Tag Archives: biographies

Thomas Corwin Anderson Biography

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle & Kniffin, 1888

Montgomery County

Thomas Corwin Anderson, one of the most noted short-horn cattle breeders of the United States, was born August 24, 1845, in Montgomery County, Kentucky, at ‘Side View’ farm, where he now lives, on the turnpike between Paris and Mt. Sterling, and which is one of the most beautiful tracts of land in the Blue Grass region.  He is the only child of John Jay and Margaret (Mitchell) Anderson, both of pioneer families of Kentucky.  His grandfathers were Captains in the War of 1812, and his great-grandfather Anderson a conspicuous officer in the war of the Revolution.  Between fourteen and fifteen years of age the subject of our sketch enlisted in the Federal army, where, by his youthful acts of bravery, quick intelligence, and manly deportment, he soon won the admiration and esteem of officers and men.  He attracted the attention of General Nelson, who suggested that he should receive a military education.  This meeting the approval of his family, he was recommended to the U.S. Naval Academy, and received the appointment through Colonel William H. Wadsworth, Representative in Congress from his district.  he remained at the academy some three years, but, preferring an independent life on a farm to that on the ocean wave, he gave it up, and finished his education at Yale College.  October 12, 1870, he was married to Miss Annie English, of Louisville, Kentucky, daughter of Colonel Sam S. English, a prominent lawyer of that city.  He has two children, handsome, intelligent boys:  English and Jay; the fifth generation who have occupied this farm.  From early childhood Mr. Anderson has been a sufferer from weak lungs, yet he is a man of great energy and nerve.  He is thoroughly informed in regard to his business, and having a library well supplied with herd books, Short-horn histories, etc., no one is better posted in knowledge of pedigrees.  He is very fond of reading, and is a man of varied information.  He is pleasing in manner, exceedingly hospitable, and has many friends.  Mr. Anderson owns the largest individual herd of Short-horn cattle in the United States.

Charles H. Higdon Biography

Charles Higdon, November 11, 1835 – September 26, 1918.  Sara A. Higdon, February 9, 1950 – December 5, 1918.  St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery, Daviess County, Kentucky.

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle & Knifflin, 1883

Daviess County – Knottsville Precinct

Charles H. Higdon, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in this precinct November 11, 1835, and was a son of B. Henson and Henrietta (Milton) Higdon, both natives of Maryland.  He was reared on a farm, and received his education in the common schools of this county.  he was married in 1870 to Sarah A., daughter of John R. Duncan.  Eight children have been born to them, six now living – Charles I., Mary M., Francis K., Elmer L., Henson and an infant son.  Mr. Higdon owns 135 acres of well-improved land.  He and family are members of the Catholic Church.

Theodore Jennings Biography

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle and Kniffin, 1888

Jefferson County

Theodore Jennings was born in Greencastle, Indiana, June 7, 1850, and is a son of Theodore C. Jennings, a miller, and an early settler of Indiana, who emigrated from Kentucky.  His mother was a daughter of Joel and Mary Yager, natives of Jefferson County, Kentucky.  The subject of this sketch was educated principally in the State University at Bloomington, Indiana.  In 1872 he engaged in a general merchandise business at Utica, Indiana, and in 1876 engaged in the drug business, which he followed until April, 1881, when he sold out and removed to Jeffersonville, and took charge of Lewman and Bros. drug business until 1884, when he came to Louisville, and engaged in the same business with F. Bender, on Shelby and Jefferson streets.  Having read medicine for ten years, he began attending a course of lectures in 1885, at the Louisville Medical College, graduating in 1887, and at once commenced practicing.  His office is at 909 East Jefferson Street, Louisville.  Dr. Jennings was married, in 1872, to Miss Maggie Summers, niece of James and Margaret Hobson, of Utica, Indiana, by whom he has three children: Anna, James and Maggie.  His wife died May 25, 1880.  He was next married, October 11, 1884, to Miss Maud Fogle, a daughter of Ebenezer Fogle, of Marion County.  By this second marriage he has one daughter, Nellie M. Jennings.

James C. Miller Biography

from History of Daviess County, Kentucky, Inter-State Publishing Company, 1883

Masonville Precinct

James C. Miller resides on the same farm in Masonville Precinct where his father settled in 1824, and where he was born August 26, 1830.  His father, Fleming Miller, was born in Henrico County, Virginia, November 1, 1791.  He followed teaming until the outbreaking of the War of 1812, when he enlisted in Captain De Val’s company.  After the war, he returned to Virginia and married Elizabeth Ally, and they came to Shelby County, Kentucky, where they had a family of four children, one living – Pleasant J., a tobacco merchant of Owensboro.  The mother died in Shelby County, and Mr. Miller then married Rosa Boswell, and then moved to Daviess County in 1824; soon after his arrival here she died.  He then married Sallie Crawford in 1829, a native of Shelby County, Kentucky.  He died June 28, 1860, and his wife died December 23, 1844.  James C., subject of this sketch, was the oldest of their eight children.  He was married to Amy S. Miller, January 23, 1852.  She was born in Ohio County, Kentucky, and was a daughter of James and A. (Anderson) Miller.  After his marriage, he settled on the old homestead with his father one year; then moved on a farm in Ohio County, Kentucky.  His wife died July 22, 1854, leaving one daughter – Sallie C., born February 27, 1853, now the wife of Dr. J. C. Sutton, residing in Hardinsburg, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.  After his wife died, he returned to Daviess County with his father.  He married Frances Y. Haynes, February 12, 1856.  She was native of Ohio County, Kentucky, born December 20, 1832, and was a daughter of Josiah and Frances Y. (Howard) Haynes.  After his marriage Mr. Miller settled on his farm in Ohio County and remained until 1870, when he returned to Daviess County and settled on a farm, two miles east of Whitesville, in Boston Precinct, where they remained until December 1878, when he purchased the old farmstead farm in Masonville Precinct, where he and family still reside.  Mr. and Mrs. Miller have had seven children, six living – Emma N., born March 14, 1857; Josiah H., born April 12, 1860; Henry C., born June 26, 1862; Fannie R., born July 12, 1866; Mary E., born January 27, 1869, and Amy B., born Jun 11, 1872, all residing with their parents except the eldest son, Josiah H., who is teaching school in Western Kentucky Normal School at South Carrollton.  Mr. and Mrs. James C. Miller are members of the Baptist church at Bethabara, as are all their children.  Mr. Miller is a member of Hodges Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at Whitesville.  He was Justice of the Peace in Ohio County four years; was appointed in Daviess County in 1880, to fill out an unexpired term, and elected in 1882 for whole term.  He was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Daviess County in 1875, and held that office three years.  He has held various other local offices of trust in his precinct.  Mr. Miller owns a fine farm of 165 acres where he resides, 125 under cultivation.  In politics, he is a Democrat.  He is of Irish and German descent.  Mrs. Miller’s family was English and Welsh decent.

Richard Creekmur Biography

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle and Kniffin, 1887

Simpson County

Richard Creekmur was born February 29, 1822, in Simpson County, Kentucky, where he grew to manhood and has always resided.  His father, William M. Creekmur, a native of Norfolk County, Virginia, was a soldier in the War of 1812; was long a member of the Regular Baptist Church, and died in Simpson County in 1844, at the age of seventy-two years.  He was a son of Richard Creekmur, of Virginia, who was a soldier in the Revolution.  William M. married Martha, daughter of Jonathan and Martha Balance (died 1847, aged sixty-three years), and from their union sprang Philip, Rilen, Dorcas (See), Mary Stewart, Sallie (May), William M., Richard and Tabitha (Stewart).

In May, 1844, Richard married Eliza, daughter of Philip and Mary (Jones) Gibbs, of Simpson County (born in Campbell County, Virginia, March 2, 1817), and to them were born Martha J. (Bush), Lafayette, Mary E. (deceased), William, Sallie B. (deceased), Emily and Alice (deceased).  In the beginning of their business career, Mr. and Mrs. Creekmur had an even start in the world, and by industry and perseverance have acquired a competency.  They lost five slaves by the late war.  Mr. Creekmur is a farmer, having 106 acres of well improved and productive land in a high state of cultivation.  He is a member of the Primitive Baptist Church, and in politics a Democrat.

William Creekmur was born in Simpson County, August 1, 1852; married November 9, 1876, Amanda N., daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Capewell) Jennings, of Simpson County (born March 14, 1856), and their union has been favored by the birth of one son, Herschel.  William owns forty-eight acres of first-class land.  He is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, and in politics a Democrat.

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

John Quincy Adams – No Genealogist!

Last night I finished a book on John Quincy Adams, A Public Life, A Private Life, by Paul C. Nagel.  I can’t tell you the last time I read a novel.  They just do not hold my attention the way a history or biography does.

John Quincy Adams was a unique individual.  I’m not sure I like him.  He was far too worried about public opinion of his presidency, his jobs as ministers to countries overseas, and how the public and the next generations would think of him.  Of course, I am not president, a representative, or a minister to a foreign government.  I suppose I’m very comfortable in my skin.  I love where I am in life and what I do.  I honestly don’t feel the need to impress anyone.  Life with Ritchey, the kids and Julian is fulfillment enough for me – and sharing this great genealogy adventure with you!

Towards the end of his life JQA, as he is styled in the book, discovered an old journal of Samuel Sewall, which mentioned his early Quincy family.  The journal was written 1674-1729.  He decided to enter the world of genealogy to untangle his family lines.  But he soon complained ‘how genealogical inquiries so often led into a labyrinth where much time was lost for more useful purposes.’  I’m sure we’ve all been through that labyrinth at one time or another!  For myself, I receive such a renewal of spirit and great satisfaction when I untangle some of those family lines – whether mine or another family.

One of JQA’s goals, or perhaps a goal set by others, was to write a biography of his esteemed father, John Adams.  Even his wife, Louisa, exhorted him to begin the project.  He decided to set aside an hour a day to work on this project.  “He began with an attempt to ‘decypher’ local history and genealogy, a project that , as usual, quickly sidetracked him.  He lost himself in tracing how, in the early days, such names as Quincy and Braintree had been spelled ‘Quinsie’ and ‘Brayntry.'”  Hm, that sounds familiar!

During the 1682 wedding of his great-great-grandparents, Daniel Quincy and Anna Shepard, an aunt dropped dead during the ceremony.  Now that’s a family story to tell – great joy to great sorrow.  I am in the process of trying to write at least a paragraph, usually more, about each of my family members – grandparents, aunts, uncles, cousins.  This will be my view of my family and the way I remember them.  Important for the generations to come.

JQA was a strong believer in ending slavery – and not allowing the new states to permit it within their boundaries.  His fiery speeches in the House left no one in doubt of how he felt.  And this was after serving as president.  He is the only man elected president that went back to Congress afterwards.  After a stroke in 1846, he still returned to his duty.  On February 21, 1848, at the age of 80, JQA was in the Capitol, voting ‘no’ one more time to oppose the commendation of veterans of the ongoing Mexican War, which he opposed.  Attempting to stand and give his opinion, he fell, caught by colleagues.  He lingered two days before his death.

JQA was a distinct individual that stood for what he believed.  His presidency has gone down as one of the worst in history, but I believe that was more to do with party politics, as he did have good ideas for the country, and always wanted to keep the union strong.  As mentioned before I’m not sure I like him (too much drama!), but I do admire him and his dedication to the country he loved and served; from his nomination by President Washington as Minister to the Netherlands in 1794, to his last day in the House in 1848, JQA lived a life of service to his country.