Tag Archives: Marion County Kentucky

Brothers John Linton Edwards and William Mason Edwards in Union Army During the War Between the States

Two brothers, John L. and William M. Edwards entered the Union army November 21, 1861, at Lebanon, Marion County.  They entered service as privates, and were in Captain Bevill’s Company E, 10th Regiment of the Kentucky Volunteers.  John was 26 and William was 21.  The two brothers were sons of Jonathan and Nancy Linton Edwards.  The other five children were Alfred, Lucretia, Susan, Edward and Benjamin.  Their parents were part of the Linton/Edwards move to Kentucky in 1816-1818.

During the Civil War John and William remained in the same unit.  May 6, 1863, John was detailed as a brigade teamster.

August 10, 1863 he was sent to a hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, and was later moved to the hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.  This was during the occupation of middle Tennessee.

Again, June 16, 1864, he was sent to the hospital in the present campaign.  This was during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in Marietta, Georgia.

John Edwards appears on the Company Muster-out Roll, dated December 6, 1864, in Louisville.  He was due $100 plus $26.32 for clothing in kind.

William Edwards was sent to the hospital at Lebanon, Kentucky, October 26, 1862.  It is very likely William was wounded during the Battle of Perryville earlier in the month, and was sent to recuperate in nearby Lebanon.

On June 10, 1864, he was sent to the hospital on the present campaign, again at Kennesaw Mountain.

William Edwards was captured at Columbia between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863; was confined by General Morgan.  He was paroled between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863.

September 19-20, 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga, William was wounded, a contusion in the back.  He was mustered-out the same date as his brother, August 6, 1864, and was due $100 plus $40.62 for clothing in kind.  I am sure John was horribly worried when William was wounded and taken prisoner by John Hunt Morgan.

J. L. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry, Cemetery Hill, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky.

After the war John and William came back to Washington County to live with their parents.  In fact, six of he seven children lived with their parents, and never married.  Youngest children, Benjamin Edwards, married his first cousin, Lucy Edwards, only children of John L. Edwards and Milly Linton.  They had no children.  Alfred, Lucretia and Edward died before 1870.  In the 1880 census for Washington County, John L, Susan and William lived at home.  John L. died between 1880 and 1900, since he does not appear in that census; only William and Susan still lived on the old home place.  William died June 10, 1903.

W. M. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry. 

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, June 18, 1903

W. M. Edwards Dead

Mr. William M. Edwards, one of the county’s best citizens, died at his home two miles from Springfield on last Wednesday night after a long illness of a complication of diseases.  The deceased was about 63 years of age and was born and reared in Washington County.  He was never married and lived with a sister on a small farm near town.  He was an upright and honorable man, and none stood higher in the estimation of his neighbors than he.

Shortly after the war broke out Mr. Edwards enlisted in the cause of the Union, and was mustered in Company E, Tenth Kentucky Infantry at Lebanon, November 21, 1861.  He followed the fortunes of that regiment of which Col. John M. Harlan was first commander, and who was afterwards succeeded by Col. W. H. Hays, through three years of hard campaigning.  He was in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Jonesboro, and other famous engagements.  On December 6, 1864, Mr. Edwards was mustered out of the army at Louisville, and returned to Springfield and soon engaged in farming.  He was a member of the Bevil Palmer Post G. A. R., and always took an interest in the affairs of that organization.  He was a good Christian man and joined the Presbyterian church during the war.

The funeral took place at the Springfield Presbyterian Church on Friday morning last and was conducted by Rev. G. A. Strickland.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 9, 1903

Public Sale

On the premises of the old Edwards place, the former home of the late W. M. Edwards beginning at 1 o’clock on Wednesday, July 15th, there will be sold three horses, two first class Jersey milk cows and calves, two heifers, a Jersey bull, sow and seven shoats, a crop of oats, farming implements and household and kitchen furniture.

Also, at the same time and place the Edwards farm containing about 75 acres will be offered for sale to the highest bidder on easy terms.

Ben Edwards, Agent

Col. R. E. Whane, Auctioneer

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 23, 1903

The sale of the personal property of the late Wm. Edwards took place on last Wednesday and was well attended, everything bringing good prices.  The Edwards farm containing about 75 acres of land was sold to Mr. Benedict Janes for $1692.

Many of the other siblings of these two brothers lie buried close by in Cemetery Hill.

Damaged Stones Area of Holy Cross Cemetery – Marion County

Holy Cross Catholic Church and Cemetery.

In Marion County, Kentucky, we find Holy Cross Catholic Church, the oldest Catholic church in the state.  The historical marker tells us ‘Basil Hayden, Sr., led 25 Maryland Catholic families to settle near here, on Pottinger’s Creek, 1785.  Father Whelan said first Mass in Kentucky here in 1787.  First Catholic church west of Alleghenies built here in 1792.  First monks, 1805, Trappist Fathers (Cistercians).  Present church erected in 1823, under direction of famous Belgian missionary, Charles Nerinckx.’  Many of the remains of these old settlers lie in this cemetery and have lain here a good two hundred years or more.

As with all cemeteries, due to weather and time, some of the stones are broken or uprooted.  The good people of the area have made a place in the cemetery for these stones.  Some are fragments of stones, some are intact, some readable, others not so much.  I want to share with you today photos taken in this area of the cemetery.  Much valuable information is here for those who cannot find their loved ones in the cemetery proper.

Ann C. Hagan, died February 20th 1849 in the 40th year of her age.

Robert Greenwell, born in 1792.

An old, unreadable stone.  Elizabeth J., wife of James M. Sims, born December 16, 1811, died June 30, 1863.

Ann, wife of Raphael Heard, died October 3, 1847, aged 82 years (born 1765).  Sacred to the Memory of Milly A. Hagan, who departed this life January 13, 1800, in the ___ year of her age (portion has flaked off stone).

Thomas Greenwell died April 11, 1843, aged 30 years, 4 months.

James Green, born May 10, 1825, died January 19, 1865.

Nancy, wife of John Pike, born January 8, 1805, died May 10, 1865.

Mary, wife of William Lush, died June 6, 1852, aged 81 years (born 1771).

Felix C. Roberts, born September 26, 1860, died July 8, 1889.

 

Eusebius B. Mayes Biography

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 1887

Marion County

Eusebius B. Mayes, farmer and stock dealer, was born August 6, 1835, being the eldest son in a family of four children born to Archibald S. and Harriet P. (McElroy) Mayes.  His paternal grandfather, Robert Mayes, was born in Virginia, March 26, 1766; immigrated to Kentucky in 1808, and settled in what is now Taylor County; his marriage to Miss Margaret McClanahan occurred in his native state in 1790.  In the county of his adoption he became quite an extensive farmer and slave owner.  Archibald S., his son, was born near Staunton, Virginia, April 1, 1800, making him eight years of age when his parents came to Kentucky.  He was reared on the farm, and early inured to the hardships which are incident to the settlement and clearing of a new country. October 9, 1828, he married Miss Harriet P. McElroy  in Marion County.  In early manhood he engaged in buying, trading in, and shipping stock, principally mules, in which business he continued almost all the rest of his life.  In 1851 he purchased the farm in Washington County on which his widow and heirs now live.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and died a firm believer in its hopes, October 27, 1883.  Eusebius S. Mayes was born in Marion County, and made his home with his parents until the breaking out of the late Civil War.  October 9, 1858, he married Miss Mary L. Green.  She died October 22, 1862, and of the three children born to their union none survive.  December 18, 1866, he married Miss Mary A. Curry of Harrodsburg, Kentucky; to their union eight children have been born, of whom seven are now living:  Paulina, Kate, Mat, Mary, Eusebius, Annie and Archibald.  Until the year 1862, Mr. Mayes lived with his parents; he then embarked in the mercantile business at Lebanon, in which he continued until 1874, when he engaged in buying and shipping cattle to the West, in which business he has since remained.  He is a Democrat in politics; belongs to the Masonic and Knights of Honor fraternities, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

Joseph Russell – Susan Moberly 1863 Marriage Bond – Marion County

Joseph Russell married Susan Moberly September 21, 1863, after receiving their marriage bond on September 19th.  Notice the two 25 cent revenue stamps on the document.  During the Civil War these stamps were used to fund the war effort – ranging from on cent to two hundred dollars.  These were used on all paper transactions.  They can also be found on photographs of this time period.  The gentleman shown on the stamp is Samuel D. Ingham, 1779-1869.  He was born in Pennsylvania, was a member of the House of Representatives and in 1829 President Andrew Jackson made him Secretary of the Treasury.

General John Hunt Morgan burned the Marion County Courthouse July 5, 1863.  This bond is from pages 24 and 25 of the new marriage book.

Marriage Bond

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, Joseph Russell, as principal, and Joseph Moberly as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of this Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound Joseph Russell and Susan Moberly.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 19th day of September 1863.

Joseph Russell, Joseph Moberly

Attest:  J. M. Fedler, Clerk

The date of marriage, Monday, September 21st 1863.  The groom resides in Marion County, is 58 years old, has been married once before.  He is a farmer, born in Washington County, parents born in Virginia.

The brides resides in Marion County, is 39 years old, this is her first marriage.  She was born in Washington County, as well as her mother, her father was born in Maryland.  Remarks – Bride’s consent proven by oath of father who appears in person before me.

To be married at Joseph Moberly’s on 21st day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 19th day of September 1863.

Joseph Russell

Attest.  J. M. Fedler.

Tobin Family Obituaries – Franklin and Marion Counties

Lawrence and Mary Tobin’s graves in Frankfort Cemetery, Franklin County, Kentucky.

Lawrence Tobin was born in County Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1817, the son of Lawrence and Kate Tobin.  He came to the United States in 1840.  Mary Leonard was born in Ireland in 1829, a daughter of John Leonard.  The couple married in 1847.  They began their Kentucky life together in Jefferson County.  In the 1850 census Lawrence was 34, a laborer; Mary was 22.  Son Richard, 2, born in Kentucky was listed, as well as Hugh Leonard, 19, born in Ireland – probably Mary’s brother.

By 1860 the family  had moved to Frankfort.  Lawrence was now a grocer.  Children John, 10; Kate, 8; Rose, 4; and Hugh, 2, had joined the family.  Three more children were born by 1880 – James, Susan and Annie.

Lawrence Tobin, 1817-1897.

Kentucky Advocate, Frankfort, Franklin County, Kentucky

Monday, December 27, 1897

Lawrence Tobin Dead

Just as the Angelus was ringing Sunday night from the church of which he was a member for many long years the spirit of Lawrence Tobin took flight.  Mr. Tobin was one of the best known Democrats in the state, having been one of the brave few who assembled in Louisville just after the war to reorganize the party in Kentucky.  He was born in 1815 in Ireland and came to this country when a young man, and had lived in Frankfort since about 1848.  He was elected city councilman several times and was on the state central committee for many years.  A wife and eight grown children survive him.

The Frankfort Roundabout, Franklin County, Kentucky

Saturday, September 16, 1905

Death of Dr. Hugh Leonard Tobin

This sad announcement came as a shock to our city.  His death occurred at 11 o’clock on Thursday night, at Pope’s Sanitarium, in Louisville.  Dr. Tobin was the third son of the late Mr. Lawrence Tobin and Mrs. Mary Tobin.  he was 44 years of age, and was a physician of fine attainments and standing.  He had been physician at the local penitentiary for eight years in succession, and had also served in a like position under Governor Buckner.

For some time Dr. Tobin had been troubled with a painful intestinal disease, which baffled the skill of our local physicians, and had recourse to an operation for relief.  The operation was performed some ten days ago, and contrary to the hopes of the surgeons, he did not rally as fully as it was hoped he would.  On Thursday the case assumed a dangerous phase, and his brothers, Mr. Richard Tobin and Mr. John Tobin, were summoned to his bedside.  He sank rapidly, and the end came as stated.

Dr. Tobin was highly esteemed for his integrity and ability as a man and physician.

He leaves a wife and nine children, three brothers, three sisters and his aged mother to mourn his untimely end.

The remains were brought home yesterday and the funeral and burial will take place from the Church of the Good Shepherd today.  Rev. Father Thos. S. Major conducting the sad rites.

The sympathy of a wide circle of relatives and friends is extended to the bereft.

Mary Leonard Tobin, 1829-1908.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, July 3, 1908

Death of Mrs. Tobin

Mrs. Mary Leonard Tobin, widow of Lawrence Tobin, once one of the leading Democratic politicians in Kentucky, died here this morning at 7 o’clock at the age of 79 years.  Infirmities of old age caused her death.  Lawrence Tobin was once chairman of the Democratic State Committee and one of the prominent party leaders in the State.  One of his son, Dick Tobin, was Mayor of Frankfort several years ago.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 15, 1926

James M. Tobin, 58, Dies In Frankfort

Frankfort, Ky., April 14 – James Madison Tobin, 58 years old, died of heart trouble at 5 o’clock this afternoon while talking with a friend in front of a Main Street store here.  Mr. Tobin was a son of the late Lawrence Tobin.  He is survived by two brothers, John Tobin, Lexington, and Richard Tobin, secretary of the Railroad Commission, and four sisters, Mrs. Kate Boldrick, Lebanon, and Misses Rose, Anne and Susie Tobin, Frankfort.

The Courier Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, July 16, 1927

Former Mayor Frankfort Dies

Lingering Illness Fatal to Secretary of State Railroad Commission

Frankfort, Ky., July 15 – Richard Tobin, 77 years old, former mayor of Frankfort and Secretary of the State Railroad Commission for the last eight years, died here this afternoon at his home in South Frankfort of a lingering illness.  Mr. Tobin had been active in State politics for many years and had a wide acquaintance among politicians throughout the State.  He was the first mayor of Frankfort to be chosen by Popular vote.  The mayor was formerly elected by the city council.

Mr. Tobin is survived by four daughters, Misses Lucille Tobin, Blanche Tobin, Anna Tobin and Mayme L. Tobin, and one son, Richard Tobin, Jr.  No funeral arrangements have been made.

——-

Susan Tobin was born October 10, 1861, and died January 25, 1929, in Marion County, Kentucky, evidently visiting her sister, Mrs. Kate Boldrick.  The unmarried sisters were living at their old homeplace, 326 Main Street, in Frankfort.  Susan never married.  She was buried in Frankfort.

After the death of sister Susan, the unmarried sisters Annie and Rose Tobin made their home with their sister, Kate, in Marion County.  Annie Tobin was born February 28, 1872, and died May 28, 1931, and was buried in Frankfort.

Two months later, brother Dr. John Tobin, born December 8, 1860, died July 28, 1931.  He also lived in Marion County; he was buried in Frankfort.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, August 13, 1939

Rose Tobin was born April 24, 1856, and died August 7, 1939, in Marion County; she was buried in Frankfort.

Kate Tobin Boldrick lived longest of all her siblings.  She was married to George Boldrick.  They had a large family of nine children.  Kate was born April 26, 1853 (although the date given on her birth certificate was April 25, 1864; she was listed in the births of Franklin County for 1853) and died October 3, 1940.  She and her husband were buried in St. Augustine Cemetery in Lebanon, Marion County.

 

 

 

Wilson-Lindsey 1863 Marriage Bond

Marion County was formed from Washington County in 1834, so earlier records will be found there.  During the Civil War, John Hunt Morgan and his raiders came through Marion County in 1863, and during the Battle of Lebanon, his brother, Lt. Tom Morgan was killed.  In retribution much of the town of Lebanon was torched, including the courthouse where the historical records went up in flames.  This occurred July 5, 1863.  This marriage bond is one of the first recorded after that date.

Marriage Bond
The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, Fletcher Wilson as principal, and John R. Thomas as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of This Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound Fletcher Wilson and Catherine H. Lindsey.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson, J. R. Thomas

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk, Marion County Court

  1. Date of marriage – Wednesday, September 23rd
  2. Name of groom – Fletcher Wilson
  3. Residence of groom – Marion County
  4. Age of groom – thirty-seven years
  5. No. of marriage of groom – second time
  6. Occupation – farmer
  7. Birth-place of groom – Washington County, Kentucky
  8. Birth-place of groom’s father – Washington County, Kentucky
  9. Birth-place of groom’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  10. Name of bride – Catherine H. Lindsey
  11. Residence of bride – Marion County
  12. Age of bride – thirty-eight years
  13. No. of marriage of bride – first time
  14. Birth-place of bride – Washington County, Kentucky
  15. Birth-place of bride’s father – U.S.
  16. Birth-place of bride’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  17. Remarks, bride’s consent proven by oath of J. R. Thomas

To be married at the residence of the bride on 23rd day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk

 

William B. and Mary Angeline Handley

 Mary A., wife of W. B. Handley, born August 23, 1840, died December 28, 1930.  William B. Handley, born January 24, 1836, died December 24, 1904.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 25, 1904

An Aged Citizen Dies – W. B. Handley, Ill Only Three Days At St. Lawrence

W. B. Handley, sixty-eight years of age, died at his home at St. Lawrence, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon  He had been ill for only three days of pneumonia.  The funeral will be held from St. Martin (s/b St. Lawrence) Church at 8 o’clock Monday morning, and interment will be made in the church cemetery.  He is survived by a widow and three children.  They are Mrs. Kate Wood, Mrs. Belle Connor and Mrs. Annie Henning.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 27, 1904

Knottsville – Mr. W. B. Handley, one of the most prominent and highly esteemed citizens of the eastern part of the county, was buried from St. Lawrence Church Monday morning at 9 o’clock.  Father Clements paid a most eloquent tribute to his character as a father, a husband, a citizen and a Christian.  Mr. Handley was in his sixty-ninth year and is survived by his wife and three daughters, Mrs. J. W. Wood, of Owensboro; Mrs. Lee Henning and Mrs. Thomas Connor, of St. Lawrence.  Mrs. J. C. Blandford, of West Louisville, was a sister.  he was stricken with pneumonia on Tuesday afternoon and died the following Saturday at 4 o’clock.

William B. Handley married Mary Angeline Russell in 1860.  The couple had eight children, two boys who died as infants, Martin Kendrick and Charles J., and six girls – Mary Catherine, Isabella Florence, Anna Elizabeth, Rosa Alice, Maria Josephine and Ida J.  Josephine died in 1892 at the age of 17, and Ida died in 1900 at the age of 22.  Rosa died in 1903, aged 32; I’m not sure if she married.  Three married daughters are survivors at the time of their father’s death in 1904.  However, two of those sisters died in 1906 – Mary Catherine Handley Wood, September 9th, of complications of diseases, leaving five children; and Anna Elizabeth Handley Henning, November 18th, of typhoid; she left three children.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1930

Mrs. William B. Handley – Mrs. Mary Angeline Handley, 90 years old, the oldest and one of the best-known women of the St. Lawrence section, died at 11:45 o’clock, Sunday night.  Mrs. Handley had exceptionally good health until a week ago when she contracted bronchial pneumonia.  She was born at Lebanon, Kentucky, August 23, 1840, the daughter of Joseph and Catherine Russell.  In 1861, she was married to the late Esq. William Handley, and to this union eight children were born, all deceased.  she is survived by eleven grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren.  For the past ten years, Mrs. Handley made her home with her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Henderson.  The funeral will be held at 9 o’clock this morning at St. Lawrence Catholic Church with a Requiem High Mass offered by Rev. F. X. Laemmle.  Burial will be in the church cemetery.

Joseph and Catherine Russell, parents of Mary Angeline Russell Handley, are buried in St. Charles Catholic Cemetery in Marion County.