Monument to Col. John Hardin

Monument to Col. John Hardin, erected by his son Mark Hardin.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Col. John Hardin was everything mentioned in the following article – pioneer, soldier, patriot and Christian.  He owned land in what was originally Nelson County, Kentucky, but in 1792 became Washington County.  His will and further information was in a former blog.

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 20, 1856

Monument to Col. John Hardin

Mr. Edgar Needham, marble cutter of this city, has executed for Mark Hardin, Esq., a marble monument 20 feet high and of very fine finish, which is to be erected in the new cemetery at Shelbyville, in this state, to perpetuate the memory of that notable and patriotic pioneer Col. John Hardin, of Shelby.

Col. John Hardin, born October 1, 1755, killed Mary 1792, whilst bearing his country’s flag of peace to the Indians N.W. of the Ohio.

Col. Hardin was one of the most distinguished of that noble band of pioneers who drove back the aborigines from the forests of Kentucky, and founded the glorious institutions of this Commonwealth.  He richly deserves to have his memory perpetuated in marble.

Pioneer

The monument of Col. Hardin is a Doric Pedestal with its capitol surmounted with a blocking course, on which is raised in Alto Relievo, four original and characteristic emblems representing the Pioneer, the Soldier, the Patriot and the Christian.  Upon the blocking course is a column with a capitol of palm leaves, upon which is perched the glorious American eagle.  On the front of the monument is the following inscription:  ‘Col. John Hardin, born 1755; killed May 1792, whilst bearing his country’s flag of peace to the Indians N.W. of the Ohio.’

Soldier

This is unquestionably one of the finest private monuments ever built in Kentucky, and the representation of the ‘old Kentucky Rifle’ with its old-fashioned flint lock has been universally admired by all who have seen the work.  We understand that the blocks containing the emblems can be seen today and tomorrow at the establishment of Mr. Needham, on Jefferson Street, previous to their being boxed up for shipment.

Patriot

We are happy to add that in this instance the designing and the execution of the work has been confided to our own citizens.

Christian

If this policy were more generally adopted by our men of means, we should hear far less about the low state of the mechanic arts in Kentucky.  What our mechanics and artisans need is a fair chance for the work which legitimately belongs here.  This they ought to have and this they must have, if Louisville is to make any progress in manufacturing and mechanical industry.

Jane, wife of Col. John Hardin, died May 31, 1823, the mother of Sarah McHenry, Martin D. Hardin, Mark Hardin, Davies Hardin, Mary Estill, Lydia Ann and Rosanna Field.