Tag Archives: Washington County Kentucky

New Kindle Book – Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery List – Washington County, Kentucky

This has been a five year project, taking photos beginning in the fall of 2008 and through 2012, although I’ve just recently put the list together. This project is dear to me because my fifth great-grandfather, Captain John Linton, helped build this church. Many of my Linton, Moran and Edwards family members are buried here. Also, many of the early settlers of Washington County were laid to rest here. In a more modern happenstance, my husband’s father was minister of this church in the early 1960’s. Who knew we would share this common piece of history?

Included is an alphabetical listing of those buried at Pleasant Grove, including birth and death dates, and sometimes additional information. There are 856 names on the list.  Within a few weeks I will make this into a CD that includes photos of most of the gravestones and can be purchased on my website through Paypal.

Do you have anyone buried in this cemetery?

Dear Aunt Lil

Goodrich Nursing Home in Lexington, Kentucky. My Aunt Lil’s nursing home, run about 1940-1960? Not sure about the dates. Aunt Lil is in the dark dress at the bottom of the photo.

This is a great photo of my Aunt Lil and her nursing staff at the Goodrich Nursing Home in Lexington, Kentucky.  Aunt Lil, actually my great-aunt, was born Lillian Catherine Montgomery, March 11, 1900 – always easy to remember old she was – in Washington County, the daughter of Robert E. Lee Montgomery and Frances Barber Linton.  She married Guy Goodrich in 1933.  They had no children, but Aunt Lil devoted her time as a registered nurse, a graduate of St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing in Lexington.  She began Goodrich Nursing Home and ran it with an iron fist.  Patients always came first.  She was a stickler for cleanliness and demanded superior work from her staff.  She was well known in this field, and well loved by those who worked for her.

I have very vague memories of visiting Aunt Lil and Uncle Guy’s home in Lexington – I always thought it very fancy!  I particularly remember her plates with pink flowers and green leaves in her china hutch.  In later years, after Uncle Guy passed on and she sold the nursing home, she returned to Springfield, in Washington County, and lived near her sister – my grandmother.  It was at this point our relationship grew, since the genealogy bug had been handed down to her, from her mother – and also handed down to me from the same, my great-grandmother.  As far as I know, we were the only two in the family so obsessed!  I would visit her for lunch and we would pore over all the delicate pieces of paper of our ancestors, handed down through the years, and look at those faces in photographs of so long ago.  Sometimes I miss her so!

Aunt Lil was rather a roving senior citizen.  She would move to Springfield, be there several years; miss Lexington; move there for several years, miss Springfield, and move back.  Torn between two worlds.  In her last years she lived in a nursing home in Springfield, but acted like she was the one taking care of things.  I suppose once a nurse, always a nurse!

Do you recognize any of the nurses in the photo?

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

1819 Tax Receipt For Edward Barbour Edwards

Today I have an original 1819 tax receipt for Edward Barbour Edwards to share with you.  Edward was my fourth great-grandfather, the eldest son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, born in Maryland, April 21, 1768.  The family moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, where Edward sold purchased from Elizabeth Pitzer in 1792, to George Smith in 1795.  This was about the time he married Nancy Linton, daughter Captain John Linton and his wife Ann Mason.

Edward B. Edwards moved with his family to Washington County, Kentucky, in November of 1816 – two years before his father-in-law, John Linton, makes the move.  On November 27, 1816, Edward B. Edwards made oath ‘he removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with him four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Poland and Charles, and not with intent to sell.’  These must be the four Negro slaves he paid taxes on in the above tax receipt.

When Edward and Nancy Edwards moved to Washington County in 1816, they brought six children with them – Susan ( my third great-grandmother), the eldest, was 19, John was 16, Catherine was 12, Jonathan was 11, Benjamin was 7, and Mary Jane was 2.  Two more children were born in Kentucky, Martha, the next year, 1817, and Sarah five years later.

Now let’s examine the tax receipt.  There are three tithes at 62 1/2 cents each – Edward, son John and ?  Perhaps a brother or nephew of Edward came to Kentucky with them.  Edward owns four horses that are taxed, and 1,706 acres of 3 rate land.  I’m not sure what that means – good or bad!  A middle of the road standard?  The total valuation is 18,960 dollars.  I wish this number were broken down a bit more, but the total tax due was 13 dollars and 75 cents.  Thomas Hind, D.S.W.C. signed the receipt for A. E. Gibbons, S.W.C.

On February 4th of last year I shared a tax receipt of Edward Barber Edwards from 1816 – for Loudoun County, Virginia.  Click here to view that post.

 

John Edgar Linton’s 1918 Candling Certificate

Well this is one for the record books – in all the old documents and pieces of paper saved by my great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, I would never have thought about finding a candling certificate in the bunch!  This belonged to her brother, John Edgar Linton, who lived with their older sister, Alice Linton, as bachelor and spinster, until their death.

And you may ask, what is a candling certificate?  Even though I knew what it was, I did research to give you a good answer.  Eggs were candled for two reasons.  One was to check to see if the egg was fertilized, to keep it in the incubator so it will eventually turn into a chicken!  In the 1918 edition of the Fannie Farmer The Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, she recommends to ‘Hold in front of candle flame in dark room, and the centre should look clear.

The other reason is more in the opposite vein – to make sure the egg isn’t fertilized, to be used for eating – and to make sure the eggs were not bad.  The first picture above is a good egg – you can see why you wouldn’t want to eat the last one!

Above you will see an 1918 poster of the breeds of poultry raised by farmers during that time period.  I cannot say if my great-grand uncle kept one of these breeds or not.

But he must have had pretty good eggs since out of the fifty he took to Washington County Produce Company on August 17, 1918, only two were refused.  Interesting to note that they also purchased butter, hides and furs from local farmers.

 

Blandford-Clark 1820 Marriage Bond

wc-mar-1Know all men by these presents, that we, John R. Blandford and Robert Greenwell, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the just and full sum of Fifty Pounds, current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made to the said Commonwealth, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals, and dated this 2nd day of October, 1820.  The condition of the above obligation is such, that whereas, there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound John R. Blandford and Miss Elizabeth Clark, daughter of Joseph Clark, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void – else, to remain in full force and virtue in law.

John R. Blandford, Robert Greenwell

Teste.  Stephen C. Brown, Washington County Clerk

wc-mar-2

Sir, you will please to grant license to John R. Blandford to gain the laws of matrimony with my daughter, Elizabeth Clark.

Joseph Clark

October 2, 1820

Robert Greenwell, Joseph Claton

Missing My Grandmother

My beautiful grandmother, Alice Montgomery Carrico, was a strong presence in my life.  I’m sure most of you have felt this way about a grandparent, a special aunt, or another person involved in your life.  She was raised with a silver spoon in her mouth, as they say, the oldest child of Robert E. Lee Montgomery and Frances Barber Linton.  They lived on a dairy farm outside of Springfield, Kentucky.  Her father, my great-grandfather, was the typical southern gentleman.  In almost every photo he is wearing a thin bow tie and white, or light linen suit.  Great-grandmother Frances was the gracious southern hostess, inviting even a passing salesman to lunch with the family.

Grandmother went to St. Catharine Academy, a school of the Dominican sisters, during her high school years.  I believe she must have boarded there since I now have her silver napkin ring, with her initials – A. M. – in beautiful script.  My aunt said she used the napkin ring while there, when giving it to me as a gift several years ago.  While there, Alice took piano lessons, but the dear sister told my great-grandmother she was wasting her money, there was no musical ability in her daughter.

Mary Alice Montgomery Carrico
Alice Montgomery

The next link I have with my grandmother is a photo taken about 1915 – at 22 she looks to be a suave and sophisticated woman, ready to take on the world.  Isn’t she quite a dish?

At the age of 27, in 1920, she married my grandfather, Joseph Reuben Carrico.  It must have been a love match since it was rather like the princess marrying the church mouse.  Alice and Rue lived on a small farm near St. Rose Church.  Their family began with a baby boy, Joseph Robert (named for both grandfathers) born in 1921.  Life was hard, especially, when the depression hit.  They had five children by that time – Robert, Reuben, Beulah, Paul, Ann – with Catherine (my mother) and Mary Alice coming along in 1931 and 1933.  Life was hard for everyone, but at least living on a farm gave garden vegetables and pork from their hogs, fruit trees gave an abundant bounty, and blackberries and raspberries were loaded on the vines.  My mother pictured her life on the farm as wonderful, filled with adventure and always having plenty to eat.  But is this the depression seen through the eyes of a child?  Did Grandmother and Granddaddy have more worries than what she remembers?  I have the leftover war ration book that was in my mother’s name – stamps for sugar, coffee, gas and other things that were rationed due to the war that followed the depression.

How did my grandmother react?  Like any sensible woman!  She rolled up her sleeves and got on with life.  She sold eggs, butter and cream to the grocery in town for extra money.  Her butter was special since she made little curves, flowers and designs on top.  Grandmother herself drove the buggy into town, driving her horse, Nipsey.  Evidently there was a very special bond between grandmother and her horse.  When he fell ill, she held his head in her lap, gently rubbing him until the end – I’m not sure how many days he lasted.  So strong, but yet so gentle.

The family didn’t have electricity for many years.  Grandmother carefully cleaned the chimneys and filled the oil lamps for the family.  She walked into the kitchen and slipped while holding one of these lamps, but had the foresight to hold the lamp high during the fall.  Not a drop of oil was spilled, no lamp crashed and hit the floor, spreading oil and flame over the room.  She kept her family safe.

In 1930 son Reuben became ill with appendicitis and died at a hospital in Louisville.  This began a number of years of giving up some of those she loved.  Robert entered the army during World War II and died a hero in 1943.  Her mother, Frances, died in 1945, and her father, Robert, in 1954.

Through all these deaths I’m sure my grandmother shed many tears.  But in 1961 my grandfather passed away.  I helped cause some of her tears during this time.  At only four years of age I didn’t understand the concept of death – I was positive granddaddy was coming back.  When we visited and I heard a noise I would always ask if that was granddaddy.  Which always produced a great deal of weeping from both my grandmother and my mother.

By this point in her life, at the age of 68, grandmother lived in town.  There was no farm to run, no garden to hoe, no butter to churn.  She turned to the enjoyment of friends and family.  Grandmother and friends, one I remember as named Crokie, played canasta and ucker.  They would visit at each others house and enjoy the afternoon.  I can’t speak for the other ladies, but grandmother never left the house without her jewelry – brooch and earrings, sometimes necklace, – hat and matching gloves.

Grandmother was still the best cook – her baked chicken and dressing was always the best.  I can still taste it – the most tender, succulent chicken with moist dressing that always included raisins!  It makes my mouth water just thinking about it!  Anything she fixed was good, I suppose this was just my favorite.

As my grandmother aged, and it became harder to visit her friends – and as they went to meet their Maker – she loved playing cards with her children and grandchildren.  Her faith was very important to her, and she prayed while sitting on the porch every day – her favorite spot for time with the Lord.

Mary Alice Montgomery CarricoNewspaper Photo

Grandmother loved her family, and I suppose she was a genealogist, too, but she wasn’t that involved with finding names and dates and records.  She was more interested in people.  One of her last involvements in life was trying to ensure that the Linton Cemetery was not forgotten, or, worse still, erased from history.  She called the local newspaper, The Springfield Sun, and brought this to their attention.  A huge article was devoted to this, complete with a wonderful photo of my grandmother in her 89th year!

My grandmother was in the hospital only twice during her life – once in the 1960’s when she had pneumonia, and at the end.  My mother visited her the night before she died.  Grandmother was eating dinner, and had taken the oxygen from her nose.  Mom scolded her when she went in.  Feisty as always, Grandmother said she couldn’t enjoy her food with the oxygen.  She was going to the nursing home the next day.  She died later that night, at age 92, taking matters into her own hands, as she always had.