Will of Ann Duncan of Jessamine County

Ann, wife of James B. Duncan, died March 20, 1849, aged 48 years. ‘god shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.’

I’m always excited to see the will of a woman back in the early days!  From her gravestone, located in the Duncan family cemetery in Nicholasville, we know that Ann was the wife of James B. Duncan.  At the time of her death in 1849, Ann has three children, Charles, Julia who married a Brown, and Margaret Ann, unmarried.  Notice there is no date on the will – an unusual fact.  I love the descriptions of silver table spoons, tea spoons, tongs, dessert spoons, etc.  This gives an idea of the type of life this family led.  When Ann Duncan talks about securing these items ‘with the property’ I suppose she means they must be handed down as family heirlooms, and not sold.

Feeling myself daily declining and believing that my end is near I wish to make some distribution of the little worldly goods I possess.  After my just debts are paid I give to my second daughter, Margaret Ann Duncan, a piece of land containing about fifty acres, lying in Mason County, four miles from Maysville on the Flemingsburgh Turnpike, and also the hire of my old man Billy while she remains single.  She is to have the whole benefit, but if she marry, then it is to be divided in three equal parts and entailed on their posterity made secure so that they cannot spend it.  I also wish that at my death a division of my bed clothing and furniture.  I have already given to Charles Duncan and Julia Brown a share of each, therefore I wish Margaret Ann to have the largest share in this last division.  I also give her my bed stead, my dressing bureau and a pair of poster tables that are now in my house.  I give Charles Duncan a half dozen silver table spoons, a half dozen silver tea spoons, they are to be secured with the property so that he cannot spend them.  I give Julia Brown my silver cream spoon, she now has a half dozen silver table spoons of mine in her possession.  I wish them also to be secured with the balance.  I give Margaret Ann Duncan, my daughter, a half dozen silver dessert spoons, a half dozen silver

tea spoons, a pair of silver sugar tongs, two salt shakers(?), one mustard spoon, one silver soup spoon, two silver butter knives, all to be secured as spoken of before.  I also give Margaret Ann, my daughter, my gold watch in consideration of her kindness and attention to me during my illness.  I had omitted to mention that I have four hundred and fifty dollars in the hands of Mr. Ely Anderson, living in Maysville, which will be due the second day of June; that I also give to Margaret Ann my daughter, and wish it secured with the rest.

Ann Duncan

Attest – J. Asline, William Duncan

State of Kentucky              Jessamine County April Court 1848

I, Daniel B. Price, Clerk of the County Court for the County of Jessamine, do certify that this writing was at the court aforesaid, produced and proven in open Court according to law by the oaths of William Duncan and J. Asline, the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the last will and testament of Ann Duncan, deceased, and ordered to be recorded and a certificate of probate granted, whereupon the same together with this certificate has been duly entered of receipt in my office.

Attest.  Dan B. Price

Will Book G, Pages 415-416 – Jessamine County Clerk’s Office

New Kindle Book – Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery List – Washington County, Kentucky

This has been a five year project, taking photos beginning in the fall of 2008 and through 2012, although I’ve just recently put the list together. This project is dear to me because my fifth great-grandfather, Captain John Linton, helped build this church. Many of my Linton, Moran and Edwards family members are buried here. Also, many of the early settlers of Washington County were laid to rest here. In a more modern happenstance, my husband’s father was minister of this church in the early 1960’s. Who knew we would share this common piece of history?

Included is an alphabetical listing of those buried at Pleasant Grove, including birth and death dates, and sometimes additional information. There are 856 names on the list.  Within a few weeks I will make this into a CD that includes photos of most of the gravestones and can be purchased on my website through Paypal.

Do you have anyone buried in this cemetery?

Dear Aunt Lil

Goodrich Nursing Home in Lexington, Kentucky. My Aunt Lil’s nursing home, run about 1940-1960? Not sure about the dates. Aunt Lil is in the dark dress at the bottom of the photo.

This is a great photo of my Aunt Lil and her nursing staff at the Goodrich Nursing Home in Lexington, Kentucky.  Aunt Lil, actually my great-aunt, was born Lillian Catherine Montgomery, March 11, 1900 – always easy to remember old she was – in Washington County, the daughter of Robert E. Lee Montgomery and Frances Barber Linton.  She married Guy Goodrich in 1933.  They had no children, but Aunt Lil devoted her time as a registered nurse, a graduate of St. Joseph Hospital School of Nursing in Lexington.  She began Goodrich Nursing Home and ran it with an iron fist.  Patients always came first.  She was a stickler for cleanliness and demanded superior work from her staff.  She was well known in this field, and well loved by those who worked for her.

I have very vague memories of visiting Aunt Lil and Uncle Guy’s home in Lexington – I always thought it very fancy!  I particularly remember her plates with pink flowers and green leaves in her china hutch.  In later years, after Uncle Guy passed on and she sold the nursing home, she returned to Springfield, in Washington County, and lived near her sister – my grandmother.  It was at this point our relationship grew, since the genealogy bug had been handed down to her, from her mother – and also handed down to me from the same, my great-grandmother.  As far as I know, we were the only two in the family so obsessed!  I would visit her for lunch and we would pore over all the delicate pieces of paper of our ancestors, handed down through the years, and look at those faces in photographs of so long ago.  Sometimes I miss her so!

Aunt Lil was rather a roving senior citizen.  She would move to Springfield, be there several years; miss Lexington; move there for several years, miss Springfield, and move back.  Torn between two worlds.  In her last years she lived in a nursing home in Springfield, but acted like she was the one taking care of things.  I suppose once a nurse, always a nurse!

Do you recognize any of the nurses in the photo?

The Wallace Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

The Wallace family is represented in Maple Grove Cemetery, on Main Street in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, with several gravestones.  The two oldest are for Joseph and Sarah Wallace.  You can see them beside/slightly behind the large Wallace stone.

Joseph Wallace was born March 9, 1779, and died February 19, 1855.  Joseph’s parents were John Wallace and Jane Finley.  John Wallace was an ensign in 1776, in Captain James Moore’s company, 5th Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Anthony Wayne’s command.  He was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died in Fayette County, Kentucky.

In Joseph Wallace’s will, dated April 21, 1853, he gives his daughter, Mary J. Brown, ‘undivided interest in and to three slaves, namely Sam, Eliza and Solomon, purchased of Briers Heirs and now in the hands of Mary J. Brown, administrator of Thomas J. Brown, deceased, my interest in said slaves being one fifth part of the same, also her note executed by her as administrator for one hundred and fifty dollars, together with whatever interest may be due thereon, at the time of my death.  Also, one thousand dollars in cash.’

Son James Wallace received his father’s tract of land in Jessamine County, where the father resided, about four hundred and sixty acres, also four Negroes, his selection, out of all the slaves.

Two Negroes are given in trust to his executor, for the use and benefit of my daughter, Margaret Harris, Emily and Nancy, 13 and 7 years old, respectively, who are now with the said Margaret in Boyle County, also one half of a tract of land in Boyle County, containing about one hundred and eighty one acres, upon which Nathaniel Harris now lives, land and Negroes to remain in the hands of my executor for the use and benefit of daughter Margaret – perhaps he didn’t trust his son-in-law.

All slaves, land, chattel, etc., are to be sold and the money divided between my daughter, Mary J. Brown, and the share to my executor, in trust for my daughter Margaret Harris.  Thomas E. West was named executor.

Sarah Barr, wife of Joseph Wallace, was born February 1, 1780, and died September 16, 1852.  She and Joseph married June 23, 1809, in Fayette County, Kentucky.

James Wallace, son of Joseph and Sarah, left a very impressive monument in the cemetery – or it could have been his children since there is ‘Our Father’ and ‘Our Mother’ above their names on the stone.  James married Margaret Mays, May 2, 1850.  Due to the date of marriage, tiny Anna Wallace must have been their first child.

James Wallace was a rather wealthy man.  In the 1860 Census of Jessamine County he is listed as a farmer, with real estate valued at $27,000, and personal estate at $15,000.  In the census James is 48, Margaret is 36, Joseph is 7, Sarah is 4, and Virginia is 8/12.  Mother-in-law Anna Mays, 67, is living with the family.  She was born in North Carolina.

In the 1870 census James is 58.  His property is valued at $34,000, with personal estate of $10,000.  Margaret is 44, Joseph is 17, Sidia (Sarah) is 15, and Virginia is 12.

James died in 1875 and, Margaret, less than a year later.

James Wallace, born February 8, 1812, died June 25, 1875. Margaret Mays Wallace, born September 29, 1826, died April 10, 1876. Maple Grove Cemetery, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

 

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

Marriages and Funerals from the 1911 News-Leader

from The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, October 12, 1911

Cokendolpher

Mr. James Cokendolpher died at his home near Chaplin Thursday of heart trouble.  He was born September 5, 1845, in Nelson County.  When the Civil War broke out he enlisted under General John H. Morgan and served with credit during the war.  Burial services were conducted at Chaplin Friday by Rev. E. L. Griffey.

He is survived by his wife and three daughters, Misses Bettie and Jennie Cokendolpher of Chaplin and Mrs. W. F. Grigsby of this place.

Steele

Mr. Harrison Steele died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cyrus Johnson, near Harrodsburg last Monday of infirmities incident to old age, being 91 years of age.  Mr. Steele moved to this county in 1866 and lived here until shortly after the death of his wife which occurred at Nashville three years ago, when he moved to Mercer County.  He was a useful and upright citizen and highly respected.

Funeral services were conducted at Willisburg, Tuesday, by Rev. J. A. Simms.  He is survived by four children, Mrs. Cyrus Johnson, of Mercer County, Mrs. G. L. Warner, Mrs. J. D. Sweeney and Mr. E. W. Steele of this county.

Marriages

Mr. Daniel Hardin and Miss Annie Jones were married here last Saturday by Rev. W. H. Williams.  Mr. Hardin is a son of Mr. James Hardin and the bride is a daughter of the late William Jones.  Both are popular young people of the Mooresville neighborhood.

Yesterday’s Courier-Journal contained the following, “Alotta O’Bannon, a wall paper hanger, 24 years old, and Pearl Lynch, also 24, both of Louisville were married in Jeffersonville Monday night by Magistrate Hay.  The bridegroom was born in Owen County, Kentucky, and the bride, who is a daughter of Isaac Lynch, is a native of Springfield, Kentucky.”

Marriage license was issued this week to Mr. Oscar Foster and Miss Mattie Brothers.  Both are prominent people of the Tatham Springs neighborhood.

Cokendolpher – Smither 1874 Marriage

In the Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Baylor, is the description of the Civil War service of James Cokendolpher – ‘James Cokendolpher, born Chaplin, Kentucky, 1845; enlisted at Munfordsville, October, 1862, in the Old Squadron, Co. B., 2d Ky. Cavalry, C.S.A., and served under General John H. Morgan.  Was captured at the time Morgan made his famous raid across the Ohio into Indiana and Ohio and was imprisoned for nearly two years at Camp Douglass.  Exchanged early in 1865 and rejoined the army in the south.  Surrendered at Christianbury, Virginia.  John H. Purdy said he was with Cokendolpher all the time.’

The Commonwealth of Kentucky.  To any Minister of the gospel, or other person legally authorized to solemnize Matrimony:  You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither, the requirements of the law having been complied with.

Witness my signature as Clerk of Nelson County Court, this 28 day of January 1874.  J. D. Elliott, Clerk, by R. H. Rowland, Deputy Clerk.

This is to Certify that on the 29 day of January, 1874, the Rites of Marriage were legally solemnized by me between James Cokendolpher and Miss Amanda J. Smither at the residence of her father in the County of Nelson in the presence of G. S. Rose, Dr. F. C. Marshall and many others.  Signed Henry A. Renbolt.

Nelson County, Kentucky, Marriages