Blake Arnold Family Buried in Old Union Baptist Cemetery

This small cemetery sits on a little knoll, just over the Marion County border in Boyle County.  I have wanted to visit this cemetery for years.  Old UnionBaptist Cemetery is just off US68 and I always passed it on my way to Danville, and still pass it visiting my sister.  Before my marriage it was always my idea to stop, never had the chance.  Then Ritchey and I have talked about it every time we pass.  So about 40 years later I finally made it!  In the above photo you can see a black plaque on the tallest gray stone.  It reads, ‘Site of Old Union Church in memory of Pioneers of the Doctors Fork Community, erected by the Harmon – Gray – Pipes Family Association.’

This marker reads – Doctor’s Fork Baptist Church, organized March 15, 1801.  the first permanent meeting house of this congregation was on this site in 1805 and remained so until 1957.  This marker has been erected for the occasion of the bicentennial of Doctor’s Fork Baptist Church in loving memory of the founding members of this church’s congregation and the family of faith that continues to serve her today.’  Across the way stands the new, brick Doctor’s Fork Baptist Church – which is ministered by a friend of ours!

Blake Arnold, born in the year 1803, died March 29, 1872.

Today we will talk about the family of Blake Arnold.  He was born in Virginia in 1803.  Blake first married Permelia Calvert in Washington County, Kentucky, August 15, 1828.   Together they had at least five children, since they are named in the 1850 census, John, Mary, Martha and Nancy.  Nancy was born in 1838.  Wife Permelia must have died shortly thereafter.  She is not listed in the 1840 census of Mercer County – the only 3 females are the daughters.

Know all men by these presents that we, Blake Arnold and Thomas Stewart, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money to the payment of which well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 17th day of August 1840.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a license about to issue for a marriage intended to be solemnized between the above named Blake Arnold and Martha Blagrave.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void else to remain in  full force and virtue.

                              Blake Arnold, Thomas Stewart

Witness, John T. Allin, D. C.

On August 17, 1840, Blake Arnold married Martha Blagrave in Mercer County, Kentucky.  She is listed in the 1850 Boyle County Census with him, the five children mentioned above, and four children of there own – Samuel, Permelia (named for the first wife), James and Woodson Arnold.  In the 1860 Boyle County Census two additional children are listed – Robert and William Creed Arnold.

Martha J., wife of Blake Arnold, born April 25, 1818, died October 12, 1893.

Blake Arnold died March 29, 1872.  We will discuss his will tomorrow.  Martha lived another 21 years, raising the children.

Permelia, daughter of B. & M. Arnold, born September 16, 1842, died August 29, 1867.

Daughter Permelia died at the young age of 25.  She was probably taken away by consumption.

R. B. Arnold died July 26, 1883, aged 30 years and 5 months.

Son Robert also died at a young age.

John Arnold, July 30, 1828 – December 3, 1880.  Julia Arnold, August 6, 1833 – June 21, 1897.

Eldest son, John, died seven years after his father.

George Crane, October 15, 1835 – August 21, 1928.  Nancy Crane, April 30, 1836 – March 17, 1909.

Daughter Nancy, buried with husband George Crane.

This small cemetery was worth the wait!  It is beautifully cared for by the families mentioned above.  Thanks to them for their dedication to their ancestors!

John Wesley Linton Family Photo

Today I share with you a photo of John Wesley Linton and wife Emma Adelaide Proctor, and two of their children.  With a bit of thought and research I believe I can tell you which of their five children are in the photo.  Let’s start with a little history.

John Wesley Linton’s grandfather was Benjamin Franklin Linton, who was born June 16, 1777, in Loudoun County, Virginia, the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.  Benjamin F. Linton married Lucy Crewdson, April 12, 1805, in Fluvanna County, Virginia.  Even though his parents and other brothers and sisters moved to the Washington/Nelson County area in Kentucky, Benjamin settled in Logan County, Kentucky.

Benjamin and Lucy had twelve children – Mildred L., Moses Lewis, Nany M., John, Thomas Crewdson, William Crewdson, Elizabeth, Benjamin Burkette, John Newman, Lucy Crewdson, Burkette Lewis and George Thomas Linton.  Most of the older children moved away from Logan County, the younger ones stayed in Logan County.

Mildred married her cousin John L. Edwards, who lived in Washington County, Kentucky.  They are buried in the Linton Cemetery, along with the Captain and other members of the family.

Moses Lewis Linton married Ann Rachel Booker, from Washington County, became a doctor and moved his family to St. Louis, Missouri.  He taught at the university and was very widely known for his medical skills, as well as his charitable work.  In the new St. Louis Cathedral he is memorialized on the ceiling as a founding member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

Nancy Mason Linton married John Mize and lived in Logan County.

John Linton, also a doctor, moved to Iowa and lived among the Indians of that area, treating them and learning their ways.  He is featured in the Garnavillo Iowa Museum, with many of his doctor’s tools, vials, medicines, and other items.

I’m not sure where Thomas Crewdson Linton lived, or who he married.

William Crewdson moved farther than any of his siblings.  He kept moving west, finally making it to California, where he lived until his death.

The other children all lived in Logan County.  Benjamin Burkette Linton married Nancy Jane Newman.  They are the parents of John Wesley Linton, featured in the photo.  John Wesley Linton was born November 14, 1843.  He joined the southern cause during the Civil War, and was part of the Orphan Brigade.  So many members of his company died that he vowed if he returned home he would plant cedar trees for each and every one who did not return.  True to his word, John Wesley did plant those trees – and many are still growing on his farm today!

After the war, John Wesley Linton married Emma Adelaide Proctor on November 11, 1869.  The couple had five children, Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.  Unfortunately, Lucy died at the age of 22 in 1903.  The four sons lived until the 1940’s – Benjamin Proctor Linton died January 19, 1941; the other three brothers died in 1945 – the youngest, Hugh Walter Linton, died March 21; James Thomas Linton died November 13; and two weeks later John Warder Linton died November 27.

Now, back to the photo.  Looking at the clothing and examining the card leads me to believe this photograph was taken about 1883-1885.  The card has an uneven scalloped edge which is appropriate to that time period.  There is no image printed on the back, but a small, photo-like image is glued to the back.  If you look careful you can see Genelli, St. Louis, printed under the photo of the woman.  I found Genelli, Hubert Brothers, Proprietors, running a photographic studio at 923 Olive Street from 1885.

John Wesley Linton and his family lived in Logan County, Kentucky, near the town of Russellville.  But they had family who lived in St. Louis!  Dr. Moses Lewis Linton had died by this date, but his children lived there.  I’m convinced this was taken during a visit to cousins.

Our next obstacle – which two children are shown in the photo?  My guess would be James Thomas and Lucy.  If you enlarge the photo you can definitely see the child standing with her hand on her father’s shoulder is a little girl.  She wears a ring on the middle finger of her right hand, and a small necklace, and her hair is styled very similar to her mother’s.  The little boy looks a few years older.  In 1885 Lucy would have been five and Thomas, eight.  It could also be that the photo was taken a year or two earlier.  There is no photographer’s name at the bottom of the card, and that could be due to setting up shop.  Either way, I feel very confident in naming the two wee ones.  The older boys could have been left at home with relatives; and Hugh, who was born in February of 1883, may have been too young to travel.  Another reason to date this photo to 1884 was the death of Ann Rachel Booker Linton, Moses’ wife, March 5, 1884.

Always check the small clues that may help you date photographs.  They will help you get close to the date.

Gilbert Ratcliff Buried in Grove Hill Cemetery

Gilbert Ratcliff, Co. L, 11th U.S. Infantry, born August 22, 1890, killed November 10, 1918, in Argonne Forest, France.  Hill Grove Cemetery, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Gilbert Ratcliff was the youngest son of John Logan Ratcliff and Lucinda A. Sleadd, born August 22, 1890.  His parents were married in 1867.  Gilbert’s grandparents were William Sleadd and Sophie Vannatta.

In the 1900 census for Shelby County, Logan Ratcliff was 56, married for 33 years, and a farmer.  Lucinda was 52, a mother of 14 children, with 11 living.  The following children lived in the household – William, 28; Jessie, 21; Homer, 20; Newel, 17; Virginia, 15; and Gilbert, 9.

Gilbert’s draft registration card for World War I lists his home address as R.F.D. #3, Waddy, in Shelby County, Kentucky.  He was a natural born citizen, a farmer and worked for his father.  He was single.  Gilbert was medium tall, stout, with blue eyes and light hair.

How tragic that Gilbert died the day before the Armistice was signed.  How many lives were lost in that last day before the World War I ended?

1783 Marriage of James Stevens and Susannah Haydon

James Stevens was born in Orange County, Virginia, July 23, 1757, and died September 3, 1832, in Warren County, Kentucky.  He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, enlisted in Orange County, and served in the Second Virginia Regiment.  Susannah Haydon, his wife, was born in Virginia, March 25, 1768, and died January 9, 1839, in Warren County.  They were married in Lincoln County, Kentucky (Virginia at the time), July 9, 1783.

I will mention that it was not Thomas Harrison that was Governor of Virginia at this time, but Benjamin Harrison.  He lived at his plantation home known as Berkeley. 

Ritchey and I visited this home last year while in Virginia – it is quite beautiful and commands a majestic view of the James River.  We had afternoon tea under the huge trees of the yard.

Know all men by these presents that we, James Stevens and Richard Beale, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of July 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James Stevens and Susannah Haydon, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

James Stevens, Richard Beale

Sealed and delivered in presence of Willis Green

Lincoln County

Sir,

Please to grant Mr. James Stevens his license to marry my daughter, Susannah Haydon, and oblige, sir, your humble servant.

John Haydon, July 9th 1783

Mr. Willis Green

Test. John Conner, Abner Haydon

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond Genealogy Conference

How many of you have ancestors that moved to Kentucky from Maryland during the 1785-1810 immigration of families to the counties of Washington, Marion and Nelson – and, also, Scott County and Breckinridge County, as I have recently discovered?  Are you attending the 2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond, Genealogy Conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, next weekend?  Ritchey and I will be there!  We will be in the vendor section, talking about genealogy and selling my CDs to those who are interested.

Holy Cross Catholic Church

In 1785 sixty families gathered in the Pottinger’s Creek area of Washington County (later to become Marion County).  Basil Hayden, Clement Johnson, Joseph Clark, James Dant, Philip Miles, among others, were those early settlers.  Holy Cross Church is the oldest Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains, built in 1792.

St. Charles Catholic Church

Some of these groups of families settled along Hardin’s Creek in 1786, worshiped in the home of Henry Hagan, until the first church was built in 1806 – my home parish of St. Charles Church located in St. Mary’s in Marion County, originally Washington County.  John Lancaster, James Elder, William and Andrew Mudd, Thomas and Ignatius Medley, Bennett Rhodes, and others made this area their home – and many of their descendants still live there today.

St. Francis Catholic Church

Also in 1786, a group of Maryland settlers intended to share the Pottinger’s Creek settlement.  They took flatboats down the Ohio River and landed at Maysville, known as Limestone at that time.  They found such beautiful land east of the river, in what was Woodford Count, later Scott, they decided to travel no further.  The first church was built in 1794, St. Francis.  It is the second oldest parish in the state.  The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Names of those early settlers were Jenkins, Gough, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, and James.

St. Rose Catholic Church

In 1787 Philip Miles, Thomas Hill, Henry Cambron, Joseph and James Carrico, Thomas Hamilton, Basil Montgomery, many members of the Smith family, and others came to Cartwright’s Creek.  In 1798, they built a church known as St. Ann’s – and this is where many of the older members are buried.  The church was abandoned once St. Rose Church was built in 1806.  There is nothing in the field where St. Ann’s Church and Cemetery used to be.  This is the area most of my ancestors settled in – Montgomery, Carrico, Dillehay, Smith, Cambron and others – lived from those very early days until my grandmother died in 1986.  Such a rich heritage concentrated in one county – since my father’s ancestors also lived in Washington County from 1860.

Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church

The Rolling Fork settlement – today in Calvary, Marion County – was established in 1798.  Leonard Hamilton, Robert Abell, Clement and Ignatius Buckman, John Raley and others left their marks here.  Ignatius Buckman was killed by Indians and was the first buried where Holy Name of Mary Cemetery is now.  The older portion of the cemetery is on a small knoll, at the back of the church.  The newer portion is across the small road that leads back to the cemetery, a nice, flat area with many gravestones.

Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral

Captain James Rapier, with his sons Charles and William, settled on southeast of what is now Bardstown, on Beach Fork of Salt River (Poplar Neck).  A few years later Thomas Gwynn, Anthony Sanders and Nehemiah Webb (originally a Quaker) settled close by.  The home of Thomas Gwynn, now the site of the Nazareth Community of the Sisters of Charity, was used for church services until St. Joseph Church was built in 1798 in what is now St. Joseph Cemetery.  The cathedral was built in 1816.  McManus, Reynolds, Howard, Lancaster, members of the Hayden family and William McQuown were early settlers.  Thomas Howard lived in the vicinity where St. Thomas Church is now located.  His home was used for church, and in 1810 he willed the farm to the church.    In 1812 St. Thomas Church was established.  Many old settlers are buried in this cemetery.

St. Thomas Catholic Church

The Cox’s Creek settlement in Nelson County was begun about 1792.  Some of my ancestors came to this area – Gardiner, Elder, Montgomery – along with Thomas Higdon, Richard Jarboe, Valentine Thompson, Hezekiah Luckett and Charles Wathen.  This is the oldest parish in Nelson County, located in Fairfield.  Unfortunately we have not visited this church and cemetery.

The County of Breckinridge was formed in 1799, but eight years previously, when a portion of Hardin County, it was settled by Leonard Wheatley, and soon followed by Richard Mattingly, Elias Rhodes, Barton Mattingly, Ignatius Coomes, William McGary and others.  Richard Mattingly’s house was used as a church until 1811, when St. Anthony was built.  Just found out about the Breckinridge settlement during my research – another to add to our list to visit!

There are many more settlers who came from Maryland to Kentucky in those early years.  It would be impossible to name them all.  This conference first began in 1990 when it was held at Nazareth, Kentucky.  In 1992, it was held in St. Mary’s at St. Charles Church; in 1994 in Cape Girardeau, Perry County, Missouri; and back in 1996 at St. Charles – the first time Ritchey and I attended.  In 1998, Owensboro, Kentucky, was the location, and we attended again.  In 2000 the gathering was held at Leonardtown, in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  2002 found the conference at St. Catharine Motherhouse in Washington County, which we attended; 2004 in Hannibal, Missouri.  2008 at the St. Thomas Farm in Bardstown; back in Leonardtown in 2010.  The last reunion was held at St. Catharine College in Washington County in 2014 – which was my first time to attend as a vendor.  This has been such a wonderful group of people!  I’ve made so many friends and found much information for my families!  If you have any family members that originated from Maryland, especially the counties of Charles, St. Mary and Prince Edward, you may want to come.  Perhaps I will see you there?

J. Zweifel Photographer – Dayton Ohio

I love this photo!  The proud grandpapa and his adorable grandchild are just precious!  The photo was probably taken 1900-1910.  Even though we don’t know much about the man and child in the photo, there is information on the photographer, a Mr. Zweifel of Dayton, Ohio.  I found several mentions of him in the Photographer’s Association News, including an article written by him.

from Photographer’s Association News, Volume 3, Issue 7

“Cooperation”

By J. Zweifel, Dayton, Ohio

I believe the best way to build up a business is to begin at the bottom.  So start with your customers and never let one leave the studio displeased.  A pleased customer is the best advertisement one can send out.

Instead of breaking your neck to get your competitor’s customers, try for new ones.  It pays better.

We should have more cooperative advertising.  Our strongest competitors are not the photographers, but the fellows that sell luxuries.  Cooperation will bring the photographers some of the money spent in candy shops and jewelry stores.

Cooperative advertising will increase the amount of money spent for photographs and each man will get his share.

We are losing a great opportunity by not following up the Eastman Kodak Advertising stronger than we do; first, by joint advertisements and then follow up with our individual advertisements.

We worry too much about the other fellow.  General Grant was once asked what he thought Lee was going to do and he replied, “I’m not worrying what he is going to do, but I’m very busy with what I’m going to do.”

So if we use our energy in what we are doing and not waste it on the other fellow we will get along better.

Let’s meet each other with a smile and handshake and see how much good we can do each other instead of trying to “get the other fellow’s goat.”  We will all live longer and better.

In another issue it was noted that the meeting of the Ohio State Photographers was held October 8th and 9th at the offices of J. Zweifel, East Third Street, Dayton, Ohio.  During the meeting they discussed the art of artificial lighting.  It was a working session where over ‘100 studies were made, demonstrating the best possible way to make photos.’  At the next meeting they were going to discuss taking photos with films instead of plates.