Tag Archives: Woodford County Kentucky

Amsden-Sanders Plot In Versailles Cemetery – Woodford County

  James P. Amsden, January 15, 1847 – October 29, 1906.  Versailles Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

These beautiful gravestones are located in the Versailles Cemetery in Woodford County, Kentucky.  They are two of eight, all family members.  In addition to James and Laura Sanders Amsden, the following are buried in this plot:

  • Son, John Sanders Amsden, October 13, 1883 – February 21, 1899
  • Laura’s daughter by a previous marriage, Margaret (Pearl) Voorhies, wife of James B. Haggin, June 13, 1869 – June 8, 1965;
  • Daughter, Jean Amsden, wife of William M. Haupt, February 5, 1880 – September 28, 1966;
  • Son-in-law, William M. Haupt, April 1, 1880 – September 26, 1957;
  • Laura’s parents, Margaret H. Sanders, September 4, 1804 – Jun 13, 1878 and Col. Lewis H. Sanders, 1796-1864, on one stone;
  • Laura’s brother, Lewis Sanders, born in Franklin County, Kentucky, November 7, 1826, died July 2, 1871.

In the 1850 census of Woodford County we find James P. Amsden, 3 years of age, living with his parents, John Amsden, 41, jailer, born in Massachusetts, and Lucretia, 35, born in New York.  John L, 6; and Laura B., 1, are siblings.  In 1860 the family is living in a boarding house, and father John is a merchant.  Two other children, Mary, 9; and Charles E., 6; make up the household.  Young daughter Laura is not listed.  I feel she must have died sometime between 1850 and 1860.  In 1870, John Amsden is a banker, son John is a salesman and son James a clerk in a bank.  No other children are listed.

James P. Amsden married Laura E. (Sanders) Voohries, June 3, 1879, in Louisville.  B. M. Messick performed the ceremony and witnesses were Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Tevis and F. W. Ferguson.  One year later in the 1880 census baby Jean has been born; Pearl Voohries, 10, was living with the family.  Pearl is Laura Sanders’ daughter from a previous marriage.  She married George T. Voohries, and must have divorced him since he lived until 1913, but he maintained a good relationship with his daughter, and was at Pearl’s home when he died.  He was a Confederate veteran.  In 1900 James and Laura have only one child living with them, Jean, aged 20.  Margaret Pearl had married by this date.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday, October 30, 1906

Laura L. Sanders, wife of James P. Amsden, November 18, 1844 – February 25, 1929.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, February 26, 1929

 

Dudley M. and Johanna Chrisman Ball Obituaries

Dudley M. Ball, Versailles Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

Dudley M. Ball, March 29, 1824 – April 19, 1900

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, April 21, 1900

Dudley M. Ball Dead

A Wealthy Farmer and Descendant of a Famous Virginia Family

Versailles, Ky., April 20 – Mr. Dudley Mitchum Ball, aged seventy-six years, a prominent and wealthy farmer and stock raiser of this county, died last midnight of pneumonia, after only a few days’ illness.  Mr. Ball was a descendant of the historic family of that name, of which the mother of George Washington was a member, and the farm upon which he died was settled more than one hundred years ago by Mr. Ball’s maternal grandfather, Dudley Mitchum, of Virginia.

Mr. Ball is survived by a widow, three daughters and four sons, viz: Mrs. Minnie Moore, the wife of the Hon. D. L. Moore, of Harrodsburg; Mrs. Josephine Harris, Miss Susan Ball, Messrs. John, Dudley, Howard and Ernest Ball.

The funeral services will be held at Mr. Ball’s late residence, on the Nicholasville turnpike, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Joanna Chrisman, wife of Dudley M. Ball, December 8, 1833 – June 18, 1915.

The Advocate Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, June 18, 1915

Was Well-Known Here

Versailles, Ky., June 16 – Mrs. Johanna Chrisman Ball, eighty years old, widow of Dudley M. Ball, died this morning at her home, Maple Hill, on the Nicholasville turnpike, after an illness of seven weeks.  She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Josie Ball Harris, of this county; Mrs. D. L. Moore, of Harrodsburg, and Mrs. Charlton Alexander, of Paris, and three sons, John, Dudley M. and Howard Ball, of this county.

 

Stephen L. Chasteen – Civil War Soldier – Dies At 81 Years of Age

Stephen L. Chasteen, 1845-1926.  His wife, Millie Ann Davis, 1849-1924.  Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

Sunday, October 17, 1926

Stephen Chasteen was a bugler in Company A, 6 Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, Union Army, during the Civil War.

According to the Company Descriptive Book he was 18 years of age when he joined the Union Army, six feet tall, of fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  Stephen was born in Rockcastle County, Kentucky.  He was a farmer.

Stephen Chasteen was captured at Woodville, Alabama, August 25, 1863, and confined at Richmond, Virginia, September 26, 1863.  He was paroled at City Point, Virginia, March 7, 1864; reported at C. B. Maryland, March 9, 1864, sent to C. P. Maryland November 1864, where he reported the same day.  Sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, March 9, 1864.

Stephen mustered out December 23, 1864, at Louisville, Kentucky.  He was a soldier for three years, including one being prisoner of war.

Isn’t it impressive that he was with the Regimental Brass Band from August to November of 1864?

 

 

1866 Wedding of George T. Hord and Miss Jane Steele

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 25, 1866

A Diamond Wedding in Woodford

The quiet of our happy village was dispelled on the evening of the 19th by the hurrying to and fro of carriages, hacks and every conceivable kind of vehicle, and greeting the ear of every passer-by was the cheerful inquiry, ‘Shall we meet you at the wedding tonight?’  Mr. George T. Hord, a most elegant and highly cultivated banker, of the firm of Hord and George, and Miss Jane Steele, one of Kentucky’s rarest and most beautiful fair ones, were married by Mr. Venable, our most worthy and greatly beloved Episcopal minister.  The wedding was regal, the scene attendant upon it truly imposing, the beautiful church was brilliantly lighted, and strains of soul-searching music welcomed many distinguished and magnificently dressed guests.

On they came until every seat and aisle were crowded, and after merry greetings, they waited in breathless anxiety the coming of the happy pair.  Intense the excitement grew, until, at last, to the tune of a grand march, entered first the graceful bride and groom, accompanied by ten beautiful attendants, led to the altar by so many gallant cavaliers, magnificently attired.  The bride, as blushing as a May-day rose, was half concealed ‘neath the mazes of a costly and long flowing veil, her dress of the most gorgeous rep silk, handsomely decorated with point lace, and hung in massive folds superbly around her matchless form.  The diamonds sparkling from her queen-like neck and fairy ilugers, made a most brilliant display of a handsome bridal gift of her generous husband.  Her presents were many and mostly of silver.  The groom, the very essence of gallantry and elegance, wore a few gems of the purest water, but rarer far than all, there seemed to be enshrined within his bosom a heart all wreathed with rare and tender buds of love and joy.  So soon as the beautiful ceremony was performed the bridal party were followed by the happy guests to the residence of the bride’s father, Judge William Steele, whose courtesy, coupled with that of his estimable lady, could not have been excelled.  The supper gotten up in good taste, with almost unlimited labor and cost was indeed sumptuous.

The evening passed delightfully, and to the music of Saxton’s band through the mazes of the merry dance we glided until the wee hours of the night, when, with light hearts, we repaired homeward to invoke a prayer for the loving pair, and to mingle with our dreams thoughts of the grand entertainment of the evening.

Versailles, Dec. 20th

According to the census records George and Jane Steele Hord did not have children.  In 1900 they had been married for 35 years.  George was born in Virginia and Jane in Alabama.  George died January 16, 1901, of pneumonia.  According to Jane’s death certificate, she died July 31, 1918.  Her parents are listed as W. J. Steele, born in Kentucky, and Mary D. Winston, born in Alabama.  Jane was born February 14, 1839.

1850 Woodford County Marriage Bonds and Returns

Date of Marriage Bond – Name of Couple – Minister’s Return

Woodford County Kentucky

  • April 3, 1850 – Ewin Trower to Louisa E. Johnson.
  • April 6, 1850 – Johnson Miller to Sarah Shryock. I hereby certify that I, a minister of the gospel of the Presbyterian Church, celebrated the rites of matrimony between Johnson Miller and Sarah Shryock of the County of Woodford and State of Kenucky on the 7th day of April 1850.  William M. King.
  • May 13, 1850 – Benjamin F. Taylor to Eleanor H. Yancy. I hereby certify that the rites of matrimony between Benjamin F. Taylor and Eleanor H. Yancy were solemnized by me on the 14th of May 1850, J. M. Botts, M.G.
  • Mary 18, 1850 – Hugh C. Spears to Susan Mary Munday
  • May 29, 1850 – Christopher W. Veatch to Mary P. Beckam
  • June 3, 1850 – Robert S. Gray to Mariah M. Ball. This is to certify that the underlined celebrated the rites of matrimony between Robert S. Gray and Maria M. Ball, the 4th day of June 1850, Enos Campbell.
  • June 4, 1850 – Frank P. Hearn to Catherine Hiatt. I do certify that I celebrated the rites of matrimony between Frank P. Hearn and Catherine Hiatt on this 4th day of June 1850, H. H. Kavanaugh.
  • February 14, 1850 – Richard B. Young to Jane E. Jennings. I do hereby certify that I, this day, celebrated the rites of matrimony between Richard B. Young and Jane E. Jennings February 14, 1850, William Morton.
  • June 19, 1850 – John Allen to Fanny S. Derrings
  • July 22, 1850 – Hiram Wiggs to Eliza Smithy
  • July 31, 1850 – George W. Hawkins to Pamelia Sargent. I do hereby certify that I solemnized the rites of matrimony between George W. Hawkins and Pamelia a. Sargent on the first day of August 1850, J. M. Botts, M.G.

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

Brown Family Plot – Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

George I. Brown was born in Virginia in 1784.  He bought property in Jessamine County, Kentucky – quite a lot since his real estate was valued at $54,000 in 1850.  George married Sarah Perry, November 17, 1809, in Woodford County, Kentucky.  They had two sons, George and Moreau Brown.

Sarah, wife of G. I. Brown, born September 30, 1789, died May 6, 1832.

Sarah Brown died in 1832, and the next year George married Catharine W. McKinney, June 6, 1833, in Woodford County.  Since both wives came from this county perhaps there were family members living there.

In the 1850 census of Jessamine County George, 65, is listed as a farmer, born in Virginia.  Wife Catherine is 46.  Their three children are Mary Hannah, 15; William, 12; and Sally, 9.

George I. Brown, born December 11, 1784, died March 14, 1856.

Catherine lived another nine years before dying in 1867.

Catherine W., wife of G. I. Brown, born October 25, 1802, died October 2, 1867.

From this angle you can see son Moreau Brown’s gravestone on the right – with the statue at the top – and son George Brown’s would be on the left, next to the beautiful gravestone of his wife, Anne Hemphill.  A better view is in the first photo of this article.

 

 

Final Resting Place of R. T. Thornton

My posts have been meager the past few days – it is a busy time.  Our living room, kitchen, entry, hall and office were painted last week.   The office consists of three walls of bookcases – filled with books.  All those books were packed in totes, stacked in other rooms – books were everywhere!  Now I’m in the process of putting them back on the shelves – at least this has given me an excuse to sort!  More in-depth posts will hopefully come later in the week – or whenever the house is in order again!

R. T. Thornton, Standard Bearer in the 6th Reg. KY Volunteers, born October 10, 1811, fell at the Battle of Shiloh, April 7, 1862.  Versailles Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.