Category Archives: Genealogy Ramblings

Genealogy – Rain and Shine

Ritchey and I had a wonderful time at the Maryland to Kentucky genealogy conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, this past weekend.  On our drive, we stopped at a couple of cemeteries – even though it was raining!  We will have to return to take better photos, but Ritchey volunteered to brave the rain – dear man that he is! – and, of course, he had his geocaches to look for also!

Our goal was to visit the Greathouse and Lewis family cemeteries in Hancock County.  We found the Greathouse, where this video was taken, but not the Lewis – I feel it is at the back of a cornfield, near the river, and we couldn’t see it from River Road.  We also found the Henderson family cemetery, and visited Lewisport Cemetery.

The conference was great fun – met lots of new people and visited with old friends.  Thanks to all of you who stopped by the booth – it was so nice to see you!  I made some new discoveries, bought lots of books and maps, and sold some of my CDs.  The most fun was talking genealogy for two full days!

Sunday, before heading home, we stopped at St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery in Daviess County.  It was a beautiful day – great for taking photos.

2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond Genealogy Conference

How many of you have ancestors that moved to Kentucky from Maryland during the 1785-1810 immigration of families to the counties of Washington, Marion and Nelson – and, also, Scott County and Breckinridge County, as I have recently discovered?  Are you attending the 2017 Maryland to Kentucky and Beyond, Genealogy Conference in Owensboro, Kentucky, next weekend?  Ritchey and I will be there!  We will be in the vendor section, talking about genealogy and selling my CDs to those who are interested.

Holy Cross Catholic Church

In 1785 sixty families gathered in the Pottinger’s Creek area of Washington County (later to become Marion County).  Basil Hayden, Clement Johnson, Joseph Clark, James Dant, Philip Miles, among others, were those early settlers.  Holy Cross Church is the oldest Catholic church west of the Allegheny Mountains, built in 1792.

St. Charles Catholic Church

Some of these groups of families settled along Hardin’s Creek in 1786, worshiped in the home of Henry Hagan, until the first church was built in 1806 – my home parish of St. Charles Church located in St. Mary’s in Marion County, originally Washington County.  John Lancaster, James Elder, William and Andrew Mudd, Thomas and Ignatius Medley, Bennett Rhodes, and others made this area their home – and many of their descendants still live there today.

St. Francis Catholic Church

Also in 1786, a group of Maryland settlers intended to share the Pottinger’s Creek settlement.  They took flatboats down the Ohio River and landed at Maysville, known as Limestone at that time.  They found such beautiful land east of the river, in what was Woodford Count, later Scott, they decided to travel no further.  The first church was built in 1794, St. Francis.  It is the second oldest parish in the state.  The present church was built in 1820 at a cost of $3,600.  Names of those early settlers were Jenkins, Gough, Leak, Combs, Tarleton, Worland, Greenwell, and James.

St. Rose Catholic Church

In 1787 Philip Miles, Thomas Hill, Henry Cambron, Joseph and James Carrico, Thomas Hamilton, Basil Montgomery, many members of the Smith family, and others came to Cartwright’s Creek.  In 1798, they built a church known as St. Ann’s – and this is where many of the older members are buried.  The church was abandoned once St. Rose Church was built in 1806.  There is nothing in the field where St. Ann’s Church and Cemetery used to be.  This is the area most of my ancestors settled in – Montgomery, Carrico, Dillehay, Smith, Cambron and others – lived from those very early days until my grandmother died in 1986.  Such a rich heritage concentrated in one county – since my father’s ancestors also lived in Washington County from 1860.

Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church

The Rolling Fork settlement – today in Calvary, Marion County – was established in 1798.  Leonard Hamilton, Robert Abell, Clement and Ignatius Buckman, John Raley and others left their marks here.  Ignatius Buckman was killed by Indians and was the first buried where Holy Name of Mary Cemetery is now.  The older portion of the cemetery is on a small knoll, at the back of the church.  The newer portion is across the small road that leads back to the cemetery, a nice, flat area with many gravestones.

Basilica of St. Joseph Proto-Cathedral

Captain James Rapier, with his sons Charles and William, settled on southeast of what is now Bardstown, on Beach Fork of Salt River (Poplar Neck).  A few years later Thomas Gwynn, Anthony Sanders and Nehemiah Webb (originally a Quaker) settled close by.  The home of Thomas Gwynn, now the site of the Nazareth Community of the Sisters of Charity, was used for church services until St. Joseph Church was built in 1798 in what is now St. Joseph Cemetery.  The cathedral was built in 1816.  McManus, Reynolds, Howard, Lancaster, members of the Hayden family and William McQuown were early settlers.  Thomas Howard lived in the vicinity where St. Thomas Church is now located.  His home was used for church, and in 1810 he willed the farm to the church.    In 1812 St. Thomas Church was established.  Many old settlers are buried in this cemetery.

St. Thomas Catholic Church

The Cox’s Creek settlement in Nelson County was begun about 1792.  Some of my ancestors came to this area – Gardiner, Elder, Montgomery – along with Thomas Higdon, Richard Jarboe, Valentine Thompson, Hezekiah Luckett and Charles Wathen.  This is the oldest parish in Nelson County, located in Fairfield.  Unfortunately we have not visited this church and cemetery.

The County of Breckinridge was formed in 1799, but eight years previously, when a portion of Hardin County, it was settled by Leonard Wheatley, and soon followed by Richard Mattingly, Elias Rhodes, Barton Mattingly, Ignatius Coomes, William McGary and others.  Richard Mattingly’s house was used as a church until 1811, when St. Anthony was built.  Just found out about the Breckinridge settlement during my research – another to add to our list to visit!

There are many more settlers who came from Maryland to Kentucky in those early years.  It would be impossible to name them all.  This conference first began in 1990 when it was held at Nazareth, Kentucky.  In 1992, it was held in St. Mary’s at St. Charles Church; in 1994 in Cape Girardeau, Perry County, Missouri; and back in 1996 at St. Charles – the first time Ritchey and I attended.  In 1998, Owensboro, Kentucky, was the location, and we attended again.  In 2000 the gathering was held at Leonardtown, in St. Mary’s County, Maryland.  2002 found the conference at St. Catharine Motherhouse in Washington County, which we attended; 2004 in Hannibal, Missouri.  2008 at the St. Thomas Farm in Bardstown; back in Leonardtown in 2010.  The last reunion was held at St. Catharine College in Washington County in 2014 – which was my first time to attend as a vendor.  This has been such a wonderful group of people!  I’ve made so many friends and found much information for my families!  If you have any family members that originated from Maryland, especially the counties of Charles, St. Mary and Prince Edward, you may want to come.  Perhaps I will see you there?

William Malcolm Miller Obituary

William Malcolm Miller, born February 16, 1810, died July 26, 1889.  Mary Jane Patterson, wife of William M. Miller, born February 13, 1824, died April 19, 1876.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

from The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, July 31, 1889

William Malcom Miller died in Madison County, Kentucky, at 4 o’clock on Friday morning, July 26th, 1889, of flux.  He had been sick only a few days and his death was unexpected until a few hours before it happened.  The funeral was preached at Mr. Zion Christian Church, on Saturday afternoon by Professor Hagerman and Elder Reynolds, and the remains were deposited in the family lot in Richmond Cemetery.

William Malcolm Miller was born February 16th, 1810, in Madison County, and never resided elsewhere.  He was a prominent man of considerable property and once represented the county in the Legislature.  He was twice married and reared a large family.  Among his children were County Judge William C. Miller, and Leslie Miller, both deceased, John C. and M. M. Miller and Mrs. Samuel Lackey.  Considering the long and useful career of deceased, he had more friends and fewer enemies than most men.

The father of deceased was William Miller, born in Virginia in 1776, died in Kentucky in 1841, and his mother was Hannah Lackey, born in 1783, died in 1814.

The grandfather of William Malcolm Miller was John Miller, born in Albemarle County, Virginia, 1750, married Jane Delaney, 1774, removed to Kentucky in 1784 and erected the first house, not far from the big spring down on what is now Main Street in Richmond.  He was a Captain in the Continental army, was with Washington at Yorktown in 1781, was one of the first three delegates sent from Kentucky County to the Virginia Legislature, and was one of the first representatives from Madison County in the Legislature of Kentucky.  He died in 1808, and his wife in 1844, aged 93 years.

Two Brothers Who Died Young – Sheldon and Albert Thomas Emery

My first thought when I caught sight of this dramatic angel in Spring Grove Cemetery in Cincinnati was, ‘Don’t blink!’  Not sure how many of you are Dr. Who fans – but that’s all I could think about while looking at this statue.  For a while I was mesmerized.  Now that I’ve found out more about the two young men who died far too young, I’m overwhelmed with sadness at the early loss of life.

Just a note on the Gracchi reference in the following obituary – the two brothers were Roman politicians in the 2nd century B.C.

Sacred to the memory of Sheldon and Albert Thomas Emery.  Gather many into Christ’s flock.  Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio.

Sheldon and Albert Thomas Emery were sons of Thomas Josephus Emery and Mary Muhlenberg Hopkins, born in England and New York, respectively.  They were married in 1864.  Sheldon Emery was born March 18, 1867, in Turin, Italy.  Albert Thomas Emery was born in Cincinnati, September 21, 1868.

In the 1880 Hamilton County, Ohio, census, Thomas Emery, 48, was a dealer in real estate; Mary was 43, Sheldon 13 and Albert 11.  Also living in the household was Mary’s mother, Mary Hopkins, 73; and Mary’s sister, Belle Hopkins, 31.  In the 1890 census Sheldon is listed as a clerk, working for his father.

Albert Thomas Emery died February 11, 1884, in Concord, New Hampshire, as the result of an accident while coasting.  He was at school.  Sheldon Emery died October 26, 1890, as a result of pneumonia.  He was an alumnus of Harvard Law School.

Cincinnati, October 27, 1890

Sheldon Emery

On Sunday, October 26, 1890, of double pneumonia, Sheldon Emery, son of Thomas J. and Mary M. Emery, in his 24th year.

When the mother of the Gracchi was asked to display her jewels she answered, as she enveloped her two boys in her arms, ‘These are my jewels.’  In imitation of this noble Roman mother Mrs. Emery might thus have truly answered six years ago if asked to exhibit some token of her wealth.  She, like the mother of the Gracchi, was the mother of two boys as bright and promising as were the Gracchi.  Today her jewels are gone.  The first perished in a coasting accident while at St. Paul’s School about six years ago; the other died last night at his home at Edgecliffe, Walnut Hills.  The house is now left unto Mr. and Mrs. Emery desolate.  Mr. Sheldon Emery, in whom both the father and mother had centered all their hopes, was but just developed into a mature man.  He had scarcely rounded his twenty-fourth year.  Of exemplary habits and endowed with the energy that has characterized his father and that distinguished his grandfather, he was big with promise.  He had a powerful frame, symmetrical with a brain that had been cultivated by study and extensive reading.  He was therefore fully equipped to engage successfully in the pursuits of which his father was master.  Indeed, he had already begun to gradually assume a part of the great responsibilities with which the master was eager to entrust him.  Is it any wonder, then, that the house is today desolate?

 

Leslie C. Riker Obituary

Leslie C. Riker, 1882-1940, Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, June 21, 1940

In the sudden passing of Leslie Condit Riker on Sunday evening, June 16, 1940, at his home on College street, the community of Harrodsburg lost one of its best loved citizens. He was born July 8, 1882, at the family home on Danville Pike, in Mercer County and has always lived in Harrodsburg. He was the son of Lee Riker and Marie Rue Riker, both deceased. He was one of five children of which three are still living; Carrie R. Michel, of Oak park, Ill., Frank C. Riker, of council Bluffs, Iowa, and Charles N. Riker, of Harrodsburg. In 1934 he married Amelia Craig who survives him.

The funeral was at 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, June 18, at the Presbyterian church with the pastor, Dr. John W. Carpenter conducting the services. Burial was in Spring Hill cemetery.

The bearers were Otto Redwitz, J. E. Brown, George Rue, Oran Stagg, Harrodsburg; Frederick Mickel, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Bennett Bean and Lawrence Brewer, Lexington; and Herbert Robertson, Henderson.

He was a trustee of the United Presbyterian church, a member of the A. D. Price Memorial Hospital Board, director of the Mercer County National Bank and one time City Commissioner.

He was associated with the London Assurance Company for nearly thirty years as special agent for Kentucky and Tennessee, which position he held at the time of his death. The high esteem in which he was held throughout the states was manifested by the floral offerings, the expressions of praise and the attendance at the funeral by Chris D. Shefe, assistant manager of the New York office, as well as agents from many places.

From childhood he has been a part of the community of Harrodsburg. Its problems, its joys and its sorrows were a part of his life. Many friends, white and colored, will remember his wise counsel, his practical advice in their affairs, and his generous financial help in their extremities. They will remember and continue to work, with his ideals in mind for the best interests of his community.

 

Obituaries of Pioneer Citizens of Schuyler County Illinois – Jacob and Clara McKee Ritchey

Jacob and Clara McKee Ritchey are the third great uncle and aunt of my husband.  We photographed gravestones of family members buried in the Sugar Grove North Cemetery during one of our genealogy tours in 2002.  I can’t believe it was that long ago!  Rushville, Illinois, is a beautiful little town with very friendly citizens.

Jacob Ritchey, December 5, 1821 – December 29, 1901

from The Schuyler Citizen, Rushville, Illinois

January 2, 1902

Death of Jacob Ritchey

He Died at His Home North of Rushville on Sunday, After a Long Illness

Jacob Ritchey, an honored pioneer resident of Schuyler County, died at his home, four miles north of Rushville, on Sunday,  He had been in failing health for many years and for the past five years has been a great sufferer.

On Tuesday morning at 11 o’clock funeral services were held at his late residence, conducted by Elder G. W. Ford.  There was a large attendance of friends and relatives, for during the many years Mr. Ritchey has resided in this county he has enjoyed the honor and respect of all who have known him.  The remains were laid to rest in the Sugar Grove North Cemetery.

Jacob Ritchey was born in Dayton, Montgomery County, Ohio, December 5, 1821.  He was left an orphan when seven years of age and for five years he lived with his uncle, Jacob Sawyer.  When still in his teens he accompanied his brother George to this county, living with him until he grew to manhood.

In 1849 Mr. Ritchey was united in marriage with Clara Ann McKee, daughter of the late William McKee, and the young couple settled on an 80-acre farm which was given them by the bride’s father.  To this union were born nine children, two dying in infancy, while three sons and four daughters, with his loving wife, survive the loss of a loving husband and father.

In 1852, in company with Thomas Boyd and Milton Moore, Mr. Ritchey made the overland trip to California.  In 1855 he returned to his farm where he has lived since, and where his life ended after much suffering, being an invalid for more than three years.  His life ended like a summer evening, calm and peaceful, surrounded by his wife, three sons and three daughters; one daughter, living in Kansas, did not get here.  His last words to his family were, “I am going home.”

Besides leaving an aged wife and a family of grown children he leaves a host of other relatives, friends and neighbors to mourn the loss of a kind husband and father, and a true, faithful friend and neighbor.

Clara Ann Ritchey, August 9, 1825 – March 13, 1902

from The Schuyler Citizen, Rushville, Illinois

March 20, 1902

Death of Mrs. Jacob Ritchey

Mrs. Jacob Ritchey, one of the old pioneer residents of the county, died at her home four miles north of Rushville last Thursday evening from the effects of a paralytic stroke.  Mrs. Ritchey was 75 years of age and had resided in this county the greater portion of her life.  She was a sister of the late William McKee, one of Schuyler’s prominent early settlers.

Mrs. Ritchey leaves a family of grown children to mourn her loss.  Two daughters, Misses Georgia A. and Mary, lived with their mother; Charles resides in Camden township; Mrs. R. E. Sands in Rushville township; Mrs. Susan Moore in New Salem, Kansas; and James Ritchey in Woodstock township.

Funeral services were held at the family residence on Saturday morning at 11 o’clock and the remains were interred in the Sugar Grove Cemetery.

Reed and Belle Russell Buried At Deep Creek Baptist Cemetery

Reed Russell, 1856-1932. Bell Russell, 1858-1928. Deep Creek Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, September 21, 1928

Mrs. Belle Russell, seventy years of age, the wife of Reed Rus­sell, of the Deep Creek section of Mercer, died Monday of heart trouble. She was one of the best known women of the section where she resid­ed. Her funeral was at the Deep Creek Church by the Rev. E. M. Gash, with burial in the cemetery there. Surviv­ing are her husband and two sons, William and Rouse Russell, and a brother, John Lester, all of Mercer County.

From The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, December 30, 1932

Mr. C. R. Russell, 76 years of age, died at the home of his son, W. H. Russell, near Rose Hill, last Wednesday.  He was a prominent farmer of the Rose Hill section and was a member of the Deep Creek Baptist church.  Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. T. Turpin on Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Deep Creek church and burial followed in the adjoining cemetery.  He was preceded to the grave by his wife, who died four years ago last September. He is survived by two sons, W. H. Russell, and R. Russell, both of Rose Hill, and four grandchildren.  Casket-bearers were as follows: Will Langford, Obie Lester, Thomas Russell, Reed Russell, Lem Lester and Robert Langford.