Tag Archives: Fleming County Kentucky

Author of A Knight Templar Abroad

W. Harlan Cord, son of W. H. & V. R. Cord.  March 10, 1850 – November 29, 1885.  ‘A Knight Templar Abroad’.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

When I first saw this gravestone in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in Flemingsburg, Fleming County, I knew there had to be a story behind it.  And yes, I found one.

William Harlan Cord was the son of William Hough Cord and Virginia R. Dupuy.  His father was born in Mississippi, his mother, Virginia.  The two met and married in Mason County, just north of Fleming County May 31, 1849.  I could not find the couple in the 1850 census, but in 1860 the family is living in Fleming County.  William is 37, a lawyer.  Virginia passed away in 1855.  Children listed are William H., 10; Irene, 8; and Mary, 5.  Also living in the household is Mary F. Dupuy, sister of Virginia, living there to help care for the children.  She is listed as 32, born in Virginia.

In 1870 William and Mary have married.  Children listed are William H., 20; Mary, 15; and Clarence, 3, evidently a child of this second marriage.  Also living in the household is Eliza Dupuy, 45, her occupation – authoress.  She is another sister of Virginia and Mary Dupuy.  In 1880 everyone except Mary Cord live together.

With just a bit of research I found that Eliza Ann Dupuy, 1814-December 29, 1880, was a short-story writer and novelist.  She was born in Petersburg, Virginia, the daughter of Jesse Dupuy, a shipowner, and Mary Anne Thompson Sturdevant.  Jesse Dupuy died at an early age and Eliza helped support her mother and younger siblings, which included working as governess and tutor for several prominent southern families.  She lived in New Orleans during the Civil War.  She wrote thirteen novels, many under the pen name Annie Young.  She returned to Kentucky after the war and died on a visit to New Orleans January 15, 1881.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, April 3, 1885

Perhaps having an aunt that was a published author – or authoress as she proclaimed herself – helped William Harlan Cord take up his pen and paper.  Harlan studied law, to follow in the footsteps of his father, but perhaps writing was his passion.  His book, A Knight Templar Abroad, is a record of his visit to Europe in 1883.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, May 15, 1885

The Evening Bulletin of Maysville said in their December 15, 1884, edition, that Harlan had sold $500 worth of his book in three weeks!  The books were priced at $1.50.  He sold about 335 copies during that time period.  Unfortunately. he did not live long enough to achieve the fame that could have been his.  In the November 30, 1885, edition of the same newspaper it is mentioned that ‘Mr. W. Harlan Cord of Flemingsburg is dangerously ill.’  W. Harlan Cord died the day before the newspaper was printed, November 29, 1885.

The beautiful stone that was made specifically for Harlan has a knight on horseback, with the name of his book above.  The cross and crown at the top of the stone is a Christian symbol of the sovereignty of the Lord.  When the crown is combined with a cross, the crown means victory and the cross means Christianity.  The cross with a crown also denotes a member of the York Rite Masons.  As with all types of crowns used by the Masons, it symbolizes the power and authority to lead or command.

My Birthday Gift – McIntire Family Treasures

As any good sister would do, Donna knocked my birthday gift out of the park!  She kept telling me I could never guess in a million years what she had found for me, and, that is very true.  She bought a box of old books at an auction, and in one of the books were four very old receipts that she just knew I would love!  Have I mentioned she is my favorite sister?  And not only because of her gift!  We are the two oldest and have spent more time together than the rest of my siblings.

The first is a receipt that says, ‘Received Flemingsburg, December 8, 1804, of Captain Aaron McIntire, one pound three shillings and seven pence in full of all accounts up to this day, William Jacobs.’  What a remarkable find!  Flemingsburg is in Fleming County.

The next reads, ‘Lexington, April 6, 1810, Received of Captain Aaron McIntire five dollars and seventy-two cents, for Daniel Bradford, Charles Bradford.’

Of course, my first thought – who was this Captain Aaron McIntire?  Was he a captain from the Revolutionary War or perhaps the War of 1812?  I was in research mode.

But, wait.  There is more.  Two more old receipts.

‘Mr. Thomas B. McIntire, 1870, to W. J. Ross & Co.

July/August 20.  1 bbl 35 100 pounds sugar at 14 cents, $14.35, 50 pounds sugar at 14.2 cents, $7.25.  10 pounds coffee at 25 cents, $2.50, 10 pounds granulated sugar at 16 cents, $1.60, for a total of $25.70.

If you can send us the above next week it will be quite an accommodation.  Respectfully, W. J. Ross & Co.’

And –

‘Mr. Bennett McIntire, to John F. Fleming, Dr.

To this amount for medical services from July 27th, 1878 to July 1st 1879 inclusive, $9.00.

June 11 to visit and medicate Charles Jones $2.50.  Amount due $11.50.

Received payment October 3, 1881.  John F. Fleming per G. W. Fleming.’

Now we are on a quest.  The boxes purchased were from Frances Moore’s family.  Frances married William Joseph Peterson in 1975, Donna’s husband’s older brother.  I found a marriage announcement in The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Sunday, January 12, 1975.  It said that Miss Frances May Moore was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. McIntire.  Our first clue – the McIntire line comes from her step-father.  The wedding took place at the Flemingsburg Christian Church.

With a bit of search through old newspaper articles and the census records of Fleming County, I found that O. W. McIntire was the son of Oscar W. McIntire.  In the 1940 census the elder Oscar is 64, wife Pearl is 55 and son Oscar is 22.  Living in the household are James Planck, father-in-law, and Alice L. Planck, mother-in-law.  From the 1880 census A. James McIntire, 44, and wife Nancy, 35, have a son W. Oscar, aged 4 (father in the 1940 census).  In the 1850 census A. James McIntire is listed as son, aged 14, to parents Thomas B., 42, and Mary, 37.  Also living in the household is Aaron McIntire, aged 77.

Therefore, our four old receipts are for Aaron McIntire, 1773 – April 3, 1856, and his son, Thomas Bennett McIntire, March 8, 1808 – June 27, 1886.  Someone thought them important enough to keep until this year when they were eventually sold at auction.  It is quite amazing to think that I am now the proud owner of this history.

When Ritchey and I were in Fleming County on Saturday we tried to find Johnson’s Fork Presbyterian Cemetery where Aaron McIntire, Mary McIntire and John McIntire are buried.  We searched but it could not be found.  Ancestry gives the direction of ‘two miles north of Elizaville’.  We drove northeast on Hwy 170 but could find nothing.  Another day we will go to Fleming County Library or the historical society and get proper directions.  We did find the gravestones for James A. and Nancy Catherine McIntire, and their son Oscar W. and his wife Pearl Planck McIntire in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in nearby Flemingsburg.  I will save those photos for another day.  I’m in the process of going through McIntire wills, deeds and other information from Fleming County.  There is much information on this McIntire family.

I’m sure Donna didn’t realize quite how happy I would be with her birthday gift, or what a great genealogy adventure it has been!  Can she top this next year?  We’ll have to wait and see.

Two Counties, Six Cemeteries, Four Covered Bridges and a Battlefield

Yesterday was a glorious day in Kentucky.  A reprieve from the 90+ temperatures we’ve had in the last several weeks – and no rain!  The high managed to get to 82, the skies were a bright blue, grass and trees wonderful shades of green.  We left at 8:00 a.m.

Our goal was to visit Robertson and Fleming counties and take photos in several cemeteries each.  You know how much Ritchey loves geocaching.  There are four covered bridges in the two counties – those beautiful, historic structures that are slowly dwindling in our country – and they each had geocaches hidden in them!  They were added to the list.  And on the way home, we planned to visit Blue Licks Battlefield State Park – what some have called the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought in Kentucky on August 19, 1782.  The British and Indian forces slaughtered many of the Kentuckians.  I have posted several wills written by men from Mercer County that did not survive the battle.

We began at Piqua Methodist Church in Robertson County, a small, rural cemetery.  While there, the gentleman who takes care of the cemetery stopped by.  He showed me a list of those buried here, useful since many did not have gravestones, or have long since broken.  He related that the last person buried in this cemetery was his elementary school teacher, Gladys Shepherd, who passed away in 2004 at the age of 104.

Ritchey finding a geocache at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge in Robertson County.

Just about a mile north on Highway 165 was the small church and cemetery of Piqua Christian.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, just outside the town of the same name, was our last cemetery for this county.  On the way to neighboring Fleming County we stopped at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge, and Ritchey found his first geocache of the day.  Sitting in the middle of the bridge eating a chicken salad and croissant sandwich, the breeze was heavenly.  Butterflies were plentiful, and there was no noise, just an occasional moo or bird chirp.

Top stone – In Memory of Edward Dulin, Sen., Born in Virginia, August 6, 1769, and Died in Kentucky, September 25, 1830.  Lower stone – In Memory of George, twin son of John W. and Elizabeth D. Dulin, Born October 23, 1851, died July 30, 1852, age 9 months and 7 days.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

In Fleming County we visited Elizaville Cemetery, a lovely small town, only few miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery was quite impressive with its old stones.  I wanted to share this one with you today since it was so unusual.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen an old above ground stone with writing on the side.  There were at least ten or twelve in this cemetery.  Other beautifully carved stones were for cholera victims in 1833.

Goddard White Bridge

On to the three covered bridges in Fleming County – Goddard White, Grange City and Ringo Mills.  One more cemetery stop in this county – Mt. Pisgah on Oakwood Road.

It was about 6:00 p.m. and we still had one more stop – Blue Licks Battlefield – in Nicholas County.  I was so impressed with the granite monument that names those who fought and died in this battle.  After taking photos we had a picnic supper before starting home.  It was a full day but so much fun!  And think of all the great information I have to share with you!

Is the Death Date Correct?

Oswell B. Dorsey, born January 15, 1818, died March 22, 1854.  Machpelah Cemetery, Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Kentucky.

I believe most of us would conclude when looking at an ancestor’s gravestone, that the death date listed would be a good indication of when our loved one died.  Today while looking through photos taken at Machpelah Cemetery in Mount Sterling, Montgomery County, I found that not quite the case.  Not daily, but quite often I add a gravestone photo on my Kentucky Kindred Facebook page.  I chose the stone of Oswell and Virginia Dorsey since, according to the dates on the stone, both died in 1854, about six months apart.  Very unusual for a young couple to pass away so soon after the other.  The detective wheels started turning.

Virginia M., wife of O. B. Dorsey, born February 24, 1824, died September 28, 1854.

I put the two names in ancestry, with the dates of birth and death for Oswell Dorsey.  The first item I looked at was Montgomery County deaths for the year 1854.  Now this is when it got interesting.

According to their gravestone, Oswell died March 22, 1854, and wife Virginia died September 23, 1854.  Looking at the death records that was not the case.  They both died in July of 1854, both of fever and they were cared for by Dr. Benford.  There were quite a few deaths during the month of July – fever, flux and cholera listed as causes of death.  This changed their death dates from six months apart to a few days, possibly the same day.

Other information in the death records gave us the name of their parents.  Oswell was born in Fleming County, the son of John and Nancy Dorsey.  He was a merchant.  Virginia, born in Montgomery County, was the daughter of Edward and Mary Stockton.

Hm.  Next, I checked for a will for Oswell Dorsey.  His will was dated March 22, 1854.  The date on his gravestone.  Since the will wasn’t probated until the October 1854 term of court, it isn’t likely Oswell died the day he wrote it.  According to the will, everything was ‘to be managed and controlled by my friend and brother-in-law, George J. Stockton, for the exclusive use, enjoyment and benefit of my beloved wife, Virginia Dorsey.’  Of course, by the time the will was probated, Virginia Dorsey was dead.

One other reference on Ancestry was made to Genealogies of Kentucky Families Volume I.  I checked my copy and found the Dorsey’s came from Calvert County, Maryland, one group of whom settled in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, which was at that time called Stockton Station.  Larkin Dorsey, whose grandfather was in the Revolution, came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, founder of Stockton Station.

‘Larkin Dorsey, who came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, married Elizabeth Ingram, in 1780 at Hagerstown, Maryland.  He was born August 24, 1784 [must be 1748], and died February 22, 1822, in Flemingsburg, Kentucky.  He was a cadet in the 9th company of Light Infantry, January 3, 1776.  Commissioned Ensign in Army, June 18, 1778.  His children were:  Edward, John, Joshua, Rachel, Sarah, Robert, Amelia and Joseph.

‘John Dorsey married Nancy Spiers, Edward – Juliet McDowell, Joshua – Nancy Williams and Milly Alexander, Rachel – C. V. Anderson, Sarah – Thomas Wallace, Robert died in infancy, Amelia – Thomas Andrews and Joseph married Mary Wheatley and Ann Threlkeld.

‘The children of John Dorsey, who was born April 19, 1783, and died November 5, 1847, were – Oswell Burns Dorsey, Elizabeth Ingram Dorsey, Martha Ann Dorsey, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, John Edmondson Dorsey, Rachel Anderson Dorsey, Robert Stockton and Jeremiah Spiers Dorsey.’

Virginia Stockton Dorsey was a descendant of Major George Stockton, in whose company Larkin Dorsey came to Kentucky.  George Stockton married Larkin Dorsey’s sister, Rachel Dorsey; their son Edward Stockton married Mary Allin Jouett (of the Mercer County families of those names).  George Jouett Stockton and Virginia Margaret Stockton were two of their children.

In conclusion we can say the dates on the gravestone for Oswell and Virginia Stockton Dorsey are incorrect – but why?  If we look a little closer to the death records for Montgomery County for 1854, we find that George J. Stockton is listed just under the name of Virginia Dorsey.  George is listed as 40, a merchant (were he and Oswell Dorsey business partners as well as brothers-in-law?), parents were Edward and Mary Stockton (same as Virginia) and he died of cholera, cared for by Dr. Nelson.  Under his name is William Stockton, 14, son of George and Gusta [Augusta] Ann Stockton, who also died of cholera.  And below his name is Gusta A. Stockton, 36, daughter of Francis Somersall, who died of fever.  Oswell and Virginia Dorsey had no children.  George and Augusta Stockton had four – William Edward who died in 1854 with his parents, Robert Henry, Mary Somersall Stockton and Augusta George Stockton, who was born in February of 1854, a babe of five months when her parents died, and who lived just until the age of three.  With so many deaths in one family, it was quite likely several years before gravestones were purchased.  This could have led to the mix-up in death dates.  Always check several sources, if possible.

Marriages – Fleming County, Kentucky

Gabriel Builderback married Rachel Ferguson 14 Feb 1799
William Builderback married Mary McAllister 18 Sep 1799
Nathaniel Bunnell married Elizabeth Dunevan 13 Jan 1800
John Burress married Sarah Ferguson 11 Jan 1800
Charles Burress married Elizabeth Plummer 29 Oct 1799
Isaac Butcher married Elizabeth Clark 10 Mar 1799
Anderson Callahan married Patty Reeves 18 Dec 1800
Simeon Carpenter married Sallie Dankins 30 Jun 1800
Bartholomew Carrel married Frances Clark 19 Dec 1799
Henry Carter married Mary Green 11 Aug 1800
Edward Choat married Hannah Fraser 28 Sep 1799
James Cochran married Jane McIntire 27 Apr 1800
Levi Connely married Jane Hasting 08 Mar 1800
Bartholomew Correl married Frances Clark 19 Dec 1799
Uriah Dale married Mary Gardner 13 Jun 1799
Joseph Davis married Polly McKee 18 Apr 1799
James DeMoss married Sarah Burris ?? Nov 1798
John Donohu married Elizabeth Williams 28 Mar 1798
Jesse England married Hannah Mershan 13 Feb 1800
Isaac Farrand married Elizabeth Gilmore 11 Mar 1800
John Farrand married Sarah Currel 12 Mar 1800
Henry Ferguson married Nancy Glen 11 Jan 1800
John Finley married Mary Longhead 01 Jun 1799
James Fitzgerald married Fannie Hughes 27 Apr 1800
Jilson Fletcher married Rhoda Heffling 11 Jun 1799

Thomas Family Buried At Maysville Cemetery

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This beautiful stone marks the final resting place of many members of the Jacob Thomas and Amanda Cooper family.  Jacob was born in Virginia and made his way to Kentucky at a young age.  He met and married Amanda, born in Kentucky, around 1833.  After their marriage the couple moved to Indiana for a time; their two eldest children were born there.

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Jacob Thomas, July 7, 1807 – July 27, 1885.  Amanda A. Thomas, February 20, 1813 – May 14, 1871

In the 1850 Census of Mason County Jacob is listed as 43, a farmer; Amanda, 37; James C., 16; John N., 14; Richard B., 12; Oliver H. P., 6; Alice J., 2.  A period of six years between Richard and Oliver make us suspect that a couple of children died during that time period.  In 1860 Jacob is 52; Amanda, 47; John, 24, is a clerk; and Oliver is 15.  Alice died in 1851 and Richard in 1854.  In 1870 there is Jacob, 63; Amanda, 57; and Perry, 25.  I believe this must be son Oliver, due to the ages from 1860 and 1870 – and since he was named for the famous naval commander.  In 1880 Amanda has already passed away.  Jacob is listed as 72, with son James, 44; his wife, Elizabeth, 38; and children John, 19; Lilly, 11; Jacob, 9; and Laura, 3.

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Richard B. Thomas, July 19, 1838 – October 24, 1854.  Alice J. Thomas, March 12, 1848 – February 12, 1851.

Richard and Alice are children of Jacob and Amanda Thomas.

James Cooper Thomas, eldest son of Jacob and Amanda, married Elizabeth Jane Soward, from Fleming County, November 24, 1859.   I could not find them in the 1860 or 1870 census, just in the 1880, living with James’ widowed father.

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John N. Thomas, July 16, 1836 – February 3, 1896.  Jacob Thomas, 1872-1932.  Lulu Y. THomas, 1871-1965.  James C. Thomas, 1898-1950.  Marybelle Thomas, 1965-1965.

John Thomas is the son of Jacob and Amanda, and brother to James Cooper Thomas.  Jacob and Lulu (Lilly) are children of James and Elizabeth.  I’m not sure how the last two fit in the family.

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James C. Thomas, April 2, 1834 – October 23, 1917.  Elizabeth J., wife of J. C. Thomas, June 24, 1842 – July 4, 1899.  Charles Thomas, son of J. C. & E. Thomas, March 12, 1862 – April 5, 1863.

A tiny son, born during the Civil War, is listed on the stone with his parents.  Elizabeth Soward Thomas died on Independence Day in 1899.  James lived another 18 years.  His death certificate says he was born in Indiana, his father Jacob was born in Virginia, and his mother, a Cooper, was born in Kentucky.  He was widowed, a retired farmer.  It said he died, sitting in a chair, after eating a hearty meal – at the wonderful age of 83!

Dr. Henry Plummer Obituary

IMG_7282Henry Plummer, 1834-1904.  His wife, Lizzie, 1842-1910, Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Thursday, January 21, 1904

Found Dead in Bed – His Death Causes Much Sorrow

The entire community was shocked Wednesday morning by the announcement that Dr. Henry Plummer had been found dead in bed at his office, which he had used as a sleeping apartment for some months. He had been complaining two or three days previous. Early Monday morning he called up Dr. W. D. Powell, whose office adjoined his own. He seemed to be suffering with an acute attack of indigestion and Dr. Powell relieved him. On Monday night he again called up Dr. Powell by telephone, and again later in the night. Dr. Powell then took him to his room where he remained the balance of the night. On Tuesday night Dr. Powell called on him and they talked for an hour or two, and on leaving Dr. Powell asked him to again occupy his room. Dr. Plummer replied that he felt so much better that he would remain in his own room, saying that if he needed him he would call him up. At 7 o’clock Wednesday morning, Henry Speaks, the colored man who attended the office, went into the room and found Dr. Plummer on his left side, with one hand extending down the side of the bed. The boy at once notified Dr. Powell. From indication he had passed away without a struggle, and had been dead but a short time. Deceased was a native of Fleming County. He enlisted in Captain Ben Desha’s Confederate Infantry. He was medical officer of the company and remained in the hospital at Bowling Green until February, 1862, when, on the retreat, he was assigned to an Arkansas battalion as surgeon. He was at Shiloh, Perryville and Chicamauga. After the war he located here and married Miss Lizzie Mills, daughter of Major Benjamin Mills, who had charge of the arsenal at Harper’s Ferry at the time of the John Brown raid, whom he met while caring for wounded soldiers after the Battle of Perryville. Dr. Plummer had served as President of the Central Kentucky Medical Society, also as President of the Mercer County Medical Society and as school trustee and was a leading Mason. Two children, Mrs. Arthur Wiseman, of Shelbyville, and Mrs. Bowen Jones, of Lexington, survive him. All Masons are requested to meet at their hall at 1 o’clock this (Thursday) afternoon to attend the funeral, which will take place at 2 o’clock at the First Presbyterian Church. Dr. Vaughn of the Methodist Church will preach the funeral, Dr. Hunter being too ill to officiate.