Tag Archives: Benjamin Harrison

1783 Marriage of James Stevens and Susannah Haydon

James Stevens was born in Orange County, Virginia, July 23, 1757, and died September 3, 1832, in Warren County, Kentucky.  He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, enlisted in Orange County, and served in the Second Virginia Regiment.  Susannah Haydon, his wife, was born in Virginia, March 25, 1768, and died January 9, 1839, in Warren County.  They were married in Lincoln County, Kentucky (Virginia at the time), July 9, 1783.

I will mention that it was not Thomas Harrison that was Governor of Virginia at this time, but Benjamin Harrison.  He lived at his plantation home known as Berkeley. 

Ritchey and I visited this home last year while in Virginia – it is quite beautiful and commands a majestic view of the James River.  We had afternoon tea under the huge trees of the yard.

Know all men by these presents that we, James Stevens and Richard Beale, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of July 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James Stevens and Susannah Haydon, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

James Stevens, Richard Beale

Sealed and delivered in presence of Willis Green

Lincoln County

Sir,

Please to grant Mr. James Stevens his license to marry my daughter, Susannah Haydon, and oblige, sir, your humble servant.

John Haydon, July 9th 1783

Mr. Willis Green

Test. John Conner, Abner Haydon

McDougal and Farquhan 1783 Marriage Bond and Consent

I do apologize for no post yesterday.  Saturday I planned this marriage bond and consent for Sunday, even scanned both.  I’m working on a cookbook and because so engrossed Saturday I worked until about 10:00 at night – it was just too late for a blog.  Life sometimes happens.

This marriage bond does not contain the day of the month it was written, but the consent gives the date of November 10th.  Lincoln County was still a part of Virginia at the time – notice the governor is Benjamin Harrison.

Know all by these presents that we, Charles McDougal and Stephen Archer, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Benjamin Harrison, Esquire, Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money to the payment whereof well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this day of November 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Charles McDougal and Elizabeth Farquhan, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

Charles McDougal, Stephen Archer

Sealed and delivered in the presence of Willis Green

Whereas Charles McDougal and my daughter, Elizabeth, being inclined to join in matrimony, you will please therefore grant license and in so doing you will oblige your servant.  Given under my hand and seal this 10 day of November 1783.

Robert Farquhan

Test.

Stephen Archer, Hugh Edmonson, Ash Edmonson

Samuel Young 1786 Will

Another of the early wills from the Kentucky wilderness, still within the boundaries of the State of Virginia.  Samuel Young was sure he had not long to live in this world, and he was correct.  The will was written on the fourth day of June, 1786, and he died within two weeks.  The mention of his having medicines and money due on account wonder if he was a very early druggist – or just acting as one?  There is no mention of wife or children, so he was one of the many who lived alone in the Kentucky wilderness.

young-will-2In the name of God Amen.  I, Samuel Young, now in Bourbon County and State of Virginia, being of sound memory and duly sensible, but weak and conceiving I will soon depart this life, for the settling my temporal affairs do make this my last will and testament.  First, and principally, I commend my soul to Almighty God, who is the giver, hoping through the merit of my blessed Redeemer, Jesus Christ, to obtain forgiveness of all my sins and wickednesses.

Imprimis.  I do give and bequeath unto John Dawson of Bourbon County and State of Virginia, all my property which do unto me belong on goods, medicine, or monies due me unto me on account.  Note of hand or otherwise now in the said Commonwealth of Virginia and do hereby desire that the said John Dawson will, in a decent and Christian manner, bury my body and do appoint him, the said John Dawson, Executor to this my last will and testament, revoking all others and ratifying and confirming this to be my last.  Given under my hand and sealed with my seal this fourth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty six.

Samuel Young

In presence of Benjamin Harrison, John Trimble, John Farlow

At a Court held for Bourbon County on Tuesday the 20th June 1786

The last will and testament of Samuel Young, deceased, was proved by the oaths of Benjamin Harrison, John Trimble and John Farlow, witnesses thereto and on the motion of John Dawson, executor therein named, who acknowledged bond and made oath according to law, certificate is granted him for obtaining probate thereof in due form.

Test. John Edwards, Clerk