Tag Archives: Nelson County Kentucky

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

Cokendolpher – Smither 1874 Marriage

In the Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Baylor, is the description of the Civil War service of James Cokendolpher – ‘James Cokendolpher, born Chaplin, Kentucky, 1845; enlisted at Munfordsville, October, 1862, in the Old Squadron, Co. B., 2d Ky. Cavalry, C.S.A., and served under General John H. Morgan.  Was captured at the time Morgan made his famous raid across the Ohio into Indiana and Ohio and was imprisoned for nearly two years at Camp Douglass.  Exchanged early in 1865 and rejoined the army in the south.  Surrendered at Christianbury, Virginia.  John H. Purdy said he was with Cokendolpher all the time.’

The Commonwealth of Kentucky.  To any Minister of the gospel, or other person legally authorized to solemnize Matrimony:  You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither, the requirements of the law having been complied with.

Witness my signature as Clerk of Nelson County Court, this 28 day of January 1874.  J. D. Elliott, Clerk, by R. H. Rowland, Deputy Clerk.

This is to Certify that on the 29 day of January, 1874, the Rites of Marriage were legally solemnized by me between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither at the residence of her father in the County of Nelson in the presence of G. S. Rose, Dr. F. C. Marshall and many others.  Signed Henry A. Renbolt.

Nelson County, Kentucky, Marriages

Who Reads the Western American Newspaper In 1805?

np1Who reads The Western American Newspaper in 1805?  What today sounds like someone from California, or at least Arizona, in 1805 we are talking about Bardstown, Kentucky – Nelson County!  How times change, and talk of western lands in one century is definitely not the same in another! Personal information was found in ads that were run in the paper.  Most of the other written words were about the laws of Kentucky, items concerning the court, and in one, the second Inaugural Address of Thomas Jefferson!  In 1805 it wasn’t quite as easy to visit Washington for the inauguration, or watch it on television!

I found this newspaper while searching for something else, but couldn’t believe my luck!  Several extended family members are mentioned!

np4-1On page four of the January 11, 1805, paper is an advertisement to be inoculated for the ‘Cow Pox’ by Dr. Burr Harrison.  He has ‘just received the genuine infection from Philadelphia.’  Notice the insertion of ‘f’ for ‘s’ – makes it a bit difficult to read.  Burr Harrison was a descendant of the family of Susannah Harrison who married Moses Linton.  I descend from his second marriage with Susannah Hancock.

np4-2On the same page is a list of letters remaining in the Bardstown Post Office.  If they are not collected by April 1st they will go to the dead letter file.  Benjamin Mason, Joseph Lewis, Mrs. Anne Lewis, are all in my lines.  I can’t imagine why they didn’t pick up their mail.  Getting a letter was a rare treat in those days.  News from loved ones was a treasure to read and re-read many times.

np3-3On page three is a notice of leave by George Berry and Willis Hairgrove, to lay out a town on their land in Logan County, on big Muddy Creek, a branch of Green River.  I found Muddy Creek on the map.  It is rather long, but the only town on it today is where it starts on the Green River, a little town called Mining City, now in Butler County.  I can’t say if this is the town, or if Mr. Berry and Mr. Hairgrove were able to sell lots in their town, or if the project fell through.  Some of my Linton family went to Logan County.

np3-2David McClellan was in need of lots of butter in 1805.  Was he starting a bakery?  ‘I will contract for any quantity (not exceeding 2000 weight) of good Butter to be delivered in this place, any time between this and the first of April next, for which I will give a generous price in Cash or Merchandize – Any person on whose punctuality I can rely, that will contract for 100 weight or upwards, may receive their pay at any time, by giving their obligations to deliver the Butter in the time above specified.’

np3-1 Benjamin Mason, nephew of my fifth great-grandmother, Ann Mason, who married Captain John Linton, is requesting to hire a Negro woman for one year.  He lives 3 1/2 miles from Bardstown.

np2-2On page one was this advertisement wanting furs.  William King, located at Mr. J. McMeekin’s Store, is going to open a furriers business in Bardstown, and offers the highest prices in merchandise for skins that will be used in his business – bear, black and red foxes, martins, minks, fishers (?), wolverines, raccoons, wild cats, black and spotted tame cats, rabbits, etc.

np2-1Several ads like this were on the first page.  Plum Run is located near Fairfield in northern Nelson County close to the Spencer County border.  Nicholas Minor, who was a Justice of Peace for Nelson County, was married into the Linton/Mason families.  It is so interesting to find these little tidbits to make the lives of our ancestors come alive.  Each time we find a little piece of information that person becomes more of a real person, that lived, worked and loved just as we do today.

 

Hazel Family of Daviess County – Shoemakers, Undertaker and Grist Mills

The Hazel family – father and two sons – have quite an interesting story.  From the Virginia county of Fairfax, to Nelson County, Kentucky, and on to Daviess County, they are just one family of westward pioneers in the early years of our country.  I especially love the part about the bottle of molasses – stories like this are treasures for families!

from History of Daviess County, Kentucky, 1883

Richard Henry Hazel, shoemaker, of Knottsville, was born near Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia, September 7, 1818, and was a son of Edward Hazel, or, as commonly called, Uncle Ned, who brought his family to Nelson County, Kentucky, in the fall of 1827, and to this county the following spring, settling in the forests of Knottsville Precinct.  He was married in 1840, to Eliza Henning, daughter of Ezekiel Henning, and has two sons – Thomas E. and William S.  Mrs. Hazel died in 1881.  She was a member of the Catholic Church.  Mr. hazel is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Thomas E. Hazel, son of R. H. Hazel, of Knottsville, was born in this precinct, January 22, 1841.  On the day of his birth some parties dug a grave in the St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery.  They had a large bottle of whisky with them, which they left by the grave, and a few days after, Mr. Hazel was out hunting and passed by the cemetery and found this bottle and took it home.  It was a half-gallon bottle, and of the old-fashioned kind.  For several years this bottle was used to churn the butter in for the family, and when Tom was large enough to send to the store he carried molasses in it.  On one occasion he came swinging it along, when all at once it flew from his hand and broke, and away went bottle, molasses and all.  He was married, January 10, 1860, to Matilda Wathen, by whom he had nine children, four living – Mary E., Elnora, Eliza and Rosaline.  Mrs. Hazel died August 19, 1874.  Mr. Hazel married in January, 1876, Emma May, by whom he had one child (deceased).  Mr. Hazel early learned the shoemaker’s trade with his father, and followed it several years.  He also worked in tobacco factories several years, and for some time in saw and grist mills.

William S. Hazel, son of R. H. Hazel, was born in Knottsville, February 20, 1853.  He was educated in Cecilian College, of Hardin County, this state.  In 1872 and 1873 he clerked on the wharf-boat of Triplett, Bacon & Co., of Owensboro; came to Knottsville in 1874, and clerked for Dr. Drury, and was at the same time engaged in the insurance agency.  In 1875 he worked on a farm, and in 1876 he engaged in the mercantile business with C. O. Clements, in Knottsville.  In 1878 Clements sold to J. W. McJohnston, of Owensboro, who continued with Mr. Hazel as a partner until August, 1880, when he sold his interest to the latter.  Mr. Hazel continued the business until October 8, 1882, when he sold it to Ignatius A. Aull, he still owning the undertaker’s department.  Mr. Hazel erected a small grist-mill at Knottsville in 1881, but sold it and built a larger one in 1882, which we describe elsewhere in this work.  He married Agnes L. Clements, daughter of C. O. Clements, of Knottsville,  They have two children – Chloe and Joseph B.  Mr. Hazel is Deputy County Clerk, and a Catholic Knight; also member of the N. M. B. A.

New Kindle Book – Gethsemani Abbey Public Cemetery List

GethsemaniA new Kindle book available at Amazon – Gethsemani Abbey Public Cemetery List.  In the early days of the abbey, located in rural Nelson County, Kentucky, the families that lived around it were very involved there – working there at times, going to church there, and many wanted to be buried there.  It is such a beautiful place!  The land in front of the abbey was used as a cemetery for these families, while the monks were buried in an area behind the abbey walls.  This is a list of 287 people buried there, with birth and death dates (when available), and other information.

Nelson County Marriages

Marriages – Nelson County, Kentucky

Thomas Backster married Phoebe Lee 04 Sep 1800
Silas J. Bailey married Mary Featherkile 04 Oct 1793
John Patton Baird married Sarah Bethel 29 Nov 1798
Robert Baird married Anna Barnett 20 Sep 1785
Thomas Baird married Peggy Cotton 21 Mar 1795
James Ball married Rachel Collver 28 Apr 1800
James Barclay married Caron H. Simpson 28 Oct 1800
Michael Barlow married Rebecca Pybourn 23 Dec 1789
Samuel Barlow married Elizabeth Blackford 17 Apr 1788
Elijah Barnes married Rachel Willcocks 04 Apr 1798
Samuel Barnes married Lydia Willcocks 21 Sep 1797
John Barr married Agnes Glover 20 Oct 1788
Augustine Barron married Sarah Cissell 22 Dec 1796
Roger Barton married Phoebe Johnson 26 Dec 1786
Thomas Basye married Provy Dorsey 25 Dec 1790
John Batman married Jenny Brown 17 Apr 1788
Thomas Batsel married Grizza Nalle 07 Dec 1797
Thomas Bayne married Mrs. Sarah Goff 21 Jul 1796
William Bayne marred Lydia Hobbs 08 Jan 1801
Walter Beall, Jr., married Nancy Cox 09 Aug 1794
William Beard married Betty Carrithers 07 Aug 1800
Stephen Beauchamp married Elizabeth Tubman 07 Jan 1800
Thomas Beauchamp married Sally Smithers 23 Mar 1797

August 17th – Happy Wedding Day!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mercer Cty., KY Reuben Humphreys married Martha Reed 17 Aug 1795
Washington Cty., KY Robert Allen married Polly McElroy 17 Aug 1797
Washington Cty., KY Barnett Seal married Elizabeth Craven 17 Aug 1799
Mercer Cty., KY William Wales married Caty Voorhies 17 Aug 1805
Mercer Cty., KY James Rainey married Ruth Freeman 17 Aug 1807
Mercer Cty., KY Isham Axton married Betsy Murphy 17 Aug 1808
Washington Cty., KY Isaac Briscoe married Polly Crump 17 Aug 1819
Washington Cty., KY Benson Riggs married Mary Denny 17 Aug 1819
Washington Cty., KY Otho Hardin married Nancy Davis 17 Aug 1823
Nelson Cty., KY Daniel Brown married Catherine Meador 17 Aug 1824
Washington Cty., KY James Drury married Mary Leake 17 Aug 1829
Washington Cty., KY Joseph Suttles married Hannah Barnes 17 Aug 1830
Washington Cty., KY Hamilton C. Uler married Margaret Phillips 17 Aug 1830
Washington Cty., KY John H. Steel married Sarah Leonard 17 Aug 1839
Washington Cty., KY Nathaniel Gordon married Lucy Rice 17 Aug 1840
Washington Cty., KY Thomas L. Hagan married Martha E. Montgomery 17 Aug 1846
Washington Cty., KY James Marattay married Mary A. Spears 17 Aug 1848
Washington Cty., KY Stephen W. Edwards married Druscilla Paddox 17 Aug 1850
Marion Cty., KY Samuel M. Ray married Teresa A. McElroy 17 Aug 1852
Washington Cty., KY James Crane married Nancy S. Burns 17 Aug 1862
Washington Cty., KY James T. Mudd married Mrs. Jane F. Kendall 17 Aug 1862
Washington Cty., KY John T. Bowman married Ophelia Crouch 17 Aug 1865
Washington Cty., KY Hardin Lay married Elizabeth Barnett 17 Aug 1867
Washington Cty., KY William Lawson married Lenora A. Campbell 17 Aug 1875
Washington Cty., KY Lewis Brown married Emma Graves 17 Aug 1879
Washington Cty., KY Henry Cooksey married Martha Sutton 17 Aug 1879
Washington Cty., KY Nathan H. Waters married Mariah E. Bottoms 17 Aug 1880
Washington Cty., KY W. Dorsey married Kate Beam 17 Aug 1881
Washington Cty., KY Benjamin Pinkston married Sarah D. Kays 17 Aug 1884
Washington Cty., KY William J. Buckman married Cora Alston 17 Aug 1885
Washington Cty., KY Charles T. Mudd married Lizzie Wheatley 17 Aug 1886