Author of A Knight Templar Abroad

W. Harlan Cord, son of W. H. & V. R. Cord.  March 10, 1850 – November 29, 1885.  ‘A Knight Templar Abroad’.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

When I first saw this gravestone in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in Flemingsburg, Fleming County, I knew there had to be a story behind it.  And yes, I found one.

William Harlan Cord was the son of William Hough Cord and Virginia R. Dupuy.  His father was born in Mississippi, his mother, Virginia.  The two met and married in Mason County, just north of Fleming County May 31, 1849.  I could not find the couple in the 1850 census, but in 1860 the family is living in Fleming County.  William is 37, a lawyer.  Virginia passed away in 1855.  Children listed are William H., 10; Irene, 8; and Mary, 5.  Also living in the household is Mary F. Dupuy, sister of Virginia, living there to help care for the children.  She is listed as 32, born in Virginia.

In 1870 William and Mary have married.  Children listed are William H., 20; Mary, 15; and Clarence, 3, evidently a child of this second marriage.  Also living in the household is Eliza Dupuy, 45, her occupation – authoress.  She is another sister of Virginia and Mary Dupuy.  In 1880 everyone except Mary Cord live together.

With just a bit of research I found that Eliza Ann Dupuy, 1814-December 29, 1880, was a short-story writer and novelist.  She was born in Petersburg, Virginia, the daughter of Jesse Dupuy, a shipowner, and Mary Anne Thompson Sturdevant.  Jesse Dupuy died at an early age and Eliza helped support her mother and younger siblings, which included working as governess and tutor for several prominent southern families.  She lived in New Orleans during the Civil War.  She wrote thirteen novels, many under the pen name Annie Young.  She returned to Kentucky after the war and died on a visit to New Orleans January 15, 1881.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Friday, April 3, 1885

Perhaps having an aunt that was a published author – or authoress as she proclaimed herself – helped William Harlan Cord take up his pen and paper.  Harlan studied law, to follow in the footsteps of his father, but perhaps writing was his passion.  His book, A Knight Templar Abroad, is a record of his visit to Europe in 1883.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, May 15, 1885

The Evening Bulletin of Maysville said in their December 15, 1884, edition, that Harlan had sold $500 worth of his book in three weeks!  The books were priced at $1.50.  He sold about 335 copies during that time period.  Unfortunately. he did not live long enough to achieve the fame that could have been his.  In the November 30, 1885, edition of the same newspaper it is mentioned that ‘Mr. W. Harlan Cord of Flemingsburg is dangerously ill.’  W. Harlan Cord died the day before the newspaper was printed, November 29, 1885.

The beautiful stone that was made specifically for Harlan has a knight on horseback, with the name of his book above.  The cross and crown at the top of the stone is a Christian symbol of the sovereignty of the Lord.  When the crown is combined with a cross, the crown means victory and the cross means Christianity.  The cross with a crown also denotes a member of the York Rite Masons.  As with all types of crowns used by the Masons, it symbolizes the power and authority to lead or command.

Mothers, Grandmothers and Great-Grandmothers

Couldn’t help but think about my maternal grandmother today.  Mary Alice Montgomery Carrico was a lovely person, but as a grandmother she was rather stilted.  When we came to visit she was always sitting in her rocking chair and offered her cheek for us to kiss.  There were no big hugs.  We were expected to sit on the couch and behave.  The cherry tree in the back yard always drew our attention, and we eagerly climbed the small tree to eat all the tart cherries we could pop in our mouths.  Outside we could run and play and wear off some of the energy that was not allowed inside.  Back inside it was more time on the couch, hopefully with a book.  Grandmother Alice was a fabulous cook – everything was just perfection – especially her baked chicken and dressing.  Although long before my time, mom talked of the butter she made from their cream, decorating it with flowers and designs.  Cottage cheese was also homemade.  Bread puddings, cakes and pies were all on the menu.

In contrast Grandmother Alice’s mother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, was quite the opposite.  Unfortunately, I did not know her, she died in 1945, years before my birth.  Mom told all the wonderful stories of good times at her grandmother’s house, always met at the door with hugs and kisses.  During their weekly stay in the summer Great-grandmother Frances let her seven grandchildren play with her canned food and pantry items in the living room on tables and bookshelves.  Frances would don her best hat and with purse on her arm go through the stores and purchase items for five cents each.  At the end of the week she held a big party, in the dining room, with lace tablecloth and many goodies and desserts on glass dishes.  Mom always talked about what a treat it was.  At Easter the grandchildren would find baskets on the porch, with eggs and other items.  And at Christmas the girls received a doll and the boys a ball.  Since this was during the Depression these items were very precious.  Another thing that was special each year was the fair.  Grandmother Frances love the fair and took a picnic lunch for her children and grandchildren to enjoy.  She died the week of the fair, and everyone was encouraged to go since it was a yearly event she dearly loved.

My mother, Catherine Lyons Carrico Hill McIlvoy, was more like her Grandmother Frances.  Mom always met you at the door, hugs and kisses, and, ‘Are you hungry?  Can I fix you something to eat?’  Her children and grandchildren were her pride and joy.  My children love to tell the story that one day, when they were small, Gran, as they called her, asked if they would like to see a flying saucer.  With their eyes big and watching her every move, she took one of the glass saucers they were drying and gave it a whirl into the dining room.  It landed on the carpet and turned and rolled into the living room.  Linton and Kate, of course, said, ‘Do it again!  Do it again!’  When Kate was in middle school mom picked her up every day – and was usually talked into going for ice cream.  Myself, I remember coming home from school and having a treat in the Lazy Susan on the table – exactly four spots for four children (little sister Laura came much later!).

My paternal grandmother, Nannie Bell Coulter Hill, was a very quiet woman.  She rarely spoke to anyone.  But she loved us dearly, loved to give kisses and hugs.  She was such a good cook – and cooked on a wood stove all her life.  I still remember the smells from her kitchen, and how much everyone loved to sit at her table for a meal.  One of my earliest memories was at Easter.  When we drove in, the yard was filled with suckers standing straight up, eggs and other goodies.  There was a garden to explore and every time we left during season we were given a brown bag to hold some of the fresh vegetables on the back porch – our own tomato, potato, zucchini, etc.

I did not know Grandmother Nannie’s mother – Mary Elizabeth Crow Coulter.  But I was told she loved to dance and smoked a corn cob pipe!  How could she have been so full of life and not her daughter?

Now that I am Nana, I fall into the line of my mother and great-grandmothers.  Julian and Percy are met at the door with kisses and hugs.  Julian has a basket with Kit-Kats and M&Ms.  We play wild games like Old McJulian Had A Beach – where we sing and run after him, our fingers a crab’s claw trying to catch hold.  We sit in the floor and make traffic jams with his cars.  Play color games out on the porch.  Blow bubbles.  Casper Babypants is our favorite music to listen to when he’s here.  How different will Percy be?  It’s hard to say since she’s just two weeks old.  But I’m sure she will be a match for her brother, and an individual to boot!

What wonderful memories do you have of your mother, grandmothers or great-grandmothers?  Remember to write them down for future generations.  Precious memories made and to be made.

My Birthday Gift – McIntire Family Treasures

As any good sister would do, Donna knocked my birthday gift out of the park!  She kept telling me I could never guess in a million years what she had found for me, and, that is very true.  She bought a box of old books at an auction, and in one of the books were four very old receipts that she just knew I would love!  Have I mentioned she is my favorite sister?  And not only because of her gift!  We are the two oldest and have spent more time together than the rest of my siblings.

The first is a receipt that says, ‘Received Flemingsburg, December 8, 1804, of Captain Aaron McIntire, one pound three shillings and seven pence in full of all accounts up to this day, William Jacobs.’  What a remarkable find!  Flemingsburg is in Fleming County.

The next reads, ‘Lexington, April 6, 1810, Received of Captain Aaron McIntire five dollars and seventy-two cents, for Daniel Bradford, Charles Bradford.’

Of course, my first thought – who was this Captain Aaron McIntire?  Was he a captain from the Revolutionary War or perhaps the War of 1812?  I was in research mode.

But, wait.  There is more.  Two more old receipts.

‘Mr. Thomas B. McIntire, 1870, to W. J. Ross & Co.

July/August 20.  1 bbl 35 100 pounds sugar at 14 cents, $14.35, 50 pounds sugar at 14.2 cents, $7.25.  10 pounds coffee at 25 cents, $2.50, 10 pounds granulated sugar at 16 cents, $1.60, for a total of $25.70.

If you can send us the above next week it will be quite an accommodation.  Respectfully, W. J. Ross & Co.’

And –

‘Mr. Bennett McIntire, to John F. Fleming, Dr.

To this amount for medical services from July 27th, 1878 to July 1st 1879 inclusive, $9.00.

June 11 to visit and medicate Charles Jones $2.50.  Amount due $11.50.

Received payment October 3, 1881.  John F. Fleming per G. W. Fleming.’

Now we are on a quest.  The boxes purchased were from Frances Moore’s family.  Frances married William Joseph Peterson in 1975, Donna’s husband’s older brother.  I found a marriage announcement in The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, Sunday, January 12, 1975.  It said that Miss Frances May Moore was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. W. McIntire.  Our first clue – the McIntire line comes from her step-father.  The wedding took place at the Flemingsburg Christian Church.

With a bit of search through old newspaper articles and the census records of Fleming County, I found that O. W. McIntire was the son of Oscar W. McIntire.  In the 1940 census the elder Oscar is 64, wife Pearl is 55 and son Oscar is 22.  Living in the household are James Planck, father-in-law, and Alice L. Planck, mother-in-law.  From the 1880 census A. James McIntire, 44, and wife Nancy, 35, have a son W. Oscar, aged 4 (father in the 1940 census).  In the 1850 census A. James McIntire is listed as son, aged 14, to parents Thomas B., 42, and Mary, 37.  Also living in the household is Aaron McIntire, aged 77.

Therefore, our four old receipts are for Aaron McIntire, 1773 – April 3, 1856, and his son, Thomas Bennett McIntire, March 8, 1808 – June 27, 1886.  Someone thought them important enough to keep until this year when they were eventually sold at auction.  It is quite amazing to think that I am now the proud owner of this history.

When Ritchey and I were in Fleming County on Saturday we tried to find Johnson’s Fork Presbyterian Cemetery where Aaron McIntire, Mary McIntire and John McIntire are buried.  We searched but it could not be found.  Ancestry gives the direction of ‘two miles north of Elizaville’.  We drove northeast on Hwy 170 but could find nothing.  Another day we will go to Fleming County Library or the historical society and get proper directions.  We did find the gravestones for James A. and Nancy Catherine McIntire, and their son Oscar W. and his wife Pearl Planck McIntire in Evergreen Hill Cemetery in nearby Flemingsburg.  I will save those photos for another day.  I’m in the process of going through McIntire wills, deeds and other information from Fleming County.  There is much information on this McIntire family.

I’m sure Donna didn’t realize quite how happy I would be with her birthday gift, or what a great genealogy adventure it has been!  Can she top this next year?  We’ll have to wait and see.

Hogan – Hendrix 1783 Marriage Bond and Consent – Lincoln County

This marriage license is interesting in many ways.  In 1783 Kentucky was still part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Benjamin Harrison was Governor of said Commonwealth.  It mentions that Edward Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix are both of ‘this Parish’ – I suppose that means Lincoln County.  The consent gives the name of Elizabeth’s father, John Hendrix, and it is also signed by Thomas Hendrix – Elizabeth’s brother or uncle?  In 1783 Kentucky County had been divided into three counties – Jefferson, Fayette and Lincoln.  Lincoln comprised quite a bit of area at that time, not just the county we know today.

Know all men by these presents that we, Edward Hogan and Thomas Henry, are held and firmly bound unto Benjamin Harrison, Esq., Governor or chief magistrate of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money of Virginia, to be paid to the said Benjamin Harrison, Esq., and his successors, for payment of which we bind ourselves, jointly and severally, our, and out of our joint and several heirs, sealed with our seals and dated this twenty-fifth day of March 1783.  The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had and solemnized between said Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix, both of this Parish.  It there shall appear no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage than this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

Edward Hogan, Thomas Henry

This is to certify that you should grant license for Edward Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix.

To Mr. May, this from John Hendrix, March the 22 1783.

Test.  Thomas Hendrix

Lincoln County, Kentucky

Two Counties, Six Cemeteries, Four Covered Bridges and a Battlefield

Yesterday was a glorious day in Kentucky.  A reprieve from the 90+ temperatures we’ve had in the last several weeks – and no rain!  The high managed to get to 82, the skies were a bright blue, grass and trees wonderful shades of green.  We left at 8:00 a.m.

Our goal was to visit Robertson and Fleming counties and take photos in several cemeteries each.  You know how much Ritchey loves geocaching.  There are four covered bridges in the two counties – those beautiful, historic structures that are slowly dwindling in our country – and they each had geocaches hidden in them!  They were added to the list.  And on the way home, we planned to visit Blue Licks Battlefield State Park – what some have called the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought in Kentucky on August 19, 1782.  The British and Indian forces slaughtered many of the Kentuckians.  I have posted several wills written by men from Mercer County that did not survive the battle.

We began at Piqua Methodist Church in Robertson County, a small, rural cemetery.  While there, the gentleman who takes care of the cemetery stopped by.  He showed me a list of those buried here, useful since many did not have gravestones, or have long since broken.  He related that the last person buried in this cemetery was his elementary school teacher, Gladys Shepherd, who passed away in 2004 at the age of 104.

Ritchey finding a geocache at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge in Robertson County.

Just about a mile north on Highway 165 was the small church and cemetery of Piqua Christian.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, just outside the town of the same name, was our last cemetery for this county.  On the way to neighboring Fleming County we stopped at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge, and Ritchey found his first geocache of the day.  Sitting in the middle of the bridge eating a chicken salad and croissant sandwich, the breeze was heavenly.  Butterflies were plentiful, and there was no noise, just an occasional moo or bird chirp.

Top stone – In Memory of Edward Dulin, Sen., Born in Virginia, August 6, 1769, and Died in Kentucky, September 25, 1830.  Lower stone – In Memory of George, twin son of John W. and Elizabeth D. Dulin, Born October 23, 1851, died July 30, 1852, age 9 months and 7 days.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

In Fleming County we visited Elizaville Cemetery, a lovely small town, only few miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery was quite impressive with its old stones.  I wanted to share this one with you today since it was so unusual.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen an old above ground stone with writing on the side.  There were at least ten or twelve in this cemetery.  Other beautifully carved stones were for cholera victims in 1833.

Goddard White Bridge

On to the three covered bridges in Fleming County – Goddard White, Grange City and Ringo Mills.  One more cemetery stop in this county – Mt. Pisgah on Oakwood Road.

It was about 6:00 p.m. and we still had one more stop – Blue Licks Battlefield – in Nicholas County.  I was so impressed with the granite monument that names those who fought and died in this battle.  After taking photos we had a picnic supper before starting home.  It was a full day but so much fun!  And think of all the great information I have to share with you!

Burials In Cloverport Cemetery – Breckinridge County

Mark Wedding, August 26, 1820 – February 25, 1894.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 28, 1894

An Old Resident Dead

Mr. Mark Wedding, seventy-two years of age, died of consumption at his home in this city at 1 o’clock p.m. Sunday, February 25.  His remains were interred in the Cloverport City Cemetery yesterday.

Mr. Wedding had been in bad health for some time, and his death was not a surprise to those who were acquainted with his condition.  He has been a respected citizen of Cloverport for many years and his death is regretted by many friends.  He raised a family of four sons, who are filling lucrative and honorable positions in other parts of the country.  He leaves a widow to mourn the loss of a good husband.

Dudley Hambleton, 1821-1898.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 28, 1898

Two Old Citizens Pay Nature’s Debt

Hon. Dudley Hambleton Passes Away

Represented Breckinridge Twice in the Legislature

Was a Consistent Member of the Baptist Church

Hon. Dudley Hambleton, a man who was loved by all who knew him, died early Tuesday morning.

For a week he has been hovering between life and death, and although his precarious condition was known to almost everyone in the county, the news of his final passing away came like a shock.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton has always been prominently identified with Cloverport.  He was born in this county, April 19, 1821.

He was married to Jane Watkins in November, 1843, and the following children were the result of the union:  James Hambleton, Samuel Hambleton, Mrs. Courtney Babbage, and Mrs. Martin S. Whitford, now living in England.

For many years Mr. Hambleton was regarded as a leading business man of Breckinridge County.  He practically bought all the tobacco that was brought to Cloverport for sale and was the largest buyer until the war came on.

At the close of the Civil War he purchased the A. A. Gordon farm at Holt’s paying $25,000 cash for it and engaged in farming.

He was always a man of affairs and stood high in the estimation of all who knew him.  He was twice elected to the legislature by the Democratic Party.

Hon. Dudley Hambleton was one of the best men Cloverport ever had.  During the days of his prosperity he was known as the young man’s friend and his purse was always ready to back some poor young fellow struggling for a foothold on the ladder to success.  He was charitable to a fault.

He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church, also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

His funeral took place today and was largely attended, the remains being interred according to the rites of Masonry.

Julius Hardin Has Been Laid to Rest

Was a Prominent Democratic Worker

A Man of Strong Convictions and Fine Character

By the death of Julius Hardin, Breckinridge County has been deprived of one of her most substantial citizens.

The deceased had been suffering for some time with a carbuncle on the back of his neck and his death was looked for daily for a week or more before the end came.

He passed away Friday, September 23rd, with hardly a struggle.

Julius Hardin was born in this county October 9, 1846.

He was a man of strong character and firm convictions.  He took an active interest in politics during his life and for years was regarded as one of the staunchest Democrats in the county.

While he was a hard worker for party success he never sought office or preferment of any kind.

He was honest, sincere and his agreeable personality won for him a host of warm friends.

He was a scion of the noted Hardin family, coming from the pioneer stock that settled Breckinridge County over a century ago.

The deceased leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss.

The funeral took place Saturday, the services being conducted by Rev. Sneed, of Hardinsburg, who preached a sermon eloquent in its sympathy for the bereaved wife and children and rich with its tributes to the character of the dead.

The remains were interred in the Cloverport Cemetery and were followed to their last resting place by one of the largest funeral corteges that has ever been seen in the city.

The News with the whole community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.

Peter Dhonau, born January 30, 1812, died September 13, 1899.  Mary Elizabeth Dhonau, born January 1, 1815, died March 27, 1896.

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Kentucky

Wednesday, September 20, 1899

Peter Dhonau

An Old Resident of the County Passes Away

Mr. Peter Dhonau, one of the county’s oldest citizens, died at his home near Balltown last Wednesday.  He had not been confined to his bed and death was due to the sudden giving away of his constitution.

Mr. Dhonau was born in Sobenheim, Prussia, January, 1813.  He came to this country in 1844, and located at Rome, Indiana, on a farm.  He continued farming until the year of 1869, when he moved to this part of Kentucky where he has resided ever since.

His most estimable wife departed this life in March, 1896, leaving eleven children to mourn her loss.  Two died in infancy, one at nine years and one at mature age.  Seven children are still living who are, Mrs. Michael Hamman, Mrs. Phillip Dick, Mrs. Charles Fuchs, Mrs. William Sanders, Miss Harriet Dhonau and William and Albert Dhonau.  There are twenty-seven grand-children and twelve great-grandchildren.

Mr. Dhonau was probably one of Breckenridge County’s most prosperous farmers, and was well liked by everyone.  He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.  His remains were laid to rest in the cemetery near Rome, Indiana.  [Although this gravestone leads us to believe he was buried in Cloverport Cemetery.]