Category Archives: Genealogy Ramblings

Sarah J. Thomas Died at 75

Sarah J. Thomas, 1824-1899.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Wednesday, July 12, 1899

Mrs. Sarah E. Thomas, aged 75, a highly respected citizen and life-long resident of this place, died, Wednesday morning, July 5th, at four o’clock, at her late home on Factory Street. She had been a sufferer from a complication of diseases for a long time, but bore her sufferings with the true christian fortitude that had marked her long and useful life, and passed peacefully from time into eternity. She was the descendant of an illustrious pioneer family, her grand-parents, who came from Pennsylvania and Maryland, and were relatives of the McAfees, having settled at the Old Fort, here, more than a hundred years ago, while her father and mother were native-born Kentuckians. When a child, she united with the Methodist church and was a faithful and consistent member for 60 years. Over 50 years ago she was united in marriage to Mr. John H. Thomas, of Anderson County, who was also of pioneer descent, and who died about four years ago. Six children, four sons and two daughters, blessed this happy union, all of whom are living, save Robert, who died about ten years ago: Mrs. J. D. Bryant, Miss Margaret Thomas and Mr. John T. Thomas, being residents of this place, while Mr. W. R. Thomas lives in Stockton, Cal., and Mr. James P. Thomas in Hot Springs, Ark. The funeral services were conducted at the residence, Thursday, at 2:30 o’clock p.m., by Dr. W. O. Goodloe, after which a long cortege of sorrowing friends and relatives followed the remains to their last resting place in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Main Street in Harrodsburg – 1904 and 113 Years Later!

Let me introduce you to my town!  Harrodsburg, located in Mercer County, was laid out June 16, 1774, by Captain James Harrod and his band of men.  It was first called Harrodstown, then Oldtown, and finally Harrodsburg.  In the very early years there were Indian attacks, and many settlers were killed.  But the rich and fertile land of the Bluegrass area was too profitable to give up.  As more and more families moved to Mercer County, and the Indians gave way to Ohio and Indiana, life became more peaceful.

In the 130 years since the site was laid out, and this picture was taken, there is no comparison to the log fort and this photo from 1904.  Fort Harrod, and the cabins within, fell into disuse and decay.  This is a photo of a bustling little town!  Power lines dominate the picture, large buildings, churches, horse and buggies, men and women on the streets – with no worry of Indian attacks!  Progress was here.

And if we go an additional 113 years forward to today, we see a modern, small town, but with a few signs from the first photo.  The brick building on the right side of the street, in the middle of the photo, is still standing.  For many years it was used as the home for the County Clerk’s Office.  Directly across the street is the courthouse, which cannot be seen in either photo.  A new courthouse was built a few years ago, and the county offices were moved to a building on Lexington Avenue.

The yellow house is still there, with a bit of renovation.  In the original photo the Christian Church stands beside it.  The church, which has been rebuilt, is hidden by the tree, but can be see in the above photograph.

I wanted to show you a close up of the old photo.  You will have to imagine that the first two buildings on the right (the church and store front) are now the large Christian Church from the modern photo.  The brick building begins with what was the County Clerk’s Office.

Past the building that housed the clerk’s office is The Kentucky Fudge Company – one of our favorite places to eat!  Studio G is next, with local music and talent.  Several other businesses are located down the street.  The building at the end – blue, with a turret – is the office of Dr. Tammy Hoskins, my optometrist.  You can see this building in the original photo!

Power lines are now underground, giving a nice, neat Main Street appearance.  I love small towns – and I especially love living in one!  Come visit – I’ll show you the replica of Fort Harrod, with the huge Osage orange tree in front, that has been the center of many school photos.  We’ll visit The Kentucky Fudge Company for lunch.  The Harrodsburg Historical Society on Chiles Street is a must for genealogy research.  There are many old cemeteries to visit.  And Shaker Village is just a few miles away – they serve a lovely dinner.

 

C. B. Overstreet Dies of Consumption

C. B. Overstreet, born December 14, 1823, died March 5, 1885.  Old Union Cemetery, Boyle County, Kentucky.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, March 13, 1885

Mr. C. B. Overstreet died of consumption at his home, near Aliceton, at 5 minutes past 12 o’clock, Wednesday night, the 4th inst.  The deceased was 61 years old and was highly esteemed.  His remains were buried by the Masons at Union Church, last Friday.  Rev. R. H. Caldwell delivered the funeral discourse in the presence of a large audience of sorrowing friends.  He leaves a wife, one daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Harmon, and a host of friends.

Mary A., wife of C. B. Overstreet, born April 15, 1834, died January 23, 1892.

Col. John F. Wight Obituary

In the 1880 census of Shelby County, John and Martha Wight had the following children:  Duke (Martha), 19; John F., 17; Sarah B., 15; J. Albert, 14; Mary, 12; and William A., 8.

John Fletcher Wight, son of James and Sarah Wight, born in Frankfort, Kentucky, 1832, moved to Shelby County 1836, graduated at Dartmouth College 1853, married to Martha Jane Oglesby in Panola County, Mississippi, 1859, member of Kentucky Legislature 1869-71.  Died in Shelbyville, Kentucky, September 27, 1908.  ‘All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come, though shalt call and I will answer there.’  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, September 28, 1908

Col. John F. Wight Dead

Shelbyville, Kentucky, September 27 – Col. John F. Wight, a wealthy retired farmer, died at 8 o’clock this morning at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in this city after an illness of bladder trouble.  Col. Wight was prominent in Democratic politics for a number of years and at one time represented Shelby County in the Legislature.  He is survived by his wife and several grown children.  He was a member of the Centenary Methodist Church.  The funeral will take place Tuesday morning and the burial will be in Grove Hill Cemetery at this place.

Martha Jane Wight, daughter of Albert A. and Agnes Abernathy Oglesby, born in Surrey County, North Carolina, February 29, 1840.  In early life removed with her parents, five brothers and three sisters to Panola County, Mississippi, died in Shelbyville, Kentucky, April 1, 1935.  “I give unto them eternal life.’

Gilbert Ratcliff – WWI Soldier Killed Day Before Armistice

All casualties of war are sad, not only for the parents and family, but the rest of the country.  No one wants to lose a child, spouse, sibling, relative or friend.  But to be killed the day before the armistice took effect must have been an extra blow to the loved ones of Gilbert Ratcliff.  Since his parents were not informed until December 6, I’m sure they were ready to welcome their hero home from the war, sure that he had made it through. 

My uncle, Robert Carrico, was killed in Sicily in September of 1943.  My mother, her parents and siblings, never got over his death.  Even in her last years she would tear up talking about Robert.  I’m sure Gilbert Ratcliff’s photograph was hung on the wall, in prominent view, for all to see and remember – I know Uncle Robert’s was.

Gilbert Ratcliff, Co. L, 11th US Infantry, born August 22, 1890, killed November 10, 1918, in Argonne Forest, France.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, December 7, 1918

Six Gold Stars on Shelby’s Honor Roll

Gilbert Ratcliff’s Death Makes Total of 26 Casualties From the County

Shelbyville, Kentucky, December 6th.  Shelby County has given its sixth life to the cause of liberty and freedom.

Mr. and Mrs. Logan Ratcliff were notified by the War Department today that their son, Gilbert, who was in his twenty-seventh year, was killed in battle in France, November 10, the day before the armistice was signed.

Ratcliff went to Camp Zachary Taylor May 28 and sailed overseas the following August.  He was attached to a machine gun company.

Shelby’s other hero sons are:

Corporal Jesse N. Martin, who died April 7.  Private Luther Stevens, whose death occurred some time in July; Sergeant Frank Jesse, death reported July 23; Corporal Aaron Devine, who died in August, and Noah Wilmott who died October 14.

In addition to these six fatalities, four Shelby boys have died in France from disease, fifteen in training camps here and one in an airplane accident, making the county’s honor roll, unofficially, twenty-six.

Edwin Barber Clarkson Obituary

Barber Clarkson, February 7, 1860 – February 14, 1909.  St. Rose Catholic Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, February 18, 1909

E. B. Clarkson Dead

Mr. E. Barber Clarkson, one of the best known farmers in Washington County died at his home four miles north of Springfield on last Sunday evening after a short illness of pneumonia and heart trouble.  The deceased was born in this county 58 years ago and was a son of the late Mr. Dora Clarkson, his mother being a Miss Edwards.  In early life Mr. Clarkson married Miss Etta Taylor, who together with five daughters and three sons survive him.  There was probably not a more honorable nor upright man in the county than Barber Clarkson.  His word was as good as his bond and he never made an enemy and had a host of friends.  He had been engaged in farming and stock raising all of his life.  He reared a large family which was always well provided for.  Besides his wife and children, Mr. Clarkson is survived by a brother, Mr. Sidney Clarkson, of the county, and a sister, Mrs. T. P. O’Bryan, of Springfield.

The deceased was a member of the Catholic Church and his funeral took place at St. Rose Tuesday morning.

Etta Taylor, wife of B. Clarkson, 1862-1920.

Edwin Barber Clarkson was the son of Stephen Theodore Clarkson and Martha Linton Edwards.  He married Etta Clark Taylor May 11, 1878.  Etta Clark Taylor was the daughter of Benjamin Springer Taylor and Martha Jane Janes.  Their children were James Eugene, who died in 1895; Martha Evelyn, who married Samuel Donatus Mudd; Annie Mary, who married John Earl Snider; twins, Mary Alberta and Sidney Albertus, who died before 1900; Francis L. K.; Mary Catherine; Mary Sally; Marguerite, who married Reed Crume; Thomas Dominic, who married Annie Mae Lanham; Charles Albert; and Edwin Bertram, who married Elizabeth Taylor.

Joseph Francis Carrico Obituary

Joseph F. Carrico is my second cousin three times removed.  All the Carrico’s in Washington County are related!  William M. Carrico and Mary Jane O’Daniel were Joseph’s parents.  The large Last Supper that hung above my grandmother’s kitchen table, while she was alive, and is now in my kitchen, was purchased from an ‘old’ William Carrico.  Perhaps this is he?  Born about 1820 he was 53 years older than my grandmother.

Joseph F. Carrico, 1849-1909.  Isabell F. Carrico, 1850-1920.  St. Rose Catholic Cemetery, Washington County, Kentucky.

The News-Leader, Springfield, Washington County, Kentucky

Thursday, May 27, 1909

Joe F. Carrico Dead

Mr. Joe F. Carrico died at his home four miles south of Springfield early yesterday morning.  About one year ago Mr. Carrico suffered a severe stroke of paralysis from which he never fully recovered.  About two weeks ago he received another stroke which was the immediate cause of his death.

Mr. Carrico was about sixty years of age, and the son of Mr. William Carrico, who died many years ago.  Early in life he was married to Miss Belle Johnson, a daughter of Mr. Henry Johnson.  The greater portion of his life was spent on the farm where he died.  He leaves his wife and one son, Damon Carrico, of Lebanon.  The funeral will take place at St. Rose this morning at 9 o’clock.