Tag Archives: Bucks County Pennsylvania

The Wallace Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

The Wallace family is represented in Maple Grove Cemetery, on Main Street in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, with several gravestones.  The two oldest are for Joseph and Sarah Wallace.  You can see them beside/slightly behind the large Wallace stone.

Joseph Wallace was born March 9, 1779, and died February 19, 1855.  Joseph’s parents were John Wallace and Jane Finley.  John Wallace was an ensign in 1776, in Captain James Moore’s company, 5th Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Anthony Wayne’s command.  He was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died in Fayette County, Kentucky.

In Joseph Wallace’s will, dated April 21, 1853, he gives his daughter, Mary J. Brown, ‘undivided interest in and to three slaves, namely Sam, Eliza and Solomon, purchased of Briers Heirs and now in the hands of Mary J. Brown, administrator of Thomas J. Brown, deceased, my interest in said slaves being one fifth part of the same, also her note executed by her as administrator for one hundred and fifty dollars, together with whatever interest may be due thereon, at the time of my death.  Also, one thousand dollars in cash.’

Son James Wallace received his father’s tract of land in Jessamine County, where the father resided, about four hundred and sixty acres, also four Negroes, his selection, out of all the slaves.

Two Negroes are given in trust to his executor, for the use and benefit of my daughter, Margaret Harris, Emily and Nancy, 13 and 7 years old, respectively, who are now with the said Margaret in Boyle County, also one half of a tract of land in Boyle County, containing about one hundred and eighty one acres, upon which Nathaniel Harris now lives, land and Negroes to remain in the hands of my executor for the use and benefit of daughter Margaret – perhaps he didn’t trust his son-in-law.

All slaves, land, chattel, etc., are to be sold and the money divided between my daughter, Mary J. Brown, and the share to my executor, in trust for my daughter Margaret Harris.  Thomas E. West was named executor.

Sarah Barr, wife of Joseph Wallace, was born February 1, 1780, and died September 16, 1852.  She and Joseph married June 23, 1809, in Fayette County, Kentucky.

James Wallace, son of Joseph and Sarah, left a very impressive monument in the cemetery – or it could have been his children since there is ‘Our Father’ and ‘Our Mother’ above their names on the stone.  James married Margaret Mays, May 2, 1850.  Due to the date of marriage, tiny Anna Wallace must have been their first child.

James Wallace was a rather wealthy man.  In the 1860 Census of Jessamine County he is listed as a farmer, with real estate valued at $27,000, and personal estate at $15,000.  In the census James is 48, Margaret is 36, Joseph is 7, Sarah is 4, and Virginia is 8/12.  Mother-in-law Anna Mays, 67, is living with the family.  She was born in North Carolina.

In the 1870 census James is 58.  His property is valued at $34,000, with personal estate of $10,000.  Margaret is 44, Joseph is 17, Sidia (Sarah) is 15, and Virginia is 12.

James died in 1875 and, Margaret, less than a year later.

James Wallace, born February 8, 1812, died June 25, 1875. Margaret Mays Wallace, born September 29, 1826, died April 10, 1876. Maple Grove Cemetery, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

 

The Jolly Family

from Kentucky – A History of the State by Perrin – 1887

Breckinridge County

The Jolly Family were among the earliest settlers in Breckinridge County.  Nelson Jolly, the progenitor of the family in Kentucky, was a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  In 1780 he left that state in company with thirteen other families and immigrated to Kentucky, then beyond the borders of civilization.  The little band stopped at the mouth of Beargrass Creek – the present site of Louisville, where they remained one year.  Not satisfied with the look of the surrounding country they determined to go further, and in 1781 they embarked in flat boats and floated down the Ohio, landing at the mouth of Sinking Creek.  From there they proceeded through the unbroken forest until they reached the spot where Hardinsburg now stands, which place had previously been selected as a place of settlement by the leader of the band – William Hardin.  Here they at once constructed a log fort, as a protection against the Indians, that soon became known on the frontier as “Hardin’s Fort”.  In this rude fortification the little band remained for several years.  Mr. Jolly was an inmate of the fort some two years, when he located two miles west of Hardinsburg, and lived there until his death, in 1814.  Nelson Jolly, Jr., his son, was also born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in 1786, and was quite young when the family came to Kentucky.  He grew to manhood in Breckinridge County, and was a man of some prominence.  He was a magistrate a number of years, and as senior magistrate of the county, under the old constitution, became high sheriff, and then was again elected magistrate and served out his term, and became sheriff a second time, January 15, 1849.  He lived for a number of years at the mouth of Sugar Tree Run, in the Union Star Precinct, and there he died, in November, 1878.  His wife was Barbara Barr, born in 1781, and died in 1863. Her father, Adam Barr, was a native of Virginia; came to Kentucky in 1792, and settled near where the village of Union Star now stands; he died there in 1859, at the age of one hundred years.  The children of Nelson and Barbara Jolly were Mary, Sallie (deceased), John B., James G. (deceased), Samuel J., Gideon P., Bettie A., Adam N., Thomas J., David C. (deceased), H. Clay and Francis M. (deceased).

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

John Watson was a Private in the Virginia Militia.  John entered the service at Powhatan County, Virginia, in 1780.  John served under Captain Mayho in the regiment commanded by Col. Faulkner in the brigade commanded by Captain Stephens.  John marched to Hillsborough in North Carolina.  He marched from Hillsborough, North Carolina, to South Carolina and joined the army of General Yates at Watson’s Mills.  John moved to Adair County, Kentucky, some time between 1799 and 1809.  John was born November 18, 1763, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth in December 1782.  John died July 31, 1849, in Barren County, Kentucky.

James Weir was a Private in the Pennsylvania Line.  James entered the service in 1775 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  James lived in Adair County, Kentucky, then he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois.  James was born in 1756 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, married Lydia Richards March 10, 1793, in Frederick County, Maryland.  Lydia was born May 27, 1770.  James died February 12, 1837, in Sangamon County, Illinois.

Thomas White was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Thomas lived in Virginia five or six years after his Revolutionary War service, then moved to Fayette County, Kentucky, for about seven years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  Thomas was born March 15, 1763.

Philip Winfrey was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Philip entered the service in 1780, at Buckingham County, Virginia.  Philip was a substitute for John Winfrey, a drafted militiaman under Captain Anthony Winston, Asap Walker and Lieutenant John January.  He marched on Cabin Point, and there joined Major Jones’ battalion and remained there for 2 months; thence to Cooper’s Mill.  Philip lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, until 1795, when he moved to Lincoln County, Kentucky.  He lived in Lincoln County for two years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky, in 1797.  Philip Winfrey was born in 1764, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  Philip was the son of John Winfrey.  He married Martha Northcult.  Philip died in 1841 in Adair County.

David Winniford was a Sergeant in the Virginia Line.  He entered the service in 1777 in Virginia.  David lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, Cumberland County, Virginia, and Adair County, Kentucky.  David married Judith November 16, 1780, in Cumberland County, Virginia.  He died in Cumberland County, Virginia, April 26, 1834.

John Yates was a Lieutenant in the Virginia Line.  John entered the service in Culpeper County, Virginia.  He lived in Culpeper County near Sperryville (now Rappahannock County) until 1774.  He moved to Adair County, Kentucky, before 1810.  John was born in 1752 in Caroline County, Virginia.  He was the son of Captain George Yates.  He married Elizabeth Gaines December 17, 1787.  Elizabeth was born 1757 in Culpeper County, Virginia.  She died July 1820 in Barren County, Kentucky.  John died in 1820 in Adair County, Kentucky.

William Young was a Private in the North Carolina Militia.  William entered the service October 13, 1777, in Rowan County, North Carolina.  William served in Col. Lock’s regiment.  He stated in his affidavit that he received thirteen wounds and all the troops were killed except for Captain Snipes, himself and three or four others.  William lived in Rowan County, North Carolina, after the war, then in 1787 he moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  William was born in 1760.  He was the son of Jonathan Young.  William married Elizabeth.  He died July 11, 1838.

Harvey H. Gillam Biography

from Book of Biographies, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

HARVEY H. GILLAM is a prominent real estate dealer and public-spirited citizen of the village of Langhorne, Bucks County, Pa., and is a worthy representative of an old and pioneer family of Bucks County.  He was born in the above village July 23, 1846, and is a son of Harvey and Hannah (Hunt) Gillam, and grandson of William Gillam.  Simon Gillam, our subject’s great-grandfather, was also a native of Bucks County, and was of English parentage; he was a Quaker preacher and owned an estate of 400 acres of land in this county.  His son William, the grandfather of our subject, was also born in this county, and upon the death of his father inherited the property, and followed agricultural pursuits the remainder of his active days.  He was joined in marriage with Susanna Woolston, by whom he reared a family of four sons and five daughters, namely:  Harvey, Jonathan, William, Simon, Elizabeth, Anna, Hannah, Susan and Mary.  William Gillam died in 1840 at the age of fifty-four; his widow attained the age of seventy-two.  He and his family were prominent members of the Society of Friends.  Mr. Gillam was a hard and industrious worker, and enjoyed the good-will of many friends.  Harvey Gillam, Sr., was born on the old farm, near Langhorne, in 1814, and was engaged in tilling the soil during his early days.  He purchased a farm two miles east of the village, but on account of poor health he later sold that property and engaged in the mercantile business in Langhorne, and then returned to farming, purchasing a small farm of 30 acres near the village.  He soon gave up farming and went to Philadelphia, where he was engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe business; after closing out that business he became a member of the Farrell Herring Co., fire-proof safe manufacturers, remaining in that business until his death occurred.  In politics he was a strong Republican.  He was wedded to Hannah Hunt, of Chester County, Pa., and they became the parents of four children, as follows: Mary W., the wife of William Albertson, of Philadelphia; W. Henry died, aged thirty years; Morris, also deceased, and Harvey H., the subject of this memoir.  The mother of our subject departed from this life in 1857.  Harvey H. Gillam was intellectually trained in the Friends’ School, and completed his education at the Friends’ Central School in Philadelphia; when a young man he embarked in agricultural pursuits, purchasing a farm of 150 acres in Middletown township, this county, upon which he resided for a period of twenty years.  In 1886 he rented his farm and moved to Langhorne, where he has since been engaged in the real estate business.  Mr. Gillam is a thorough business man and occupies a prominent position among the other substantial business men of his vicinity.  Fraternally, Mr. Gillam is a member of the Masonic Order, Bristol Lodge, No. 25; religiously, he is a member of the Society of Hicksite Friends.  Politically, he is a Republican, and has served ten years as justice of the peace, during which time he has settled many estates.  Mr. Gillam was one of the chief promoters of the Langhorne, Newtown & Bristol Electric Street Railway Co., and was also secretary and a director of the same; he is a member and director of the Langhorne Building & Loan Association; and is a director of the Farmers’ National Bank of Bucks County at Bristol, Pa.  Our subject was married October 2, 1873, to Mary Mitchell, a daughter of Pierson and Caroline Mitchell.  Her father was president of the Farmers’ National Bank of Bucks County, at Bristol, Pa., and director of the People’s National Bank of Langhorne, Pa.  As a result of this happy union, a family of two daughters was reared, namely: Caroline M. and May.  Mr. Gillam has been remarkably successful in his business ventures; is enterprising and progressive, and commands the confidence and respect of a multitude of acquaintances throughout the county.

The Jolly Family

from Breckinridge County, Kentucky – Biographies

Part 1

The Jolly Family were among the earliest settlers in Breckinridge County.  Nelson Jolly, the progenitor of the family in Kentucky, was a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  In 1780 he left that state in company with thirteen other families and immigrated to Kentucky, then beyond the borders of civilization.  The little band stopped at the mouth of Beargrass Creek – the present site of Louisville, where they remained one year.  Not satisfied with the look of the surrounding country they determined to go further, and in 1781 they embarked in flat boards and floated down the Ohio, landing at the mouth of Sinking Creek.  From there they proceeded through the unbroken forest until they reached the spot where Hardinsburg now stands, which place had previously been selected as a place of settlement by the leader of the band – William Hardin.  Here they at once constructed a log fort, as protection against the Indians, that soon became known on the frontier as “Hardin’s Fort”.  In this rude fortification the little band remained for several years.  Mr. Jolly was an inmate of the fort some two years, when he located two miles west of Hardinsburg, and lived there until his death in 1814.  Nelson Jolly, Jr., his son, was also born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in 1786, and was quite young when the family came to Kentucky.  He grew to manhood in Breckinridge County, and was a man of some prominence.  He was a magistrate a number of years, and as senior magistrate of the county, under the old constitution, became high sheriff, and then was again elected magistrate and served out his term, and became sheriff a second time, January 15, 1849.  He lived for a number of years at the mouth of Sugar Tree Run, in the Union Star Precinct, and there he died, in November, 1878.  His wife was Barbara Barr, born in 1781, and died in 1863.  Her father, Adam Barr, was a native of Virginia; came to Kentucky in 1792, and settled near where the village of Union Star now stands; he died there in 1859, at the age of one hundred years.  The children of Nelson and Barbara Jolly were Mary, Sallie, John B., James G., Samuel J., Gideon P., Bettie A., Adam N., Thomas J., David C., H. Clay and Francis M.

John B. Jolly, the eldest son of Nelson and Barbara (Barr) Jolly, is still living and is an honored citizen of Breckinridge County.  He has been sheriff and assessor, and held other offices of importance.  He married Rachel, youngest daughter of Henry Hardin, Esquire, a son of General Hardin, the proprietor of the town of Hardinsburg.  The result of their union was the following children:  George W., William H. H., Nannie, Sallie, Gideon and Dolly, wife of William Hardin.

Gideon P. Jolly was born February 7, 1822, and was brought up on the farm.  His education was limited, and confined to the common schools of the county.  He commenced his public career as deputy sheriff under his father, in 1849, serving for two years and five months.  He was elected the first sheriff (in 1851) under the present constitution; was re-elected in 1852, and held the office for six years.  At the expiration of his last term, he was elected to represent Breckinridge County in the Legislature, and served one term.  In August, 1856, he was elected circuit court clerk, and two years later was elected county court clerk, filling both positions until 1862, when he was re-elected.  He was defeated in 1866 for county clerk, but in 1867 was elected to fill out the unexpired term of Mr. Hambleton, who had died.  He was defeated for circuit clerk in 1868, and for county clerk in 1870; was elected sheriff in 1872 – held the office two years; and in 1874 was again elected county clerk, and re-elected in 1878.  He held the office of county clerk in all nineteen years, circuit clerk twelve years and sheriff eight years.  Since 1882 he has not been in active business, but at present is a candidate for county clerk.  He is one of the most popular men in the county – the soul of generosity, charitable, hospitable, and truly a man of the people.  He was married, September 24, 1866, to Eliza Beard, a daughter of Burrel and Ellen (Taber) Beard, of Breckinridge County.  Their children are Bion, Nannie (Mrs. Wathen), Lulu (Mrs. Bush), Clarre and Everett.  Mr. Jolly is a member of the Methodist Church, of the Masonic order and of the Republican party.

Cheston Hutchinson Biography

Cheston Hutchinson.  The village of Morrisville can boast of no worthier nor more dutiful citizen than the gentleman whose name appears above, who was for many years a prominent contractor and builder in that community, but who has recently been living in retirement owing to ill health. He is a son of Joseph and Maria (Cheston) Hutchinson, and was born in Tullytown, Bucks County, Pennyslvania, August 26, 1826.  Joseph Hutchinson, the father of the subject of this personal history, was born in Falls Township, Bucks County, and during his early career plied the trade of a carpenter with good results, after which he became a sailor and subsequently attained the rank of sea captain. He continued as such for a few years, but, tiring of life upon the sea, he located in Bristol Township, Bucks County, where he conducted an inn for some years and then moved to Tullytown, where he passed from this life at the age of seventy years. His wife, Maria Cheston, also attained the age of seventy years before succumbing to the inevitable. Their happy union was blessed by the birth of four children, namely: Cheston, the subject of this biographical record; Jackson, deceased; Ann (Scott); and Emily (Morris).  Cheston Hutchinson obtained his education in the common schools of his native place, after which he learned the trade of a carpenter, which he followed there for a time, but subsequently moved to Morrisville, where he was the principal contractor for many years. He was an industrious and conscientious workman and always fulfilled the terms of his contracts to the letter. He erected many large buildings and residences in Morrisville, including the new public schoolhouse, the tile factory, and remodeled the rubber works plant. Of late he has not enjoyed the best of health, and he recently relinquished his business in order that he might recuperate more rapidly with the weight of business cares off his mind. He is a man of sound judgment, a good neighbor and friend, and possesses the highest esteem of his fellow townsmen.  In 1847, he was united in marriage with Hannah Wharton, a daughter of Timothy Wharton, and their union has resulted in the following issue: Joseph, deceased; Edward; William; Frank; Maria (Craft); Louisa (Moffit); and Medora (Sine). He has always been an active worker in church affairs and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, ill which he has held various offices. Politically, he is a firm adherent of Republican principles, and has been a member of the council for many years.

Mathias J. Loux Biography

from Bucks County, Pennsylvania – Book of Biographies

Mathias J. Loux has been a resident of Bucks County all his life, and, having been reared to manhood within its boundaries and brought up to the noble calling of a farmer, he has done his part in its agricultural development; he is now living in retirement, enjoying a well-earned competency and spending his latter days in quiet and peace.  This worthy citizen of New Britain Township was born in Hilltown Township, this county, July 13, 1841, and is a son of Mathias and Catherine (Yost) Loux and grandson of Andrew Loux.

Our subject is of sturdy German stock, and the name Loux has long been connected with the early history of this county; the family was founded by Andrew Loux, the great-grandfather of our subject, who emigrated from Germany with his two brothers, Jacob and John; Andrew first took up a tract of land in Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, but later disposed of his first purchase and bought a large farm in Hilltown Township, this county, and continued to reside there until death claimed him.  He was a farmer all his life.  Andrew Loux, the grandfather of our subject, was born and reared in Hilltown Township, and his vocation was that of a farmer.  His son, Mathias Loux, the father of our subject, was born in Hilltown Township, and learned the trade of a weaver, which he successfully prosecuted in addition to carrying on general farming.  His entire life was spent in Hilltown Township, where he died on the homestead in 1874.  He chose Catherine Yost as his life companion and they became the parents of a family of fourteen children, who were named as follows:  Andrew, Isaac, Daniel, Hannah, the wife of William Mace; Catherine, wife of Mathias Hartman, of Line Lexington, this county; Mary, wife of John Kratz, a retired farmer of Sterling, Illinois; Elizabeth, wife of Charles Miller; Noah, resides at Sterling, Illinois, and is a carriage and furniture maker; Adrian, died aged three years; Anna, Eli, Israel, who resides on the old homestead; David and Mathias J., our subject.  The mother of our subject died in 1874.

Mathias J. Loux acquired a liberal education in the district schools of Hilltown Township, and remained under the parental roof until he attained the age of twenty years; at that time the Civil War broke out, and, being inspired by a patriotic spirit, Mr. Loux offered his services in defense of the Union, and on the sixth day of September, 1861, enlisted in Co. A, 104th Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, which was under the command of Colonel Davis and Captain Rogers.  Our subject participated in many engagements, among which the most notable were Fair Oaks, Seven Days’ Fighting, Siege of Charleston, which lasted nine months, John’s Island and many others.  He was in eleven battles and skirmishes the first year of his service.  Our subject received an honorable discharge September 23, 1864, at Philadelphia, but on March 30, 1865, he re-enlisted in Hancock’s Corps in which he served until the following April, when the war was brought to a close.  Returning home, our subject learned the trade of a mason, which he followed two years, and then engaged in farming, which he successfully prosecuted for a period of eleven years; he then took up his former trade which he has continued up to the present time, but on account of his bad health since the war he has been unable to do much work.  In 1880, Mr. Loux purchased his present residence, which he has remodeled into a neat, little home.  Our subject takes an active interest in the welfare of his community of which he has so long been a member, and is highly respected by this fellow-townsmen.

Mr. Loux is a solid Democrat in politics, but is not an aspirant to office; religiously, both he and his devoted wife are members of the Reformed Church of Dublin, this county.  Mr. Loux, on August 12, 1865, married Annie Elizabeth Bryan, a fourth cousin to Honorable William Jennings Bryan, who was the Democratic candidate for President in 1896; she was born in Plumstead Township, this county, November 12, 1840, and is a daughter of William G. and Louise (Leidy) Bryan; her father was a resident of Line Lexington, and was a hatter by trade, which occupation he followed until his death.  Mr. and Mrs. Loux have reared one son, Harvey Monroe, born October 23, 1875.  Harvey resides on a farm near where our subject resides, and he married Anna E. Haldeman, by whom he reared one daughter, Grace Marcella.