Tag Archives: Mary Jouett

Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter

Last weekend my son, Linton, and I had a day together in Louisville.  He lives in Indianapolis, not the ends of the earth, but not an easy day trip.  When our weekend was planned I told Ritchey and Kate he was mine on Saturday, but I would share him with the rest of the family on Sunday!  We had a huge family dinner and Julian had quite a day with Uncle Linton.

Most of our day together was spent at bookstores, record shops, eating and talking.  Beforehand I searched for those rare and used bookstores and the first we visited was A Book By Its Cover on Dartmouth.  When we turned in it was a residential area.  We searched again and came up with the same place.  Linton called, and, yes, we were in front of the business!  The gentleman told us most of his business is online, but he welcomes those who want to come and peruse.  And he had one room of Kentucky history and county histories – I was in heaven!

One book I found was Matthew Harris Jouett – Kentucky Portrait Painter (1787-1827) by E. A. Jonas.  The book is in excellent condition, being No. 264 of 500 copies of the first edition.  About forty of his portraits are reproduced in the book.  Being a Mercer County resident and having a little knowledgeable about the history of our county, I recognized the last name as the same as the wife of Thomas Allin, our first county clerk.  Thomas Allin married Mary Jouett on February 16, 1789, at the home of her brother, Captain John Jouett, Jr.  Their parents were John Jouett, Sr., and Mourning Harris.  Captain John Jouett, Jr., better known as ‘Jack’, was the father of Matthew Harris Jouett.  Matthew was born in 1787, two years before his aunt’s marriage.

After a local education, Matthew’s father sent him to Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, to be educated as a lawyer.  He studied and became a lawyer, but his free time was spent painting.  In 1812 he married Miss Margaret Allen of Fayette County.

He could not continue his law profession, gave up his business and started painting portraits as his livelihood.  His father was not happy, and that is an understatement.  The War of 1812 changed everyone’s lives, and Matthew Jouett volunteered his services and served valiantly.  He enlisted in Captain Robert Crockett’s Company, Third Mounted Regiment, Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel Allen commanding.  July 13, 1814, he was appointed paymaster, with the rank of captain of the 28th United States Infantry by President Madison.  At the battle of the River Raisin the payrolls and papers, in his care as paymaster, fell into enemy hands and were never recovered.  He found himself in debt to the War Department for $6,000.  That doesn’t sound like a huge sum today, but it would be about a million dollars.  This was not due to negligence or lack of prudence, just a fortune of war.  He was determined to pay the money back – and he did so through painting portraits.  His father was furious and called him a ‘sign-painter’, never realizing how great his talent truly was.

Matthew Jouett went to Boston in 1817 and studied for a year with Gilbert Stuart – who painted the famous George Washington portrait.  Back in Kentucky Matthew painted assiduously.  Those who sat for him sound like a Who’s Who of history – Henry Clay, Judge John Rowan, Andrew Jackson, Hon. George M. Bibb, Mr. Justice Thomas Todd, Captain Robeson DeHart, Colonel Edmund Taylor, Sr., General LaFayette, Hon. John Brown, Hon. Robert S. Todd, George Rogers Clark and many, many others.  It is said that in the ten years of his career he produced over 400 portraits – and there could be more.  In 1964, at an auction in Lexington, a gentleman bought a portrait of a child for $22 – and afterwards found out it was a Matthew Jouett painting, worth $1600-$2000!

Matthew Jouett died after a short illness, August 10, 1827, in his fortieth year and at the top of his professional success.  It is said he accomplished as much in ten years as many others were able to do only in a lifetime.  His fame as a great painter truly began at the 1893 World’s Fair in Chicago.  His paintings were given the best place in the gallery by the Hanging Committee because of their recognized merit.  In 1928 fifty to sixty of Matthew Jouett’s portraits were exhibited at the J B Speed Museum in Louisville.  Some of his work is in the Hall of Governors at the Kentucky History Center, and I believe one hangs in a New York museum.

Matthew and his wife are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.  I think there’s another road trip to plan – to the cemetery, J B Speed Museum in Louisville, and the old state house in Frankfort where the life-size portrait of General LaFayette hangs!  I will keep you updated!

Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., Obituary

Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., 1856-1924.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Mr. Buckner Allin, Sr., was a descendant of Thomas Allin, the first county clerk for Mercer County, and his wife, Mary Jouett.  Thomas Allin was born in Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, and afterwards came to Mercer County – Virginia at that time! – where he married Mary Jouett in 1789.  The couple had ten children.  Thomas and Mary died two days apart in June of 1833 during the cholera epidemic.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, January 25, 1924

Mr. Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., aged 67 years, died Tuesday night after a gradual decline of health for several years caused by a partial stroke of paralysis. Mr. Allin was a native of Mercer County, a son of the late George Allin and Susan Miller Allin, and is a descendant of a line of pioneers promi­nent in the development of Mercer County from its first settlement. Mr. Allin was personally popular with all who knew him. He was a man of upright principles and a warm heart, and was always on the side that favored the ad­vancement of community interests. For many years he was a prominent merchant here, being engaged in the grocery business, later he was in the internal revenue service for a long time, and after that was City School Tax Collector and Vital Statistician up to the time his failing health forced him from active business.

He was twice married, first to Miss Mattie Hudson and second to Miss Annie May Nooe, who survives him, together with three children, Mrs. Eben Hardin and Miss Mattie Miller Allin, by the first union, and Mr. B. M. Allin, Jr., by the second marriage. His funeral was held Thurs­day morning at 10:30 at his home on Chestnut Street, conducted by his pastor, Rev. S. S. Daughtry, of the Presby­terian Church, and Rev. L. E. Sellers, of the Christian Church. The interment was in Spring Hill Cemetery.

The Family of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin, Part 2

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Continued

The Family of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin

Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

Thomas Allin, son of William and Frances (Grant) Allin, was born May 14, 1757, in Hanover County, Virginia.  Thomas served in the Revolutionary War and afterwards moved to Mercer County, Kentucky.  On February 16, 1789, Thomas Allin married Mary Jouett, at the home of her brother, Captain John Jouett, Jr.  Mary was born June 14, 1765, in Louisa County, Virginia, the daughter of John Jouett, Sr., and his wife Mourning Harris.  Thomas and Mary raised a large family in Mercer County, Kentucky.  Thomas died June 26, 1833, at his home in Harrodsburg, during the cholera epidemic of that year.  His wife Mary died two days later, June 28, 1833.  They are buried in Spring Hill Cemetery.

The children of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin are:

  • Nancy Harris Allin
  • William H. Allin
  • John Jouett Allin
  • Thomas Allin, Jr.
  • Charles W. Allin
  • Mary Jouett Allin
  • Grant Allin
  • Philip Trapnell Allin
  • Samuel Woodson Allin
  • Benjamin Casey Allin

Charles W. Allin was born July 13, 1796, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky; died March 4, 1847, in Henderson County, Kentucky.  Charles married first, on June 14, 1819, Patsy Mitchell; married second in 1824, Mrs. Caroline Harrison, at Henderson County, widow of Daniel Harrison, born 1809, died 1873.  Children by first marriage:

  • Richard Mitchell Allin, who later attained the rank of Captain

Children by second marriage:

  • Philip Trapnell Allin, born 1834; became a Major and Chief of Staff to Generals Cheatham and Forrest, Confederate States of America, 26th Battalion, Tennessee Cavalry.

Mary Jouett Allin was born March 6, 1798, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky; died September 2, 1818; married December 13, 1815, to Dr. Don Carlos Dixon, son of Major Tilghman Dixon and Maria Don Carlos Dixon, and born 1792 at Dixon Springs, Tennessee; died 1841.  Since Mary was deceased at the time her father made his will, May 5, 1830, he left her share of his estate to her son Tilghman Dixon, namely two tracts of land in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, containing about two hundred acres each, to be held for him until he came to the age of 21 years or married, and he was to be educated by the Executors, free of any charge against him until he became 21 years of age or married.  Children:

  • Tilghman Allin Dixon

Grant Allin was born January 20, 1800, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky; died Thursday, December 11, 1873, in Randolph County, Missouri.  Buried at College Mound, Missouri.  Grant married first, December 20, 1827, Mary Ware, daughter of Colonel Thompson Ware and Sally (Conn) Ware of Bourbon County, Kentucky; married second, at her father’s home in Bourbon County, October 23, 1830, Catherine Todd Ware, also a daughter of Colonel Thompson Ware and Sally (Conn) Ware, and born December 21, 1799; died June 26, 1863, in Randolph County, Missour, and was buried at Hebron, Missouri, near the Grant Allin farm.  Children by first marriage:

  • Mary Ware Allin
  • Thompson Allin, born November 4, 1828, at Harrodsburg

Children by second marriage:

  • Thomas Allin, born September 24, 1831, at Harodsburg; died June 25, 1865, and buried at Hebron, Missouri; married March 29, 1855, Kate Woods McNamara.  Served in the Confederate States Army during the Civil War.
  • Amanda Allin, born July 13, 1833, at Harrodsburg
  • Charles Ware Allin, born February 21, 1835, at Harrodsburg
  • Sallie Ware Allin, born January 26, 1837, at Harrodsburg
  • Lucy Bedford Allin, born August 30, 1838, at Harrodsburg
  • Mary Catherine Allin, born February 21, 1842,  near Huntsville, Randolph County, Missouri

Philip Trapnell Allin was born May 5, 1803, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky; died November 23, 1849; married first May 6, 1824, Jane Randolph Cabell, daughter of Joseph Cabell and his second wife, Anne Everard Bolling (Duval) Cabell, and born August 29, 1805, died June 28, 1833, at Harrodsburg of cholera.  Married second December 3, 1835, Mary Sophie Elizabeth Hart, daughter of William Hart and Dinah (Bradford) Hart, of Henderson County, Kentucky, and born February 15, 1814; died July 2, 1874.

Philip Trapnell Allin was appointed by his father as one of three Executors of his will, in which Philip was named to inherit “the tract of land containing fifty acres, lying west of the dower land of the widow McClure, now deceased, and all my interest in said dower land: as from his equal share of money to be had from the sale of the estate at the death of his mother, Mary.

In 1786 when Mercer County was organized, Thomas Allin was appointed county and circuit clerk, and served until 1830.  He then resigned and his son Philip Trapnell Allin was appointed as circuit clerk in which capacity he served until his death in 1849.  Children by first marriage:

  • Joseph Cabell Allin, born March 14, 1825, at Harrodsburg; married first Susan A. Smith, daughter of Obediah Smith of Henderson County.  No issue.  Married second, Mrs. Brown, of Louisville, Kentucky.  No issue.
  • Mary Ann Allin, born August 2, 1827, at Harrodsburg; died March 17, 1832
  • Elizabeth Randolph Allin, born December 13, 1832, at Harrodsburg

Children by second marriage:

  • Charles William Allin, born Octoer 13, 1836; died October 6, 1837
  • Robert B. Allin, born June 17, 1837; died October 17, 1839
  • William Hart Allin, born June 23, 1841; died July 20, 1859
  • John Bradford, born April 13, 1844, at Harrodsburg
  • Benjamin Casey Allin, born November 1, 1846, at Harrodsburg
  • Philip Trapnell Allin, born Mary 27, 1849, at Harrodsburg; married Mary Lloyd Ewing Marshall, daughter of Dr. Burwell Keith Marshall, of Louisville, Kentucky, and his wife, Sarah Lloyd Moore (Ewing) Marshall.  No issue.

Samuel Woodson Allin was born April 8, 1805; died January 1, 1807, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Benjamin Casey Allin was born May 6, 1808, at Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky; died September 26, 1895, at Harrodsburg; married January 28, 1829, Susan Hart Warren (1811-1897), daughter of John Warren and Judith (Boswell) Warren.  Benjamin was mentioned in his father’s will to inherit the home place consisting of about 200 acres, also another small tract of about 45 acres, as well as two negroes and to be given possession at the death of his mother.  He was appointed one of the Executors and was to inherit his share of the money to be had from the sale of the estate at his mother’s death that had not been otherwise disposed of.

At the time of the death of his brother, Philip Trapnell Allin, in 1849, Benjamin was appointed to fill his office of Circuit Clerk of Mercer County.  He held the office under appointment until 1851, when a new constitution was adopted, making the office elective.  He was then elected to the same office continuously until 1862, when on account of his strong southern sympathy, a Unionist was elected.  In 1886 Benjamin was elected County clerk and was elected to the same office every four years until his death.  Children:

  • Mary Boswell Allin, born November 5, 1829
  • George T. Allin, born June 18, 1831; died April 27, 1834
  • Benjamin Casey Allin, Jr., born August 18, 1834
  • Marie Catherine Allin, born June 26, 1836
  • John W. Allin, born March 12, 1838; died June 28, 1839
  • Philip Trapnell Allin, born December 15, 1839
  • Bushrod Warren Allin, born February 6, 1843
  • William Boswell Allin, born March 17, 1845
  • Susan Jouett Allin, born March 6, 1847, died November 1, 1864
  • Grant T. Allin, born December 12, 1848
  • Mary A.  Allin, born April 17, 1852
  • Thomas Allin, born March 17, 1857; died July 1864

 

 

The Family of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin

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The Family of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin

Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

Thomas Allin, son of William and Frances (Grant) Allin, was born May 14, 1757, in Hanover County, Virginia.  Thomas served in the Revolutionary War and afterwards moved to Mercer County, Kentucky.  On February 16, 1789, Thomas Allin married Mary Jouett, at the home of her brother, Captain John Jouett, Jr.  Mary was born June 14, 1765, in Louisa County, Virginia, the daughter of John Jouett, Sr., and his wife Mourning Harris.  Thomas and Mary raised a large family in Mercer County, Kentucky.  Thomas died June 26, 1833, at his home in Harrodsburg, during the cholera epidemic of that year.  His wife Mary died two days later, June 28, 1833.  They are buried in Spring Hill Cemetery.

The children of Major Thomas Allin and Mary Jouett Allin are:

  • Nancy Harris Allin
  • William H. Allin
  • John Jouett Allin
  • Thomas Allin, Jr.
  • Charles W. Allin
  • Mary Jouett Allin
  • Grant Allin
  • Philip Trapnell Allin
  • Samuel Woodson Allin
  • Benjamin Casey Allin

Nancy Harris Allin was born December 14, 1789, in Mercer County, Kentucky, died October 8, 1833, at Hopkins County, Kentucky.  In Mercer County she married Samuel Woodson, son of Samuel Woodson and Sarah Mills Woodson, born September 1, 1787, in Goochland County, Virginia.  Mentioned in her father’s will as having been “of uncommon feeble health from her infancy” thereby inheriting a larger share of the estate.  Samuel Woodson mentioned in the codicil of the will as having been advanced a “negro woman Nutty worth $400.00”.  Samuel Woodson was Court Clerk in Hopkins County.  Nancy and Samuel’s children:

  • Harris Woodson, born August 21, 1810, died October 6, 1827
  • James Woodson, born November 2, 1813, died December 11, 1813
  • Sarah Jane Grant Woodson, born February 24, 1823 (twin)
  • Mary Ann Russell Woodson, born February 24, 1823 (twin), died March 7, 1909
  • Samuel Charles Woodson, born May 29, 1825
  • William Woodson
  • Emily Weir Bishop Woodson, born November 6, 1829

William H. Allin, born April 9, 1791, in Mercer County, Kentucky; died 1834, Chariton County, Missouri.  William married Elizabeth Hooe.  William and Elizabeth’s children (born in Mercer County):

  • Benjamin Allin
  • Thomas Hooe Allin, born March 12, 1821
  • John Hooe Allin, born September 24, 1826

John Jouett Allin, born January 23, 1793, in Mercer County, Kentucky; died May 10, 1857, in Randolph County, Missouri; married first on November 15, 1815, at Harrodsburg, Sally Ann Hopkins, daughter of John Hopkins (b. February 20, 1762, Mecklenbug County, Virginia) and Mary Spencer Speed (Smith) Hopkins (widow of Hon. John Speed Smith) and born January 14, 1797; died August 9, 1821, at Harrodsburg, Kentucky; married 2nd on October 16, 1822, Cynthia McAfee, daughter of John McAfee and Elizabeth (McKarney) McAfee and born March 3, 1805; died September 26, 1850, in Randolph County, Missouri.  John McAfee was born October 26, 1775, in Boutetort County, Virginia; died April 28, 1833, in Mercer County, Kentucky, during the cholera epidemic.

John Jouett Allin as named by his father in his will as one of he executors.  In the codicil he is mentioned as a business partner in mills and a distillery and as having been advanced a sum of $150, which was to become part of his inheritance.  Member of the Legislature from Mercer County, Kentucky, for four years during the 1821-1826 time frame.

In 1834 John moved to Randolph County, Missouri.    John and Sally Ann’s children:

  • John James Allin, born April 9, 1819, at Harodsburg, Kentucky; died December 25, 1847, at Harrodsburg; married March 27, 1841, at Huntsville, Missouri, Susan Withers.
  • Thomas Speed Allin, born March 4, 1821; died 1822.

Children of John and Cynthia:

  • Samuel Allin, born May 10, 1824; died December 27, 1825
  • Grant Allin, born January 11, 1827; died September 2, 188
  • William Allin, born November 15, 1828
  • Joseph Huston Allin, born November 16, 1830
  • Mary Elizabeth Allin, born October 26, 1832, married March 11, 1852, Asa Grant
  • Sally H. Allin, born November 14, 1834; married October 14, 1852, James R. Murphy.  Went to California 1849.
  • Charles A. Allin, born August 19, 1838, in Missouri; died 1912, Los Angeles, California; married April 17, 1863, Elizabeth F. Mitchell
  • Philip Allin, born January 31, 1841, in Missouri; died in service, Confederate Army
  • Benjamin Casey Allin, born September 10, 1846, Missouri; died February 28, 1849

Thomas Allin, Jr., born July 20, 179, at Mercer County, Kentucky; died May 16, 1864; married September 15, 1814, Mary Burton Thompson, daughter of John Thompson and Rebecca Burton Thompson, born May 10, 1796; died August 27, 1860.

Thomas, Jr., was named in his father’s will to inherit certain land in Harrodsburg containing seventy-five acres; also one negro boy, Isaac.  Thomas also states in a codicil that his son Thomas, Jr., was to pay him one-third the amount of the profits of his office as Clerk of County Court since his father’s resignation from that office and any deficiency to be considered as so much advanced to him.  Thomas, Jr., was Clerk of Court in Mercer County at the time of his father’s death.  Children of Thomas, Jr., and Mary:

  • John Thompson Allin
  • Edwin Allin
  • William Robertson Allin, born 1814, died c. 1892.  Merchant at Keytesville, Missouri.  Unmarried.
  • Henry Clay Allin, born February 10, 1825
  • James Allin, born 1826
  • George Thompson Allin, born 1827
  • Philip Trapnell Allin, born March 3, 1835
  • Charles Joseph Allin
  • Susan Burton Allin
  • Ann Eliza Allin
  • Sally Jane Allin, born 1833
  • Davis Allin, died in infancy

To Be Continued

Will of Thomas Allin, Mercer County, Kentucky

Major Thomas Allin was born May 14, 1757, in Hanover County, Virginia, the son of William Allin and Frances Grant.  After serving in the Revolutionary War, Thomas Allin moved to Kentucky.  When Mercer County was created in 1786 he became the first county clerk and first circuit court clerk.  Married to Mary Jouett, of Albemarle County, Virginia, the couple raised ten children:  Nancy Harris, William H., John Jouett, Thomas, Jr., Charles W., Mary Jouett, Grant, Philip Trapnell, Samuel Woodson and Benjamin Casey Allin.

Major Thomas Allin died June 26, 1833, during the cholera epidemic.  His wife died two days later.  They are buried in  Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg.

Will Book 9, page 498.  Date, May 5, 1830

Probated, August County Court, 1833, Mercer County, Kentucky

In the  name of God, Amen.  I, Thomas Allin, of Mercer County, Kentucky, do make this my last will and testament as followeth: to wit:  I do hereby revoke all former wills by me heretofore made as entirely as if such wills had never been made.  I give and bequeath to my wife, Mary, all the estate of which I die possessed, except such as I shall specifically bequeath, to be by her used and enjoyed during her natural life, and then to go and be disposed of as hereinafter directed, except such part as shall be sold by my executors for the payment of any and every debt I may owe or be legally or equitable liable to pay.  I give and bequeath to my son, Benjamin C. Allin, the tract of land on Salt River on which I now live, containing about 200 acres with all and every of its appurtenances, also one other tract of about 45 acres, which I purchased of Garret Terhune, deceased, and which was conveyed to me by Henry Vandiver, the whole of which being 50 acres, 5 acres of which I have sold to Rube Terhune, and on which he now resides; also one other tract adjoining the last above on the West and adjoining Tewny’s land on the North, to be by said Benjamin held and enjoyed both by him, his heirs, etc., forever, the full possession of which said three tracts of land he is not to have possession during the lifetime of his mother – and further I give and bequeath to my son Benjamin the two following negroes, to wit:  Louisa, and John Black.  I give and bequeath to my son, Grant Allin, a tract of one thousand acres of land on Blackford’s Creek near the Ohio River, patented in my own name, but I expect it will be found to contain  much more; the whole of the tract, however, I give to him, be the same more or less.  I give and bequeath to my grandson, Tillman A. Dixon, son of Don C. Dixon and my daughter Polly, now deceased, two tracts of land in Muhlenberg County, patented in my own name, and containing about 200 acres each.  I give and bequeath to my son, Thomas Allin, Jr., the tract of land containing 75 acres lying West of the lot of land on which Cornelius Vanarsdall now lives, on which George B. Thompson had a tanyard, one acre of which I have sold to Dixon Robins; the balance I give and bequeath to my said son Thomas, to him and his heirs forever.  I also give him one negro boy, Isaac, son of John and Rachel.  I give and bequeath to my son, Phil T. Allin, the tract of land containing 50 acres, lying West of the dower land of the widow McClure, now deceased, and all my interest in said dower land, for which said dower land a suit is now pending in the Mercer Circuit Court, to him the said Phil T. Allin, his heirs, etc., forever.  And now after the above bequeaths and the many advances already heretofore made by me to my children in land, negroes, money and other estate, it is my will further that at my death the foregoing legacies be by my executors paid over to my legatees except the land given to my son Benjamin, which are not to be paid over or in anywise go to his use during the life of my wife, nor is the bequest herein made to my grandson, Tillman A. Dixon, to be paid over to him or be put into the power or control of him or any guardian that may be made, chosen or appointed for him, until he arrives at the age of 21 years, or gets married; but it is my will that said Tillman be educated and supported by my executors, free from any charge against him, out of my estate until he shall arrive at the age of 21 (twenty-one years) or gets married.

It is further my will that at the death of my wife that all the estate of mine that remain not devised or otherwise not used under this my will shall be sold by my executors at such credits as they may think best to give and the proceeds thereof to be equally divided among all my children and my grandson, Tillman A. Dixon, giving each an equal share thereof, with this exception however, that until each of their dividends shall amount to $200.00, one-ninth part is to be added to my daughter Nancy’s share and my son William not to receive any until each share shall amount to $200.00, and then my daughter Nancy’s share shall amount to $400.00, and after that should there be further dividends, my son William is to receive an equal share thereof with the rest of my legatees, this seeming partiality is not for want of sincere parental affection for my son William, nor for a greater fondness for my daughter Nancy, but that Nancy from her infancy has been of uncommon feeble health, and on my son William I have expended much larger sums for his education than for any of my children, and during his minority, his time was spent in getting his education and his other brothers and sisters in their minority were toiling with me for his and their support.  It is further my will that my executors, with the consent of my wife, at any time, if need be thereof shall appear to them, either for the support of the family or the payment of my debts, sell for the best price they can get, either at public or private sale, such part of my estate as they think most advisable.  It is also my will that my executors, or either of them, shall make conveyance of any lands I may have sold or for which I otherwise have become liable to convey or for any land it may be necessary to convey under any sale that may be made under this my last will.  Lastly, I appoint my three sons, John J. Allin, Philip T. Allin and Benjamin C. Allin, executors of this my last will and testament.

                                                                                 Thomas Allin

Codicil to my foregoing will made July 13, 1830.  It is further my will that my son Benjamin C. Allin shall continue to live with his mother during her life (so long as she and him shall both agree to do so) and mange the affairs of the farm, stock, etc., and after supporting her and the family and himself, and his family, from the proceeds of the plantation and divide the net profits equally with his mother, her proportions thereof to be by her disposed of in any way she may choose.  It is further my will that after the death of my wife, the moiety of the mills and distillery, which I hold in partnership with my son John J. Allin, shall go to him and his heirs forever.

It is further my will that after my decease and that of my wife, no demand shall be made by my executors for any arrearages that may be supposed to be due me from my son John J. Allin, touching our mills and distillery, nor any demands made on my son Philip T. Allin, for any arrearages that may be supposed to be due me touching our agreement, concerning the office, further than they themselves shall voluntarily acknowledge and agree to pay.  And it is further my will that if any of my legatees shall in any way or manner, set up any kind of claim whatever for any further estate of mine, by debt, gift, promise or otherwise than what is given them under this will and codicil, such legatee so claiming shall recover nothing under this my will and codicil, but shall rely upon such other claim for his, her or their proportion of my estate and such bequests as has ben made to such legatee, shall be equally divided by my executors between the rest of my legatees, who shall agree to take agreeably to my foregoing will and codicil.  It is also my will that all the stocks of cattle, hogs and sheep that shall be left or raised on the farm, whether my wife or my son Benjamin, are to be killed and used alike for the use and support of both families and the horses of each are alike to be worked or rode as though they were all one entire estate.

                                                                                                 Thomas Allin

I have advanced to my children as followeth, in addition to what is expressed in my foregoing will, viz:  to my son William about $180.00; to my son John J. Allin about $150.00, to Charles W. Allin about $140.00, to Grant about $400.00, to Samuel Woodson Allin, a negro woman, Nutty, worth $400.00.  These sums were to be repaid, but should they not, they are to stand as so much advanced their legacies.  My son Thomas Allin was to pay me one-third of the amount of profits of his office since my resignation and any deficiency is to be considered as so much advanced to him.  My son Phil was to pay me one half the profits of his office and so much as he shall fail to pay thereof, is to be considered as advanced to him.  November 10, 1832.

                                                            Thomas Allin

Mercer County, August County Court, 1833

The foregoing last will and testament of Thomas Allin, deceased, together with the codicil thereto was this day produced into Court and the whole body of said will and codicil, together with the signatures thereto, was proven to be in the handwriting of said decendent by the oaths of Samuel Daviess and Joseph Haskins, Esqrs., and ordered to be recorded, which is here done.

                               Attest:  Thomas Allin, C. C. (son)

I, W. W. Stephenson, a Notary Public, in and for Mercer County, State of Kentucky, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and correct copy of the will and codicil of Thomas Allin, deceased, as recorded in Will Book 9, page 498 to 501 of the Mercer County Clerk’s Office.

                                 Signed.  W. W. Stephenson, Notary Public

Major Thomas Allin

Friday evening I went to Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg.  The day was picture perfect – a beautiful blue sky, white billowing clouds – and temperatures were in the low 80’s!  Quite different from the 90-100 degree weather we’ve had the last six weeks!  This is such a beautiful cemetery, many old and unusual gravestones, lots of shade trees.  I did have a couple of gravestones on my list, but after finding and photographing those stones, I just wandered through, taking shots of what I thought most interesting.

The photo above is a double above-ground monument.

When I got home I could make out Major Thomas Allin, that he was born in May and died in June, but that was all I could decipher.

The stone for his wife, Mary, was even harder to read.  I decided to go back to the cemetery Saturday morning, but even tracing my finger over the dates was no help.  A trip to our local library gave me much more information about this couple.

Major Thomas Allin was born May 14, 1757, in Hanover County, Virginia.  He was the son of William Allin and Frances Grant.  The next year the family moved to Granville County, North Carolina.  Shortly after the beginning of the Revolutionary War, Thomas enlisted as a private, and later served in the army of General Nathaniel Greene.

In 1781 Thomas Allin moved to what is now Stanford in Lincoln County, Kentucky.  He was chosen as deputy surveyor for the county, and the next year became deputy sheriff.  After the war he moved to Danville, Kentucky.  On February 16, 1787, he married Mary Jouett of Albemarle County, Virginia.  The couple’s children are as follows:  John J., Thomas, Charles W., Grant, Philip, Nancy, William and Ben C. Allin.

When Mercer County was created in 1786, Thomas Allin was chosen as the first county clerk and clerk of the circuit court.  He represented Mercer County in the Virginia constitutional convention in June 1788.

Thomas, in addition to being county and circuit court clerks, operated a farm, a mill and a distillery.  He resigned as circuit court clerk in 1825 and as county clerk in 1831, his sons, Ben C., and Thomas, Jr., succeeded him in these positions.

Thomas died during the 1833 cholera epidemic on June 26th – and his wife, Mary, died two days later on June 28th.  Cholera was widespread that year.  My great-great-grandfather, William Peter Montgomery, died in Washington County, Kentucky, June 19, 1833.  In Lexington it was said that people were dying at the rate of 50 per day.  Such a tragic time.