Tag Archives: Civil War

Honoring a Civil War Veteran on Memorial Day In 2009

James Carr Potts, Private, Co. C, 14th Regiment Kentucky Cavalry.  December 12, 1830 – December 27, 1894.  Powell’s Valley Baptist Cemetery, Powell County, Kentucky.

This story makes me so happy!  Every veteran deserves a gravestone to mark his/her final resting place.

May 28, 2009

Family strives and succeeds in honoring a Civil War veteran

By James Cook, Citizen’s Voice & Time Editor

The Memorial Day holiday has special meaning to everyone who has lost a loved one. It has even deeper feelings for those who have lost someone who served this nation in the military. Parades, military bands and grand speeches fill the air to honor those brave men and women, who have fought and died for our freedoms. But imagine being forgotten.
The family of a local Civil War veteran felt as if their loved one may have been overlooked and decided to rectify that problem. But it did not come easily.
The final resting place of James Carr Potts is located on the small side of the Powell’s Valley Baptist Church Cemetery. He passed away on Dec. 27, 1894, just 15 days after he turned 64. Next to his gravesite is that of his second wife Susan Adams Potts, whose headstone shows the signs of aging as she was laid to rest in 1901. But for over 120 years Private Potts of the Kentucky Cavalry, Company C, 14th Regiment, did not even have a marker. All that changed Memorial Day weekend as family from Texas to Ohio to Florida came in to honor the man, as well as family and friends from Powell County who were also on hand.
“They were so poor and had so little, ” Pott’s great granddaughter Wilma Potts Delaney said as she watched family and friends gather at the cemetery for a special ceremony last Sunday. “They had his military pension and he went back to his trade as a carpenter after the war. But he worked at a lot of different jobs. It was tough back then.”
Delaney and one of her uncles, William Dawson, worked for nearly five years to get a headstone for their loved ones burial site. “It took a long time, a lot of phone calls and a lot of red tape to get him this. We called wrote letters and begged,” Delaney said. “After about five years, I talked to Bill and he spoke with his congressman in Ohio, then two weeks later they have a stone for us. I guess you have to have some pull.”
Dawson, one of only two of Potts grandchildren still alive, spoke to the crowd about his grandfather’s patriotism, loyalty and love of his country.” He went on and told how when the Union Army came looking for volunteers, Potts joined at the age of 32 back in the day when life expectancy was just under 50 years old. “He volunteered as a scout, because the Union needed them to scout this area. They knew the area and were sharpshooters as they hunted for game to feed their families in these hills,” Dawson said.
Potts served with the Union and Company C from May 1, 1863 to September 16, 1863. “He was discharged after he came down with malaria,” Dawson said as he looked over documents he received either from the Internet or from Washington about his grandfather’s service. “A lot of them boys got sick living and fighting in these hills in all kinds of weather and medicine not being what it is today. The records say he was given patented medicines, which were new medicines just coming out, ” Dawson added. “Everything I have ever learned about my grandfather says he was an honorable, gentle, patriotic man and I am thankful, humbled and honored to be able to tell you about my grandpa, a hard working family man.”
The Honor Guard from the American Legion Post 308 gave Potts a 21-gun salute and then played taps to honor the man who had been forgotten by he world but never by his family. “My mother is 97 and she insists we all come back to Clay City on Memorial Day to honor our family,” Delaney said.
The flag that accompanies such a ceremony was given to Dawson, who passed it on to Delaney. But she then donated it to the cemetery committee.
The hard work and time it took to finally get a headstone for her great grandfather was not easy, but Delaney believes it was all worth the effort. “I love history and I love my family and for him to be laying here with no headstone was just not right.” Delaney said as she looked at the new marker and the red, white and blue arrangements already placed at Potts grave. “It may have took a while to get it, but it was long past time. Our families and our veterans deserve that honor.”

1890 Veteran’s Schedules, Powell County, Kentucky.

James Carr Potts was born in Clark County, December 12, 1830, to Thomas Jefferson Potts and Mary Gholson Vivion.  Both parents were deceased before 1850.

December 22, 1852, James married Mary Elizabeth Jane Eaton, in Clark County.  Mary Eaton was the daughter of John and Viney Eaton, and was listed with them in the 1850 Census of Clark County.  She was 16.

By 1860 the couple were living in Estill County.  In the census for that year James is listed as 30; wife Mary E., is 26.  The couple have three children – David D., 15; Tempa F., 12; and James W., 9/12.  In the 1870 census we find that three more children have been born.  Their ages in the census – Albert M., 8; John, 4; and Olivia, 2/12.  Daughter Ada was born in 1873; and the last child, Nora, was born in 1876 and died a year later.  The couple’s first child, Sarah, was born in 1853 and died at the age of 3.

I’ve found birth records for three children.  Sally [Sarah] Ann Potts was born January 9, 1853, in Powell County, parents James Potts and Jane Eaton, residence Snow Creek in Powell County – but this birth is listed in the Clark County birth records for 1853.  James Potts was born there, but I can’t say why there is a record in Clark for a birth in Powell.

Dillard Potts was born June 20, 1854, in Powell County, to James C. Potts and Jane Eaton.

Tempa F. Potts was born May 18, 1857, in Powell County to James C. Potts and Mary E. Eaton.

The death certificate for daughter Olivia Potts Williams, March 19, 1870 – May 12, 1912, born in Estill County.  Father, James C. Potts, was born in Clark County; mother, Mary J. Eaton, was born in Powell County.

Mary Elizabeth Jane Eaton Potts was last found in the 1880 census of Powell County, age 46.  She must have died shortly after this date since James Potts married Susan J. Adams December 20, 1883.  I don’t believe there were any children from this marriage.

Susan, wife of James C. Potts, born May 2, 1850, died December 6, 1901

 

General Bragg’s Official Report of The Battle of Perryville

The Battle of Perryville was one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War, and the largest fought in Kentucky.  There were so many dead that there was not enough wood to make enough coffins, and many bodies were not buried for a number of days.  Wounded were sent to surrounding cities – Harrodsburg, Springfield and Danville.  Many of the wounded died and were buried in these cities.  Confederate casualties were 3,401; Union, 4,276 – killed, wounded, captured or missing.

The Maysville Weekly Bulletin, Mason County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 6, 1862

The Battle of Perryville – General Bragg’s Official Report

Headquarters Department No. 2, Bryantsville, Kentucky, October 12, 1862

Sir:  Finding the enemy pressing heavily in his rear, near Perryville, Major General Hardee, of Polk’s command, was obliged to hold and check him at that point.  Having arrived at Harrodsburg from Frankfort, I determined to give him battle there, and accordingly concentrated three divisions of my command – the Army of the Mississippi, now under Major General Polk, Cheatham’s, Buckner’s and Anderson’s – and directed General Polk to take command on the 7th, and attack the enemy next morning.  Wither’s division had gone the day before to support Smith.  Hearing, on the night of the 7th, that the force in front of Smith had rapidly retreated, I moved early next morning, to be present at the operations of Polk’s forces.

The two armies were formed confronting each other on opposite sides of the town of Perryville.  After consulting the General, and reconnoitering the ground and examining his disposition, I declined to assume the command, but suggested some changes and modifications of his arrangements, which he promptly adopted.  The action opened at half-past twelve p.m., between the skirmishers and artillery on both sides.  Finding the enemy indisposed to advance upon us, and knowing he was receiving heavy reinforcements, I deemed it best to assail him vigorously, and so directed.

The engagement became general soon thereafter, and was continued furiously from that time to dark, our troops never faltering and never failing in their efforts.

For the time engaged it was the severest and most desperately contested engagement within my knowledge.  Fearfully outnumbered, our troops did not hesitate to engage at any odds, and, though checked at times, they eventually carried every position, and drove the enemy about two miles.  But for the intervention of night we should have completed the work.  We had captured fifteen pieces of artillery by the most daring charges, killed one and wounded two Brigadier Generals, and a very large number of inferior officers and men estimated at no less than four thousand, and captured four hundred prisoners, including three staff officers with servants, carriage and baggage of Major General McCook.

The ground was literally covered with the dead and wounded.  In such a contest our own loss was necessarily severe – probably not less than 2,500 killed, wounded and missing.  Included in the wounded are Brigadier Generals Wood, Cleburn and Brown – gallant and noble soldiers – whose loss will be severely felt by their commands.  To Major General Polk, commanding the forces; Major General Hardee, commanding the left wing, two divisions, and Major Generals Cheatham, Buckner and Anderson, commanding divisions, of this memorable field.  Nobler troops were never more gallantly led.  The country owes them a debt of gratitude which I am sure will be acknowledged.

Ascertaining that the enemy was heavily reinforced during the night, I withdrew my force early the next morning to Harrodsburg, and thence to this point.  Major General Smith arrived at Harrodsburg with most of his force and Wither’s division the next day, the 10th, and yesterday I withdrew the whole to this point, the enemy following slowly, but not pressing us.

I am sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant.

Braxton Bragg, General Commanding

Brothers John Linton Edwards and William Mason Edwards in Union Army During the War Between the States

Two brothers, John L. and William M. Edwards entered the Union army November 21, 1861, at Lebanon, Marion County.  They entered service as privates, and were in Captain Bevill’s Company E, 10th Regiment of the Kentucky Volunteers.  John was 26 and William was 21.  The two brothers were sons of Jonathan and Nancy Linton Edwards.  The other five children were Alfred, Lucretia, Susan, Edward and Benjamin.  Their parents were part of the Linton/Edwards move to Kentucky in 1816-1818.

During the Civil War John and William remained in the same unit.  May 6, 1863, John was detailed as a brigade teamster.

August 10, 1863 he was sent to a hospital at Nashville, Tennessee, and was later moved to the hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.  This was during the occupation of middle Tennessee.

Again, June 16, 1864, he was sent to the hospital in the present campaign.  This was during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain in Marietta, Georgia.

John Edwards appears on the Company Muster-out Roll, dated December 6, 1864, in Louisville.  He was due $100 plus $26.32 for clothing in kind.

William Edwards was sent to the hospital at Lebanon, Kentucky, October 26, 1862.  It is very likely William was wounded during the Battle of Perryville earlier in the month, and was sent to recuperate in nearby Lebanon.

On June 10, 1864, he was sent to the hospital on the present campaign, again at Kennesaw Mountain.

William Edwards was captured at Columbia between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863; was confined by General Morgan.  He was paroled between December 20, 1862 and January 10, 1863.

September 19-20, 1863, during the Battle of Chickamauga, William was wounded, a contusion in the back.  He was mustered-out the same date as his brother, August 6, 1864, and was due $100 plus $40.62 for clothing in kind.  I am sure John was horribly worried when William was wounded and taken prisoner by John Hunt Morgan.

J. L. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry, Cemetery Hill, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky.

After the war John and William came back to Washington County to live with their parents.  In fact, six of he seven children lived with their parents, and never married.  Youngest children, Benjamin Edwards, married his first cousin, Lucy Edwards, only children of John L. Edwards and Milly Linton.  They had no children.  Alfred, Lucretia and Edward died before 1870.  In the 1880 census for Washington County, John L, Susan and William lived at home.  John L. died between 1880 and 1900, since he does not appear in that census; only William and Susan still lived on the old home place.  William died June 10, 1903.

W. M. Edwards, Co. E, 10 KY Infantry. 

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, June 18, 1903

W. M. Edwards Dead

Mr. William M. Edwards, one of the county’s best citizens, died at his home two miles from Springfield on last Wednesday night after a long illness of a complication of diseases.  The deceased was about 63 years of age and was born and reared in Washington County.  He was never married and lived with a sister on a small farm near town.  He was an upright and honorable man, and none stood higher in the estimation of his neighbors than he.

Shortly after the war broke out Mr. Edwards enlisted in the cause of the Union, and was mustered in Company E, Tenth Kentucky Infantry at Lebanon, November 21, 1861.  He followed the fortunes of that regiment of which Col. John M. Harlan was first commander, and who was afterwards succeeded by Col. W. H. Hays, through three years of hard campaigning.  He was in the battles of Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Jonesboro, and other famous engagements.  On December 6, 1864, Mr. Edwards was mustered out of the army at Louisville, and returned to Springfield and soon engaged in farming.  He was a member of the Bevil Palmer Post G. A. R., and always took an interest in the affairs of that organization.  He was a good Christian man and joined the Presbyterian church during the war.

The funeral took place at the Springfield Presbyterian Church on Friday morning last and was conducted by Rev. G. A. Strickland.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 9, 1903

Public Sale

On the premises of the old Edwards place, the former home of the late W. M. Edwards beginning at 1 o’clock on Wednesday, July 15th, there will be sold three horses, two first class Jersey milk cows and calves, two heifers, a Jersey bull, sow and seven shoats, a crop of oats, farming implements and household and kitchen furniture.

Also, at the same time and place the Edwards farm containing about 75 acres will be offered for sale to the highest bidder on easy terms.

Ben Edwards, Agent

Col. R. E. Whane, Auctioneer

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 23, 1903

The sale of the personal property of the late Wm. Edwards took place on last Wednesday and was well attended, everything bringing good prices.  The Edwards farm containing about 75 acres of land was sold to Mr. Benedict Janes for $1692.

Many of the other siblings of these two brothers lie buried close by in Cemetery Hill.

Stephen L. Chasteen – Civil War Soldier – Dies At 81 Years of Age

Stephen L. Chasteen, 1845-1926.  His wife, Millie Ann Davis, 1849-1924.  Pisgah Presbyterian Cemetery, Woodford County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.

Sunday, October 17, 1926

Stephen Chasteen was a bugler in Company A, 6 Regiment Kentucky Cavalry, Union Army, during the Civil War.

According to the Company Descriptive Book he was 18 years of age when he joined the Union Army, six feet tall, of fair complexion, blue eyes and brown hair.  Stephen was born in Rockcastle County, Kentucky.  He was a farmer.

Stephen Chasteen was captured at Woodville, Alabama, August 25, 1863, and confined at Richmond, Virginia, September 26, 1863.  He was paroled at City Point, Virginia, March 7, 1864; reported at C. B. Maryland, March 9, 1864, sent to C. P. Maryland November 1864, where he reported the same day.  Sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, March 9, 1864.

Stephen mustered out December 23, 1864, at Louisville, Kentucky.  He was a soldier for three years, including one being prisoner of war.

Isn’t it impressive that he was with the Regimental Brass Band from August to November of 1864?

 

 

Confederate Soldier Buried In Green Lawn Cemetery Simpson County

H. D. Wade, 1861-1865, C.S.A.

According to his death certificate, Harvey David Wade was born in Allen County, Kentucky, February 17, 1836, and died September 22, 1911, due to heart problems.  Harvey and his family are buried in the Wade plot in Green Lawn Cemetery in Franklin, Simpson County, Kentucky.  His death certificate gives us little other information.  Both mother and father are listed as unknown.

Let’s move further back in time to see what we can discover.  In the 1860 census, Henry David Wade (H. D.) is living in Newton County, Missouri, with Henry Wade, aged 40, and Martha Wade, 38, with their six children.  Henry was born in Kentucky, Martha in Tennessee.  Remember that Simpson County is located on the Tennessee border.  The four older children were born in Kentucky.  Amanda, age 6, was born in Missouri, as well as younger sister, Eliza.  From Amanda’s date of birth of 1854, and her brother Henry’s birth in Kentucky in 1851, we can surmise the family moved to Missouri between those two dates – 1852-1854.  Next listed in the census record as living with the Wade family is Franklin Keath, 22, a farm laborer born in Georgia.  The last person living with the family is H. D. Wade, 23, a school teacher, born in Kentucky.  Some researchers believe Henry and Martha to be Harvey’s parents, but I do not.  If Harvey were their son the couple would have married very young, Martha being approximately 15 when Harvey was born.  Another consideration is the fact he is listed last in the census record, after a farm laborer.  If he were the first-born son he would have been named after his parents, not last in line.  I feel Henry was either an uncle, or an older brother, of Harvey.  But this gives a good reason for Harvey to have enlisted in the Confederate States Army in Newton County, Missouri.

This service record for H. D. Wade shows he is listed as an Ordinance Sergeant.  Since he dealt with weapons and ammunition he would have been a very valuable person within the regiment.

And from this record we find that H. D. Wade was on the roll of prisoners of war – ‘Company F, 8th Regiment Missouri Infantry, Confederate States Army, commanded by 2d Lieutenant Paul F. Peete, surrendered at New Orleans, Louisiana, to Maj. Gen. E. R. S. Canby, U.S.A., May 26, 1865, and paroled at Alexandria, June 7, 1865.  The date May 26, 1865 is significant since it was after Lee’s surrender.  Notice that his residence is given as Simpson County, Kentucky.

Mary Neely Wade, October 1, 1841 – September 12, 1868.

After the war Harvey Wade married Mary Neely, but she died within a year or two.  Could this have been during childbirth?

After the death of his first wife Harvey married Pauline Mahin.

Naomi M. Wade, October 12, 1873 – January 29,1880.

They were the parents of three children.

Tho’s M. Wade, April 13, 1875 – April 18, 1875.

All three died at less than eight years of age.

Charles D. Wade, June 22, 1877 – January 25, 1882.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky.  Sunday, September 24, 1911.

Harvey, D. Wade, February 17, 1836 – September 22, 1911.

Harvey David Wade is buried between his two wives, his children beside their mother Pauline.

Pauline Wade died April 24, 1929.

Pauline Mahin Wade lived an additional 18 years, dying in 1929.

Pine Knot Cemetery – McCreary County

A few of the photos taken in Pine Knot Cemetery in rural McCreary County.  Take US27 south past Whitley City, to the little area of Pine Knot, turn left to 1651.  If you get to Strunk, you’ve gone too far!  And if you reach the Tennessee border it’s time to turn around!

Kizzie King Lay, November 6, 1910 – April 8, 1941.  She was a kind and affectionate wife, a fond mother, and a friend to all.

Nettie King Young, 1875-1935.  Aunt Net is gone with Jesus.

Nancy L. Campbell, 1866-1920.  M. B. Campbell, 1866-1928.

Martha A. Swain, born April 9, 1864, died December 3, 1937.  The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.

Dr. P. Medekle, March 23, 1844 – October 28, 1928.  At rest.

Ella Wood, wife of Harry Jones, born February 10, 1878, died July 11, 1913.  Ella, we miss you at home.

Calvin Richardson, Pvt CO E, 32 KY INF, Civil War, 1828-1888.

William J. Lee, March 20, 1853 – October 8, 1909.

 

Graham Springs – Famous Waters Bring Many To Mercer County

Who knew Harrodsburg had the reputation of one of the best mineral springs anywhere around?  Graham Springs and its hotel saw many of important and famous people visit both before the Civil War and after the turn of the 20th century.  It is said its guest registers hold the names of everyone who visited; and one was used in a murder trial in the 1850’s to locate the whereabouts of certain witnesses at the time of the murder.  You guessed it – they were at the Graham Springs Hotel.

Begun in 1820, a large hotel was built in 1843.  In 1853 the property was sold to the US government, and burned in 1865.  In 1911 the idea of the Graham Springs Hotel was reborn with another building, and continued through 1932 when the property was purchased by Glave Goddard.  In 1946 it was decided to build the James B. Haggin Hospital on the site of the Grahm Springs Hotel.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, November 17, 1929

Autumn At Graham Springs

To the Editor of The Courier-Journal

Graham Springs Hotel stands upon a beautiful wooded hilltop overlooking the historic town of Harrodsburg, itself one of the oldest and most famous resort hotels in the South.

Twenty-five acres of almost virgin forestry surround it, in unusual beauty of location, its site superb, and its outlook majestic.  As the changing seasons come and go in Kentucky, they write a progressive record of the sylvan beauty upon these woods that thrill an observer with the sheer loveliness of it.  The bluegrass has a marvelous power of resurrection which no amount of scorching in summer drouths can destroy, and late rains of the fall season have laid an aftermath of tender green upon the sunlit slopes in Graham Springs woods.  Upon walnut trees of unusual size and symmetry dark clumps of mistletoe hang in profusion, their waxen berries turning to pearl in a setting of shimmering dark green leaves.  It is no wonder that the Druids worshipped the mistletoe, with its suggestion of everlasting life!  From oak and elm and walnut trees, brilliant autumn colors are flaunted in the face of on-coming winter, with a brave abandon.  As one by one, scarlet, gold and russet-brown leaves float softly to earth, in the still sunlight, a sense of peace and restfulness falls like soothing balm upon the spirit of anyone who may walk there.

In 1820, Dr. C. C. Graham erected a classic building resembling an old world castle upon these grounds, close to the famous Graham0 Springs, whose marvelous curative waters still attract people in search of health and pleasure.  It does not need a page from the United States Dispensary, which states that, ‘Graham Springs and Saratoga are the only saline waters of true worth to be found in America,’ to convince one who has tasted it.  Many have declared it equal to the waters at Baden-Baden.  Kentucky has an asset in this mineral water which she cannot afford to overlook, and progress will surely present it to the world in the fullest measure.  In 1865, that year of the War Between the States anguish, the old hotel was burned.  Its romantic memories, its charm and prestige, however, which are things of spiritual permanence, still cling about the place.

It was in Harrodsburg that George Rogers Clark planned his famous army for the conquest of the Northwest, in commemoration of which event, Old Fort Harrod has been made a State park.  It was within the hotel grounds that a beautiful pageant, representing the early history of Kentucky, was given in celebration of the centennial anniversary of the founding of Harrodsburg, several years ago.  A priceless old record book of Graham Springs Hotel shows names of men famous in the making of America.  Henry Clay was a frequent guest and left his name upon its register.  Pages might be printed of other famous signatures found there.

Old Dr. Graham himself, with his snow-white beard and princely bearing, was a conspicuous figure in the annals of Kentucky, not only leaving a record of his fame at Graham Springs, but at old Transylvania University at Lexington, where he received his education.  Dr. Ephraim McDowell at Danville, and Dr. C. C. Graham at Harrodsburg were men who measured up to the highest standards in the world’s medical records.  The wise old doctor saw to it that his guests had a full measure of exercise and pleasure as well as curative waters to tone up the human system.  A series of dances were inaugurated at Graham Springs before the War Between the States, which became famous for their brilliancy and aristocratic patronage.  The musicians were colored slaves of Dr. Graham, highly trained and gaily liveried.  The singing of ‘spirituals’ before an audience began, in the old South, upon these occasions.

The grave of the unknown girl who died of a heart attack at one of the balls given at Graham Springs.  Her grave is well-tended today.

To this day the weekly dances at Graham Springs are social events of importance in Kentucky, during the season.  Perhaps a mention of the ante-bellum balls may not be complete without reference to the beautiful ‘Unknown’ who danced so gaily and so long at one of them, that she died of a heart attack on the same summer night.  Her grave, marked first by Dr. Graham, and afterward by the City of Harrodsburg, is shown to tourists who never fail to respond to the pathetic appeal of her story.

Mrs. James Harrod, widow of the hardy old pioneer who founded Harrodsburg, lived to a very old age, and was an honored guest at Graham Springs on the first anniversary celebration held there.

Nancy Lewis Greene, Harrodsburg, Kentucky

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, January 1, 1942

Where Southern Gentry Met to Freshen, Fatten and Flirt

This article of 1942 talks about the many ‘watering places’ or mineral springs located in Kentucky, and used before the advent of the Civil War.  It is said physicians strongly recommended taking the waters and were advertised as being ‘especially beneficial to persons suffering from diseases of the stomach, live and kidneys, as well as from asthma, gout, dyspepsia, rheumatism, bilious disorders, neuralgia, autumnal fevers and general debility.’  I believe that takes in almost anyone!

In 1803 John Kennedy’s stagecoach lines helped bring patrons from the city to the country where they might take the waters.

At Olympian Springs, in Bath County it was said ‘there was much flirting, sometimes by ‘married charmers, thirsting for universal dominion.’  Disputes between the ladies often involved ‘pillows, bolsters, fingernails and the poignant sarcasm of the tongue,’ and, at time, the dueling pistols of sensitive gentlemen could be heard in a nearby woodland settling ‘affairs of honor.’

‘Dr. Christopher Columbus Graham, veteran of the War of 1812 and “for many years the champion off-hand rifle shot of the world,” purchased the Greenville Springs in 1827, and the following year bought the “Harrodsburg or Sutton Springs” from his father-in-law, Captain David Sutton, for $10,000.  Dr. Graham then combined these two watering places under the name of Harrodsburg or Graham’s Springs.

‘A guest, viewing the Springs in retrospect, said of them: “The walk to the spring before breakfast was very fashionable, a long board-walk covered with tan-bark and shaded with locust trees, their branches meeting and arching overhead the whole distance.  The belles and beaux walked up and down the long portico of the hotel in what seemed to me a fair procession.  The ladies with their beautiful elaborately dressed hair in the New Orleans fashion, as from there we got the styles, and their organdy muslins, which were not then to be bought outside of New Orleans.  The envy of all were the exquisite wide embroidered collars and cuffs worn by the Southern belles.  A score of Creole beauties, prim and particular in their lovely, fleecy, muslin dresses were always present.  The ballroom at night was a scene of enchantment; old Dr. Graham, the proprietor, was the master of ceremonies and the life of the party.”’

It was said that during the summer months of 1833, when the Asiatic cholera was rampant in Kentucky, many came to the springs for healing.  ‘Dr. Graham, at Harrodsburg, announced: “These Springs are perfectly free from the cholera and they never have been otherwise,” and “the many who visited the Springs, from the various cholera districts, with the disease upon them, have all quickly recovered.”’

‘By the middle ‘40’s the watering places of the state were in their heyday.  To keep abreast of the times, Dr. Christopher Graham of Harrodsburg Springs erected an elegant and commodious hotel during the late fall of 1842 and winter of 1843.  This splendid building, costing $30,000, was acclaimed by many to the “the finest edifice in the West.”’

And this July 19, 1851, note in The Courier-Journal gives a rousing description of the dance in the Graham Springs Hotel ball room.  ‘Returning from the ball room, brilliantly illuminated by the sparkling eyes, rivaling the stars in their dazzling brilliancy, methought, if in the cool evening zephyrs that continually fanned my brown, (such were a possibility) to collect, my thoughts scattered in the whirling waltz, to the northern extremity of my brain.  Truly the poet says there’s a “magical influence in the wafted breeze;” but I am afraid (like the charming coquette) she has her favorites, for in spite of all my efforts, my thoughts continue to revert to the ball room!  What a potent charm there is in the dance, and how delightfully sounds the music!’

This popularity of ‘taking the waters’ continued into the early 1850’s.  in 1853 Dr. Graham sold the Springs to the United States Government and it was turned into a military asylum for old and disabled soldiers.

In 1856 the main building burned.  And during the Civil War the buildings that remained were used as a hospital.  After the Battle of Perryville on October 8, 1862, in Boyle County, the ballroom was used as an operating room.

But the Springs did revive in the early days of the 20th century.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, April 21, 1911

It will be pleasant news to the people of Central Kentucky to learn that the far-famed historical old Graham Springs will be opened as a select summer resort the coming season.  The Cassell mansion, one of the most elegant brick buildings in the Blue Grass has been converted into a choice hotel.  Old fashioned cooking will be provided and food in abundance will be supplied.  The water that pours from Old Graham Springs is the finest in the world and it is a wonder that somebody has not long ago erected a hotel there sufficient to accommodate five hundred guests.  The property is now owned by Mr. Ben C. Allin and Editor T. Sanders Orr has charge of the publicity department.  The water from these springs should be bottled and shipped throughout the country.  Reasonable rates will be made.  Many Danville people will doubtless take advantage of the fine accommodations and benefit themselves by drinking the pure water that made Harrodsburg famous sixty years ago.

This 1923 advertisement for the Graham Springs Hotel touts its ‘tennis, croquet and shady grounds, is located on a high eminence with splendid views and amid beautiful scenery.’  Perhaps this was the first of what today is known as farm-to-table – ‘its table is supplied with the best of foods, old-fashioned cooking, chicken dinners, including pure Jersey milk from our own herd, fresh vegetables and fruit from our own gardens.’

It is also a tourist manual, giving ideas for outings in the surrounding country – ‘beautiful and full of historic interest.  The roads are ideal for riding, driving and motoring and short excursions may be made to the site of the old fort, to Daniel Boone’s Cave, High Bridge, Shakertown, Perryville Battlefield and other points of interest.’

This photo was taken during those early days of the 20th century.

This is what the area looks like today.