Tag Archives: old photos

Beautiful Woman from Arbroath Scotland

This beautiful woman is from Arbroath, Scotland.  The huge sleeves are from the late 1890’s.  The high neckline and rosettes are also from this time period.  She has just a sense of sadness on her face, but that is not unusual.

The photo was taken by Geddes and Son Photographers in Arbroath.  Arbroath was a Pict village from the Iron Age.  William the Lion built an Abbey there in 1178.  The village was very small for many years, The Declaration of Arbroath was signed in the Abbey in 1380, after the Battle of Bannockburn, by 38 Scottish Lords who agreed to the independence of Scotland.  The Abbey, although a ruin today, is a popular tourist attraction.

Little Brother and Sister Photograph

Isn’t this an adorable photograph?  Tiny brother and sister, arms linked, standing in Mahan & Keller’s Photography Studio, 1427 Ridge Avenue, in Philadelphia.  Both are dressed in the late 1860’s/1870’s fashion for children.  The girl’s plaid dress with white lace collar and lace pantalettes is so sweet.  And the little boy, with his outfit, similar to little Lord Fauntleroy, is just as cute.  His parted and combed hair is just as precise as his sister’s.

Mahan & Keller Photography were at the above address, I believe, since 1842.  In the Important Events of the Century:  Containing Historical and Important Events During the Last 100 Years, published by the US Central Publishing Company in 1876, the bi-centennial year, Mahan & Keller are listed on the page 343, under Philadelphia’s Leading Business Houses.

This photo is a carte-de-visite, 4×2.5.

Adorable Children Photographed By T. C. Partridge

I have two photographs to share with you – two little ones.  Photos were taken on the same day, different poses.  These were taken from the large red photo album I purchased through Ebay.

Unfortunately there are no names on the photos.  The dresses are the same – a smocked upper bodice and cuffs, full sleeves and trim at the hem.  You know how I love little boots!

In my research I found little about T. C. Partridge.  He did have a studio in Sudbury from around 1888 to 1900.

 

Little Miss Mariva Anna Eubella Gerard

Let me introduce you to Mariva Anna Eubella Gerard!  What a beautiful name for a beautiful child.  This is a delightful photo, this tiny baby encased in a huge dress.  The detail is amazing, the little ruffles and lace, and eyelet embroidery on the bottom half of the skirt.

When this photo was taken little Mariva was five weeks and four days old.  She is truly a little sweetheart.

This photo was taken by Powell Studios in Kankakee, Illinois.

Two Examples of Ambrotype Photographs

The second type of early photographs were ambrotype photos.  Ambrotypes look very similar to the later tintype photos.  An easy way to test them is to use a magnet – even through the case you can fell the attraction of the magnet with the iron used for the tintype.  The glass of the ambrotype feels no pull from the magnet.

An ambrotype was created on a piece of glass – and looked like a negative until a black background was added.  Begun about 1855, the earlier ambrotypes had the photograph on one piece of glass, with an additional piece of glass covered with a tar-like pitch.  About 1858 the varnish covers the back of the glass with the photo on front or sometimes a colored class was used.  In 1859 the clear glass has a black cloth at the back of the image.  I have one with the double glass and one with the black varnish on back of the photo.

This photograph of my 4th great-grandmother, Nancy Linton Edwards, was probably taken about 1855.  There are two pieces of glass in the case – one with the photo, and another with the black pitch on back.  Unfortunately, the glass containing the photograph was broken, but it still gives us a good idea of her features.  Nancy was the daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, born in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1778.  She married Edward Barber Edwards, with whom she raised a large family.  On the way through the Cumberland Gap, from Virginia to Kentucky, her horse was spooked by a cougar or bobcat, causing her to fall and break her leg.  She traveled in a litter the rest of the way to Washington County, and never walked again.

Nancy’s cotton cap was used by older women during the 1850’s, younger women using a bonnet.  She wears the older fashions of the 1840’s.  Looking at her white hair, face and neck you could easily guess her age of about 77.  But look at her fingers – they look long and very elegant.  There is just a hint of color in her cheeks.

As you can tell from this photo, the scan is not generally good unless you remove the photograph from the case, but I wanted you to see the mat that is used with this photograph.  It is called a nonpareil mat, due to the shape, and was used between 1850 and 1859.  The preserver (around the edge) is still rather simple, but a little more decorative than with the daguerreotype photos.

The case is lined with red velvet and is decorated on front and back with the same design.  The case is 3 ¼ x 3 ¾.

This next ambrotype is a great photo of a youngish man with great hair and beard!  His collar and tie are from the 1850’s – as are the wide lapels of his coat and the overall larger look of the suit.  I believe this to be Edward Edwards Taylor, son of John Compton Taylor and Susan Clark Edwards, my 3rd great-grandparents.  Edward was a brother to my Catherine Elizabeth Taylor who married Edward Edwards Linton – a little confusing with those middle names!  This photo has only one piece of glass, with the varnish on back, so we can date this photo to about 1858.  In that year Edward, or ‘Ned’ as he was called, would have been 27 years of age.  Also, his ears look very much like those of his father, John Taylor.

The mat with this photo is oval, with much decoration.  The preserver, not shown in this photo, is also more decorated, with semi-reinforced corners.  The case is similar to Nancy Edwards’ case, but the photograph is smaller – 2 3/8 x 2 7/8.

Next up, tintypes!

1900 Photo of Family with Baby in Umbrella Stroller

Such a wonderful old photo to share with you today!  There is no name of photographer, or the couple and baby in this photo, but it is precious beyond saying!  Look at the old fashioned stroller, with umbrella to protect baby from the sun.  It is wicker, and very ornate, white lace and ruffles falling gently from the top of the umbrella.  The couple is not looking directly at the photographer, but has their eyes focused on their child! The mother wears a white blouse and skirt, and the father a suit and dapper hat.  A beautiful remembrance from a time long ago.

Old Photo from Logan City Utah

This is a great photo I share with you today.  Definitely from the 1870’s, the style of skirts and the man’s jacket, closely buttoned at the top, are more than enough clues to date it.  This style of dress is very beautiful, not quite the impression the huge skirts of the 1860’s made, but more ornate in detail and trims.  Both women wear fine gold necklaces, and the gentleman a gold watch chain.

Do you notice anything unusual in the photograph?  It seems that both woman are a bit possessive of the gentleman.  The hand on the shoulder, and one on the forearm speak volumes.

This photograph was taken by T. B. Cardon in Logan City, Utah.  I did just a bit of research on Logan City and found it is indeed inhabited by many Mormons, and is considered very conventional.  The town was founded in 1859 by settlers sent by Brigham Young to survey for the site of a fort by the Logan River.  Evidently a beautiful place to live, it is the home of Utah State University and has a ski areas close by.  Given that this photo was taken in Logan City, this three people could very well be Mormon, and be a man with his two wives.

I found a wonderful site with information on T. B. Cardon and his wife, Lucy Smith.  They were Mormon, and not only was he a photographer, but also a watch maker and jeweler.

Thomas B. Cardon was a member of General George B. McClellan’s army during the Civil War, and after the Battle of Gaines Hill, where he was shot in the arm and side, was left for dead.  Coming to,  surrounded by the dead from the fight, he caught up with the Union Army just before being captured by the South.  He survived, met Lucy Smith and proposed in 1867, married four years later.  They were married 27 years before Thomas’ death in 1898.

T.B. Cardon Dead.  Passing Away One of Logan’s Most Highly Respected Citizens. The hand of death has again been thrust into our midst and has plucked from amongst us one whom, not only his family, but the entire community, will miss and mourn for.  Thomas B. Cardon passed away at his home on Tuesday evening after an illness reached its culmination in an attack of pneumonia which developed recently, and was the stated cause of death.

Nervous prostration, brought on by worry over business reverses which a less honest man than he would not have noticed, which had weakened his body and made it an easy prey to disease, was the real cause of death. He built up a magnificent business here, and then when the panic came a few years ago he lost it all, simply because he gave every man credit for being as honest as he was himself.  He never recovered from the shock of the affair, but fell prey to needless worry; for no man in Logan would have deemed Thomas B. Cardon’s word less than his bond. But the strain was too great; the magnificent brain wore itself out and the big, honest heart of Thomas B. Cardon was stilled forever. He leaves a wife and family behind him, who will miss him as much, but will treasure within their hearts the memory of his worth and goodness.

A biographical sketch of Mr. Cardon was partly prepared for this issue but was withheld at the request of the relatives, in order to obtain some additional information in regard to his life.  The funeral services will be held at one o’clock on Friday in the tabernacle.

–      Utah Journal Newspaper, February 17, 1898