Wilson-Lindsey 1863 Marriage Bond

Marion County was formed from Washington County in 1834, so earlier records will be found there.  During the Civil War, John Hunt Morgan and his raiders came through Marion County in 1863, and during the Battle of Lebanon, his brother, Lt. Tom Morgan was killed.  In retribution much of the town of Lebanon was torched, including the courthouse where the historical records went up in flames.  This occurred July 5, 1863.  This marriage bond is one of the first recorded after that date.

Marriage Bond
The Commonwealth of Kentucky

Be it known, that we, Fletcher Wilson as principal, and John R. Thomas as surety, are jointly and severally bound to the Commonwealth of Kentucky, in the sum of one hundred dollars.

The Condition of This Bond is as follows:

That, whereas Marriage is intended to be solemnized between the above bound Fletcher Wilson and Catherine H. Lindsey.  Now, if there is no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage, this bond shall be void, otherwise it shall remain in full force and effect.

Dated at Lebanon, Marion County, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson, J. R. Thomas

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk, Marion County Court

  1. Date of marriage – Wednesday, September 23rd
  2. Name of groom – Fletcher Wilson
  3. Residence of groom – Marion County
  4. Age of groom – thirty-seven years
  5. No. of marriage of groom – second time
  6. Occupation – farmer
  7. Birth-place of groom – Washington County, Kentucky
  8. Birth-place of groom’s father – Washington County, Kentucky
  9. Birth-place of groom’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  10. Name of bride – Catherine H. Lindsey
  11. Residence of bride – Marion County
  12. Age of bride – thirty-eight years
  13. No. of marriage of bride – first time
  14. Birth-place of bride – Washington County, Kentucky
  15. Birth-place of bride’s father – U.S.
  16. Birth-place of bride’s mother – Washington County, Kentucky
  17. Remarks, bride’s consent proven by oath of J. R. Thomas

To be married at the residence of the bride on 23rd day of September 1863.

I certify that the above is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.  Witness my hand, this 22nd day of September 1863.

Fletcher Wilson

Attest:  John R. Wheat, Deputy Clerk

 

Revolutionary War Veterans In Hardin County

From Two Centuries in Elizabethtown and Hardin County Kentucky 1776-1976, by Daniel Elmo McClure, Jr., we find mention of many, many Revolutionary War veterans that settled in Hardin County.  The following excerpt names just a few.

Kentucky is said to have been settled by a greater proportion of Revolutionary War veterans than any other state west of the original thirteen colonies, and Hardin County shared in the great influx of those hardy men.  Two centuries of time and the incomplete records of that period render difficult any attempts at this time to list all of the old soldiers who came to what is now Hardin County.

Some names are recorded in military records, land grants and pension lists; however, many of the veterans did not apply for pensions, feeling they had only done their duty as citizens and patriots.  The writer recognizes that the following list of Revolutionary veterans is only a partial record and does not have the names of many who served during the long struggle.  In fact, many settlers came into the territory long before the war’s final battle at Yorktown.

Isaac Van Meter was born February 2, 1759, and died November 4, 1840, in Grayson County.  He enlisted in western Pennsylvania in 1778 as a private under Captain William Harrod and Colonel George Rogers Clark, served six months under Harrod, served six weeks in 1780 under Captain John Swan, was under Colonel Lynn in the fall of 1782, and later under Captain John Vertrees and Colonel John Floyd.  He was at Kaskaskia, Vincennes, Chillicothetown and Piqua in the Campaign in the Northwest.

Edward Rawlings, who married Rebecca Van Meter, served in the Revolutionary Army before coming to Elizabethtown.  He was born in 1745, and died in 1796.

Isaac Vertrees, born April 15, 1755, a son of Jacob Vertrees, who with his brother, John, fled from France to America, was a private and fought in the Battle of Brandywine, Pennsylvania, and at Boundbrook.  He died in Meade County in 1822.  John rose to the rank of captain and later settled in Elizabethtown.  Isaac served in the8th Regiment of Pennsylvania Line.

General John Thomas, who rose to major general in the War of 1812, was a captain in the Revolution.

Captain John Vertrees (family name was originally Van Tress) fought at the Battle of King’s Mountain, October 7, 1780.  Prior to that he was one of the 175 Virginia volunteers of George Rogers Clark called by the Indians ‘the Long Knives’ in the campaign of the Northwest.  He took up 1,300 acres of land in Severn’s Valley under Virginia land warrants in 1781.  He died in Elizabethtown in 1803.

Captain John Swan, whose wife was Elizabeth Van Meter, was killed by Indians on the Ohio River enroute to Kentucky.

Colonel Francis Slaughter, who died in Elizabethtown in 1805, was a native of Essex County, Virginia.  Another record shows his birth as 1730 in Culpeper County, Virginia.

Captain Thomas Helm, one of the settlers who built the three forts at the site of Elizabethtown in the fall of 1780, was a lieutenant in the Colonial Army, and was a native of Virginia.

Samuel Haycraft, Sr., another of the builders of forts at Elizabethtown, was likewise a veteran of the Revolution.

Colonel Andrew Hynes, the third builder of a fort in Severn’s Valley, saw Revolutionary service.

 

William B. and Mary Angeline Handley

 Mary A., wife of W. B. Handley, born August 23, 1840, died December 28, 1930.  William B. Handley, born January 24, 1836, died December 24, 1904.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 25, 1904

An Aged Citizen Dies – W. B. Handley, Ill Only Three Days At St. Lawrence

W. B. Handley, sixty-eight years of age, died at his home at St. Lawrence, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon  He had been ill for only three days of pneumonia.  The funeral will be held from St. Martin (s/b St. Lawrence) Church at 8 o’clock Monday morning, and interment will be made in the church cemetery.  He is survived by a widow and three children.  They are Mrs. Kate Wood, Mrs. Belle Connor and Mrs. Annie Henning.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 27, 1904

Knottsville – Mr. W. B. Handley, one of the most prominent and highly esteemed citizens of the eastern part of the county, was buried from St. Lawrence Church Monday morning at 9 o’clock.  Father Clements paid a most eloquent tribute to his character as a father, a husband, a citizen and a Christian.  Mr. Handley was in his sixty-ninth year and is survived by his wife and three daughters, Mrs. J. W. Wood, of Owensboro; Mrs. Lee Henning and Mrs. Thomas Connor, of St. Lawrence.  Mrs. J. C. Blandford, of West Louisville, was a sister.  he was stricken with pneumonia on Tuesday afternoon and died the following Saturday at 4 o’clock.

William B. Handley married Mary Angeline Russell in 1860.  The couple had eight children, two boys who died as infants, Martin Kendrick and Charles J., and six girls – Mary Catherine, Isabella Florence, Anna Elizabeth, Rosa Alice, Maria Josephine and Ida J.  Josephine died in 1892 at the age of 17, and Ida died in 1900 at the age of 22.  Rosa died in 1903, aged 32; I’m not sure if she married.  Three married daughters are survivors at the time of their father’s death in 1904.  However, two of those sisters died in 1906 – Mary Catherine Handley Wood, September 9th, of complications of diseases, leaving five children; and Anna Elizabeth Handley Henning, November 18th, of typhoid; she left three children.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1930

Mrs. William B. Handley – Mrs. Mary Angeline Handley, 90 years old, the oldest and one of the best-known women of the St. Lawrence section, died at 11:45 o’clock, Sunday night.  Mrs. Handley had exceptionally good health until a week ago when she contracted bronchial pneumonia.  She was born at Lebanon, Kentucky, August 23, 1840, the daughter of Joseph and Catherine Russell.  In 1861, she was married to the late Esq. William Handley, and to this union eight children were born, all deceased.  she is survived by eleven grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren.  For the past ten years, Mrs. Handley made her home with her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Henderson.  The funeral will be held at 9 o’clock this morning at St. Lawrence Catholic Church with a Requiem High Mass offered by Rev. F. X. Laemmle.  Burial will be in the church cemetery.

Joseph and Catherine Russell, parents of Mary Angeline Russell Handley, are buried in St. Charles Catholic Cemetery in Marion County.

Ben Hardin – Famous Lawyer of Bardstown

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Tuesday Morning, December 18, 1900

Historic

Former Residence of Old Ben Hardin

In Suburbs of Bardstown

The Place Where The Famous Lawyer Lived and Died

[Bardstown Record]

One of Kentucky’s historic residences is ‘Edgewood,’ the former home of Ben Hardin, in his day one of Kentucky’s greatest lawyers.  This old homestead is situated in the suburbs of Bardstown, and is a large and irregular structure built entirely of brick.  It was originally a one-storied building, with two rooms in front.  To this an addition was made on the left, comprising a wide hall and front room and chambers in rear with similar apartments above.  These added rooms and the hall are unusually large and airy.  The hall is entered by a large door in front, and contains a massive old-fashioned staircase, connecting with the upper story.  The present occupant, Hon. Lud. McKay, has added a handsome veranda to the house, which greatly improves its general appearance.

This dwelling was erected between 1819-1822 by Mr. Hardin on land that was contained in the original pre-emption of Bardstown.  The tract contains about two hundred and fifty acres of as fine soil as there is in Nelson County.  A wide lawn in front of the residence stretches down to one of the streets of the town, and is liberally shaded with a fine growth of forest trees.

Ben Hardin, who erected and long occupied the residence, was born in Pennsylvania, February 29, 1784, and at the age of four years was brought to Kentucky by his parents, who settled in Nelson County.  At an early age he was placed in the school of Dr. Priestly, then the most able educator in the West.  At the age of twenty, young Hardin began the study of law, which he soon mastered and was admitted to the bar of Bardstown.  His first case was one in which a large tract of land was involved.  He was alone on his side and opposed by several of the most distinguished lawyers of the day.  However, he won his case and his fame was made, and from that time on he never lacked for clients.  Readers of the Standard are familiar with the history of Mr. Hardin; his public services; his numerous debates in Congress with Henry Clay; how he was dubbed the ‘Kitchen Knife’ by John Randolph, and the ‘Red Fox’ by some other equally as great man.  Suffice it to say that he was one of the shrewdest and most successful attorneys that ever practiced his profession within the domains of this old Commonwealth.

In early life Mr. Hardin was married to Elizabeth Barbour, daughter of Col. Ambrose Barbour, of Washington County, one of Kentucky’s most distinguished pioneers.  She is described as a handsome woman, with many admirable traits of character.  Seven children were the result of this union – three sons and four daughters.

The latter were Lucinda, who married John Helm, afterward Governor of Kentucky; Emily, who married Dr. Palmer, a prominent physician of Washington County; Kate, who married Thomas Riley, a prominent attorney of Bardstown, and Sallie, who married Thomas W. Dixon, a Kentuckian living in the West.  Of the sons, William died of a fever in childhood; James and Rowan married in early life – the former a Miss Chinn; the latter a Miss Cartmell.  James died a short time after his marriage.  Rowan became an able lawyer; served in the State Legislature, and in 1851 was appointed by President Fillmore Secretary of Legation to Guatemala.  During the year it is supposed he was assassinated in the mountains of the Isthmus of Darien, as a skeleton was discovered and identified as his by some papers that were found in the vicinity.

Old Ben Hardin’s home life was always a happy one.  His doors were always open, and he dispensed the most lavish hospitality to all who came beneath his roof.  Many distinguished men were entertained by him at his residence, among whom may be mentioned Gen. William Preston, ex-Senator Garland, Bishop Kavanaugh, Judge John Rowan, gov. William Duvall, and many others who afterward became men of national reputation.  Mr. Hardin’s death occurred in September 1852, and was the result of a fall from a horse which he received as he was journeying from Bardstown to Lebanon to attend court.  He was buried in an old grave yard in a field near the pike leading from Springfield to Lebanon, by the side of his mother.  His grave is marked by an unpretentious stone bearing the simple inscription: ‘Ben Hardin, of Bardstown.’  Mrs. Hardin had preceded her husband to the grave in August, her death being hastened by constant attendance upon Mr. Hardin.  She is buried in the old pioneer cemetery here, in the midst of children and relatives.  A marble shaft, that has been sadly disfigured by vandals, marks her last resting place.  The only inscription is bears is ‘Elizabeth Barbour Hardin, wife of Ben Hardin.’

Ritchey and I have visited the Pioneer Cemetery in Bardstown, but we did not see a stone for Elizabeth Barbour Hardin.

Before The War

This was a newspaper column published in The Springfield Sun in 1926.

Before The War was a newspaper column devoted to gleanings from the lives of citizens of Springfield and Washington County before the War Between the States.

Editor’s Note:  This column will appear as a weekly Sun feature.  Our readers are invited to send copies of old letters, newspaper clippings, or data of historical nature for publication.  The only requirement is that all material sent must apply to events in the lives of citizens of Springfield or Washington County previous to the War Between the States, which began in 1861.

Pottsville Ahoy!

The following advertisement appeared in the Lebanon (KY) Post.  Issue of March 22, 1854:  Notice – The undersigned will at the May term of the Washington County Court move said Court to establish a town on the land where Pottsville is now situated, in Washington County, as shown by a survey and plat now filed in the County Clerk’s office of Washington County, and shall ask the appointment of Trustees, etc.  The boundary of the town will be seen by reference to plat.  This 20th day of February 1854 – William Burns, Johnson Stumph, Samuel Burns, William Spraggins, William Thurman, Henry Pope, Spence & Hord, J. W. Pope, James Burns, R. Jones, George Campbell, M. Martin, William Worshaw.

Time Have Speeded [sic] Up

In 1854 it took two days to get a letter from Springfield to Louisville, and three days from Lebanon to Louisville.  Starting a letter from Lebanon on Monday 12 12 o’clock, it would reach Springfield at 2, where it remained until the next day until 3, at which hour it would move on to Bardstown, and arrive there at 6.  At 10 p.m. it would leave there and arrive in Louisville at 6 o’clock on Wednesday morning.  This schedule, of course, depended upon good time and no delays.

Fire At James Clements

The farm house of James Clements, situated two miles from Springfield, was burned to the ground Sunday morning, April 9, 1854.  The family were absent at church, and when they returned in the evening, they found their dwelling house a heap of smoldering ruin.  It was believed that a hired servant, who had been left in charge, set it on fire.  This was, truly, an unfortunate circumstance as Mr. Clements, a few months before, had let to the altar a fair bride.

Small Child Burned

A small child of Mr. C. Cunningham, of Springfield, got badly scalded on Monday, April 17, 1854, by the overturning of a kettle of boiling water in its lap.  Instant medical care was given the little tot and it was soon out of danger.

Cholera In Springfield

This dread disease raged in Springfield in 1854, and there were ten or more deaths reported by the middle of June.  Citizens were frantic, and many deserted the place.  Warnings to be careful of their diet were issued to the town’s residents.  Cherries and other unhealthy fruit, as well as unripe vegetables, were to be shunned as one would poison.

Died

At his residence in Washington County on Tuesday, the 15th of August 1854, Mr. J. T. Hamilton, after a long and painful illness.  He was a member of the Catholic Church.

Heavy Rain

There was a very heavy rain in the neighborhood of Springfield on Tuesday evening, September 19, 1854.  Old timers could not remember when the community had before been visited by such a veritable cloud burst.  The creeks and branches ran in torrents, even sweeping away fences in places.

Prominent Lawyer Dies

George C. Thurman, Esq., departed this life at 9 o’clock Saturday, September 30, 1854, at his home in Springfield.  He was an excellent lawyer, and a clever, warm-hearted gentleman.  He was attacked by an immense carbuncle between his shoulders, but a week or so before he died, which defied all the acknowledged medical skill which was called to his beside.

Taken from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, Cook.

Adorable Stairsteps

I have the cutest photo to share with you today!  Fourteen children evidently born one just after the other!  Can you imagine all those little boots lined up at night!  The oldest is possibly fifteen or sixteen – the others are stairsteps down the line to the infant held by one of the girls.  All the older children are girls – it is always harder to tell with the little ones since they were usually dressed the same from about three or four and younger.  Do you think their mother made their clothes?

This is a postcard photo.  On back, in the area where it says ‘Place stamp here’, in the corners around it are four triangles, face up, with AZO in lettering, on each side, between the triangles.  This actually tells the postcard stock used.  This particular paper was from Eastman Kodak, and was used for 1904-1918.

What a wonderful glimpse of a bygone era!

Woosley Family of Butler County

Today I would like to share information about the Woosley family, originally of Edmonson County, later Butler County.  The Woosley Cemetery is in the most northeastern tip of Butler County, on Hwy 411, near the small community of Decker.  The two oldest graves for the Woosley family are those of Curtis and Elizabeth Jones Woosley.  And that is where we begin our story.

Curtis Woosley is the son of Samuel Woosley, 1802-1865, and Rebecca Blakley, 1808-1890.  In the 1850 census of Edmonson County Samuel and Rebecca are listed as 47 and 43, respectively.  Children listed were Curtis, 17; George, 15; Samuel, 12; Thomas J., 10; and Martha J., 8.  Another individual living in the household is David Woosley, 75, who was born in Virginia.  Quite possibly this is Samuel’s father.  Samuel and Rebecca Blakley Woosley are buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Edmonson County.

Curtis B., husband of Elizabeth Woosley, January 26, 1833 – June 13, 1906.  Woosley Cemetery, Butler County, Kentucky.  ‘He died as he lived – a Christian.’

Curtis Woosley must have been the first of his family to move to Butler County.  We find him there in 1880 with the following children – James S., 24; Winston D., 20; Rody K., 17; Joseph L., 17; Jacob D., 13; Arpy S., 11; and Reason A., 6.  Son John H. Woosley was listed next in the census, 26; with wife Kitty E., 20; and children Solomon, 1; and William B., 7/12.  Son Thomas Jefferson Woosley was listed next, 22, with wife Louisa, 19, and baby son William A., 8/12.  Unfortunately, Louisa A. Cummins Woosley, died the next year.

Elizabeth, wife of C. B. Woosley, October 4, 1830 – July 26, 1918.  ‘A tender mother and a faithful friend.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley next married Dora Alice Wilson, daughter of Solomon and Polly Wilson, with whom he had Estella Pearl, 1885-1918; Rebecca, 1887-1891; Thomas, 1888-1889; McCary Fieldon, 1896-1983; and Janie Alice, 1898-1953.  The 1900 census of Butler County reveals two additional daughters – Willie C., 10; and Polly, 7.  I think one of the most confusing parts of the census is names – in one census the child was called by his first name, the next census he was called by his middle name – or sometimes a nickname!  I try to match ages – how old would that child be ten years from 1880?  That is not an exact science since parents could confuse ages and make the child a little older or a bit younger.  But we try!

Dora A., wife of T. J. Woosley, born April 24, 1862, died April 11, 1907.  ‘Come ye blessed.’

Dora Alice Wilson Woosley died April 11, 1907, age the age of 44, of pneumonia.  Thomas Woosley married Nancy Ann Bryant after her death.  He and Nancy had three children – a son named Goldie, a daughter, Edra, and a son, Clayton.

Nancy Ann Woosley, March 1, 1877 – September 17, 1964.  ‘The Lord is my shepherd.’

Thomas J. Woosley, September 25, 1857 – October 2, 1951.  ‘he was beloved by God and man.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley lived a long life – 94 years!  He is buried in the Woosley Cemetery along with many other members of his family.  In addition to his gravestone, there is a sandstone stile block.  The plaque on the stone reads ‘Handmade by father and son, T. J. Woosley, 1857-1951, W. G. Woosley, 1900-1994.’

Sandstone stile block.

Sandstone stile block from back, between Thomas and Dora Woosley’s gravestones.

I thought this was so impressive – and such a wonderful place to put this stone in the cemetery – otherwise it may be lost and forgotten.  What a wonderful tribute to father and son.  And do you know which son this is?  The one named Goldie in the census!