Family Stories

Benjamin F. Mattingly, Biography

from Marion County, Kentucky, Biographies

Benjamin F. Mattingly was born October 11, 1828, and is a son of Benjamin and Susan (Graves) Mattingly.  Benjamin Mattingly was born near Lebanon, December 25, 1792.  He was a substantial farmer, was a soldier of 1812 and was in General Harrison’s army.  He was an active and prominent Democrat, died April 9, 1854, and was a son of John Mattingly, of Maryland, who married a Miss Fenwick and immigrated to Marion County and settled first near Lebanon, as early as 1790; later located on 100 acres one mile west of St. Mary’s, which he partially improved and died in 1804, aged about forty years.  He was a son of Leonard Mattingly, who married a Miss Hagan, both natives of Maryland.  He came to Kentucky, settled and died, where Benjamin F. was born and now resides, in Loretto Precinct, Marion County.  He had a large apple orchard and manufactured considerable cider and brandy, of which he was particularly fond, and made in large quantities for that early day.  He was of English origin and his ancestors were supposed to have immigrated to Maryland during Lord Baltimore’s reign.  The first who came to America were mechanics, after which they turned their attention to plain farming, which has continued to be the occupation of successive generations.  The mother of Benjamin F. was born near Roan’s Knob, in Nelson County, Kentucky, 1794, and was a daughter of John and Susan (Noble) Graves, natives of Maryland and of English origin, who immigrated to Nelson County as early as 1790 and engaged in farming.  Benjamin F. Mattingly, a native of Loretto Precinct, Marion County, was reared on a farm and received a liberal education at St. Mary’s College; at the age of seventeen he commenced business on his own account at farming and distilling.  In 1860, with his brother, he located and engaged quite extensively in the distillery business at Louisville; in 1880 sold his interest to his brother and immediately erected another distillery with a capacity of 1,000 bushels.  With the exception of four years’ residence in Louisville, Mr. Mattingly has resided all his life about one mile west of St. Mary’s on 140 acres improved with a fine residence and an apple orchard of seventy-five acres of fine winter varieties, and he is of the fourth generation owning the old homestead.  Mr. Mattingly also owns a number of other valuable farms in Marion County to the extent of 3,000 acres, all of which (excepting a small legacy) he has accumulated by his own energies and careful management.  He also runs a saw mill and grist mill.  Mr. Mattingly is a liberal giver to any enterprise enhancing and advancing the interest of his community.  August 9, 1864, he was united in marriage to Kate Willett of Nelson County, a daughter of George and Catherine (Miles) Willett.  To this union thirteen children were born:  Agnes, Mary, Imelda, Francis X., Bernard, Benedict, Teresa, Anna Mary, Paul, Veronica, Margaret, Mary and Gertrude.  Mr. and Mrs. Mattingly are consistent members of the Roman Catholic Church.  Iin politics he is a Democrat.

2 replies »

  1. Correct me if I am wrong but in the above biography of Benjamin F. Mattingly Jr. b.10-11-1828, It says…..”.it says, John Mattingly was a son see next.”…….He was a son of Leonard Mattingly, who married a Miss Hagan. I have that Leonard Mattingly b 1739 d 1820 married Mary HAYDEN. B 1739 in MD. I know I like to be advised if I have something wrong in my database, and thought maybe I should check with you about this info. I thought well may be I am wrong, and I went to Rootsweb, and they also have that he was married to Mary Hayden. Thanks as always for your cotinuous work of sharing of the so many great families.

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