Tag Archives: Washington County Kentucky

Ignatius Layton – Elizabeth Miles 1799 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents, that we, Ignatius Layton and Nicholas Miles, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 16th day of November 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Ignatius Layton and Elizabeth Miles, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then the above obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

Ignatius Layton, Nicholas Miles

Witness, Moses Rice

This is to let you know that I have no objection against Ignatius Layton marrying my daughter, Elizabeth Miles, and by so doing you will much oblige your humble servant.

Joseph Miles, Mark Manning, James French

Washington County, Kentucky

 

Wilson-Lindsey 1863 Marriage Bond

Marion County was formed from Washington County in 1834, so earlier records will be found there.  During the Civil War, John Hunt Morgan and his raiders came through Marion County in 1863, and during the Battle of Lebanon, his brother, Lt. Tom Morgan was killed.  In retribution much of the town of Lebanon was torched, including the courthouse where the historical records went up in flames.  This occurred July 5, 1863.  This marriage bond is one of the first recorded after that date.

Marriage Bond
The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, Fletcher Wilson as principal, and John R. Thomas as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of This Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound Fletcher Wilson and Catherine H. Lindsey.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson, J. R. Thomas

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk, Marion County Court

  1. Date of marriage – Wednesday, September 23rd
  2. Name of groom – Fletcher Wilson
  3. Residence of groom – Marion County
  4. Age of groom – thirty-seven years
  5. No. of marriage of groom – second time
  6. Occupation – farmer
  7. Birth-place of groom – Washington County, Kentucky
  8. Birth-place of groom’s father – Washington County, Kentucky
  9. Birth-place of groom’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  10. Name of bride – Catherine H. Lindsey
  11. Residence of bride – Marion County
  12. Age of bride – thirty-eight years
  13. No. of marriage of bride – first time
  14. Birth-place of bride – Washington County, Kentucky
  15. Birth-place of bride’s father – U.S.
  16. Birth-place of bride’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  17. Remarks, bride’s consent proven by oath of J. R. Thomas

To be married at the residence of the bride on 23rd day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk

 

Before The War

This was a newspaper column published in The Springfield Sun in 1926.

Before The War was a newspaper column devoted to gleanings from the lives of citizens of Springfield and Washington County before the War Between the States.

Editor’s Note:  This column will appear as a weekly Sun feature.  Our readers are invited to send copies of old letters, newspaper clippings, or data of historical nature for publication.  The only requirement is that all material sent must apply to events in the lives of citizens of Springfield or Washington County previous to the War Between the States, which began in 1861.

Pottsville Ahoy!

The following advertisement appeared in the Lebanon (KY) Post.  Issue of March 22, 1854:  Notice – The undersigned will at the May term of the Washington County Court move said Court to establish a town on the land where Pottsville is now situated, in Washington County, as shown by a survey and plat now filed in the County Clerk’s office of Washington County, and shall ask the appointment of Trustees, etc.  The boundary of the town will be seen by reference to plat.  This 20th day of February 1854 – William Burns, Johnson Stumph, Samuel Burns, William Spraggins, William Thurman, Henry Pope, Spence & Hord, J. W. Pope, James Burns, R. Jones, George Campbell, M. Martin, William Worshaw.

Time Have Speeded [sic] Up

In 1854 it took two days to get a letter from Springfield to Louisville, and three days from Lebanon to Louisville.  Starting a letter from Lebanon on Monday 12 12 o’clock, it would reach Springfield at 2, where it remained until the next day until 3, at which hour it would move on to Bardstown, and arrive there at 6.  At 10 p.m. it would leave there and arrive in Louisville at 6 o’clock on Wednesday morning.  This schedule, of course, depended upon good time and no delays.

Fire At James Clements

The farm house of James Clements, situated two miles from Springfield, was burned to the ground Sunday morning, April 9, 1854.  The family were absent at church, and when they returned in the evening, they found their dwelling house a heap of smoldering ruin.  It was believed that a hired servant, who had been left in charge, set it on fire.  This was, truly, an unfortunate circumstance as Mr. Clements, a few months before, had let to the altar a fair bride.

Small Child Burned

A small child of Mr. C. Cunningham, of Springfield, got badly scalded on Monday, April 17, 1854, by the overturning of a kettle of boiling water in its lap.  Instant medical care was given the little tot and it was soon out of danger.

Cholera In Springfield

This dread disease raged in Springfield in 1854, and there were ten or more deaths reported by the middle of June.  Citizens were frantic, and many deserted the place.  Warnings to be careful of their diet were issued to the town’s residents.  Cherries and other unhealthy fruit, as well as unripe vegetables, were to be shunned as one would poison.

Died

At his residence in Washington County on Tuesday, the 15th of August 1854, Mr. J. T. Hamilton, after a long and painful illness.  He was a member of the Catholic Church.

Heavy Rain

There was a very heavy rain in the neighborhood of Springfield on Tuesday evening, September 19, 1854.  Old timers could not remember when the community had before been visited by such a veritable cloud burst.  The creeks and branches ran in torrents, even sweeping away fences in places.

Prominent Lawyer Dies

George C. Thurman, Esq., departed this life at 9 o’clock Saturday, September 30, 1854, at his home in Springfield.  He was an excellent lawyer, and a clever, warm-hearted gentleman.  He was attacked by an immense carbuncle between his shoulders, but a week or so before he died, which defied all the acknowledged medical skill which was called to his beside.

Taken from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Cook.

Adam Pearce – Amy Graves 1798 Marriage Bond

Know all men by these presents that we, Adam Pearce and Isaac Pearce, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency the Governor of Kentucky in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 6th day of December 1798.  The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Adam Pearce and Amy Graves, for which a license is issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then he obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

Adam Pearce, Isaac Pearce

Witness, Moses Rice

Washington County, State of Kentucky

This is to certify that I have given leave unto Adam Pearce to take out license for marriage between him and my daughter, Amy Graves, and him given under my hand this 1st day of December 1798.

William Graves and Nancy Graves

John Pearce, Jacob Pearce

Emancipation of Three Slaves

Today I want to share with you three slave emancipations from Washington County.  Black family history is sometimes very difficult to follow.  Hopefully this can help just a bit.  I do not have the original documents, but am using Pioneer History of Washington County Kentucky by Orval W. Baylor.  Mr. Baylor wrote for the Springfield, Washington County newspapers for a number of years.  Next time I am at the courthouse I will ask about these papers and if I find the originals will add them to this blog.

Know all men by these presents that I, Martin D. McHenry, of the County of Washington in the State of Kentucky, do hereby emancipate, set free and forever discharge from slavery a small mulatto girl named Maria, about seven years old last fall, being the same that was raised in the family of my deceased father and being the child of a Negro woman, Phoebe, who lived in my father’s family, and a reputed child of Harry, a mulatto man, who was emancipated by my father.  Given under my hand and seal this 1 day of April 1835.

M D. McHenry

Teste. John R. Wharton, D. H. Spears

Know all men by these presents, that I, Ann Spalding, widow of John Baptist Spalding, deceased, possessing an entire estate during widowhood, by virtue of the last will and testament of the aforesaid John Baptist Spalding, in a mulatto man slave, named Phillip; and I Stephen Spalding, the only claimant to the remainder of the said slave, at the marriage or death of the aforesaid Ann Spalding, (the other claims to the remainder of the aforesaid being extinguished by purchase), do solemnly agree to relinquish and abandon, or several and respective rights and titles to the ownership of the aforesaid Phillip, and the said Phillip is by force of this instrument, freed and emancipated from all service, which we and our heirs, have a legal claim to.  In witness we hereto set our hands and seals, this 8th day of January 1804.

Ann Spalding, Stephen Spalding

At a County Court held for Washington County the 2nd day of February 1807.  This instrument of writing was acknowledged by the within named Ann Spalding and Stephen Spalding to be their act and deed and ordered to be recorded.

Teste. John Reed, Clerk, Washington County

Know all men by these presents, that I, Barnabas McHenry, of Washington County and State of Kentucky, do fully emancipate Harry Pile, a slave now belonging to me, to go out free December the twenty-fifth in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six:  I do hereby relinquish all right, title and claim to the aforesaid Harry after the date aforesaid, he shall not be free until he shall have made up all the time which he shall have absconded, by faithful services subsequently to the date aforesaid and repaid in the same way, all costs which may have been occasioned by his absconding, and then even in that case all my right, title and claim to him shall forever cease – he shall be free.  In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal on this second day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eight.

Barnabas McHenry

Acknowledged and recorded 2nd May 1808.  John Reed, Clerk Washington County

Hill-Hamilton 1798 Marriage Bond and Consent

Thomas Hill and Thomas Hamilton are the fathers of our bride and groom.  Both came from Maryland in the latter part of the 18th century to settle in Washington County, Kentucky.  Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton are said to have been the parents of seventeen children!  Think of the number of their descendants now!

Know all men by these presents that we, Clement Hill and John B. Speaks, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of November 1798.  The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

Clement Hill, John B. Speaks

Witness, Moses Rice

The Clerk of Washington County is hereby directed to issue a license for Clement Hill and Polly Hamilton to be married.  Given under my hand and seal this 9th day of November 1798.

Thomas Hamilton

Teste.  John Speaks, Jeremiah Harbert

 

Will of Col. John Hardin – Written 1788

Col. John Hardin was an early Kentuckian – came to the state after serving in the Revolutionary War.  In April of 1786, according to Collins’ History of Kentucky, he settled on his preemption on Pleasant Run, then in Nelson County, but part of Washington County when it was organized in 1792.  That is why he mentions the County of Nelson and State of Virginia when he wrote his will in 1788.

In 1792 Col. Hardin was sent by General Wilkinson to make overtures with the Indians.  At an Indian camp about a day’s journey from the site where Ft. Defiance was afterwards built, he encamped with the Indians for the night, on the promise they would take him in the morning to their chief.  John Hardin never made it home, the Indians murdered him that night and made off with his horses and baggage.  In a letter written by John Hardin May 19, 1792, from Fort Washington (later Cincinnati), he stated they were going to ‘try to form a junction at the mouth of the Miami River, which is called Rosadebra, where we expect to form a treaty with all the Indians we can collect at that place.‘  And later in the letter says he ‘reproaches myself for having left my family, throwing myself into the hands of a cruel, savage enemy.’  (This information taken from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky by Orval W. Baylor.)

Colonel John Hardin’s will is the first in the Washington County Will Book A.

Washington County, Kentucky

Will Book A, Page 4-8

In the name of God amen.  I, John Hardin, of Nelson County and state of Virginia, being in perfect state of health and memory blessed be God for the same,

do make and ordain this my last will and testament, revoking all others.  As far as my worldly goods, I bequeath in the manner following, that is to say, I devise to my beloved wife, Jane, three hundred acres of land, to be taken out of my preemption, including the plantation whereon I now live, binding on the northwest line and not to extend further in Pleasant Run than where the Spring Branch empties.  Also I give to my beloved wife one Negro woman named Camer, but not her future increase, one feather bed and furniture and her choice of all the horses I have.  I devise to my son, Martin, four hundred acres of land binding on the southwest line of my preemption to include the Salt Licks and Mill Seat on Pleasant Run.  I devise to my son Mark, five hundred acres of land to be taken of a fifteen hundred acre survey adjoining my preemption, to be laid out of the east end.  I devise to my son Davis, five hundred acres of land adjoining my son Mark, on the west, it being one third of the fifteen hundred acre survey.  I devise to my daughter Sarah, three hundred acres of land to be laid off of my preemption.  I devise to my daughter

Mary, two hundred and fifty acres of land, part of a five hundred acre tract joining my preemption on the east, to include all the Beech Fork that lies in that survey.  Note, I give to John _____ two hundred and fifty acres of land in consideration for Negro George, to be laid off on the south of the above mentioned five hundred acre tract.  As my beloved wife is likely to have another son or daughter I devise to it five hundred acres of land, part of my fifteen hundred acre survey, adjoining my son Davis’ devised land on the west.  And all other lands that I may be hereafter possessed with I devise to the above mentioned children, to be equally divided amongst them.  Also, Negroes George, Bob and Bet and the future increase of Camer to be equally divided among them in like manner, and all my horses, cattle, household furniture and other estate to be equally divided between my beloved wife and above mentioned children.  Should any of the within mentioned children decease before such part of their estate herein mentioned is given into their possession, it shall be divided equally amongst the living brothers and sisters.

Lastly, I do constitute and appoint my beloved wife, Jane, Executrix, and my brothers Mark Hardin and Martin Hardin, my Executors to this my last will and devise they will collect all debts due and pay all my lawful demands.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-second day of July, anno domini one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight.

John Hardin

Signed and sealed in the presence of Samuel Robertson, John Hardin, Mary Robertson

Note the words ‘hundred’ in the twenty-fourth line underlined on the other side and words ‘and other estate’ as mentioned in the third line on this side was underlined before signed.  Samuel Robertson, John Hardin, Mary Robertson

At a County Court held for Washington County the 4th day of April 1793

This will was proved by the oaths of Samuel Robertson, John Hardin and Mary Robertson, witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Martin Hardin, Mark Hardin and Mary Hardin, the Executrix and Executors, who made oath and

acknowledged bond as the law directs, a certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.