Tag Archives: Marion County Kentucky

Bequest In Will Becomes Ryder’s Cemetery In Lebanon

This old will has a gem of a piece of information.  In it Augustus Ryder gives money to buy land for a cemetery and its upkeep.  But it is also the first will written in the new Will Book 1 after the Marion County Courthouse burned when General John Hunt Morgan came to town July 5, 1863.  The original will was included in those books that became ashes on that date.  In many counties that suffered the loss of a courthouse it was very common for copies of wills, and other records, to be brought in and added to the new books to have those records on file.

On my first reading I thought perhaps Augustus Ryder was a soldier of the Civil War, who intended to take care of his sister Julia (she is the only family member named in the will) and use the rest of his estate for the betterment of the community – a new cemetery.  Augustus Ryder was civic minded, but I don’t believe he served during the war.  He was a German immigrant, born in 1812.  I can’t say when he came to this country, but in the 1850 census he is living in Marion County with John and Sally Yowell, aged 40, born in Germany and listed as a merchant.  John Yowell was a bookkeeper, aged 53, his wife, 57.  In 1860 Augustus is 47, a bookkeeper, living with Michael S. Ray.

My great-grandmother Mary Elizabeth Crow Coulter Alford is buried in Ryder’s Cemetery.   The cemetery is located on a hill on Highway 68, Main Street, in Lebanon, halfway between Sulphur Spring Road and Woodlawn Avenue.

 

Will Book 1, Page 1, Marion County, Kentucky

I, Augustus Ryder, of Marion County, Kentucky, do make and ordain this to be my last will and testament.

1st.  It is my will that all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid.

2nd. I will and bequeath to my sister Julia Ryder three thousand dollars and also my gold watch.

3rd. I will all the balance of my estate to be laid out in the purchase, enforcement and ornament of suitable cemetery grounds in the vicinity of Lebanon, for a funeral place for all denominations, Catholic and Protestant.

4th.  I appoint John Shuck and Thomas C. Woods, Executors, of this my last will and testament, this 30th day of November 1862.

  1. Ryder

Attest. James M. Fogle, N. J. Ray

The above is the substance and as near the form as I can remember of A. Ryder’s will drawn by me.

John Shuck

State of Kentucky, County of Marion

I, James M. Fuller, Clerk of Marion County Court, certify that the above and personal substances of the will of A. Ryder, deceased, was on August 10, 1863, presented to Marion County Court and proven by the oath of James M. Fogle, and N. S. Ray, subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the substance of the original will of Augustus Ryder, deceased, which was received in the County Clerk’s office and burned on July 5, 1863, which fact also attested by the oath of John Shuck.

Thereupon it is ordered that said substance of will marked in order form A is received as the last will and testament of Augustus Ryder, deceased.

Whereupon the same and this certificate are truly received in my office this August 31st, 1863.

James M. Fuller, Clerk

Husband and Wife? Brother and Sister?

Samuel N. Caldwell, December 15, 1857 – February 9, 1922.  Bettie A. Caldwell, September 2, 1849 – November 22, 1918.  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

At first glance this gravestone looks like any other.  A couple with their births and dates; most would think it husband and wife.  I did – until I searched for obituaries for them.  Now we would all be forgiven for thinking that, but Samuel and Bettie are actually brother and sister – children of James Barnes and Sarah J. (Crawford) Caldwell – old bachelor and maid that lived their lives together – with two other siblings.  The single life just seems to run in some families – such as my Linton and Montgomery lines.  The point I would like to make today, check original sources.  So important.  But a little more about Samuel and Bettie.

James B. Caldwell, September 16, 1822 – February 12, 1911.  Sarah J. Caldwell, December 26, 1823 – June 9, 1903.

Bettie was the first born of her parents.  She is listed in the Marion County births, born June 17, 1853, in that county near Cartrites Church (probably Cartright).  I’ve not heard of this church, although there were early settlements on Cartwright’s Creek.  There could have been a church there at one time.  Samuel was the fifth child, born December 15, 1857.

Sarah J. Crawford was born in Marion County, her husband in Green County.  Before the 1870 census the couple and their family of seven moved to Boyle County, where they spent the remainder of their days.  A daughter, Maggie, is listed in the 1870 and 1880 census, but I could find no further information.  Daughter Kate married Wood Walker.  Daughter Harriet (Haggie in the census) lived at home.  Daughter Susan married a Newbolt.

After the deaths of their parents John Crawford, Samuel Nelson, Harriet and Bettie A., lived together, until their end days.  John Crawford Caldwell was the last to pass away, in 1938.

Harriet E. Caldwell, December 12, 1860 – May 27, 1912.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Tuesday, May 28, 1912

Miss Harriet Caldwell died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, yesterday.  She was in the fifty-third year of her age.  The funeral will be at the residence at 4 o’clock this afternoon, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.  Deceased was a member of the Second Presbyterian Church and the funeral will be conducted by the pastor.  She is survived by three sisters and two brothers, Miss Bettie Caldwell, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt, Mrs. W. B. Walker, Mr. John C. Caldwell and Mr. S. N. Caldwell.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, November 22, 1918

Miss Bettie A. Caldwell died in a Lexington Hospital this morning.  The body will be brought to Danville and funeral services will be held at the grave in Bellevue Cemetery tomorrow (Saturday) at 2:30 p.m.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, February 10, 1922

The Advocate deeply regrets to chronicle the death of Mr. Samuel Nelson Caldwell, which occurred last night at 6 o’clock at the home of his brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Pike, where he had made his home for the past several years.  For a number of years the deceased was in the grocery business in Danville, where by his universal courteous treatment and square dealing he won for himself a host of staunch friends, all of whom will read of his demise with the deepest regret.  The funeral will be held at the home tomorrow morning on the Alum Springs Pike at eleven o’clock and will be conducted by the Rev. Frank J. Cheek, of this city, who has been a friend of the family since boyhood.  The deceased was a member of long standing of Old Caldwell Church and always lived up to the Presbyterian faith.  He was in his sixty-fourth year and had lived all of his splendid life in this county, where he was born.  He is survived by one brother, Mr. John C. Caldwell, and two sisters, Mrs. G. P. Newbolt and Mrs. W. D. Walker, both of whom live in this county.  After the funeral ceremony the burial will follow in Bellevue Cemetery.

Sue C. Newbolt, June 17, 1863 – July 1, 1933.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Monday, July 3, 1933

Mrs. Newbolt Is Taken By Death

Mrs. Sue C. Newbolt, 80 years old, died at the home of her brother, John C. Caldwell, on the Alum Springs Road, at 8 o’clock Saturday night after an illness of some duration, brought on by advanced years.

Funeral services were held at 10 o’clock this morning by Dr. George E. Sweazey, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery here.  Casketbearers were:  Sam C. Walker, George l. Mahan, Ben Clark, Will Caldwell, S. H. Nichols, Ned Wiseman.

Mrs. Newbolt, who was a member of an old and distinguished Boyle County family, is survived by one brother, Mr. Caldwell, and one sister, Mrs. W. D. Walker, of Perryville.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, December 16, 1938

John C. Caldwell Is Buried Today

Funeral services for John Crawford Caldwell, 87 years old, former Danville merchant and Boyle County farmer, who died at 1:30 o’clock Sunday afternoon at the Danville and Boyle County hospital, were conducted at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon in the chapel of Stith Funeral home on West Main Street by Dr. William E. Phifer, Jr., pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, followed by interment in Bellevue Cemetery.

The deceased was in the dry goods and notion business in Danville under the firm name of Roberts and Caldwell.  both gentlemen were held in highest esteem in this city by all who did business with their house, which was that now occupied by Dr. M. D. Spoonamore, local druggist.

Bearers were:  Ben Clark, William Caldwell, J. B. Nichols, Sr., Nicholas McDowell, Joseph Irvine and Charles Caldwell.

Mr. Caldwell was born November 27, 1851, in Boyle County, the son of the late James Barnes Caldwell and Sarah Jane Crawford Caldwell of Marion County.  He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Danville.

Surviving are two nieces and two nephews, Miss Maude W. Adams, Amityville, R.I., Mrs. J. W. Craft, Hazard, Kentucky, James B. Walker, Flint, Michigan, and J. C. Brown, Atlanta, Georgia, and one great-nephew, Marshall Mahan of Wheelwright, Kentucky.

 

 

1863 Reno-Taylor Marriage – Marion County

Marriage Bond

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, J. W. Reno as principal, and J. M. Halen, as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of this Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound J. W. Reno and Lizzie Taylor.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 12th day of September 1863.

J. W. Reno and J. M. Halen

Attest:  J. M. Hidler, Clerk, Marion County Court

Male

  • Date of marriage – Tuesday, 15th day of September 1863
  • Name of groom – James W. Reno
  • Residence of groom – Haysville, Kentucky
  • Age of groom – 24 years
  • No. of marriage of groom – first
  • Occupation – physician
  • Birth-place of groom – Hardin County, Kentucky
  • Birth-place of groom’s father – Bourbon County, Kentucky
  • Birth-place of groom’s mother – Virginia

Female

  • Name of bride – Lizzie Taylor
  • Residence of bride – Marion County, Kentucky
  • Age of bride – 22 years
  • No. of marriage of bride – first
  • Birth-place of bride – Marion County, Kentucky
  • Birth-place of bride’s father – Boyle County, Kentucky
  • Birth-place of bride’s mother – Boyle County, Kentucky
  • Remarks – Bride’s consent given in writing attested by oath of J. M. Hourigan

To be married at Bannister Taylor’s on 15th day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 12 day of September 1863

J. W. Reno

Attest:  J. M. Hidler

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Wednesday, June 5, 1918

 

Brothers John Linton Edwards and William Mason Edwards in Union Army During the War Between the States

Two brothers, John L. and William M. Edwards entered the Union army November 21, 1861, at Lebanon, Marion County.  They entered service as privates, and were in Captain Bevill’s Company E, 10th Regiment of the Kentucky Volunteers.  John was 26 and William was 21.  The two brothers were sons of Jonathan and Nancy Linton Edwards.  The other five children were Alfred, Lucretia, Susan, Edward and Benjamin.  Their parents were part of the Linton/Edwards move to Kentucky in 1816-1818.

During the Civil War John and William remained in the same unit.  May 6, 1863, John was detailed as a brigade teamster.

August 10, 1863 he was sent to a hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, and was later moved to the hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.  This was during the occupation of middle Tennessee.

Again, June 16, 1864, he was sent to the hospital in the present campaign.  This was during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in Marietta, Georgia.

John Edwards appears on the Company Muster-out Roll, dated December 6, 1864, in Louisville.  He was due $100 plus $26.32 for clothing in kind.

William Edwards was sent to the hospital at Lebanon, Kentucky, October 26, 1862.  It is very likely William was wounded during the Battle of Perryville earlier in the month, and was sent to recuperate in nearby Lebanon.

On June 10, 1864, he was sent to the hospital on the present campaign, again at Kennesaw Mountain.

William Edwards was captured at Columbia between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863; was confined by General Morgan.  He was paroled between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863.

September 19-20, 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga, William was wounded, a contusion in the back.  He was mustered-out the same date as his brother, August 6, 1864, and was due $100 plus $40.62 for clothing in kind.  I am sure John was horribly worried when William was wounded and taken prisoner by John Hunt Morgan.

J. L. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry, Cemetery Hill, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky.

After the war John and William came back to Washington County to live with their parents.  In fact, six of he seven children lived with their parents, and never married.  Youngest children, Benjamin Edwards, married his first cousin, Lucy Edwards, only children of John L. Edwards and Milly Linton.  They had no children.  Alfred, Lucretia and Edward died before 1870.  In the 1880 census for Washington County, John L, Susan and William lived at home.  John L. died between 1880 and 1900, since he does not appear in that census; only William and Susan still lived on the old home place.  William died June 10, 1903.

W. M. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry. 

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, June 18, 1903

W. M. Edwards Dead

Mr. William M. Edwards, one of the county’s best citizens, died at his home two miles from Springfield on last Wednesday night after a long illness of a complication of diseases.  The deceased was about 63 years of age and was born and reared in Washington County.  He was never married and lived with a sister on a small farm near town.  He was an upright and honorable man, and none stood higher in the estimation of his neighbors than he.

Shortly after the war broke out Mr. Edwards enlisted in the cause of the Union, and was mustered in Company E, Tenth Kentucky Infantry at Lebanon, November 21, 1861.  He followed the fortunes of that regiment of which Col. John M. Harlan was first commander, and who was afterwards succeeded by Col. W. H. Hays, through three years of hard campaigning.  He was in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Jonesboro, and other famous engagements.  On December 6, 1864, Mr. Edwards was mustered out of the army at Louisville, and returned to Springfield and soon engaged in farming.  He was a member of the Bevil Palmer Post G. A. R., and always took an interest in the affairs of that organization.  He was a good Christian man and joined the Presbyterian church during the war.

The funeral took place at the Springfield Presbyterian Church on Friday morning last and was conducted by Rev. G. A. Strickland.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 9, 1903

Public Sale

On the premises of the old Edwards place, the former home of the late W. M. Edwards beginning at 1 o’clock on Wednesday, July 15th, there will be sold three horses, two first class Jersey milk cows and calves, two heifers, a Jersey bull, sow and seven shoats, a crop of oats, farming implements and household and kitchen furniture.

Also, at the same time and place the Edwards farm containing about 75 acres will be offered for sale to the highest bidder on easy terms.

Ben Edwards, Agent

Col. R. E. Whane, Auctioneer

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 23, 1903

The sale of the personal property of the late Wm. Edwards took place on last Wednesday and was well attended, everything bringing good prices.  The Edwards farm containing about 75 acres of land was sold to Mr. Benedict Janes for $1692.

Many of the other siblings of these two brothers lie buried close by in Cemetery Hill.

Damaged Stones Area of Holy Cross Cemetery – Marion County

Holy Cross Catholic Church and Cemetery.

In Marion County, Kentucky, we find Holy Cross Catholic Church, the oldest Catholic church in the state.  The historical marker tells us ‘Basil Hayden, Sr., led 25 Maryland Catholic families to settle near here, on Pottinger’s Creek, 1785.  Father Whelan said first Mass in Kentucky here in 1787.  First Catholic church west of Alleghenies built here in 1792.  First monks, 1805, Trappist Fathers (Cistercians).  Present church erected in 1823, under direction of famous Belgian missionary, Charles Nerinckx.’  Many of the remains of these old settlers lie in this cemetery and have lain here a good two hundred years or more.

As with all cemeteries, due to weather and time, some of the stones are broken or uprooted.  The good people of the area have made a place in the cemetery for these stones.  Some are fragments of stones, some are intact, some readable, others not so much.  I want to share with you today photos taken in this area of the cemetery.  Much valuable information is here for those who cannot find their loved ones in the cemetery proper.

Ann C. Hagan, died February 20th 1849 in the 40th year of her age.

Robert Greenwell, born in 1792.

An old, unreadable stone.  Elizabeth J., wife of James M. Sims, born December 16, 1811, died June 30, 1863.

Ann, wife of Raphael Heard, died October 3, 1847, aged 82 years (born 1765).  Sacred to the Memory of Milly A. Hagan, who departed this life January 13, 1800, in the ___ year of her age (portion has flaked off stone).

Thomas Greenwell died April 11, 1843, aged 30 years, 4 months.

James Green, born May 10, 1825, died January 19, 1865.

Nancy, wife of John Pike, born January 8, 1805, died May 10, 1865.

Mary, wife of William Lush, died June 6, 1852, aged 81 years (born 1771).

Felix C. Roberts, born September 26, 1860, died July 8, 1889.

 

Eusebius B. Mayes Biography

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 1887

Marion County

Eusebius B. Mayes, farmer and stock dealer, was born August 6, 1835, being the eldest son in a family of four children born to Archibald S. and Harriet P. (McElroy) Mayes.  His paternal grandfather, Robert Mayes, was born in Virginia, March 26, 1766; immigrated to Kentucky in 1808, and settled in what is now Taylor County; his marriage to Miss Margaret McClanahan occurred in his native state in 1790.  In the county of his adoption he became quite an extensive farmer and slave owner.  Archibald S., his son, was born near Staunton, Virginia, April 1, 1800, making him eight years of age when his parents came to Kentucky.  He was reared on the farm, and early inured to the hardships which are incident to the settlement and clearing of a new country. October 9, 1828, he married Miss Harriet P. McElroy  in Marion County.  In early manhood he engaged in buying, trading in, and shipping stock, principally mules, in which business he continued almost all the rest of his life.  In 1851 he purchased the farm in Washington County on which his widow and heirs now live.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and died a firm believer in its hopes, October 27, 1883.  Eusebius S. Mayes was born in Marion County, and made his home with his parents until the breaking out of the late Civil War.  October 9, 1858, he married Miss Mary L. Green.  She died October 22, 1862, and of the three children born to their union none survive.  December 18, 1866, he married Miss Mary A. Curry of Harrodsburg, Kentucky; to their union eight children have been born, of whom seven are now living:  Paulina, Kate, Mat, Mary, Eusebius, Annie and Archibald.  Until the year 1862, Mr. Mayes lived with his parents; he then embarked in the mercantile business at Lebanon, in which he continued until 1874, when he engaged in buying and shipping cattle to the West, in which business he has since remained.  He is a Democrat in politics; belongs to the Masonic and Knights of Honor fraternities, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

Joseph Russell – Susan Moberly 1863 Marriage Bond – Marion County

Joseph Russell married Susan Moberly September 21, 1863, after receiving their marriage bond on September 19th.  Notice the two 25 cent revenue stamps on the document.  During the Civil War these stamps were used to fund the war effort – ranging from on cent to two hundred dollars.  These were used on all paper transactions.  They can also be found on photographs of this time period.  The gentleman shown on the stamp is Samuel D. Ingham, 1779-1869.  He was born in Pennsylvania, was a member of the House of Representatives and in 1829 President Andrew Jackson made him Secretary of the Treasury.

General John Hunt Morgan burned the Marion County Courthouse July 5, 1863.  This bond is from pages 24 and 25 of the new marriage book.

Marriage Bond

The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, Joseph Russell, as principal, and Joseph Moberly as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of this Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound Joseph Russell and Susan Moberly.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 19th day of September 1863.

Joseph Russell, Joseph Moberly

Attest:  J. M. Fedler, Clerk

The date of marriage, Monday, September 21st 1863.  The groom resides in Marion County, is 58 years old, has been married once before.  He is a farmer, born in Washington County, parents born in Virginia.

The brides resides in Marion County, is 39 years old, this is her first marriage.  She was born in Washington County, as well as her mother, her father was born in Maryland.  Remarks – Bride’s consent proven by oath of father who appears in person before me.

To be married at Joseph Moberly’s on 21st day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 19th day of September 1863.

Joseph Russell

Attest.  J. M. Fedler.