bright

The Advocate-Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Sunday, April 24, 1983

According to a family history, Thomas Madison Lillard was born December 5, 1815, near the small town of Kirksville on Silver Creek in Madison County.  He was one of five children of Thomas Lillard, a native of Culpeper County, Virginia, and Elizabeth Rider, a native of Madison County, Virginia.  The Lillards moved from Culpeper County to Madison County, Kentucky, in 1808.

When Thomas Madison Lillard was three months old, his father died, then in 1829 his mother died.  He was 14 years old, without patrimony and with no legacy, except a clear head, an honest heart, a good constitution, and well-directed energy and industry.

He as described as six feet tall, weighing about 200 pounds.  He had dark gray eyes, a Roman nose, a good set of teeth and black curly hair.  He was a French Huguenot.  Because he only attended school three months, his reading was poor.

As a young man, Lillard worked as a drover and stock trader, spending winters in Charleston, South Carolina, and summers herding livestock to the markets in New York.

On October 23, 1848, at the age of 33, he married Mary Bright Williams, a young widow of 25 years of age of Stanford.  After spending the winter in Charleston, South Carolina, the couple returned to Kentucky on May 27, 1849.

Eight months later, Lillard purchased 200 acres of land in Boyle County, part of the present homestead.  He later added to the farm to bring it to 500 acres in Boyle and Lincoln counties.  After his marriage he turned to farming.  He raised livestock, hay, and orchard grass seed, his money crop.

The family lived in a log house on the farm un1860 when the new house was ready.

Mary Bright Lillard was born March 16, 1823, on a farm owned by her parents, John Bright and Elizabeth Morrison, in Lincoln County.  Mary Bright Lillard is described as short – about five feet two inches – and stout.  She weighed 120 pounds in her younger days and 20 pounds in her most vigorous days.  Mrs. Lillard had dark brown hair and eyes.  She was one of nine children.

Thomas M. Lillard and his wife, Mary Bright, had 11 children – Elizabeth, Sarah F., John T., Henrietta, Mary T., Pet, Katherine, Thomas, Nannie B., S. J. and William H.

The youngest sons, Thomas and Wiliam acquired Spring Hill farm at their father’s death in 1891 and kept it until 1901.

Thomas Madison Lillard, born in Madison County, Kentucky, December 5, 1815, died in Boyle County, Kentucky, May 7, 1891.  ‘The friend of man, the friend of truth, The friend of age, the friend of youth.  Few hearts like his with virtue warmed, few heads with knowledge so informed.’  His wife, Mary Bright Hillard, March 16, 1823 – April 6, 1907.  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, May 8, 1891

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Monday, April 8, 1907

Husband and Wife? Brother and Sister?

Samuel N. Caldwell, December 15, 1857 – February 9, 1922.  Bettie A. Caldwell, September 2, 1849 – November 22, 1918.  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

At first glance this gravestone looks like any other.  A couple with their births and dates; most would think it husband and wife.  I did – until I searched for obituaries for them.  Now we would all be forgiven for thinking that, but Samuel and Bettie are actually brother and sister – children of James Barnes and Sarah J. (Crawford) Caldwell – old bachelor and maid that lived their lives together – with two other siblings.  The single life just seems to run in some families – such as my Linton and Montgomery lines.  The point I would like to make today, check original sources.  So important.  But a little more about Samuel and Bettie.

James B. Caldwell, September 16, 1822 – February 12, 1911.  Sarah J. Caldwell, December 26, 1823 – June 9, 1903.

Bettie was the first born of her parents.  She is listed in the Marion County births, born June 17, 1853, in that county near Cartrites Church (probably Cartright).  I’ve not heard of this church, although there were early settlements on Cartwright’s Creek.  There could have been a church there at one time.  Samuel was the fifth child, born December 15, 1857.

Sarah J. Crawford was born in Marion County, her husband in Green County.  Before the 1870 census the couple and their family of seven moved to Boyle County, where they spent the remainder of their days.  A daughter, Maggie, is listed in the 1870 and 1880 census, but I could find no further information.  Daughter Kate married Wood Walker.  Daughter Harriet (Haggie in the census) lived at home.  Daughter Susan married a Newbolt.

After the deaths of their parents John Crawford, Samuel Nelson, Harriet and Bettie A., lived together, until their end days.  John Crawford Caldwell was the last to pass away, in 1938.

Harriet E. Caldwell, December 12, 1860 – May 27, 1912.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 28, 1912

Miss Harriet Caldwell died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, yesterday.  She was in the fifty-third year of her age.  The funeral will be at the residence at 4 o’clock this afternoon, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.  Deceased was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church and the funeral will be conducted by the pastor.  She is survived by three sisters and two brothers, Miss Bettie Caldwell, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt, Mrs. W. B. Walker, Mr. John C. Caldwell and Mr. S. N. Caldwell.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, November 22, 1918

Miss Bettie A. Caldwell died in a Lexington Hospital this morning.  The body will be brought to Danville and funeral services will be held at the grave in Bellevue Cemetery tomorrow (Saturday) at 2:30 p.m.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, February 10, 1922

The Advocate deeply regrets to chronicle the death of Mr. Samuel Nelson Caldwell, which occurred last night at 6 o’clock at the home of his brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Pike, where he had made his home for the past several years.  For a number of years the deceased was in the grocery business in Danville, where by his universal courteous treatment and square dealing he won for himself a host of staunch friends, all of whom will read of his demise with the deepest regret.  The funeral will be held at the home tomorrow morning on the Alum Springs Pike at eleven o’clock and will be conducted by the Rev. Frank J. Cheek, of this city, who has been a friend of the family since boyhood.  The deceased was a member of long standing of Old Caldwell Church and always lived up to the Presbyterian faith.  He was in his sixty-fourth year and had lived all of his splendid life in this county, where he was born.  He is survived by one brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, and two sisters, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt and Mrs. W. D. Walker, both of whom live in this county.  After the funeral ceremony the burial will follow in Bellevue Cemetery.

Sue C. Newbolt, June 17, 1863 – July 1, 1933.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Monday, July 3, 1933

Mrs. Newbolt Is Taken By Death

Mrs. Sue C. Newbolt, 80 years old, died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, at 8 o’clock Saturday night after an illness of some duration, brought on by advanced years.

Funeral services were held at 10 o’clock this morning by Dr. George E. Sweazey, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery here.  Casketbearers were:  Sam C. Walker, George l. Mahan, Ben Clark, Will Caldwell, S. H. Nichols, Ned Wiseman.

Mrs. Newbolt, who was a member of an old and distinguished Boyle County family, is survived by one brother, Mr. Caldwell, and one sister, Mrs. W. D. Walker, of Perryville.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, December 16, 1938

John C. Caldwell Is Buried Today

Funeral services for John Crawford Caldwell, 87 years old, former Danville merchant and Boyle County farmer, who died at 1:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Danville and Boyle County hospital, were conducted at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon in the chapel of Stith Funeral home on West Main Street by Dr. William E. Phifer, Jr., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.

The deceased was in the dry goods and notion business in Danville under the firm name of Roberts and Caldwell.  both gentlemen were held in highest esteem in this city by all who did business with their house, which was that now occupied by Dr. M. D. Spoonamore, local druggist.

Bearers were:  Ben Clark, William Caldwell, J. B. Nichols, Sr., Nicholas McDowell, Joseph Irvine and Charles Caldwell.

Mr. Caldwell was born November 27, 1851, in Boyle County, the son of the late James Barnes Caldwell and Sarah Jane Crawford Caldwell of Marion County.  He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Danville.

Surviving are two nieces and two nephews, Miss Maude W. Adams, Amityville, R.I., Mrs. J. W. Craft, Hazard, Kentucky, James B. Walker, Flint, Michigan, and J. C. Brown, Atlanta, Georgia, and one great-nephew, Marshall Mahan of Wheelwright, Kentucky.

 

 

Colonel Joseph McDowell of Boyle County

The McDowell name is well known to those of us in Mercer and Boyle counties.  The Danville hospital, Ephraim McDowell, is visited by many in the area, named for the eminent doctor of the same name, and brother to Colonel Joseph McDowell.  Following are a couple of old newspaper articles about the McDowell family, the first concerning the colonel’s daughter, Anna.

The Olive Branch and Danville Advertiser, Boyle County, Kentucky

Thursday, December 15, 1825

Married – On Thursday evening last, by he Rev’d Samuel K. Nelson, Mr. Abram I. Caldwell, to Miss Ann McDowell, daughter of Col. Joseph McDowell – all of this vicinity.

The second concerns family members moved from a family cemetery to Bellevue Cemetery in Danville.

Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Friday, June 3, 1892

Col. Nicholas McDowell, commissioner of agriculture, completed Tuesday the removal of two of his ancestors from the old Gov. Adair farm, in Mercer County, to the Danville Cemetery [Bellevue].  They were Samuel McDowell, who died in 1830, and his wife, who died in 1816.  A portion of Mrs. McDowell’s coffin was well preserved, showing the walnut wood and velvet bound to wood by brass tacks.  From this same Mercer County farm the remains of Gov. Adair and wife were 16 years ago taken to the Frankfort Cemetery.  In the Danville cemetery, in addition to those placed there Tuesday, and in the same lot, are the bodies of Col. Joseph McDowell and wife, Judge Samuel McDowell, the eminent jurist, and wife.  The dust of Dr. Ephraim McDowell, another of this prominent pioneer family, is in the old cemetery, now called McDowell Park, adjoining the First Presbyterian Church.  Mr. Samuel McDowell, the father of the commissioner, who died in 1859, and his wife, are also buried in the Danville cemetery.

I checked my photographs taken in Bellevue Cemetery, but had none for the McDowell family – I see another trip there in the future!

Historic Families of Kentucky, Green, 1889

Colonel Joseph McDowell of Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

The fifth son of Judge Samuel McDowell and Mary McClung, Joseph, was born September 13, 1768.  A child when the Revolution commenced, and still a boy when it ended, yet was his character molded by the stirring events transpiring around him, and by the patriotic deeds to the narration of which he was an eager listener.  Coming to Kentucky, with his father, in 1784, his youth was passed in intimate association with the men who, in Danville conventions, prepared the way for separation from Virginia, and who established and gave its peculiar tone to the commonwealth.

In the Indian campaigns, in which Kentuckians were engaged in the North-west, between the dates of his attaining the age for military service and the treaty which followed the victory of ‘Mad Anthony’ Wayne, he was a prompt and brave participant.  He was a private in Brown’s company, in Scott’s expedition of 1791.  He was in both expeditions under General Hopkins, 1812.  The reputation for good sense, sound judgement, military capacity and courage won therein, induced his appointment, by Shelby, to the position of adjutant-general upon the staff of that hard fighting commander.  He served from the beginning to the close of Shelby’s campaign in the North-west, and was at the Thames, where Tecumseh fell.  For good conduct and valuable service rendered in that campaign and battle, he received complimentary mention, not only by his immediate commander, but also from General Harrison.

The occupation of Colonel Joseph McDowell was that of a farmer.  Disdaining all shams, and himself one of the most unassuming of men, his was eminently a veracious character; in the perfect uprightness and simplicity of his life, there was a constant beauty.  One of the most amiable, quiet and unobtrusive of men, of all his sex there was none more resolute and determined.  A ruling elder of the Presbyterian Church for many years, and devoutly religious, in his observance thereof there was no parade.  In the decline of his honorable life, after he had withdrawn from all active participation in public affairs, the writer was witness to the respectful deference shown him by the entire community among whom he lived.  He died, in Danville, June 27, 1856, at the good old age of eighty-eight years.

The excellent wife of Colonel Joseph McDowell was Sarah Irvine, sister to Anne Irvine, who married his brother, Samuel – a relative, whose symmetrical character made her, in every way, worthy of such a man.  Samuel, their oldest son, married, first, Amanda Ball, granddaughter of John Reed, already mentioned, and a cousin of James G. Birney.  Of this marriage, the sole issue was a daughter, who was the wife of Dr. Meyer, of Boyle County.  This Samuel McDowell, married, secondly, Martha Hawkins, by whom he had children, among them Samuel and Nicholas, both farmers in Boyle County.

Colonel Joseph McDowell’s oldest daughter, Anna, married Abram I. Caldwell, descended from one of the most reputable of the Scotch-Irish families of the Valley, and a farmer of Boyle; they have a number of children living in that county.

Sarah, the second daughter of Colonel Joseph McDowell, married Michael Sullivant, of Columbus, Ohio.  Of wonderful energy and the most sanguine temper, Mr. Sullivant engaged in gigantic agricultural enterprises, first upon his inherited acres in Ohio, and afterwards in Illinois.  He is best known to the world as the once owner of the princely estates of ‘Broadlands’ and ‘Burr Oaks,’ in the latter state.  Throughout the most tremendous operations, and amid the saddest vicissitudes, he preserved an untarnished honor and the sunniest of tempers.  Large hearted as well as of herculean stature; free handed as he was unreserved and cordial in manner; frank, generous, hospitable and cheery, his image will continue with the living as the most pleasant of memories.  The only son of Sarah McDowell and Michael Sullivant, Joseph McDowell, is a prosperous farmer near Homer, Illinois.  Annie, one of their daughters, is the wife of E. L. Davison, now of Louisville; and Lucy, another daughter, is the wife of Wm. Hopkins, a grandson of General Samuel Hopkins, and resides in Henderson, Kentucky.

Margaret Irvine McDowell, the third daughter of Colonel Joseph, of Danville, was the first wife of Joseph Sullivant, of Columbus, a younger brother of Michael.  Mr. Joseph Sullivant’s second wife was Mary Eliza Brashear, granddaughter of Judge William McDowell.  He was a man of cultivated tastes, devoted to scientific pursuits, too public spirited for his own welfare in a pecuniary sense, and did much to develop literary and scientific ambitions and enterprises in his native Columbus.  In many ways a public benefactor, in all ways he was a useful citizen, and at all times a gentleman.  He lived to a venerable and respected old age.  His first wife died in giving birth to their only child, Margaret Irvine Sullivant, the wife of Henry B. Carrington, a brigadier-general of volunteers in the Union army, colonel of the Eighteenth Regular Infantry, now on the retired list – a gallant and capable officer.  Mrs. Carrington is dead; two worthy sons survive her.

Magdalen, the fourth daughter of Colonel Joseph McDowell, of Danville, married Caleb Wallace, a lawyer, of Danville; her husband was a grandson of Judge Caleb Wallace, of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, whose wife was a sister of Colonel William Christian.  Mrs. Magdalen Wallace is still living, in Danville, blessed with two manly sons, McDowell and Woodford.

McFerran’s Buried In Bellevue Cemetery

Earlier in the week I published a post on James B. McFerran and his family – originally immigrants from Ireland before the beginning of the American revolution.  To read more about this family click here.

Yesterday Ritchey and I visited Bellevue Cemetery in Danville, Boyle County, where many of the family are buried.  The larger stone is for the parents of James B. – James M. and Ruth Brown McFerran.

Mrs. Ruth B. McFerran, born October 31, 1811, died September 26, 1885.  ‘There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God.’  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

J. M. McFerran, born November 26, 1809, died September 17, 1884.  ‘Ask his neighbors.’

I’ve never seen such a simple line on a gravestone, but it speaks volumes.

James B. McFerran

Mattie Davis McFerran, James’ wife.

Leila McFerran Farris, James and Mattie’s daughter.

Lucy M. Welch, 1846-1927.  James B.’s sister.

Elizabeth McFerran, wife of William Crow, 1837-1919.  James B.’s sister.

William Crow, 1831-1900.  James B.’s brother-in-law.

A few others are buried in this lot, probably grandchildren to James M. and Ruth Brown McFerran.

James B. McFerran of Boyle County

James B. McFerran came from a long line of paternal James’, his grandfather emigrating from Ireland in 1761.  In the 1870 Census of Boyle County, James, 28, was living with his parents, James M. and Ruth Brown McFerran.  He is listed as a lawyer, as well as his 24-year-old brother, William.  In the 1880 Census, four years after his marriage to Mattie Davis, the couple are listed as boarders in a hotel in Danville, run by J. P. Thorel, and with them lives their 3-year-old daughter, Lela B.

Our story takes a sad turn as James B. McFerran died in Louisville, May 26, 1893, from hydatid cysts of the liver and spleen.  This was a parasitic infestation that is rather rare, especially to form in the spleen, as only 4% of cases do.  This is endemic in farming areas, and we know he came from a large farming family, as did his wife’s family.  Wife Mattie lived another 57 years.  She died May 22, 1944, and is buried in Bellevue Cemetery in Danville, Section 4, Lot 13, with her husband and other family members.

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1887

Boyle County, Kentucky

James B. McFerran was born September 17, 1841, in Boyle County, Kentucky, and is the third of six sons and four daughters born to James M. and Ruth (Brown) McFerran.  James M. McFerran was born November 26, 1809, two miles south of Danville; was a large farmer and trader in stock; served as justice for twenty-four years, and represented his county one term in the lower house of the Kentucky Legislature, and died September 17, 1884.  He was a son of James McFerran, who was born in Ireland, July 16, 1757, and came to the United States with his parents when a lad of four years, and settled in Botetourt County, Virginia; when a young man about eighteen or twenty, he migrated, and located four miles south of Danville and became a substantial farmer and slave owner.  He married Elizabeth Young, of Lincoln County, and died in 1835, aged seventy-eight years.  He was the son of Martin McFerran, who came to Virginia from Ireland with his three sons, John, James and Martin, before the war for independence.  His religion was Presbyterian.  Mrs. Ruth (Brown) McFerran was born in Franklin County, Kentucky, in 1811, a daughter of Scott and Lucy (Monday) Brown, of Scotch descent.  She died September 26, 1855.  Scott Brown was a large farmer, and served as magistrate and sheriff of Franklin County.

James B. McFerran graduated from Centre College in the class of 1862; was a trader until 1867, when he began the study of law.  In the winter of 1867-1868 he attended the law school at Louisville, and was soon after admitted to the bar at Danville, where he had an excellent practice.  He has served as master commissioner four years, and also represented his county in the Kentucky Legislature in 1873-1874.  In 1883 he located on a farm of 200 acres, two miles south of Danville.  He was married May 17, 1876, to Miss Mattie Davis, daughter of James H. and Mattie (Alexander) Davis, the former a native of Garrard, and the latter a native of Mercer Count, Kentucky.  James H. Davis located in Boyle County about 1852, and became a leading farmer and breeder of shorthorns.  He had the reputation of having the finest herd of shorthorns in the state, realizing fabulous prices, but paying as high as $5,000 for a single bull.  He was a son of Asel and Sarah (Tucker) Davis, from Virginia.

Mr. and Mrs. McFerran have one bright daughter to bless their home.  In politics he is a Democrat, and is now engaged in the practice of his profession at Danville.

Cemetery Symbology

773Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky

Every time we visit a cemetery and search for our ancestor’s gravestones, we notice the beautiful array of figures – angels, men, women, children – who adorn some of the markers – as well as what is on the stones themselves – urns, anchors, flowers, trees, hands, doves, etc.  I decided it was time to do a bit of research on the subject.  And what I found will make me never look at a gravestone the same again – look for the symbols next time you visit and it will be a new and interesting way to look at the final resting place of those you love and honor.

IMG_8313Bellevue Cemetery, Boyle County, Kentucky

Angels grace the tops of many stones – above is the Michael the Archangel – he is always seen with his sword.

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Battle Grove Cemetery, Harrison County, Kentucky

This is the Angel Gabriel – he is always represented holding a horn.

IMG_6208Indianapolis Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana

An angel, with cross behind, holding what appears to be leaves – there is also a lily of the valley at her feet.

IMG_0354Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky

The draped urn is a 19th century symbol of the veil between heaven and earth.  Cremation was not practiced at this time, it was simply a decorative touch.

200St. Rose Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky

This stone shows the hand of God coming down from the clouds, holding a broken chain.  This could be a symbol of the chain of sin, or the opening of the gates of heaven after Jesus’s death on the cross.

IMG_6144Indianapolis Cemetery

The anchor has always been a symbol of hope.  But many times the anchor is also shown as a cross, as in this example.  The anchor also holds particular significance since this gentleman was killed while serving in the U.S. Navy.

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Carlisle Cemetery, Nicholas County, Kentucky

This is one of my favorite gravestones!  ‘Do not weep.  She is not dead, only sleeping.’  Many memorials have the figures of men, women and children – a lovely memory of those gone before.

IMG_8334Bellevue Cemetery, Boyle County, Kentucky

From about 1880 to 1920 this gravestone in the form of a tree trunk was very popular, especially with a group called Woodman of the World.  This group was much like the Odd Fellows, or Masons, or our Rotary or Lions groups of today.  The tree stump is broken, symbolizing the end of life.  For some time this group provided every member with a gravestone – they felt everyone deserved to be remembered!  This particular example is very striking due to the palm fronds at the base, and the ivy growing up the tree.

IMG_8440Frankfort Cemetery, Franklin County, Kentucky

This is a beautiful example of a Celtic Cross – always represented with a circle.  As in this example they are usually very decorative, with many carved symbols.  This cross can be used for anyone, but especially by those of Irish and Scottish ancestry.

IMG_8945Hillsborough Baptist Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky

A hand with a finger pointing up means the soul has risen to heaven.  This example even has the words ‘Gone Home’ added to the symbol.

IMG_2004Battle Grove Cemetery, Harrison County, Kentucky

Hands together are a symbol of matrimony.  If you look closely you will see a man and woman’s hand, represented by cuff of a suit and shirt, and a bit of frilly cuff representing the woman’s dress.  There is also the addition of the unbroken chain representing the love that still exists.

IMG_2028Old Cynthiana Cemetery, Harrison County, Kentucky

This gravestone is rife with symbolism!  At the very top is the open hand holding a heart, the symbol of love.  Beneath that is the all-seeing eye, an ancient symbol for God.  And below that is a tent – the portable structure that housed the Ark of the Covenant while the Israelites traveled through the desert.  Today it symbolizes a place to summon the powers of God.  There are many Masonic symbols on this stone; surely this gentleman was a member.

IMG_3097Battle Grove Cemetery, Harrison County, Kentucky

And finally we have a young child, a life ended far too soon.  The lad is dressed, ready for school, resting his arm on his books.  His cap rests beside him.

These I pulled from photos taken at various cemeteries throughout the state, and a few from Indianapolis.  I can’t wait to visit a cemetery with the primary goal of looking for particular symbols.  I believe we’ll have another blog then!  Happy researching!

 

 

Robert Russell and Malinda Parrish

IMG_8691Robert Russel, born in Petersburg, Virginia, August 6, 1792, died June 20, 1873.  Malinda Russel, born in Goochland County, Virginia, May 14, 1795, died March 15, 1877, Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Robert Russel was the son of Robert Russel, Sr., and Janet Robinson, both born in Edinburgh, Scotland.  The parents married and came to America shortly thereafter, their first child being born at sea during the journey.  Robert was born in Petersburg, Virginia, August 6, 1792, and came to Kentucky at the age of eight years.

Robert, Jr., married Malinda Parrish April 28, 1817, in Mercer County, Kentucky.  Malinda was the daughter of Nicholas Parrish, a soldier of the War of 1812, born May 14, 1795, in Goochland County, Virginia.

Robert was a brickmaker and mason.  He built Centre College Home in 1820 and nearly all the first brick buildings in Danville.  Boyle County was formed from Lincoln and Mercer counties in 1842, with Danville as the county seat.

In the 1850 census of Boyle County Robert is listed as 58, a brick maker, Malinda, 51, Edward, 30 and Josephine, 22.  In 1860 Robert is 67, Malinda, 62, and son Robert, 37.  In 1870 Robert, 77, and Malinda, 72, are living alone.  One additional daughter, Isabelle, is not listed in any census record.  She married John Andrew Lyle September 27, 1852.