Tag Archives: Nelson County Kentucky

Happy Fourth of July – Let Us Always Remember

Francis Coomes, Private, Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War, 1726-1822.  St. Michael Catholic Cemetery, Nelson County, Kentucky

Let me introduce you to the most recent Revolutionary War soldiers we have found.  We visited St. Michael Catholic Cemetery yesterday, and photographed Francis Coomes’ gravestone.  As you can see, the original stone is almost impossible to read, only the cross at the top is visible.  Thanks to the DAR and SAR for adding plaques to the veterans’ graves!

Proctor Ballard, Kentucky, Sergeant, Clark’s Illinois Regiment, Revolutionary War, 1760-1820.  Pioneer Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Proctor Ballard’s grave is another recent find.  He was a native of Virginia and served with the state militia.  He came to the Falls of the Ohio River with General George Rogers Clark in 1779.  He initially settled on Corn Island at the falls near Louisville, but moved to Bardstown in 1782.

To the memory of William Coomes, Sergeant, 8th Virginia Regiment, 1730-1820.  William Coomes, Jr., Virginia Militia, 1769-1834.  Walter A. Coomes, Virginia Militia, Battle of Blue Licks, Kentucky.  Soldiers of the American Revolution.  St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery, Daviess County, Kentucky.

These Coomes veterans could be related to the first Coomes who is buried in Nelson County.  William Coomes, Sr., married Jane Greenleaf.  She was a pioneer doctor and teacher.

Let us celebrate all those who have fought for our country over the years – from the beginning, the first war, for our independence – to those who continue to fight to keep our country safe.  Happy Fourth of July to all of you!

Greathouse Cemetery in Hancock County

Isaac N. Greathouse, born November 18, 1792, died October 21, 1832.  Greathouse Family Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

The Greathouse family cemetery is located on Hwy 1957, also known as Lee Henderson Road, close to where it T’s with Hwy 1605.  It is very close to the Henderson family cemetery, and both are marked with a road sign – although the cemeteries are easily visible from the road.

Isaac Newman Greathouse was born in Nelson County, Kentucky, November 18, 1792.  He was the son of Harmon Greathouse and Marcia Buche (she was also called ‘Mercy’ and her last name has been written as Bukey).  Harmon and Mercy moved from Frederick County, Maryland, to Nelson County, Kentucky.

Elizabeth B., wife of Isaac N. Greathouse, born July 14, 1799, died April 4, 1879.

Isaac Newman Greathouse married Elizabeth Berkeley Lewis in 1818.  Elizabeth was the daughter of John Lewis and his cousin, Hannah Lewis.  Hannah’s parents were William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton (a sister to my Captain John Linton).

Original stone for Isaac Greathouse.  To the memory of Dr. I. N. Greathouse who departed this life October 21, 1832, aged 40 years.

Hannah Amanda Linton Greathouse was a daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth.  She lived only fifteen years.

Hannah A. L. Greathouse, born April 15, 1821, died June 11, 1839.

William Linton Greathouse was a son of Isaac and Elizabeth.  He was born in 1832, either just before or after his father died.

William L. Greathouse, died July 16, 1901, aged 69 years.

Rodolphus B. Greathouse was a brother to Isaac Newman Greathouse.  He was born in 1801, probably in Nelson County, Kentucky.

In memory of Rodolphus B. Greathouse died 10 April 1838 in his 37th year.

Susannah E. Greathouse was the daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse.

Susannah E. Greathouse, died September 26, 1846, aged 21 years, 1 month and 18 days.

Isaac and Elizabeth Greathouse had four other children for whom we do not have gravestone photos.  Son John L. Greathouse was born in 1819, and died two years later.  Harmon Bukey Greathouse was born in 1822 and died 1889.  Joseph Linton Greathouse was born 1828 and died 1891.  John Fletcher Greathouse was born in 1830; in the Hancock County death records he is listed as dying November 11, 1852, in Rolls County, Missouri, of typhoid fever.  I do not know if they brought his body back to Kentucky for burial.

These photos were taken in the rain – we will return one day for sunshine and blue skies and retake!

 

 

 

2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond Genealogy Conference

How many of you have ancestors that moved to Kentucky from Maryland during the 1785-1810 immigration of families to the counties of Washington, Marion and Nelson – and, also, Scott County and Breckinridge County, as I have recently discovered?  Are you attending the 2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond, Genealogy Conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, next weekend?  Ritchey and I will be there!  We will be in the vendor section, talking about genealogy and selling my CDs to those who are interested.

Holy Cross Catholic Church

In 1785 sixty families gathered in the Pottinger’s Creek area of Washington County (later to become Marion County).  Basil Hayden, Clement Johnson, Joseph Clark, James Dant, Philip Miles, among others, were those early settlers.  Holy Cross Church is the oldest Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains, built in 1792.

St. Charles Catholic Church

Some of these groups of families settled along Hardin’s Creek in 1786, worshiped in the home of Henry Hagan, until the first church was built in 1806 – my home parish of St. Charles Church located in St. Mary’s in Marion County, originally Washington County.  John Lancaster, James Elder, William and Andrew Mudd, Thomas and Ignatius Medley, Bennett Rhodes, and others made this area their home – and many of their descendants still live there today.

St. Francis Catholic Church

Also in 1786, a group of Maryland settlers intended to share the Pottinger’s Creek settlement.  They took flatboats down the Ohio River and landed at Maysville, known as Limestone at that time.  They found such beautiful land east of the river, in what was Woodford Count, later Scott, they decided to travel no further.  The first church was built in 1794, St. Francis.  It is the second oldest parish in the state.  The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Names of those early settlers were Jenkins, Gough, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, and James.

St. Rose Catholic Church

In 1787 Philip Miles, Thomas Hill, Henry Cambron, Joseph and James Carrico, Thomas Hamilton, Basil Montgomery, many members of the Smith family, and others came to Cartwright’s Creek.  In 1798, they built a church known as St. Ann’s – and this is where many of the older members are buried.  The church was abandoned once St. Rose Church was built in 1806.  There is nothing in the field where St. Ann’s Church and Cemetery used to be.  This is the area most of my ancestors settled in – Montgomery, Carrico, Dillehay, Smith, Cambron and others – lived from those very early days until my grandmother died in 1986.  Such a rich heritage concentrated in one county – since my father’s ancestors also lived in Washington County from 1860.

Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church

The Rolling Fork settlement – today in Calvary, Marion County – was established in 1798.  Leonard Hamilton, Robert Abell, Clement and Ignatius Buckman, John Raley and others left their marks here.  Ignatius Buckman was killed by Indians and was the first buried where Holy Name of Mary Cemetery is now.  The older portion of the cemetery is on a small knoll, at the back of the church.  The newer portion is across the small road that leads back to the cemetery, a nice, flat area with many gravestones.

Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral

Captain James Rapier, with his sons Charles and William, settled on southeast of what is now Bardstown, on Beach Fork of Salt River (Poplar Neck).  A few years later Thomas Gwynn, Anthony Sanders and Nehemiah Webb (originally a Quaker) settled close by.  The home of Thomas Gwynn, now the site of the Nazareth Community of the Sisters of Charity, was used for church services until St. Joseph Church was built in 1798 in what is now St. Joseph Cemetery.  The cathedral was built in 1816.  McManus, Reynolds, Howard, Lancaster, members of the Hayden family and William McQuown were early settlers.  Thomas Howard lived in the vicinity where St. Thomas Church is now located.  His home was used for church, and in 1810 he willed the farm to the church.    In 1812 St. Thomas Church was established.  Many old settlers are buried in this cemetery.

St. Thomas Catholic Church

The Cox’s Creek settlement in Nelson County was begun about 1792.  Some of my ancestors came to this area – Gardiner, Elder, Montgomery – along with Thomas Higdon, Richard Jarboe, Valentine Thompson, Hezekiah Luckett and Charles Wathen.  This is the oldest parish in Nelson County, located in Fairfield.  Unfortunately we have not visited this church and cemetery.

The County of Breckinridge was formed in 1799, but eight years previously, when a portion of Hardin County, it was settled by Leonard Wheatley, and soon followed by Richard Mattingly, Elias Rhodes, Barton Mattingly, Ignatius Coomes, William McGary and others.  Richard Mattingly’s house was used as a church until 1811, when St. Anthony was built.  Just found out about the Breckinridge settlement during my research – another to add to our list to visit!

There are many more settlers who came from Maryland to Kentucky in those early years.  It would be impossible to name them all.  This conference first began in 1990 when it was held at Nazareth, Kentucky.  In 1992, it was held in St. Mary’s at St. Charles Church; in 1994 in Cape Girardeau, Perry County, Missouri; and back in 1996 at St. Charles – the first time Ritchey and I attended.  In 1998, Owensboro, Kentucky, was the location, and we attended again.  In 2000 the gathering was held at Leonardtown, in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  2002 found the conference at St. Catharine Motherhouse in Washington County, which we attended; 2004 in Hannibal, Missouri.  2008 at the St. Thomas Farm in Bardstown; back in Leonardtown in 2010.  The last reunion was held at St. Catharine College in Washington County in 2014 – which was my first time to attend as a vendor.  This has been such a wonderful group of people!  I’ve made so many friends and found much information for my families!  If you have any family members that originated from Maryland, especially the counties of Charles, St. Mary and Prince Edward, you may want to come.  Perhaps I will see you there?

Carother’s Infants Buried In Old Presbyterian Cemetery In Nelson County

Emmelene, daughter of J & R Carothers, born August 18, 1841, died October 30, 1845.  Old Presbyterian Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Sunday Ritchey and I were out early for a day in the cemeteries of Nelson County.  We went to early Mass, had a glorious pancake breakfast at Cracker Barrel, and were in St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery in Bardstown by 11:00.  We also visited Pioneer Cemetery and the old Presbyterian Cemetery – also in Bardstown.

Our last stop was the Presbyterian Cemetery, just a small lot with the remains of about fifty people.  Today I want to share a beautiful stone dedicated to two infants – Emmelene and Joseph Lewis Carothers.  Since many of the stones in the cemetery are very faded and unreadable, this one stands out both in clarity and color.

Joseph Lewis, son of J & R Carothers, born March 25, 1845, died June 26, 1845.

As there are no other Carothers in this cemetery, at least of the readable stones, research gave us more information about this family.  A DAR lineage for a woman in Bardstown listed James Carothers (1738-1826), who served as a private in the 2nd battalion of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in the the militia in 1781.  He was born in Scotland and died in Huntington County, Pennsylvania.  His son James Carothers married Nancy Neely.  Their son, Samuel Carothers, married Ann Simmerman.  Their son, James Carothers, married Rebecca Massie.  Their son, William Burke Carothers, married Sue Yager.

In the 1850 Census of Nelson County, James Carothers, 51, is listed as a bridge builder, born in Pennsylvania.  Wife Rebecca, 36, was also born in Pennsylvania, as well as the oldest daughter, Hannah, 16.  Three other children were born in Kentucky, A. R., 11; William B., 7; and Josephine B., 4.  Of course there is no listing for the two infants who died in 1843 and 1845.

This is the last census record for James Carothers, since he died in 1851.

The will of James Carothers is in Will Book 6, Page 553, of the Nelson County Clerk’s Office. 

In the name of God, Amen.  I, James Carothers, being persuaded in my own mind that it would redound to the interest of my wife and children to make a disposition of my property, do make, publish and declare the following as my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others made by me.

It is my will that all my just debts be paid and after they are paid off I desire my wife to have the use of all my estate so long as she remains my widow, with power to sell and convey any of my property to pay debts or to reinvest in other property or to use for her support and that of her family of children.  Should she marry than I desire that my property to be disposed according to law of the state.  I desire my boys to be put to trades so soon as they arrive at proper age.

I constitute and appoint  my wife sole executrix to carry out this will.  Witness my hand this 19 day of May 1851.

                                                          James Carothers

Attest.  P. B. Muir, J. Wood Wilson

A writing purporting to be the last will and testament of James Carothers, deceased, was produced in Court and duly proven by the oaths of Peter B. Muir and J. Wood Wilson, subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

                Att. J. Danosin Elliott, Clerk, N.C.C.

In the 1860 Census of Nelson County, Rebecca Carothers, 45, born in Pennsylvania, with children William B., 17, and Josephine, 14.  In the 1870 census Rebecca, 59, is living alone; she lived until 1890.

The death of two infants within two years was a terrible tragedy – unfortunately one endured by many parents during the 1800’s.  The love for these children is evident in the beautiful stone erected in their honor – and the beautiful verse written on it.

So fades the lovely blooming flower, Frail smiling solace of an hour.  So soon our transient comforts fly, And pleasure only blooms to die.

Sweet flower, transplanted to a clime, Where never come the blight of time.  Sweet voice which hath joined the hymn of the undying seraphim.

Young wanderer who hath reached thy rest, With everlasting glory blest.  Thy little bark in life’s dark sea, Has anchored in eternity.

Oh who would not thy brief career, With lamentation’s selfish tear.  Or who would stay thy upward flight, To the bright realms of perfect light.

Come gentle patience smile on pain, Till dying Hope shall live again.  Hope wipes the tear from sorrows eye, And faith points upward to the sky.

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

Cokendolpher – Smither 1874 Marriage

In the Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Baylor, is the description of the Civil War service of James Cokendolpher – ‘James Cokendolpher, born Chaplin, Kentucky, 1845; enlisted at Munfordsville, October, 1862, in the Old Squadron, Co. B., 2d Ky. Cavalry, C.S.A., and served under General John H. Morgan.  Was captured at the time Morgan made his famous raid across the Ohio into Indiana and Ohio and was imprisoned for nearly two years at Camp Douglass.  Exchanged early in 1865 and rejoined the army in the south.  Surrendered at Christianbury, Virginia.  John H. Purdy said he was with Cokendolpher all the time.’

The Commonwealth of Kentucky.  To any Minister of the gospel, or other person legally authorized to solemnize Matrimony:  You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither, the requirements of the law having been complied with.

Witness my signature as Clerk of Nelson County Court, this 28 day of January 1874.  J. D. Elliott, Clerk, by R. H. Rowland, Deputy Clerk.

This is to Certify that on the 29 day of January, 1874, the Rites of Marriage were legally solemnized by me between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither at the residence of her father in the County of Nelson in the presence of G. S. Rose, Dr. F. C. Marshall and many others.  Signed Henry A. Renbolt.

Nelson County, Kentucky, Marriages

Who Reads the Western American Newspaper In 1805?

np1Who reads The Western American Newspaper in 1805?  What today sounds like someone from California, or at least Arizona, in 1805 we are talking about Bardstown, Kentucky – Nelson County!  How times change, and talk of western lands in one century is definitely not the same in another! Personal information was found in ads that were run in the paper.  Most of the other written words were about the laws of Kentucky, items concerning the court, and in one, the second Inaugural Address of Thomas Jefferson!  In 1805 it wasn’t quite as easy to visit Washington for the inauguration, or watch it on television!

I found this newspaper while searching for something else, but couldn’t believe my luck!  Several extended family members are mentioned!

np4-1On page four of the January 11, 1805, paper is an advertisement to be inoculated for the ‘Cow Pox’ by Dr. Burr Harrison.  He has ‘just received the genuine infection from Philadelphia.’  Notice the insertion of ‘f’ for ‘s’ – makes it a bit difficult to read.  Burr Harrison was a descendant of the family of Susannah Harrison who married Moses Linton.  I descend from his second marriage with Susannah Hancock.

np4-2On the same page is a list of letters remaining in the Bardstown Post Office.  If they are not collected by April 1st they will go to the dead letter file.  Benjamin Mason, Joseph Lewis, Mrs. Anne Lewis, are all in my lines.  I can’t imagine why they didn’t pick up their mail.  Getting a letter was a rare treat in those days.  News from loved ones was a treasure to read and re-read many times.

np3-3On page three is a notice of leave by George Berry and Willis Hairgrove, to lay out a town on their land in Logan County, on big Muddy Creek, a branch of Green River.  I found Muddy Creek on the map.  It is rather long, but the only town on it today is where it starts on the Green River, a little town called Mining City, now in Butler County.  I can’t say if this is the town, or if Mr. Berry and Mr. Hairgrove were able to sell lots in their town, or if the project fell through.  Some of my Linton family went to Logan County.

np3-2David McClellan was in need of lots of butter in 1805.  Was he starting a bakery?  ‘I will contract for any quantity (not exceeding 2000 weight) of good Butter to be delivered in this place, any time between this and the first of April next, for which I will give a generous price in Cash or Merchandize – Any person on whose punctuality I can rely, that will contract for 100 weight or upwards, may receive their pay at any time, by giving their obligations to deliver the Butter in the time above specified.’

np3-1 Benjamin Mason, nephew of my fifth great-grandmother, Ann Mason, who married Captain John Linton, is requesting to hire a Negro woman for one year.  He lives 3 1/2 miles from Bardstown.

np2-2On page one was this advertisement wanting furs.  William King, located at Mr. J. McMeekin’s Store, is going to open a furriers business in Bardstown, and offers the highest prices in merchandise for skins that will be used in his business – bear, black and red foxes, martins, minks, fishers (?), wolverines, raccoons, wild cats, black and spotted tame cats, rabbits, etc.

np2-1Several ads like this were on the first page.  Plum Run is located near Fairfield in northern Nelson County close to the Spencer County border.  Nicholas Minor, who was a Justice of Peace for Nelson County, was married into the Linton/Mason families.  It is so interesting to find these little tidbits to make the lives of our ancestors come alive.  Each time we find a little piece of information that person becomes more of a real person, that lived, worked and loved just as we do today.