Main Street in Harrodsburg – 1904 and 113 Years Later!

Let me introduce you to my town!  Harrodsburg, located in Mercer County, was laid out June 16, 1774, by Captain James Harrod and his band of men.  It was first called Harrodstown, then Oldtown, and finally Harrodsburg.  In the very early years there were Indian attacks, and many settlers were killed.  But the rich and fertile land of the Bluegrass area was too profitable to give up.  As more and more families moved to Mercer County, and the Indians gave way to Ohio and Indiana, life became more peaceful.

In the 130 years since the site was laid out, and this picture was taken, there is no comparison to the log fort and this photo from 1904.  Fort Harrod, and the cabins within, fell into disuse and decay.  This is a photo of a bustling little town!  Power lines dominate the picture, large buildings, churches, horse and buggies, men and women on the streets – with no worry of Indian attacks!  Progress was here.

And if we go an additional 113 years forward to today, we see a modern, small town, but with a few signs from the first photo.  The brick building on the right side of the street, in the middle of the photo, is still standing.  For many years it was used as the home for the County Clerk’s Office.  Directly across the street is the courthouse, which cannot be seen in either photo.  A new courthouse was built a few years ago, and the county offices were moved to a building on Lexington Avenue.

The yellow house is still there, with a bit of renovation.  In the original photo the Christian Church stands beside it.  The church, which has been rebuilt, is hidden by the tree, but can be see in the above photograph.

I wanted to show you a close up of the old photo.  You will have to imagine that the first two buildings on the right (the church and store front) are now the large Christian Church from the modern photo.  The brick building begins with what was the County Clerk’s Office.

Past the building that housed the clerk’s office is The Kentucky Fudge Company – one of our favorite places to eat!  Studio G is next, with local music and talent.  Several other businesses are located down the street.  The building at the end – blue, with a turret – is the office of Dr. Tammy Hoskins, my optometrist.  You can see this building in the original photo!

Power lines are now underground, giving a nice, neat Main Street appearance.  I love small towns – and I especially love living in one!  Come visit – I’ll show you the replica of Fort Harrod, with the huge Osage orange tree in front, that has been the center of many school photos.  We’ll visit The Kentucky Fudge Company for lunch.  The Harrodsburg Historical Society on Chiles Street is a must for genealogy research.  There are many old cemeteries to visit.  And Shaker Village is just a few miles away – they serve a lovely dinner.

 

Hooper Family Bible

How many of you know the wonderful genealogical research by Faye Sea Sanders.  Ms. Sanders could almost be called ‘Ms. Washington County’!  She was a powerhouse when it came to genealogy, and her books are used by many.  I was fortunate enough to meet her at a Maryland to Kentucky Reunion at St. Catharine College. 

The following Bible record on the Hooper family of Washington County was kept by Elijah Hooper until his death in 1927.  I have a slight connection with the Hooper family – one of my Hill relatives married a Hooper (not in this list).

Elijah Hooper was a private in Company D, 11th Kentucky Cavalry, for the Union during the Civil War.  He was captured on June 9, 1864, at Altoona, Georgia, and held at Andersonville Prison, and was one of the few who survived.  He started receiving his pension October 23, 1880, and Lucy received one from February 11, 1928, after his death.

In the 1850 and 1860 Washington County census Elijah is living with parents John and Mary Hooper.

After the war Elijah married Lucy Ann Comley and raised a large family.  In the 1900 census it says Elijah and Lucy have been married for 34 years, have had twelve children and nine are living.  This corresponds to the family Bible – David, Ellic and John died before 1900.  Daughter Jannie (also listed as Pamelia J. in the 1870 census) is living with her parents, listed as a widow, and her son, Perry W. Burkhead, is one year of age.  Jannie married James W. Burkhead September 26, 1897, who evidently died shortly after the marriage.  Her second marriage was to James Comley on May 15, 1906.

Martha A. Hooper married James Alexander Walls on September 28, 1895.  Richard T. married Grace Olive Smoot, November 7, 1910.  Berry married Ada Louise Dibben, September 19, 1911.  Sallie married James Monroe Lovorn August 4, 1908.  Maggie married Will Lonzo Bunch; and Edward married Nellie Lewis.

Hooper Family Bible

Elijah Hooper and Lucy Ann Hooper [Comley] married August 6, 1869

Births

  • Elijah Hooper – March 7, 1845
  • Lucy Ann Hooper – March 28, 1851
  • Mary L. Hooper – September 2, 1869
  • Martha A. Hooper – December 28, 1871
  • Jannie Hooper – March 4, 1874
  • John W. Hooper – May 6, 1876
  • Richard T. Hooper – September 11, 1878
  • David Hooper – November 14, 1881
  • Berry L. Hooper – January 9, 1883
  • Sallie S. Hooper – March 4, 1885
  • Maggie E. Hooper – January 21, 1887
  • Eddie H. Hooper – December 16, 1889
  • Ellic Hooper – July 30, 1892
  • Nannie May Hooper – October 4, 1894
  • Willie Lewis – November 12, ____
  • Anna Mae Hooper – October 11, 1925
  • Marshall Hooper – August 11, 1929

The last three are grandchildren?

Deaths

  • David Hooper – March 18, 1888
  • Ellic Hooper – August 6, 1892
  • John W. Hooper – September 18, 1898
  • Elijah Hooper – December 2, 1927

David Hooper and Ellic Hooper were not listed in any census records since they were born and died between.  David was seven and Ellic was an infant when they passed away.  We would never have known of their existence if it weren’t for this Bible.

 

Mercer County Births – 1852-1859

Mercer County Births 1852-1859

  • Absolom H. Leonard, born October 20, 1852, son of John and Jane Deshazer Leonard, Dixville.
  • Catherine J. Leonard, born April 23, 1856, daughter of Jackson and Elizabeth Patterson Leonard, Mt. Pleasant.
  • Mary Jane Leonard, born July 11, 1856, daughter of James H. and Mary Patterson Leonard, Deep Creek.
  • Nancy J. Leonard, born October 5, 1853, daughter of John and Lucinda Sally Leonard, Dixville.
  • Rachel E. Leonard, born April 23, 1856, daughter of Erasmus and Lucinda Gammons Leonard, Graves Mill.
  • Sarah Leonard, born December 1856, daughter of John and Lucinda Sally Leonard, Deep Creek Meeting House.
  • Stephen D. Leonard, born June 15, 1857, son of William and Rhoda Lester Leonard, Dixville.
  • Turner T. Leonard, born September 7, 1858, son of Jackson and Elizabeth Patterson Leonard, Dixville.
  • Frances Lester, born February 19, 1858, daughter of Erasmus and Martha A. Powell Lester, Graves Mill.
  • Rachel B. Lester, born June 4, 1858, daughter of Erasmus and Elizabeth May Lester, Dixville.
  • ? Lester, born December 1852, daughter of Joseph and Martha Brazelton Lester, Harrodsburg.
  • Thomas Levitt, born December 10, 1854, son of John and Ann Kennedy Levitt, Curdsville.
  • Almetta Lewis, born September 1857, daughter of William and Nancy Bailey Lewis, Dixville.
  • Eliza A. Lewis, born October 7, 1857, daughter of Elijah R. and Martha A. Brown Lewis, Dixville.
  • Elizabeth Lewis, born November 15, 1859, daughter of William and Nancy Baily Lewis, Patterson’s Mill.
  • Elizabeth Lewis, born August 9, 1853, daughter of Elijah and Martha Brown Lewis, Duncansville.
  • John Huston Lewis, born April 2, 1852, son of William and Nancy Bailey Lewis, Dixville.
  • Jordan W. Lewis, born September 9, 1853, son of William and Nancy Bailey Lewis, Dixville.
  • Mahala J. Lewis, born October 2, 1855, daughter of William and Nancy Bailey Lewis, Graves’ Mill.
  • ? Lewis, born March 21, 1856, son of Samuel and Nancy Galligher Lewis, B. R. Mill.

C. B. Overstreet Dies of Consumption

C. B. Overstreet, born December 14, 1823, died March 5, 1885.  Old Union Cemetery, Boyle County, Kentucky.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, March 13, 1885

Mr. C. B. Overstreet died of consumption at his home, near Aliceton, at 5 minutes past 12 o’clock, Wednesday night, the 4th inst.  The deceased was 61 years old and was highly esteemed.  His remains were buried by the Masons at Union Church, last Friday.  Rev. R. H. Caldwell delivered the funeral discourse in the presence of a large audience of sorrowing friends.  He leaves a wife, one daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Harmon, and a host of friends.

Mary A., wife of C. B. Overstreet, born April 15, 1834, died January 23, 1892.

Holt – Maddox 1829 Marriage Bond and Consents

Know all men by these presents that we, Valentine Holt and John Darnall, are held and firmly bound unto the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the penal sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment of which well and truly to be made unto said state.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 2nd day of May 1829.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a license about to issue for a marriage intended to be solemnized between the above bound Valentine and Nancy Maddox.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

Valentine Holt, John Darnall

Teste.  Thomas Allin, D. C.

I do hereby authorize the Clerk of Mercer County to issue marriage license for my daughter, Nancy, and Valentine Holt to marry April 28th 1829.

William Maddox

Witness, John Darnall, William Goodlett

Mercer County

This day John Darnall appeared before me, William Bohon, a Justice of the Peace for said County, and made oath that he had frequently heard from different persons that Nancy Maddox was twenty-one years of age and that he is personally acquainted with her and to the best of his belief said girl is of that age.  Given under my hand this 2nd day of May 1829.

William Bohon, JP

Mercer County, Kentucky

Handsome Wedding Party

What a handsome wedding party!  The bride and her ladies in their beautiful white lace and ruffles.  The men in their dark jackets and boutonnieres.  Unfortunately there are no names, and not even the name of the photographer – this photo has been trimmed.  However, we can still enjoy this happy memory from a bygone day!

A Visit to Hammondsville Cemetery in Hart County

James Ferguson, born on September 11, 1811, died February 24, 1890.

Lucinda, wife of James Ferguson, born January 17, 1812, died October 29, 1876.  ‘Dearest mother, thou hast left us, here thy loss we deeply feel; but tis God that has bereft us, He can all our sorrows heal.’

Bettie F., wife of C. T. Thurman, born September 10, ,1870, died August 25, 1897.

Jeremiah Lamkin, born August 13, 1791, died February 23, 1877.

Elijah T. Hodges, May 29, 1848 – November 26, 1934.

G. W. Highbaugh, born February 22, 1818, died February 7, 1869. 

Hammondsville Cemetery and Bacon Creek Baptist Cemetery are side by side on Hwy 357 in the area of Hammondsville in Hart County, Kentucky, at the junction of Hammondsville-Jonesville Road with 357.