West-Burdyne 1799 Washington County Marriage Bond and Consent

Know all men by these presents that we, Lewis West and George Edelen, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, the payment of which well and truly to be made, to the said Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 16th day of November 1799.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended between the above bound Lewis West and Elizabeth Burdyne, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then this obligation to be void, else to remain in full force.

Lewis West, George Edelen

Witness, Moses Rice

Mr. Reed, will please issue marriage license for Lewis West to marry Elizabeth Burdyne, my ward.  Given under my hand and seal this 16th day of November 1799.

Elizabeth Burdyne, guardian

Teste.  David Hughes, George Edelen

H. Oliver Willham Obituary

H. Oliver Willham, 1898-1943, U.S. Veteran 1918.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, June 4, 1943

H. Oliver Willham, age 44, died Saturday, May 2,1943, at 11:15 p.m. at the U. S. Veterans Hospital, Leestown Pike, Lexington, Ky. He had been in ill health four months before being taken to the hospital two months ago. He was the son of W. W. Willham and Nancy McFatridge Willham, and was born and reared in Washington County, Ky. Twenty years ago he moved to Harrodsburg and for the past eighteen years has been bookkeeper at the State Bank & Trust Co. He was also a director of the bank, a deacon in the United Presbyterian Church, member of the Pathfinders’ Bible class of that church and belonged to the Douglas Laws Post No. 52 of the American Legion. He was a fine citizen, popular with everyone.

Surviving him are his wife, Mrs. Jewell Hiatt Willham, son Billy Willham and parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Willham all of Harrodsburg. Two uncles, Isaac Willham, Cornishville; George B. Willham, Randelett, Okla.; six cousins, Miss Ruby Willham, Cornishville; Mrs. S. D. McCray, Lexington; Mrs. Charles T. Hopkins, Lexington; Mrs. E. C. Hollingshead, Sharon, Pa.; Oliver S. Willham, Stillwater, Okla.; and Mrs. Clyde McLaughlin, Clearwater, Kansas.

The funeral services were Tuesday afternoon, June 1, at 3 o’clock at the United Presbyterian church, conducted by his pastor, Dr. John W. Carpenter, assisted by Dr. G. Whitcomb Ellers of the Baptist church; the Rev. T. Hassell Bowen, Christian church, and the Rev. Clarence Krebs, Methodist church. Burial in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Active bearers were Joe Sandusky, I. C. James, John Devine, Charles A. Davis, J. Donald Edwards and Richard Corman.

Honorary bearers — V. B. Carter, Judge Charles A. Hardin, George W. Edwards, C. B. Sullivan, Sr., W. B. Keightley, W. H. Keightley, J. D. Baxter, Sr., Lawrence Walker, W. Glenn Keightley, Edwin Whitenack, Dr. R. H. Selleck, James Burton Ison, P. B. Smalley, Oran Stagg, H. C. Bohon, J. I. Peter, Glave Vivion, Ralph Davenport, J. W. Finnell, William Sims, David Walter, W. B. Morris, Garnett Dean, Gilbert Isham, J. K. Powell, Leon Morgan, Willard Gabhart, E. H. Helwig, W. B. Purdom, Clarence Tewmey, A. T. Woods, Nelson Marsee, Charles Matherly and R. L. Cull, J. E. Brown.

1796 Will of Joshua Blanton of Garrard County

Joshua Blanton came to Kentucky from Prince Edward County, Virginia.  In the 1790 census of that county, he was listed with ‘fourteen white souls’, one dwelling and five other buildings. 

Daughter Betsy married Lewis Hawks 22 September 1786 in Prince Edward County.  Fanny married William Blanton (a cousin ?) 2 May 1798 in Garrard County.  Elijah married Mary McKee 16 September 1813 in Jessamine County.  Jesse married Sarah Cozine 28 October 1800 in Shelby County.  Son Joshua married Elizabeth Nelson 25 April 1795 in Mercer County.

Garrard County Will Book A, Pages 4-5

In the name of God, amen.  I, Joshua Blanton, of Mercer County and State of Kentucky, of sound memory, do make this my last will and testament.

Item.  I lend to my wife, Lucy Blanton, the land whereon I now live, with all the negroes, stock and household furniture that I may die possessed of, with all other of my property that may be on the said plat at my death.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my sons, Jesse, Joshua and Billy, my tract of land lying in Jefferson County of one hundred and twenty-seven acres, to be equally divided between them, said sons Jesse, Joshua and Billy.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son Elijah the land whereon I now live at the death of my wife, Lucy.

Item.  I give to my son John five shillings.  All the other property that may be at the death of my wife I give to my daughters – Amy, Polly, Diny, Betsy, Fanny, Nancy and Patsy, to be divided between the said daughters, with a deduction to Betsy of thirty-five pounds which I have

Before given her as also twenty pounds to Lucy before given in part of their portions.

I appoint my wife Lucy Blanton, my son, Joshua Blanton and my friends Lewis Hawks and James Speed to be Executrix and Executors of this my last will and testament.  All my just debts are to be paid immediately after my death and the money left to be divided between my daughters that have received no part of their portion.

In witness whereof, I hereunto set my hand and seal this 21st day of July one thousand seven hundred and ninety-six.

Joshua Y. Blanton

Witnesses – Polly S. Hopkins, Cumberland Hart, Henry Speed

At a court held for the County of Garrard at the court house on Monday the 7th August 1796, the last will and testament of Joshua Blanton, deceased, was proved by the oath of Cumberland Hart and Henry Speed, witnesses thereto and it is ordered to be recorded.

Missourian with Kentucky Ties – Marriage and Death

The Washington Herald, Washington, D.C.

Wednesday, June 24, 1908

James W. Zevely Weds

Former Washingtonian Takes Miss Janie Clay as Bride

Mexico, Missouri, June 23 – Miss Janie Clay, the only daughter of Col. and Mrs. Green Clay, of Mexico, and James William Zevely, of Muskogee, Oklahoma, were married at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church here tonight.  The ceremony was performed by Rev. Leslie M. Potter, of Kirkwood, Missouri, and was witnessed by about 200 guests, many of whom were from other states.

Miss Clay is a tall, slender blonde of pronounced beautify, a graduate of an Eastern college, and an expert horsewoman.

She is a member of an old Southern family, and her father, Col. Green Clay, has served in the Missouri senate on two different occasions.

Mr. Zevely was special agent of Indian Affairs for the Interior Department under ex-Gov. Francis, and was reappointed.  He also served as Missouri State Librarian.  He is now a practicing attorney of Muskogee.

Among the guests were Samuel G. Blythe, of Washington, and Louis Seibold, of The New York World.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 22, 1912

A great number of newspapers in Oklahoma and the adjoining states have been boosting Col. J. W. Zevely, of this city, for the position of Secretary of the Interior.  Col. Zevely is a Missourian, but is by marriage a Kentuckian, having married, some four years ago, Miss Clay, daughter of Green Clay, from Paris, Kentucky, and Mexico, and a niece of Ezekiel Clay, one of the best-known men in the Bluegrass.

Mrs. Zevely and the Colonel spend much of their time in Kentucky, and Mrs. Zevely never lets a summer go by without making a visit to her Kentucky relatives.  As Miss Janie Clay she was as well known as any of the Kentucky girls, and was always counted as one of the ‘fair daughters of Bourbon County.’

Besides having married a Kentucky, Col. Zevely has been for years the law partner of James M. Givens, born and reared in western Kentucky, and is perhaps closer to him, personally and politically, than any man living.

William Clay Zevely, January 29, 1911 – May 7, 1922.  ‘A perfect soul asleep.’  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

The Washington Post, Washington, D.C.

Monday, May 8, 1922

Col. J. W. Zevely’s Son Dead

Funeral Tomorrow at Paris, Ky., Grandson of Senator Clay

William Clay Zevely, son of Col. J. W. Zevely, 2029 Connecticut Avenue, died yesterday at the Children’s Hospital, where he had undergone an operation for mastoiditis.  Col. And Mrs. Zevely will leave with the body at 4:35 this afternoon for Paris, Kentucky, where the funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon.  Interment will be at Runnymede, the old homestead near Paris of Mrs. Zevely’s father, the late Senator Green Clay, of Mexico, Missouri.

The Zevely’s are both natives of Missouri, but they have homes at Muskogee, Oklahoma, and in Washington.

James William Zevely, October 8, 1861 – June 10, 1927.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, June 12, 1927

Buried In Paris

Attorney to Harry F. Sinclair Dies at Home in East Hampton, L. I.

New York, June 11 – Funeral services for Col. James W. Zevely, 66 years old, will be held at Paris, Kentucky, it was learned today.  Colonel Zevely, personal attorney to Harry F. Sinclair, died at his home in East Hampton, Long Island, last night.  Burial will be beside the body of his son, Billy, 10, who died three years ago.  Mrs. Zevely, a daughter, Miss Jane Clay Zevely, and Earl W. Sinclair were at his bedside when Colonel Zevely died.  Mr. Sinclair arrived after his death.

The body is to be placed aboard Mr. Sinclair’s private car, Sinco, and is to leave for New York City tonight.  The car is to leave Now York tomorrow morning for Kentucky.  Mrs. Zevely and her daughter, Harry F. Sinclair and his brother are to accompany the body to Paris.

Born in Linn, Missouri, he received his education in the public schools, the Christian Brothers’ College in St. Louis and the University of Virginia.  Following his graduation from the Virginia University he was appointed Missouri State Librarian.  He began his activity in politics in 1888, when he was elected secretary of the Missouri Democratic Committee.

Colonel Zevely was admitted to the bar and practiced law in Muskogee, Oklahoma, from 1902 until 1917.  From Oklahoma he went to Washington, later coming to New York.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Wednesday, April 18, 1928

Left Good Estate

Associated Press

New York, April 17 – Col. James W. Zevely, attorney from 1917 for the Sinclair Consolidated Oil Corporation and attorney for Harry F. Sinclair, who thought so much of the Colonel that he named the pride of his stables Zev, left

His entire estate when he died last June 10, to his wife and daughter.

Janie C. Zevely and Jane C. Zevely, who live at No. 1107 Fifth Avenue, share equally in the Zevely holdings, which may exceed $500,000, it was estimated yesterday.  Daniel F. Cohalan of No. 43 Cedar Street, attorney for Mrs. Zevely, was named executor in the will, drawn November 12, 1924, and filed for probate yesterday.

Col. Zevely entered the Teapot Dome spotlight when his ‘loan’ of $25,000 to Albert B. Fall, then Secretary of the Interior became public.  He died in his home at East Hampton, Long Island, and his body was transported in a special train under the guidance of his friend Sinclair to Paris, Kentucky, where burial took place beside the grave of a son, James W. Zevely.

Janie Clay Zevely, February 22, 1886 – October 16, 1976.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

Thomas Kyle – Minister and Revolutionary War Veteran

A few days ago I published some Mercer County marriage returns by a Rev. Thomas Kyle.  I have found that he was also a Revolutionary War soldier, and is buried in the Old Mud Cemetery, along with many other veterans.  Thomas Kyle was a son of James Kyle and Mary McArthur, of Pennsylvania.  At the young age of seventeen he joined the Revolutionary army and fought in many battles.  He came to Kentucky about 1800.  The following is his request for pension for his military service.

State of Kentucky – Mercer County Court

On this 6th day of May 1833 personally appeared in open court Thomas Kyle, Sr., a resident citizen and clergyman in Mercer County and State of Kentucky, aged seventy-five years, who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declarations in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832.

That he left home in July 1775, then in his seventeenth year, and entered the army at Bunker Hill and in a very short time thereafter we fought the battle, this was his own voluntary act, he belongs to no particular detachment in this battle, he then remained with the main army until the Battle of Long Island when I became detached to General Putnam and rode as an express for him until the Battle of White Springs, after which we were driven out of the York State and through the Jersey State across the Delaware into Pennsylvania, when we received reinforcements and re-crossed the Delaware and came up with the Hessians at Trenton and defeated them with dreadful loss, and in a few days after we defeated the British at Princeton from which place we marched to Kingston and tore up the bridge and got to Somerset that night and the next morning we drew rations the first that we had got for three days.  General Washington then went into winter quarters with the main army at Morristown and Putnam with his detachment at Princeton.  Then I returned home to rest and get some clothing.  And in the winter of 1777, I volunteered for a militia tour under my friend and acquaintance Captain James Gibson of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and marched to Philadelphia and got our arms repaired and from thence we marched to Princeton and I saw General Putnam whose headquarters was in a Stockton brick house, and remained with him upwards of

four months when we were honorably discharged by General Putnam from his brigade, and we returned home.  The British having come around and landed at the head of Elkton and marched in the direction of Brandywine.  I without delay joined the detachment of General Armstrong and marched and we met the enemy at Brandywine when we were defeated.  I remained with the army until after the Battle of Germantown, both which battles were fought in 1777, after which I returned home, and in the year aforesaid, I cannot recollect the month, I joined Captain Crouch’s Company of volunteers and served a militia tour of three months during this tour we were marched to a place called White March Mills above Germantown, from this place we marched under General Irvine and attacked the British at Chestnut Hill and were defeated with the loss of General Irvine taken prisoner and 15 or 20 killed and wounded and we retreated into this country and our tour of three months having expired we were discharged at Lancaster in Pennsylvania and returned home.  And in the year 1778 or 9, I cannot recollect which, I volunteered with Captains Brady and Campleton and marched up the western branch of the Susquehanna, when the Indians had broke out and were committing murders and depredations upon the inhabitants and succeeded in rescuing the inhabitants.  During this time we suffered very much being exposed to all kinds of weather.  Again in the year 1779 I volunteered and under Captain Campleton a tour of three months our principal station was at Wallace Mills.  We marched up the eastern branch of the Susquehanna and acted as security and spies against the Indians and built stockades and block houses and gathered in the inhabitants.  He states that he would have had sufficient evidence of his service during the War of the Revolution, but he met with the

loss of having his house burned up together with money and papers he will recollect of having his discharges filed away in his desk, and that he has no documentary evidence of his service.  He hereby relinquishes every other claim whatever to a pension except this present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Thomas Kyle

We, Jesse Head, a clergyman residing in Mercer County, and Peter Huff, residing in the same county and state, do hereby certify that we are well acquainted with Thomas Kyle, a faithful and pious clergyman, who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that we believe him to be the age he states himself to be in his declaration, and we do know that he is respected and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a brave and faithful soldier of the Revolution.

Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid.

Jesse Head, Peter Huff

Mercer County May County Court 1833

And the said Court do hereby declare this a pension after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogation prescribed by the War Department that the above named application was a Revolutionary soldier and served as he states and that the Court further certifies that it appears to them that Jesse Head, who has signed the preceding certificate is a clergyman resident in Mercer County and that Peter Huff, who has also signed the same is a resident citizen in said county and is a credible person and that their statement is entitled to credit, and we do further certify that Thomas Kyle, the applicant for a pension herein, and Jesse Head, a clergyman, and Peter Huff, severally came into Court and swore to the statements by them respectively subscribed.

I, Thomas Allin Jr., Clerk of the Mercer County Court, do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original proceedings of the said Court in the matter of the application of Thomas Kyle for a pension.

In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal of office this 6th day of May 1833.  Thomas Allin, Jr., Clerk Mercer County Court


Statement shewing the service of Thomas Kyle, Mercer County Kentucky

Entered July 1775, private, given one year of service.  Fought during the battles of bunker Hill, Long Island, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine and Germantown.

Thomas Kyle, Private, General Putnam’s Brigade, Pennsylvania Line, Revolutionary War.  1757-1846.  Bunker Hill, Trenton, Germantown.  Old Mud Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Graham Springs – Famous Waters Bring Many To Mercer County

Who knew Harrodsburg had the reputation of one of the best mineral springs anywhere around?  Graham Springs and its hotel saw many of important and famous people visit both before the Civil War and after the turn of the 20th century.  It is said its guest registers hold the names of everyone who visited; and one was used in a murder trial in the 1850’s to locate the whereabouts of certain witnesses at the time of the murder.  You guessed it – they were at the Graham Springs Hotel.

Begun in 1820, a large hotel was built in 1843.  In 1853 the property was sold to the US government, and burned in 1865.  In 1911 the idea of the Graham Springs Hotel was reborn with another building, and continued through 1932 when the property was purchased by Glave Goddard.  In 1946 it was decided to build the James B. Haggin Hospital on the site of the Grahm Springs Hotel.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, November 17, 1929

Autumn At Graham Springs

To the Editor of The Courier-Journal

Graham Springs Hotel stands upon a beautiful wooded hilltop overlooking the historic town of Harrodsburg, itself one of the oldest and most famous resort hotels in the South.

Twenty-five acres of almost virgin forestry surround it, in unusual beauty of location, its site superb, and its outlook majestic.  As the changing seasons come and go in Kentucky, they write a progressive record of the sylvan beauty upon these woods that thrill an observer with the sheer loveliness of it.  The bluegrass has a marvelous power of resurrection which no amount of scorching in summer drouths can destroy, and late rains of the fall season have laid an aftermath of tender green upon the sunlit slopes in Graham Springs woods.  Upon walnut trees of unusual size and symmetry dark clumps of mistletoe hang in profusion, their waxen berries turning to pearl in a setting of shimmering dark green leaves.  It is no wonder that the Druids worshipped the mistletoe, with its suggestion of everlasting life!  From oak and elm and walnut trees, brilliant autumn colors are flaunted in the face of on-coming winter, with a brave abandon.  As one by one, scarlet, gold and russet-brown leaves float softly to earth, in the still sunlight, a sense of peace and restfulness falls like soothing balm upon the spirit of anyone who may walk there.

In 1820, Dr. C. C. Graham erected a classic building resembling an old world castle upon these grounds, close to the famous Graham0 Springs, whose marvelous curative waters still attract people in search of health and pleasure.  It does not need a page from the United States Dispensary, which states that, ‘Graham Springs and Saratoga are the only saline waters of true worth to be found in America,’ to convince one who has tasted it.  Many have declared it equal to the waters at Baden-Baden.  Kentucky has an asset in this mineral water which she cannot afford to overlook, and progress will surely present it to the world in the fullest measure.  In 1865, that year of the War Between the States anguish, the old hotel was burned.  Its romantic memories, its charm and prestige, however, which are things of spiritual permanence, still cling about the place.

It was in Harrodsburg that George Rogers Clark planned his famous army for the conquest of the Northwest, in commemoration of which event, Old Fort Harrod has been made a State park.  It was within the hotel grounds that a beautiful pageant, representing the early history of Kentucky, was given in celebration of the centennial anniversary of the founding of Harrodsburg, several years ago.  A priceless old record book of Graham Springs Hotel shows names of men famous in the making of America.  Henry Clay was a frequent guest and left his name upon its register.  Pages might be printed of other famous signatures found there.

Old Dr. Graham himself, with his snow-white beard and princely bearing, was a conspicuous figure in the annals of Kentucky, not only leaving a record of his fame at Graham Springs, but at old Transylvania University at Lexington, where he received his education.  Dr. Ephraim McDowell at Danville, and Dr. C. C. Graham at Harrodsburg were men who measured up to the highest standards in the world’s medical records.  The wise old doctor saw to it that his guests had a full measure of exercise and pleasure as well as curative waters to tone up the human system.  A series of dances were inaugurated at Graham Springs before the War Between the States, which became famous for their brilliancy and aristocratic patronage.  The musicians were colored slaves of Dr. Graham, highly trained and gaily liveried.  The singing of ‘spirituals’ before an audience began, in the old South, upon these occasions.

The grave of the unknown girl who died of a heart attack at one of the balls given at Graham Springs.  Her grave is well-tended today.

To this day the weekly dances at Graham Springs are social events of importance in Kentucky, during the season.  Perhaps a mention of the ante-bellum balls may not be complete without reference to the beautiful ‘Unknown’ who danced so gaily and so long at one of them, that she died of a heart attack on the same summer night.  Her grave, marked first by Dr. Graham, and afterward by the City of Harrodsburg, is shown to tourists who never fail to respond to the pathetic appeal of her story.

Mrs. James Harrod, widow of the hardy old pioneer who founded Harrodsburg, lived to a very old age, and was an honored guest at Graham Springs on the first anniversary celebration held there.

Nancy Lewis Greene, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, January 1, 1942

Where Southern Gentry Met to Freshen, Fatten and Flirt

This article of 1942 talks about the many ‘watering places’ or mineral springs located in Kentucky, and used before the advent of the Civil War.  It is said physicians strongly recommended taking the waters and were advertised as being ‘especially beneficial to persons suffering from diseases of the stomach, live and kidneys, as well as from asthma, gout, dyspepsia, rheumatism, bilious disorders, neuralgia, autumnal fevers and general debility.’  I believe that takes in almost anyone!

In 1803 John Kennedy’s stagecoach lines helped bring patrons from the city to the country where they might take the waters.

At Olympian Springs, in Bath County it was said ‘there was much flirting, sometimes by ‘married charmers, thirsting for universal dominion.’  Disputes between the ladies often involved ‘pillows, bolsters, fingernails and the poignant sarcasm of the tongue,’ and, at time, the dueling pistols of sensitive gentlemen could be heard in a nearby woodland settling ‘affairs of honor.’

‘Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham, veteran of the War of 1812 and “for many years the champion off-hand rifle shot of the world,” purchased the Greenville Springs in 1827, and the following year bought the “Harrodsburg or Sutton Springs” from his father-in-law, Captain David Sutton, for $10,000.  Dr. Graham then combined these two watering places under the name of Harrodsburg or Graham’s Springs.

‘A guest, viewing the Springs in retrospect, said of them: “The walk to the spring before breakfast was very fashionable, a long board-walk covered with tan-bark and shaded with locust trees, their branches meeting and arching overhead the whole distance.  The belles and beaux walked up and down the long portico of the hotel in what seemed to me a fair procession.  The ladies with their beautiful elaborately dressed hair in the New Orleans fashion, as from there we got the styles, and their organdy muslins, which were not then to be bought outside of New Orleans.  The envy of all were the exquisite wide embroidered collars and cuffs worn by the Southern belles.  A score of Creole beauties, prim and particular in their lovely, fleecy, muslin dresses were always present.  The ballroom at night was a scene of enchantment; old Dr. Graham, the proprietor, was the master of ceremonies and the life of the party.”’

It was said that during the summer months of 1833, when the Asiatic cholera was rampant in Kentucky, many came to the springs for healing.  ‘Dr. Graham, at Harrodsburg, announced: “These Springs are perfectly free from the cholera and they never have been otherwise,” and “the many who visited the Springs, from the various cholera districts, with the disease upon them, have all quickly recovered.”’

‘By the middle ‘40’s the watering places of the state were in their heyday.  To keep abreast of the times, Dr. Christopher Graham of Harrodsburg Springs erected an elegant and commodious hotel during the late fall of 1842 and winter of 1843.  This splendid building, costing $30,000, was acclaimed by many to the “the finest edifice in the West.”’

And this July 19, 1851, note in The Courier-Journal gives a rousing description of the dance in the Graham Springs Hotel ball room.  ‘Returning from the ball room, brilliantly illuminated by the sparkling eyes, rivaling the stars in their dazzling brilliancy, methought, if in the cool evening zephyrs that continually fanned my brown, (such were a possibility) to collect, my thoughts scattered in the whirling waltz, to the northern extremity of my brain.  Truly the poet says there’s a “magical influence in the wafted breeze;” but I am afraid (like the charming coquette) she has her favorites, for in spite of all my efforts, my thoughts continue to revert to the ball room!  What a potent charm there is in the dance, and how delightfully sounds the music!’

This popularity of ‘taking the waters’ continued into the early 1850’s.  in 1853 Dr. Graham sold the Springs to the United States Government and it was turned into a military asylum for old and disabled soldiers.

In 1856 the main building burned.  And during the Civil War the buildings that remained were used as a hospital.  After the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862, in Boyle County, the ballroom was used as an operating room.

But the Springs did revive in the early days of the 20th century.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, April 21, 1911

It will be pleasant news to the people of Central Kentucky to learn that the far-famed historical old Graham Springs will be opened as a select summer resort the coming season.  The Cassell mansion, one of the most elegant brick buildings in the Blue Grass has been converted into a choice hotel.  Old fashioned cooking will be provided and food in abundance will be supplied.  The water that pours from Old Graham Springs is the finest in the world and it is a wonder that somebody has not long ago erected a hotel there sufficient to accommodate five hundred guests.  The property is now owned by Mr. Ben C. Allin and Editor T. Sanders Orr has charge of the publicity department.  The water from these springs should be bottled and shipped throughout the country.  Reasonable rates will be made.  Many Danville people will doubtless take advantage of the fine accommodations and benefit themselves by drinking the pure water that made Harrodsburg famous sixty years ago.

This 1923 advertisement for the Graham Springs Hotel touts its ‘tennis, croquet and shady grounds, is located on a high eminence with splendid views and amid beautiful scenery.’  Perhaps this was the first of what today is known as farm-to-table – ‘its table is supplied with the best of foods, old-fashioned cooking, chicken dinners, including pure Jersey milk from our own herd, fresh vegetables and fruit from our own gardens.’

It is also a tourist manual, giving ideas for outings in the surrounding country – ‘beautiful and full of historic interest.  The roads are ideal for riding, driving and motoring and short excursions may be made to the site of the old fort, to Daniel Boone’s Cave, High Bridge, Shakertown, Perryville Battlefield and other points of interest.’

This photo was taken during those early days of the 20th century.

This is what the area looks like today.

Patterson – Vanarsdall Marriage License and Certificate

This may also be of interest to those researching the Rose family.

Marriage License

The Commonwealth of Kentucky, To any Minister of the Gospel, or other Person legally authorized to solemnize Matrimony.

You are permitted to solemnize the Rites of Matrimony between Garret W. Patterson and Cynthia E. Vanarsdall, the requirements of the law having been complied with.

Witness my signature as Clerk of Mercer County Court, this 1st day of January 1866. C. R. Allin, Clerk

Marriage Certificate

This is to Certify, that on the second day of January 1866, the Rites of Marriage were legally solemnized by me, between Garret W. Patterson and Cynthia E. Vanarsdall, at Henry Vanarsdall’s, in the County of Mercer in the presence of Smith Rose and John Rose.

Signed, L. Marrett