Tag Archives: Rowan County North Carolina

Andrew Lovelace of Ballard County

The first white men in Ballard County came in 1780, when General George Rogers Clark came with about 200 soldiers to establish a military outpost at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, laying claim of the United States to the Mississippi River as its western boundary.  Fort Jefferson was established with about 200 soldiers, which was a mile and a half south of what is now the town of Wickliffe.  The Chickasaw Indians considered this their territory and were anything but happy that their land had been invaded by the white man.  A few settlers came down the river to the fort after it was established, but the Indians attacked and killed them mercilessly.  Soon the fort was abandoned and any remaining settlers left also.  Until the purchase of this area of Kentucky in 1819, there were no permanent settlers.

Of the settlers who came in around 1818/1819 were John Humphrey, Solomon Redferrin, Robert Crafton and William Crafton, Daniel Doolin, John Weaver, James Talbott, William Rush, William Holman, Samuel Wilson, Andrew Lovelace, the Ewell family, the Newman family, Benjamin Kimmell, Samuel Saruthers, Penuel Billington, James Ashley, Israel Linn, William Linn, the Stovall family, the Unsell family.

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1885

Ballard County, Kentucky

Andrew Lovelace

Upon the crest of a high hill overlooking the village of Lovelace, and commanding a magnificent view of the valley of the Mayfield Creek, rests a substantial brick residence, the home of a bright and sturdy old pioneer, the worthy subject of this sketch.  Andrew Lovelace was born February 12, 1811, in Butler County, Kentucky, and came with his parents, in 1822, to what is now Ballard County, where he has since resided.  His father, Captain Andrew Lovelace, Sr., a native of Rowan County, North Carolina, was born in 1776, removed to Kentucky in an early day, and died here in 1863.  He was the son of Elias, a soldier of the Revolution, who also died at this place about 1833.  He was the son of John, an Englishman.  Subject’s mother, Rebecca, daughter of William Holman, of North Carolina, died in 1834.  To her and husband were born:  Elizabeth (Hall), Nancy (Lynn), Elias, Archibald, subject, Rebecca (Humphrey), Isaac and William.  Subject was married November 5, 1833, to Miss Eleanor, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Shelton) Ashley, of Butler County (born May 15, 1815), and his union has been blessed by the birth of Virgil S., Martha J. (Howard), John H., Freeman B., James M., Mary E. (Elsey), William A., Eliza B. (Trice), and Susan V. (Henderson).  Subject is a farmer, has prospered in his business and now owns 400 acres of well improved and valuable land which is in a fine state of cultivation.  In politics he still clings to the tenets of the old line Whigs.

Andrew and Eleanor Lovelace are buried in the Lovelace Family Cemetery in the town of Lovelace.

1790 Will of Benjamin Graham

Benjamin Graham was born in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1753.  He married Faithful Hall, in that county, November 13, 1782.

Mercer County Court House – Harrodsburg, Kentucky

Will Book A, pages 41-43

Scan121In the name of God, Amen.  I, Benjamin Graham, of the Count of Mercer in the Commonwealth of Virginia, being sickly and weak of body, but of a sound and perfect mind and memory and calling to mind that there is a time for all men to die, do therefore make and ordain this my last will and testament in the manner and form following.  I commit my soul to the hand of almighty God that gave it and my body to the dust to be buried in a

Scan122Christian and decent like manner, at the directions of my executor hereafter named, and as for the worldly estate that hath pleased God to bless me with I give, desire and bequeath in the following manner.  First I ordain that all my just debts and funeral charges be justly and faithfully paid.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my loving wife Faithful the one third of my real and personal estate and if she thinks proper to have the same at the appraisement bill that may be made of my goods and chattels.  And all the remainder and reversion of my estate whether real, personal or mixed, and a purchase of land I made from David Hazel lying between the Cane Run meeting house and Harrodsburg, all of the same to be sold and the monies arising therefrom to be equally divided amongst my four daughters, Alice, Elizabeth, Mary and Jane; I also devise and ordain that my daughter Alice to live with my brother Samuel, and that my daughter Mary live with my brother James’ widow until they arrive to full age and that my daughter’s Elizabeth and Jane to remain with my wife as long as she remains single or can deal justly by them.  I do hereby constitute my loving brother Samuel Graham and my trusty friend Elisha Thomas my whole and sole executors of this my last will and testament, thereby revoking and disannuling all former wills and testaments by me heretofore made and done, pronouncing and declaring this only to be my last will and testament.  In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal this second day of August Anno Domini 1790.

                                                              Benjamin Graham

Signed, sealed, pronounced

Scan123and declared to be his last will and testament in the presence of us – Joshua Dodson, William McCachron

Mercer County – September Court 1790

This last will and testament of Benjamin Graham, deceased, was produced in court and proved by the oath of William McCachron, a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to recorded.

Teste.  Thomas Allin, C. C.

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

Adair County Revolutionary War Veterans

John Watson was a Private in the Virginia Militia.  John entered the service at Powhatan County, Virginia, in 1780.  John served under Captain Mayho in the regiment commanded by Col. Faulkner in the brigade commanded by Captain Stephens.  John marched to Hillsborough in North Carolina.  He marched from Hillsborough, North Carolina, to South Carolina and joined the army of General Yates at Watson’s Mills.  John moved to Adair County, Kentucky, some time between 1799 and 1809.  John was born November 18, 1763, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  He married Elizabeth in December 1782.  John died July 31, 1849, in Barren County, Kentucky.

James Weir was a Private in the Pennsylvania Line.  James entered the service in 1775 at Bucks County, Pennsylvania.  James lived in Adair County, Kentucky, then he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois.  James was born in 1756 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, married Lydia Richards March 10, 1793, in Frederick County, Maryland.  Lydia was born May 27, 1770.  James died February 12, 1837, in Sangamon County, Illinois.

Thomas White was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Thomas lived in Virginia five or six years after his Revolutionary War service, then moved to Fayette County, Kentucky, for about seven years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  Thomas was born March 15, 1763.

Philip Winfrey was a Private in the Virginia Line.  Philip entered the service in 1780, at Buckingham County, Virginia.  Philip was a substitute for John Winfrey, a drafted militiaman under Captain Anthony Winston, Asap Walker and Lieutenant John January.  He marched on Cabin Point, and there joined Major Jones’ battalion and remained there for 2 months; thence to Cooper’s Mill.  Philip lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, until 1795, when he moved to Lincoln County, Kentucky.  He lived in Lincoln County for two years, then moved to Adair County, Kentucky, in 1797.  Philip Winfrey was born in 1764, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  Philip was the son of John Winfrey.  He married Martha Northcult.  Philip died in 1841 in Adair County.

David Winniford was a Sergeant in the Virginia Line.  He entered the service in 1777 in Virginia.  David lived in Buckingham County, Virginia, Cumberland County, Virginia, and Adair County, Kentucky.  David married Judith November 16, 1780, in Cumberland County, Virginia.  He died in Cumberland County, Virginia, April 26, 1834.

John Yates was a Lieutenant in the Virginia Line.  John entered the service in Culpeper County, Virginia.  He lived in Culpeper County near Sperryville (now Rappahannock County) until 1774.  He moved to Adair County, Kentucky, before 1810.  John was born in 1752 in Caroline County, Virginia.  He was the son of Captain George Yates.  He married Elizabeth Gaines December 17, 1787.  Elizabeth was born 1757 in Culpeper County, Virginia.  She died July 1820 in Barren County, Kentucky.  John died in 1820 in Adair County, Kentucky.

William Young was a Private in the North Carolina Militia.  William entered the service October 13, 1777, in Rowan County, North Carolina.  William served in Col. Lock’s regiment.  He stated in his affidavit that he received thirteen wounds and all the troops were killed except for Captain Snipes, himself and three or four others.  William lived in Rowan County, North Carolina, after the war, then in 1787 he moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  William was born in 1760.  He was the son of Jonathan Young.  William married Elizabeth.  He died July 11, 1838.

Pension Applications – Graves County, Kentucky

Pension Applications – Graves County, Kentucky

Walter Adams

The said applicant had served as a private in the North Carolina militia. He was placed on the pension roll August 17, 1832. He was 79 years old as of March 4, 1831. He was residing in Graves County, Kentucky, when he applied for a pension May 16, 1833, while at the age of 78 years. He stated that he had been born in Fauquier County, Virginia, January 12, 1755. He further added that he had enlisted in Rowan County, North Carolina, in April 1777. He further added that since the end of the Revolutionary War he had lived in Graves County, Kentucky, moving to Kentucky in May 1833, from Rowan County, North Carolina. An affidavit of a fellow soldier, Al Cracken, was also made May 11, 1833, in Kentucky. The said affiant was then at the age of 78 years. He stated that he had been acquainted with the said Walter Adams in Rowan County, North Carolina.

John Brimmage

The said applicant served as a private in the Maryland militia and he was 73 years old as of May 10, 1834. He was residing in Graves County, Kentucky, when he applied for a pension April 15, 1834, at the age of 73 years. He also stated that he had been born in Queen Anne County, Maryland, June 8, 1760. He further added that he had enlisted in Anson County, North Carolina, in July 1781. Prior to the Revolutionary War he had resided in Queen Anne County, Maryland, Anson County, North Carolina, and also Effingham County, Georgia. He further added that since the end of the Revolutionary War, he had resided in Pendleton County, South Carolina. The said soldier also stated that he also resided in Lincoln County, Tennessee, since the war, and had moved to Kentucky from that county in 1795.

David Clark

The above named soldier was residing in Graves County, Kentucky, when he applied for a pension on the United States Roll. He had enlisted in Surry County, North Carolina, in 1776. Prior to the Revolutionary War had resided in Surry County, North Carolina, Pendleton County, South Carolina, and Christian County, Kentucky. After the war he lived in Weakley County, Tennessee, and then Graves County, Kentucky. His children are George, Charles, Mary, William, James, Susan, Silas, Harry, Elizabeth and John Clark. His widow, Charity Clark, filed her claim for a widow’s pension December 3, 1840, while she was a resident of Graves County, Kentucky. She stated that her maiden name was Charity Boon. They were married in Lincoln County, South Carolina, in 1778.

Adair County Revolutionary War Soldiers

Revolutionary War Soldiers – Adair County, Kentucky

JACOB COOPER – Jacob Cooper was a private in the North Carolina Line.  Jacob entered the service in 1776 in Burke County, Virginia.  Jacob served in Captain William Moore’s regiment.  He also served in Colonel Beckman, General Reatherford’s Brigade, Colonel Charles McDowell and Captain Joseph McDowell’s Companies.  Jacob was born in North Carolina in 1734.

LEIGHTON COOPER – Leighton Cooper was a private in the Virginia Line.  Leighton entered the service in 1778.  Leighton was born about 1757.

ALEXANDER ELLIOTT – Alexander Elliott was a  midshipman in the Virginia Navy.  Alexander entered the service in 1776 or 1777.  Alexander served under his father, Captain George Elliott.  Alexander came to Kentucky around 1789 and settled in Danville, Kentucky.  In 1779 he came to Columbia, Kentucky, in Adair County.  Alexander was born in 1763 in Rockbridge County, Virginia.

SAMUEL ELLIS – Samuel Ellis was a private in the North Caroline Militia.  Samuel entered the service in 1778 in Rowan County, North Carolina.  He lived in Rowan County three years after the war when he moved to Surry County, North Carolina, then back to Rowan County; then to Jefferson County, Tennessee, until 1826 when he moved to Cumberland County, Kentucky, where he lived until 1832, when he settled in Russell County, Kentucky.  Between September 16, 1843, and March 5, 1845, he lived in Ray County, Missouri.  Samuel was born April 9, 1762, in Montgomery County, Maryland.

JOHN GRIDER, SR. – John Grider was a private in the North Carolina Line.  John entered the service in March 1778, in Burke County, North Carolina.  When he was a small boy his father settled in Carolina County, Virginia.  Later the family moved to Burke County, North Carolina.  In 1811 John moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  He was born July 13, 1755, in Maryland.  John married Isabel Blair in 1781 in Burke County, North Carolina.  John Grider, Sr., died October 3, 1838, in Henderson County, Tennessee.

JOHN HAMILTON – John Hamilton was a private in the Virginia Line.  John entered the service in 1775, in Augusta County, Virginia.  He served in  Captain John Smith’s Company.  After the war he lived in Holstein County, North Carolina, and in the Pendleton District of South Carolina until 1810, when he settled in Caldwell County, Kentucky.  John was born April 27, 1755, in Augusta County, Virginia.  John was never married.  He died in 1841.

ZACHARIUS HOLLADAY – Zacharius Holladay was a drummer in the Virginia Line.  He entered the service in 1778 in Orange County, Virginia.  He served in Captain Burnly’s Company.  Zacharius was born in 1761.

WILLIAM HOPKINS – William Hopkins was a private in the Virginia Line.  William entered the service March 25, 1777, in Dunmore County, now Shenandoah County, Virginia.  After his discharge in 1780, he moved to Chatham County, North Carolina, until 1810, when he went to Union County, South Carolina, for a short time.  He moved to Adair County, Kentucky, for a few months, then to Wayne County, Kentucky, then back to Adair County.

WILLIAM HURT – William Hurt was a private in the Virginia Line.  William entered the service in February 1778, at Bedford County, Virginia.  William served in Captain Alexander Cummings Company in the 14th Regiment of the Virginia Line.  He lived in Bedford County, Virginia, until he moved to Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1791.  In 1794, he moved to Adair County, Kentucky.  William was born September 16, 1757, in Bedford County, Virginia.  He was the son of Moses Hurt and Rutha Turner.  William married first Sarah White Fields in 1814 in Adair County.  Sarah was the daughter of Stephen and Agatha White.  She married first John Fields, who was one of the Adair County’s first merchants.  William married Elizabeth McMurray July 17, 1817, in Barren County, Kentucky.  Elizabeth died January 22, 1850.  William died November 12, 1842, in Adair County, Kentucky.