Tag Archives: William Brown

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

Brown Family Plot – Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

George I. Brown was born in Virginia in 1784.  He bought property in Jessamine County, Kentucky – quite a lot since his real estate was valued at $54,000 in 1850.  George married Sarah Perry, November 17, 1809, in Woodford County, Kentucky.  They had two sons, George and Moreau Brown.

Sarah, wife of G. I. Brown, born September 30, 1789, died May 6, 1832.

Sarah Brown died in 1832, and the next year George married Catharine W. McKinney, June 6, 1833, in Woodford County.  Since both wives came from this county perhaps there were family members living there.

In the 1850 census of Jessamine County George, 65, is listed as a farmer, born in Virginia.  Wife Catherine is 46.  Their three children are Mary Hannah, 15; William, 12; and Sally, 9.

George I. Brown, born December 11, 1784, died March 14, 1856.

Catherine lived another nine years before dying in 1867.

Catherine W., wife of G. I. Brown, born October 25, 1802, died October 2, 1867.

From this angle you can see son Moreau Brown’s gravestone on the right – with the statue at the top – and son George Brown’s would be on the left, next to the beautiful gravestone of his wife, Anne Hemphill.  A better view is in the first photo of this article.

 

 

Will of Richard Williams

from Wills – Loudoun County, Virginia 1793-1797

pp. 297-298

In the name of God, amen.  I, Richard Williams, of the County of Loudoun and State of Virginia, being weak of body but of sound mind and memory and calling to mind the uncertainty of life and the certainty of death, do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in manner and form following; and as touching such worldly goods as God hath been pleased to bless me with I give and bequeath in the manner and form following, vizt.  My desire is that all my just debts be paid.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son, Jenkin Williams, five shillings.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son, Joseph Williams, five shillings.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son, James Williams, one middle sized pewter dish.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my daughter, Mary Shrieves, five shillings.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my son, Enos Williams, all my lands I now possess to him and his heirs or assigns forever.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my wife, Margaret, one third part of the above mentioned land with all my stock consisting of cattle, sheep, hogs and one mare for and during her natural life and after her death I give the same to son Enos Williams, with all my household furniture and everything else that is my property to him, his heirs and assigns forever; my son, Enos, to take care of the stock above mentioned and to find his mother in fire wood as long as she lives.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my grandson, William George, six pounds Virginia currency to be paid him two years after my decease by my executors.  And I make, constitute and appoint my son, Enos Williams, and my friend, Charles Bennett, as executors to this my Last Will and Testament, utterly revoking and disannulling all other former Will and Wills by me made hereto, ratifying and confirming this and this only my Last Will and Testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twentieth day of March one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five.  Sealed, signed and pronounced in the presence of Jesse Taylor, William Brown.

Richard Williams

At a Court held for Loudoun County May the 8th 1797

This Last Will and Testament of Richard Williams, deceased, was proved by the affirmation of William Brown and Jesse Taylor, two subscribing witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded.  And on motion of Enos Williams and Charles Bennett, the executors therein named, who made oath thereto according to law, and together with Isaac Larrowe, their security, entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of two hundred pounds with condition as the law directs.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining probate thereof in due form.  Teste  Charles Binns, Court Clerk

Will of Stephen Gregg of Loudoun County, Virginia

Loudoun County Virginia Wills 1793-1797

pp. 161-162

Be it remembered that I, Stephen Gregg, of the County of Loudoun and State of Virginia, being weak in body but of sound disposing mind and memory, and calling to mind the uncertainty of time in this transitory world, do this second day of the eleventh month, called November, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, make and publish this my Last Will and Testament, in manner and form following:  Vizt., First I direct that all my just debts be fully satisfied and paid by my executors hereafter named.

Secondly, I give to my wife, Susanna Gregg, the whole privilege and benefit of my dwelling house and spring house on the plantation where my son, Thomas, now lives and the use of a stable for her horse.  Also, what fruit she may think sufficient for her family’s summer and winter use from the said plantation, and a sufficiency of firewood found her ready cut and hauled to her door by my son, Thomas, likewise the privilege and use of a convenient piece of ground sufficient for a garden for the use of her family.  My son, Thomas, shall also furnish her with pasture and hay for the keeping of one horse, two cows and six sheep; he shall likewise pay his mother thirty pounds at the end of each year after my decease during her widowhood.  I likewise give all my wearing apparel to my wife to be disposed of in such manner as she may think proper; I also give her my young sorrel mare, her saddle and bridle, and two cows and six sheep to her, her choice, and all my household furniture which belonged to her before our marriage, but in case my widow should hereafter marry, that from thenceforward she shall relinquish all right or claim to any part of privilege from the above mentioned plantation.

Thirdly, I give and devise to my son, Thomas, all my plantation whereon he now lives, to him and his heirs and assigns forever; subject to the above encumbrances for his mother’s use.  He shall also pay to my son, Nathan, the sum of two hundred pounds in the following manner, to wit, in three years after my decease, the sum of fifty pounds and fifty pounds at the end of each year afterwards until the whole is paid.  I also give my son, Thomas, my black trolling mare.

Fourthly, I give and devise to my son, Samuel, all my plantation where I now live, with the mills and all other improvements thereunto belonging, to him, his heirs and assigns forever, but he shall pay at the end of six months after my decease to my son, Nathan, the sum of fifty pounds, at the end of twelve months after that time he shall pay to my daughter, Susannah, the sum of fifty pounds, and in one year after fifty pounds to Nathan, and at the expiration of the next year fifty pounds more to Susannah and fifty pounds per year at the end of the two succeeding years to Nathan.

Fifthly, I give and devise to my son, Nathan, a tract of land lying between the Short Hill and Blue Ridge containing one hundred acres to him, his heirs and assigns forever, and a young sorrel horse, as likewise the before mentioned legacies to be paid him by his two brothers.

Sixthly, I give and bequeath to my daughter, Susannah, one good feather bed and furniture, and also the before mentioned legacy of one hundred pounds to be paid her by her brother, Samuel.  And all the remainder of my personal estate of any kind whatsoever I give to my son, Nathan, and my daughter, Susannah, to be equally divided between them.

And lastly, I nominate and appoint my two sons, Thomas and Samuel, as executors to this my Last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me heretofore made and this only to be taken for my Last Will and Testament.

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the above said Stephen Gregg to be his Last Will and Testament in the presence of Israel Janney, Jesse Janney, William Brown.

Stephen Gregg

At a court held for Loudoun County, February the 8th, 1796

This Last Will and Testament of Stephen Gregg, deceased, was proved by the affirmation of Jesse Janney and William Brown, and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Thomas Gregg and Samuel Gregg, who made affirmation, and with James McIlhaney and Isaac Nichols, their securities, entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of one thousand five hundred pounds, conditioned according to law.  Certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form.

Teste Charles Binns, Court Clerk

1860 Washington County Census

Washington County, Kentucky – 1860 Census

Page 109 – Sharpsmill

Line 772 – Satterly, Albert   36  M  KY

  • Sarah   22   F  KY
  • Mary E.   15   F   KY

Line 773 – Goodlett, John J.   43   M   KY

  • Margaret   33   F   KY
  • Marion   12   M   KY
  • Jasper   6   M   KY
  • William N.   4   M   KY
  • John J.   2   M   KY

Line 774 – Goodlett, William H.   30   M   KY

  • Ellen   28   F   KY
  • John C.   6   M   KY
  • Emily J.   4   F   KY
  • Joseph   2   M   KY
  • William L.   4/12   M   KY

Line 775 – Goodlett, James B.   49   M   KY

  • Jane   51   F   KY
  • Sarena   22   F   KY

Line 776 – Mours, James   32   M   KY

  • Sarah   35   F   KY

Line 777 – Gritton, Jackson   23   M   KY

  • Elizabeth   23   F   KY
  • Sarah M.   4   F   KY
  • Mary B.   2   F   KY
  • Lorenzo   1   M   KY

Line 778 – Barnett, William   30   M   KY

  • Elizabeth   24   F   KY

Line 779 – Barnett, William   30   M   KY

  • Elizabeth   60   F   KY
  • Charles   18   M   KY
  • Sanders, Rhoda   10   F   KY
  • Barnett, Notley   23   M   KY
  • Dennis, James N.   29   M   KY

Line 780 – Edward, Nathan   27   M   KY

  • Mary   26   F   KY

Line 781 – Barnett, William Jr.   43   M   KY

  • Elizabeth   36   F   KY
  • Catherine A.   16   F   KY
  • Susan   14   F   KY
  • Eliza   12   F   KY
  • Margaret   10   F   KY
  • Uriah   8   M   KY
  • Cornelius   6   M   KY
  • George W.   4   M   KY
  • Martha   2   F   KY

Line 782 – Holt, William   51   M   KY

  • Elizabeth   47   F   KY
  • Jacob   22   M   KY
  • Abraham   18   M   KY
  • Isaac   14   M   KY
  • Frances   12   F   KY
  • Artemesa   9   F   KY
  • Eliza   6   F   KY
  • Rocksey L.   4   F   KY

Line 783 – Gritton, Hogan   45   M   KY

  • Martha   42   F   KY
  • Meritt   22   M   KY
  • Elizabeth   18   F   KY
  • Lucretia   10   F   KY
  • Thomas   16   M   KY
  • Levi   12   M   KY
  • Colvin   10   M   KY
  • Martha E.   8   F   KY

Line 784 – Brown, William   30   M   KY

  • Susan   32   F   KY
  • John   13   M   KY
  • Josephine   11   F   KY
  • Isaac H.   1/12   M   KY
  • Jackson   32   M   KY

Line 785 – Goodlett, Eliza   30   F   KY

  • Sarah   12   F   KY
  • William   10   M   KY
  • Robert   5   M   KY

Line 786 – Drury, Joshua   44   M   KY

  • Sarah   36   F   KY
  • Gordon   20   M   KY
  • Meritt   19   M   KY
  • Harvey   17   M   KY
  • Nancy   14   F   KY
  • William   12   M   KY
  • Granville   6   M   KY
  • Martha   4   F   KY
  • James E.   5/12   M   KY

The Brown Family of Washington County, Kentucky

from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky

Brown Family

The Brown or Browne family of Washington County is first found here in the year 1804.  In that year Amey Cocke, widow of Stephen Cocke, of Virginia, came to Washington County in company with her three sons, Richard, Stephen and Thomas J.  With her, the widow Cocke brought several of her grandchildren, orphans of her daughter, Elizabeth, who had married William Brown in Virginia.  These children were William Brown, Stephen Cocke Brown and Eliza Beverly Brown.

William Brown, probably the eldest of the orphans, studied medicine and was a practicing physician in Washington County.  He died in 1821, leaving a widow and two children, William Brown and Richard Jones Brown.  William, like his father, was a physician.  He married Susan M. Cozine and had Hadgie, Mattie, Jennie and Richard J.  Richard J. Browne was one of the most distinguished lawyers of his time.  He married Hadgie McElroy and died without issue.

Eliza Beverly Brown, sister of William and Stephen C., married Jack Jouett.  She died young, leaving several children.

Stephen Cocke Brown was born near Petersburg, Virginia, September 20, 1798.  Both of his parents dying while he was young, he was left in care of his maternal grandmother, Amey Cocke, and by her brought to Kentucky in 1804.  He later returned to Virginia and studied at Hampden-Sidney College and then came again to Kentucky in 1813, in company with his uncle, Samuel Booker.  After his return to Washington County in 1813 he served as a deputy in the office of the Clerk of Washington County Court.  He married, March 21, 1821, Mary E. Davison, daughter of Elias Davison, a prominent citizen of Springfield.

  After his marriage in 1821, Stephen C. Brown moved to the country.  His home was near the Beech Fork and on the road from the Dr. Hopper place in Poortown.  Robert Tate McElroy is the present occupant of the old home.  Stephen C. was one of the county’s leading citizens and a devout member of the Presbyterian Church.  He gave the land whereon Pleasant Grove Church stands.  He died January 15, 1864.  His wife died December 7, 1867.  she was born September 11, 1805.  Both are buried at Pleasant Grove.

Will of William Holms

Loudoun County Will Book B

Will of William Holms

In the name of God, Amen.  I William Holms of Loudoun County and Colony of Virginia, being sickly and weak of body, but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given to almighty God for his mercies, and calling to mind the mortality of body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, I do hereby make and ordain this my last Will and Testament.  That is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend my soul into the hands of almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the earth from whence it came to be buried in a Christian-like and decent manner at the discretion of my executors hereafter named and as touching my worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life, I give devise and dispose of in the following manner, that is to say:

Imprimis.  My will and desire is that in the first place all and every of my just debts and funeral charges be fully paid and satisfied out of my personal estate as it will and hold what is wanting for the same to be raised from the rents of my two plantations and mill till all be fully paid and satisfied.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto my well beloved son, William Holms, my plantation lying on Cetocton Mountain, which I bought from Sam Mead and part from Solomon Hoge, to him and to his heirs or assigns forever, upon his paying fifty pounds Virginia currency to my well beloved son, Joshua Holms, when he comes to age to him and his heirs or assigns forever.

Item.  I give and bequeath to my well beloved son, Joshua Holms, to him, his heirs or assigns forever the rents and profits of the mill and plantation I bought from John Wilks, from the time my son William comes to age until my son Joshua comes to age to inherit the same and if so be that my son William, or my son Joshua should either of them die before they come to age or without lawful issues, for my son Joshua to have that plantation which such deceased son should have had, to him , his heirs or assigns forever and the two sums of money above mentioned or so bequeathed to my said son Joshua to be remitted and as if they had not been bequeathed or otherwise if my son Joshua should die before he comes at age for the above said two sums of money to be remitted and as if they had not been bequeathed.

Item.  My will and desire is that all the rest and the residue of my estate, together with the rents, benefits and profits of both real and personal estate to be put to rent and use for the benefit of my well beloved daughters and to be divided in the following manner.  When my son William comes at age, that is to say my will is that my daughter Elizabeth Harris have fifteen pounds Virginia currency laid out in clothing for her and her children as my executors hereafter named shall think they stand in most need of and all that remaineth therefrom to be equally divided amongst the rest of my daughters, namely Margaret, Mary, Rachel, Deborah and Sarah, and if any of my daughters should die without lawful issue or before they come to age to receive it such share to be equally divided amongst my surviving daughters, to them, their heirs or assigns forever.  My will and desire is that as the rents and incomes becomes due and recoverable to be paid my daughter Margaret after the first year of full and clear rents  be due and so to every younger daughter a full years rents as they come to age to receive it, and what more rents rising from the  plantations, some part thereof to be for the use of my youngest children’s schooling as my executors shall think convenient, the rest to be divided as followeth – five pounds per piece to my daughters Margaret, Mary and Rachel, over and above equal shares and what remains to be equally divided amongst all my daughters when my son William comes to age.

And lastly, I do hereby nominate and appoint my trusty and well beloved friends, William Brown and George Taverns, executors of this my last Will and Testament, and I do hereby revoke all other wills.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 22 day of November, 1774.

 William Holms

In the presence of Samuel Wilks, Samuel Combs, John Updike and Edward Holms

At a Court held for Loudoun County, November 12, 1775.  This will was proved by the oaths of Samuel Wilks, Edward Holms, Samuel Combs and John Updike and ordered to be recorded.  And on the motion of William Brown and George Tavenor, executors therein named who taking the usual oath, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate, thereof they giving security.  Whereupon the said William and George, with Samuel Wilks their security, entered into and acknowledged bond in the sum of five hundred pounds current money with condition as the law directs.