Tag Archives: Christian County Kentucky

Bartholomew Wood – Patriot, Pioneer, Frontiersman, Farmer, Tavern Keeper

Anytime one hears the name ‘Pioneer’ cemetery it should be visited!  And the same can be said for the Pioneer Cemetery in Hopkinsville in Christian County.  A small park where many of the original citizens of Christian County are buried, it is nicely maintained and contains lots of history in one small area.  Today I would like to concentrate on Bartholomew and Martha Wood and their family.

This pioneer graveyard was used from 1812 to 1858.  Within this enclosure are buried 185 named persons, and many more unknown, all early settlers of Christian County.  The land for this cemetery was donated in 1812 by Bartholomew Wood, the first settler in Hopkinsvile.  He also donated land and timber for the first public buildings 1797.  He died in 1827 and was buried here.

Bartholomew Wood was the town founder – in 1796, frontiersman, a farmer, a tavern keeper in the town of Hopkinsville.  The Christian County Court House was built in 1797 upon land supplied by Bartholomew and with his lumber.  The town was originally known as Elizabeth in 1799, but was later changed to Hopkinsville in 1804.  Bartholomew Wood died here November 26, 1827.

A soldier in in the South Carolina Militia during the war, Bartholomew Wood was part of Colonel Robertson’s Regiment in 1779.

Martha Ann was the wife of Bartholomew Wood.  She was born in Virginia June 27, 1763, married in Jonesborough, North Carolina (now Tennessee) July 20, 1780, and died at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, November 9, 1846, outliving her husband by almost twenty years.

Children of Bartholomew and Martha Ann Wood were Elizabeth Wood Douglass, Mary (Polly) Wood Gist, Sarah (Sally) Wood Cornelius, Temperance (Tempy) Wood Roberts, Patsy Wood Millholland, Bartholomew T. Wood, Carter T. Wood, Curtis Davenport Wood, William J. Wood, Letitia Charlotte Wood and Hardin J. Wood.

18 Counties/36 Cemeteries/3,000 Plus Gravestone Photos

Melissa Williams, born October 25, 1851, died February 17, 1923.  ‘Gone to a brighter home where grief can not come.’  Stoney Point Cemetery, Allen County, Kentucky

The past eleven days have been more epic than I ever thought possible.  Ritchey and I traveled to western Kentucky for genealogy research.  We visited 18 counties, 36 cemeteries and took more than 3,000 gravestone photos.

James Jolly, 1828-1905, 77 years, 8 days.  Martha J. Jolly, 1831-1890, 58 years, 11 months, 25 days.  Landrum Cemetery, Livingston County, Kentucky.

Number one on our list was a visit to Livingston County to find out more about his Jolly family, and to photograph gravestones of all family members.  That was accomplished!

Drury Boyd, born May 6, 1827, died January 13, 1891.  Martha Boyd Cemetery, Christian County, Kentucky.

Number two was to visit cemeteries in as many of the surrounding counties as possible.  In addition to Livingston we visited 17 others – Allen, Butler, Caldwell, Christian, Clinton, Cumberland, Hancock, Logan, Lyon, McCreary, Monroe, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Simpson, Todd, Trigg, Warren and Wayne!

Father, Abner R. Terry, February 10, 1807 – November 29, 1847.  Mother, Eleanor Dyer, February 6, 1805 – December 9, 1892.  Daughter, Susan Emaline, wife of Judge John R. Crace, May 5, 1835 – January 20, 1860.  Infant daughter, Mary.  Terry-Pioneer Cemetery, Trigg County, Kentucky.

When we left Harrodsburg on Saturday morning, the 21st of October, we enjoyed breakfast at the Bluebird Cafe in Standford.  Then headed south to cover the southern counties that share a border with Tennessee – McCreary, Wayne, Clinton and Cumberland.

Joshua F. Bell, Pvt. Co. D., 30 Regt.  Ky Vol. Inf.  1844-1930.  Alexander Cemetery, Wayne County, Kentucky.

Our home base was Logan County, staying in Garwood Linton’s beautiful cottage farm house – large old trees surrounded the house, leaves of gold, green and red, many fluttering down with the breeze.  The old, old cedars that his gr-gr-grandfather, John Wesley Linton, planted after the Civil War, in memory of his company that didn’t make it home.  The farm house is so comfortably decorated, but with great style and pizazz!  Across the road is Corinth Country Market, with homemade bread, pies and cakes, sandwiches, canned goods, and many other yummy things (we stopped by quite often).

Aquilla M. Starks, December 28, 1799 – September 13, 1855.  Antioch Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.

From Logan County we fanned out to the other counties, generally visiting three counties per day.  One day was spent at the Logan County Historical Society.  Most of the towns we visited were small, with restaurants that concentrated on good food, and people that were so very friendly.  It was a wonderful trip – and now I have so much to share with you!

‘Cupid Cutting Capers In June’ 1905 In Christian County

from The Kentuckian, Hopkinsville, Christian County, Kentucky

June 17, 1905

Cupid Cutting Capers In June

No Let Up in the Rush of Matrimonial Matters

Still More to Follow

Two Weddings Thursday of Well Known Young Lawyers

The marriage of Mr. Roger Wayles Harrison and Miss Evie Louise Nash Thursday afternoon was an especially pretty church wedding.

The Baptist church was well filled with the friends of the young couple and the stand was elaborately decorated with potted plants.

Messrs. James A. Young, Jr., Wallace Kelly, R. M. Fairleigh and Charles H. Nash, Jr., were the ushers and preceded the wedding party as they entered promptly at 4:30 o’clock to the strains of the wedding march played by Mrs. James H. Anderson.

Mr. Harrison entered on the arm of his best man, Mr. John Stites, and the bride came in with her sister, Miss May Nash.  Meeting at the chancel, the bride and groom took their places on the stand and the ceremony that united them was appropriately said by Dr. Charles H. Nash, the bride’s father.  Dr. Edmund Harrison, father of the groom, stood beside Dr. Nash and concluded the ceremony with a short prayer.

Upon leaving the church, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison went at once to the L & N depot and boarded the 5:18 train for a Southern trip.  Returning next week, they will be at home at Bethel College.

The bride’s costume was a handsome traveling dress of blue.

A large party of friends accompanied them to the depot and threw handfuls of rice at them as they boarded the sleeper.

Mr. Harrison is the youngest son of Rev. E. Harrison, President of Bethel Female College, and is a rising young attorney.  His bride is the oldest daughter of Rev. C. H. Nash, D.D., Pastor of the Baptist church.  Petite and graceful, with dark hair and eyes, her beauty is of the Southern type.  She is a graduate of Bethel College with the degree of A.M., and is an accomplished musician.

Prowse-Lyon

Mr. Charles Odom Prowse and Miss Elizabeth Lyon, of Nashville, were married Thursday evening at 7:30 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Julia B. Lyon, in Nashville.  Rev. M. P. Logan, of the Episcopal Church, officiated.  They left for Monterey, Tennessee, to spend a few days before returning home.

The bride, a few years ago, visited Mrs. C. K. Wyly, in this city, and Mr. Prowse met her and the attachment was formed that has so happily culminated.  She is a young lady of aristocratic lineage and possesses much beauty and many personal charms.

Mr. Prowse is a son of County Clerk John P. Prowse, and is the Republican nominee for County Attorney.

They will live at the home of the groom’s father, on South Main Street.

Woosley-Hiser

Mr. John Thomas Woosley and Miss Ida Mai Hiser will be married at the home of the bride-to-be’s brother, Mr. T. G. Hiser, on West Fifteenth Street, next Thursday, June 22nd.

Smith-White

Hon. Denny P. Smith, Commonwealth’s Attorney, and Miss Susie White, daughter of Mr. W. C. White of Cadiz, will be married on June 28th.

1941 Letter From Hugh Walter Linton to Frances Barber Linton Montgomery – Cousins!

Hugh Walter Linton and Frances Barber Linton were cousins – both had a love of family and love of genealogy.  Frances was my great-grandmother and I feel she passed that love of genealogy and research directly down to me!  I know of no one else in the family who is quite so thrilled to walk through a cemetery or visit a basement full of old wills and marriage records!
Hugh was the son of John Wesley Linton and Emma Adelaide Proctor; the grandson of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy J. Newman; the great-grandson of Benjamin  Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson; and the great-grandson of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Nancy Mason.  He lived in Christian County, Kentucky, where he married Eliza “Lydabel” Belfield Garnett.  Hugh and Lydabel had 3 children:  Hugh Walter, Jr., Mary Adelaide and Frances Garnett Linton.
Frances was the daughter of Edward Edwards Linton and Catherine Elizabeth Taylor; the granddaughter of William Linton and Elizabeth Lyon Moran; and the great-granddaughter of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Nancy Mason.  She lived in Washington County, Kentucky, where she married Robert E. Lee Montgomery.  Frances and Robert had 7 children:  Mary Alice, Anna Margaret, Laura Frances, Lillian Catherine, Robert Lee, Edward Linton and Benjamin Montgomery.
I know of at least nine letters written by Hugh to my great-grandmother from October 5, 1934 to February 8, 1945 – I’m sure there were probably more that were not saved.  On April 11, 1945, Hugh’s wife, Lydabel, wrote to “Cousin Frances” to inform her of Hugh’s death on March 21.  Frances died in August of that year.  Their fascination with family history lasted until the very end!  This one was written November 18, 1941 – after a visit from Hugh and family to Frances and Robert in Springfield.

Dear Cousin Frances,

We arrived home about 5:30 to 6 Sunday afternoon, in good shape and having had a wonderful trip there.

I don’t know which one of us three had the best time; we were all treated to royally by you and your good family, and even the weather was perfect for us.  It was a most enjoyable trip and visit for us, and we want to thank you, Cousin Margaret and Cousin Bob and both the boys for it.  We have really found home folks in your family; and it reminds us of the days when we would go back to the home of my father and mother in Logan County, when they had time to talk and live in the unhurried atmosphere, different from that of last few years.

It was a treat to get all the information you had for us.  We enjoyed the old traditions that you and Cousin Maggie O’Bryan told us of the old Captain and his home life, and to see your old treasures in the corner cabinet there.

Lydabel was very much taken with your husband, and kept talking about what a kind expression he had and the twinkle in his eye, and was distressed that he had difficulty with his hearing  and recalled her mother’s same trouble for many years.

We trust you all keep well and enjoy life.  Let as many of you as can get off, come down to visit us, and we will take you to see the Logan County kin, who by the way live some 40 miles closer to Springfield than we in Hopkinsville do.

With love from Lydabel and Frances and thanks for your many hospitalities.

Your Cousin,

Hugh

Two Crittenden County Wedding Announcements

from Crittenden Record-Press, Marion, Crittenden County, Kentucky

October 3, 1907

Two Hearts Joined as One

A pretty wedding was solemnized in the home of John Hoffman, on South Broadway, Thursday evening, at 7:30, by Rev. George Mayer, of the Evangelical Church, when Roy Y. Hughes, of St. Paul, and Miss Emma Elizabeth Hoffman of this city, were made man and wife.  The parlor was handsomely decorated with asters and king ferns, of which a bower was made in the corner of the room, where the marriage ceremony was performed, the couple standing under a suspended bell of asters.  As they approached their position Mrs. Adolph Burmeister, played the Mendelssohn Wedding March on the piano.  The bride was gowned in imported embroidered Swiss over white silk, and the groom wore the customary black suit.  The bridesmaid, Miss Frieda Hoffman, a sister of the bride, wore a gown of pink print silk tissue.  The best man was Henry Hoffman, a brother of the bride.  A bouquet of white roses was carried by the bride, and the bridesmaid carried a bouquet of sweet peas.

After the ceremony the fifty to sixty guests of relatives and intimate friends were served with a beautiful wedding feast in the dining room, which was overhung with wreaths of asters and evergreen twigs.

 

Marion and Hopkinsville

City Editor Bacon of the “New Era” Capture’s One of Marion’s Fairest Daughters

The receipt of cards of invitation to the wedding of Miss Carrie F. Moore, of this city, to Mr. Merriweather E. Bacon, city editor of the New Era at Hopkinsville, was no surprise to the friends of this popular couple, especially those who had watched the courtship.  Mr. Bacon has been a most devoted suitor for the hand and heart of the talented teacher since she first went to Hopkinsville to take the management of the Lockwood Business College and how well he has succeeded is evidenced by the announcement of the wedding which is to take place Wednesday afternoon, October 9th, at 3 o’clock, at the Methodist Church in this city.  Miss Moore is the youngest daughter of Judge James A. Moore and is a justly popular girl on account of her native wit and her bright mind coupled with a most attractive personality.  Her gracious manner has won her warm friends and admirers everywhere she is known, and it’s with regret we relinquish her to our neighboring city.  The Record-Press extends congratulations to its Brother Editor with the assurance that he has won a life partner who could, if need be, fill his place in an editorial capacity and who will be a helpmate indeed.

 

Captain Darwin Bell Biography

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1884

Christian County

Captain Darwin Bell

Among the many hospitable and genial men of Christian County, there are none to be found more companionable that the gentleman whose name appears at the head of this sketch.  He was born, January 1, 1828, in the first house reared in Christian county, Kentucky, where James Davis made his pioneer settlement.  His father, Dr. John F. Bell, was born in Orange County, Virginia, in 1796; removed to Christian County, Kentucky, in 1810, where he died in 1878; he was a prominent physician of extensive information, and in his life amassed a fine property.  Dr. John F. Bell was the son of Captain John Bell, a Revolutionary soldier of Orange County, Virginia, who died in 1805, at the age of sixty-eight years.  Captain John was the son of William Bell, of Orange County, where he died.  William was the son of John Bell, who emigrated from Ireland in an early day.  Subject’s mother, Catherine B. Bocock, daughter of Douglas and Mildred Bocock, of Albemarle County, Virginia, was born in 1805, and died in Christian County, Kentucky, in 1838.  To her and her husband, Dr. John F. Bell, were born:  Elizabeth M., John H., subject, Evelina M. (Quarles), Fannie S. (Henry), Cincinnatus D., Catherine B. and Mary A. (Henry).  Subject was married, December 28, 1857, to Miss Mary W., daughter of Charles H. Meriwether, of Albemarle County, Virginia, and to them have been born:  Catherine E. (Manson), Gilmer M., Margaret (Williams) and John F.  Captain Bell’s educational advantages were of the best that the county afforded, and he has continued his habits as a student, having a fine and extensive library, until he is regarded by others as one of the best posted men in southern Kentucky.  At the age of eighteen years, in 1847, Mr. Bell enlisted in Company A., Texas Rangers, Chevallier’s Battalion, at San Antonio, and entered General Taylor’s army, and remained in service until July, 1848, when he was mustered out at Camargo, Mexico.  In 1861 he entered, as Lieutenant, Company A., 1st Kentucky Cavalry, and was soon promoted to the rank of Captain, which position he held until the end of the late war.

Eugene Wood Obituary – Christian County

from The Hopkinsville Kentuckian, Christian County

Saturday, October 27, 1917

Eugene Wood Laid to Rest

Funeral Services Held Yesterday Afternoon at Christian Church

Was 65 Years of Age And Long a Prominent Citizen

Mr. Eugene Wood died very suddenly at his home on South Main Street at 11:20 o’clock Thursday morning.  Mr. Wood was partially incapacitated from a stroke of paralysis several years ago, that forced his retirement from active business.  He was up and about as usual and had been sitting on his porch but had gone into his bedroom when the attack came.

Mrs. Wood was down in town, but members of the household, and Miss Mollie Martin, a friend of the family who happened to be calling, summoned a physician and did all that could be done, but he expired in his chair before either the doctor or Mrs. Wood arrived.

Mr. Wood was born December 1, 1852, in Todd County, a son of the late Hardin J. Wood.  He received a liberal education and went into the milling business when he reached manhood and long operated the mill now known as Cate’s Mill, just east of town.  On December 26, 1877, he was married to Miss Inez Durrett, who survives him.  After disposing of his mill Mr. Wood engaged in the insurance business up to the time his health failed.

He was widely known and universally esteemed as a courteous, companionable gentleman.  He was a devoted christian, a lifelong member of the Christian Church and a man of unquestioned integrity and honesty in all his dealings.

Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Christian Church.

The interment was in Riverside Cemetery.