Wedding Announcements In The Hazel Green Herald – Wolfe County

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 9, 1887

The Caudill Twin Brothers are United to the Wells twin Sisters Under One Marriage Ceremony

Rev. W. R. Davis, of Morgan County, on Thursday, the third institute, officiated at one of the most remarkable weddings which ever took place in this section.  On that day he solemnized the right of matrimony between Robert Lee and John T. Caudill, of the first part, twins and sons of Abel Caudill, Rowan County, and Misses Mahala and Kalah Wells, of the second part, twins and daughters of William Wells, of Caney, Morgan County; Robert Lee married Miss Mahala and John T. united in the holy banns with Miss Kalah.  There were present about two hundred persons to witness the nuptials, and everything went merry.  This was truly a double wedding in every sense, except that Mr. Davis did not get a double fee.  Indeed, he would not accept any fee whatsoever, as the young brides were his nieces.  Brides and grooms were as happy as it is possible to be, but it is safe to predict that they have already gone to Rowan or soon will.  To prevent any serious trouble, therefore, we wish them abundant success in life, and modestly suggest that each of the grooms present his bride with a year’s subscription to The Herald, which insures happiness and long life in every household.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, December 19, 1895

Quite a romantic marriage took place in our quiet little village last Monday.  As per announcement in our last issue, Tom Lee, of Midland, Texas, and Miss Lucy Wallis, of near Daysboro, in this county, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony.  The bride and groom and the attendants were on horseback when the ceremony was pronounced by Elder J. T. Pieratt, after which the party galloped away.  The attendants were John Cecil and Miss Martha Byrd, George Byrd and Miss Minnie Wallis, Andy Blankenship and Miss Florida Gillaspie.  The party had dinner at the hospitable home of our fellow-countyman, Ed. F. Cecil, by way of an infair, and then dispersed with hands shaking and protestations of love and friendship for the future.  Mr. Lee and his wife left Tuesday for their western home, and all who know them join with us in the wish that they may have a long life of pleasure and prosperity.

The Hazel Green Herald, Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky

Thursday, October 2, 1902

A Wedding and Wedding Feast

Married, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Roe Nickell, of our town, on Thursday, September 25th, Nick Bailey and Miss Eliza Nickell.  The bride is a very distant relative of mine host, where the ceremony was performed, and an orphan girl, both her parents being dead.  The groom is a young widower with three children, but a prosperous farmer of Morgan County.  Mr. Nickell and wife, F. M. Long and wife, Oscar Fallen and wife, and perhaps others of the good citizens of Dickville, for the nonce formed a trust by pooling their dinner-pots and honored the bridal couple with a dinner worthy of the occasion, after which the “two souls with but a single thought, two hears that beat as one,” left for their home on Tom’s Branch.

Allen – Cambron 1799 Marriage Bond and Consents Washington County

Know all men by these presents that we, David Allen and James Cambron, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment where of well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 25th day of November 1799.  The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound David Allen and Rebekah Cambron, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then this obligation to be void, else to remain in full force.

David Allen, James Cambron

Witness, John Reed

November the 25th 1799  This is to certify that Thomas Cambron doth agree, and his wife Nancy, to give their daughter Rebekah in the Bonds of Matrimony unto David Allen.  Given under our hands and seals the date above written.

Thomas Cambron, Nancy Cambron

Test.  John Cambron, James Cambron

November 25th 1799  This is to certify that Sarah Mattingly agrees to give her son, David Allen, in the Bonds of Matrimony unto Rebekah Cambron, given under my hand and seal the day above written.

Sarah Mattingly

Test.  John Cambron, James Cambron

 

A Few Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Who Settled in Nicholas County

William Bartlett, son of Samuel and Mercy (Seeley) Bartlett, was born October 11, 1750 in New Canaan, Connecticut.  He lived for some years in Orange County, New York.  In Volume 1, page 48 of Associators of the 4th Militia Company of Brookham is shown William Bartlett – June 8, 1775 – Data taken from:  Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to the Revolutionary War in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany, New York, in two volumes – published in 1868.

He probably first married in Virginia and had the following children: Joseph Bartlett; Polly Bartlett married Ashford Prather; Marcie Bartlett married James Buchanan; Dorcas Bartlett married George Swarts; Samuel Bartlett; Ebenezer Bartlett and William Bartlett.  He came to Kentucky very early and is shown as a tax payer in Nicholas County in 1800.  In 1820 he died in Nicholas County.

Major George Michael Bedinger was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia, December 10, 1756.  He served in the Militia in the siege of Yorktown in 1781.  He was a major at the Battle of Blue Licks.  He lived most of his adult life in Nicholas County near Lower Blue Licks Springs.  He was a Kentucky Legislator 1792-1794 and was a representative in Congress 1803-1807.  The first County Seat of Nicholas County was established at his home (Bedinger’s Mill) on Licking River at Elk Creek in 1800.  He died in 1843 and was buried near his home at Blue Licks Springs.

John Caughey was born in Pennsylvania about 1747.  He enlisted in the Revolutionary War in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1776.  He was under the command of Col. William Irvine in the Sixth Battalion.  They first went to St. John’s, Quebec, to reinforce the tired and ragged troops at St. John’s.  At Crown Point he first heard the Declaration of Independence read to the troops.  They left Crown Point with the American withdrawal to Ft. Ticonderoga.  The Sixth Pennsylvania Battalion spent the winter there, but the lack of food, medicine and bedding tormented the troops, but when the enlistment was up in January, they did not return to their homes but chose to continue to guard the northern gate until replacements came in spring.  He came to Kentucky between 1782 and 1790.  In 1800 he leased 100 acres of land on the Licking River and not only raised food for his family but assisted in surveying and building roads in that section of Nicholas County.  He died in 1826 and lies buried in a grave no longer marked, in that vicinity.

Andrew House was born December 1, 1747/48 in Frederick County, Maryland, but spent his early life in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.  It was here that he married Hannah Snap, daughter of George Snapp, in 1783.  He entered service at Montour’s Bottom on the Ohio River, 11 miles below Pittsburgh about the year 1779, as an Indian Spy under the command of Captain David Ritchie and as private in Captain Nathan Ellis’ company and Colonel Broadhead’s regiment, during which time he marched up the Allegheny River and was in an engagement with the Indians, many of their number being killed.  The summer following, he served one month as a private in Captain David Ritchie’s company between Pittsburgh and Wheeling.

After his marriage, he moved from Pennsylvania to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and was again drafted to go with George Rogers Clark for three months on the Wabash Campaign, but he hired a substitute to take his place, paying him $20.00, saying that he had to raise a crop to support his family and could not get anyone to do his plowing, but could hire a man to fight without difficulty.  He applied for a pension in Bourbon County but later moved to Nicholas County where he died in August 1843.  In 1855 his wife, at the age of 94, made application and received 160 acres of Bounty Land.

David Kennedy was born in Scotland July 22, 1764 and died in Nicholas County September 8, 1824.  When quite young, he came to Virginia and served in the Revolutionary War for about three years.  About 1790 he migrated to that part of Virginia that later became Nicholas County, and bought a ½ interest in 545 acres of land, which today is located between Headquarters and Mt. Carmel.  He married Hannah Kassaneur of Aberdeen, Ohio.  Their children were James, William Elizabeth Cassandra, Thomas, Sarah, Harriet, Polly and Clairborne.  He and his wife and some of his children are buried on the farm that he owned.

History of Nicholas County, Joan Weissinger Conley, 1976.

Confederate Soldier Buried In Green Lawn Cemetery Simpson County

H. D. Wade, 1861-1865, C.S.A.

According to his death certificate, Harvey David Wade was born in Allen County, Kentucky, February 17, 1836, and died September 22, 1911, due to heart problems.  Harvey and his family are buried in the Wade plot in Green Lawn Cemetery in Franklin, Simpson County, Kentucky.  His death certificate gives us little other information.  Both mother and father are listed as unknown.

Let’s move further back in time to see what we can discover.  In the 1860 census, Henry David Wade (H. D.) is living in Newton County, Missouri, with Henry Wade, aged 40, and Martha Wade, 38, with their six children.  Henry was born in Kentucky, Martha in Tennessee.  Remember that Simpson County is located on the Tennessee border.  The four older children were born in Kentucky.  Amanda, age 6, was born in Missouri, as well as younger sister, Eliza.  From Amanda’s date of birth of 1854, and her brother Henry’s birth in Kentucky in 1851, we can surmise the family moved to Missouri between those two dates – 1852-1854.  Next listed in the census record as living with the Wade family is Franklin Keath, 22, a farm laborer born in Georgia.  The last person living with the family is H. D. Wade, 23, a school teacher, born in Kentucky.  Some researchers believe Henry and Martha to be Harvey’s parents, but I do not.  If Harvey were their son the couple would have married very young, Martha being approximately 15 when Harvey was born.  Another consideration is the fact he is listed last in the census record, after a farm laborer.  If he were the first-born son he would have been named after his parents, not last in line.  I feel Henry was either an uncle, or an older brother, of Harvey.  But this gives a good reason for Harvey to have enlisted in the Confederate States Army in Newton County, Missouri.

This service record for H. D. Wade shows he is listed as an Ordinance Sergeant.  Since he dealt with weapons and ammunition he would have been a very valuable person within the regiment.

And from this record we find that H. D. Wade was on the roll of prisoners of war – ‘Company F, 8th Regiment Missouri Infantry, Confederate States Army, commanded by 2d Lieutenant Paul F. Peete, surrendered at New Orleans, Louisiana, to Maj. Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U.S.A., May 26, 1865, and paroled at Alexandria, June 7, 1865.  The date May 26, 1865 is significant since it was after Lee’s surrender.  Notice that his residence is given as Simpson County, Kentucky.

Mary Neely Wade, October 1, 1841 – September 12, 1868.

After the war Harvey Wade married Mary Neely, but she died within a year or two.  Could this have been during childbirth?

After the death of his first wife Harvey married Pauline Mahin.

Naomi M. Wade, October 12, 1873 – January 29,1880.

They were the parents of three children.

Tho’s M. Wade, April 13, 1875 – April 18, 1875.

All three died at less than eight years of age.

Charles D. Wade, June 22, 1877 – January 25, 1882.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

Harvey, D. Wade, February 17, 1836 – September 22, 1911.

Harvey David Wade is buried between his two wives, his children beside their mother Pauline.

Pauline Wade died April 24, 1929.

Pauline Mahin Wade lived an additional 18 years, dying in 1929.

1788 Will of Francis Lucas Jacoby

Francis Lucas Jacoby, born in Germany, came to America about 1764 via England.  Married Frederica Lotspeich, a fellow passenger, in 1764 in London.  The family lived in Culpeper County, Virginia, during the Revolutionary War, in which Francis was part of the militia.  Moved to Kentucky after 1783.

Bourbon County, Kentucky – Will Book A, Pages 8-9

In the name of God, amen.  I, Francis Lucas Jacoby, of the County of Bourbon and State of Virginia, of sound sense and memory, do make, constitute and ordain this my last will and testament, and hereby revoke all and every will heretofore by me made or ordered to be made.  I first desire that all the debts which I justly owe to all men be faithfully paid agreed to contract.  I secondly dispose of my worldly property, both real and personal,in the following manner.  I leave in possession of my beloved wife, Frederica, during her real life, the plantation whereon I now live, with the appurtenances thereon for the purpose of raising my small children.

Item.  It is my will that my hereafter mentioned shall proceed to have all my personal estate, valued immediately after my death.  And after giving my wife her first choice of a part equal to that the estimate be equally made and that each of my following children as respectively come of age and choose shall of my Executor hereafter named the sum such valuation shall amount to provided that no such demand during the natural lifetime of my wife as it is my will that all the property she is to keep for the purpose of raising my small children, be continued in her possession, disposal at will.

Item.  It is my will and desire that my lands be equally as near as may be in value among all my children, viz., Katrina, Elizabeth,

Susanna, Ralph of ?, Frank, Henry, Frederick, Daniel, Betsey, Jacob, Rachel, John and Adam, and that after such division each legatee as they come of age may have full and free possession of such part as shall fall to their respective lot.  I further constitute and appoint as Executor, to this my will for the sole purpose of executing the true intent and meaning thereof, my beloved wife, Frederica, my trusty friends, John Grant and William Butler.  In witness whereof I have set my hand and seal this twenty-seventh day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight.

Francis Lucas Jacoby

Signed in the presence of John Hopper, Joe Mosby, Catherine Butler

At a Court held for Bourbon County at the Courthouse on Tuesday the 15th day of July 1788.

The last will and testament of Francis Lucas Jacoby, deceased, was proved by the oaths of John Hopper and Catherine Butler, witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.  And on the motion of Frederica Jacoby, named and appointed executrix in the last will and testament of Francis Lucas Jacoby, and also John Grant, gentleman, and William Butler, who were also named executors in said will, they having agreeable to law qualified as Executors of said Jacoby, deceased, and together with John Hopper, their security, entered into and acknowledged bond in the penalty of one thousand pounds.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining Probate thereof in due form.

Test. John Edwards, Cl. B. C.

Vanmetre-Hoglan 1783 Marriage Bond – Lincoln County

Another of the very old marriage bonds from Lincoln County.  1783 – Lincoln had been a county for only three years.  In 1790 the census was about 6,500, leaving us to believe it was much less in 1783!

Know all men by these presents that we, Isaac Vanmetre and Andrew Lair, are held and firmly bound unto His Excellency, Benjamin Harrison, Esquire, Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment where of to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our Heirs, Executors and Administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 29th day of July 1783.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Isaac Vanmetre and Martha Hoglan, for which a license has issued.  Now, it there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, the this obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

Isaac Vanmetre, Andrew Lair

Sealed and Delivered in presence of Willis Green.

Is the Death Date Correct?

Oswell B. Dorsey, born January 15, 1818, died March 22, 1854.  Machpelah Cemetery, Mt. Sterling, Montgomery County, Kentucky.

I believe most of us would conclude when looking at an ancestor’s gravestone, that the death date listed would be a good indication of when our loved one died.  Today while looking through photos taken at Machpelah Cemetery in Mount Sterling, Montgomery County, I found that not quite the case.  Not daily, but quite often I add a gravestone photo on my Kentucky Kindred Facebook page.  I chose the stone of Oswell and Virginia Dorsey since, according to the dates on the stone, both died in 1854, about six months apart.  Very unusual for a young couple to pass away so soon after the other.  The detective wheels started turning.

Virginia M., wife of O. B. Dorsey, born February 24, 1824, died September 28, 1854.

I put the two names in ancestry, with the dates of birth and death for Oswell Dorsey.  The first item I looked at was Montgomery County deaths for the year 1854.  Now this is when it got interesting.

According to their gravestone, Oswell died March 22, 1854, and wife Virginia died September 23, 1854.  Looking at the death records that was not the case.  They both died in July of 1854, both of fever and they were cared for by Dr. Benford.  There were quite a few deaths during the month of July – fever, flux and cholera listed as causes of death.  This changed their death dates from six months apart to a few days, possibly the same day.

Other information in the death records gave us the name of their parents.  Oswell was born in Fleming County, the son of John and Nancy Dorsey.  He was a merchant.  Virginia, born in Montgomery County, was the daughter of Edward and Mary Stockton.

Hm.  Next, I checked for a will for Oswell Dorsey.  His will was dated March 22, 1854.  The date on his gravestone.  Since the will wasn’t probated until the October 1854 term of court, it isn’t likely Oswell died the day he wrote it.  According to the will, everything was ‘to be managed and controlled by my friend and brother-in-law, George J. Stockton, for the exclusive use, enjoyment and benefit of my beloved wife, Virginia Dorsey.’  Of course, by the time the will was probated, Virginia Dorsey was dead.

One other reference on Ancestry was made to Genealogies of Kentucky Families Volume I.  I checked my copy and found the Dorsey’s came from Calvert County, Maryland, one group of whom settled in Flemingsburg, Kentucky, which was at that time called Stockton Station.  Larkin Dorsey, whose grandfather was in the Revolution, came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, founder of Stockton Station.

‘Larkin Dorsey, who came to Kentucky with Major George Stockton, married Elizabeth Ingram, in 1780 at Hagerstown, Maryland.  He was born August 24, 1784 [must be 1748], and died February 22, 1822, in Flemingsburg, Kentucky.  He was a cadet in the 9th company of Light Infantry, January 3, 1776.  Commissioned Ensign in Army, June 18, 1778.  His children were:  Edward, John, Joshua, Rachel, Sarah, Robert, Amelia and Joseph.

‘John Dorsey married Nancy Spiers, Edward – Juliet McDowell, Joshua – Nancy Williams and Milly Alexander, Rachel – C. V. Anderson, Sarah – Thomas Wallace, Robert died in infancy, Amelia – Thomas Andrews and Joseph married Mary Wheatley and Ann Threlkeld.

‘The children of John Dorsey, who was born April 19, 1783, and died November 5, 1847, were – Oswell Burns Dorsey, Elizabeth Ingram Dorsey, Martha Ann Dorsey, Thomas Andrew Dorsey, John Edmondson Dorsey, Rachel Anderson Dorsey, Robert Stockton and Jeremiah Spiers Dorsey.’

Virginia Stockton Dorsey was a descendant of Major George Stockton, in whose company Larkin Dorsey came to Kentucky.  George Stockton married Larkin Dorsey’s sister, Rachel Dorsey; their son Edward Stockton married Mary Allin Jouett (of the Mercer County families of those names).  George Jouett Stockton and Virginia Margaret Stockton were two of their children.

In conclusion we can say the dates on the gravestone for Oswell and Virginia Stockton Dorsey are incorrect – but why?  If we look a little closer to the death records for Montgomery County for 1854, we find that George J. Stockton is listed just under the name of Virginia Dorsey.  George is listed as 40, a merchant (were he and Oswell Dorsey business partners as well as brothers-in-law?), parents were Edward and Mary Stockton (same as Virginia) and he died of cholera, cared for by Dr. Nelson.  Under his name is William Stockton, 14, son of George and Gusta [Augusta] Ann Stockton, who also died of cholera.  And below his name is Gusta A. Stockton, 36, daughter of Francis Somersall, who died of fever.  Oswell and Virginia Dorsey had no children.  George and Augusta Stockton had four – William Edward who died in 1854 with his parents, Robert Henry, Mary Somersall Stockton and Augusta George Stockton, who was born in February of 1854, a babe of five months when her parents died, and who lived just until the age of three.  With so many deaths in one family, it was quite likely several years before gravestones were purchased.  This could have led to the mix-up in death dates.  Always check several sources, if possible.