Category Archives: Genealogy Ramblings

John E. Keith Obituary

J. E. Keith, 1837-1909.  Mary Elizabeth, his wife, 1841-1930.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky.

John E. Keith was the senior member of the firm J. E. Keith & Sons, marble cutters.  An announcement of his company, less the sons, was in the local newspaper October 3, 1883.  It said he was prepared to do all kinds of marble work, from a $3 tombstone to a $500 monument.  He purchased marble direct from the quarries in Vermont and Marietta, Georgia, and granite from the celebrated Concord quarries in new Hampshire.

John Keith married Mary Elizabeth LaHeist (found on son Clarence’s death certificate).  In the 1880 census for Breckinridge County he was listed as 43, a tombstone agent, with wife Mary, 39.  Children in the census were Jennie, 17; Fannie, 15; Samuel, 12; Clarence, 10; and Proctor, 1.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 3, 1909

Brief Illness For Mr. Keith

Widely Known Citizen and Monument Maker Dies at His Home In This City Saturday Night

Death Lamented By All

The entire town was deeply grieved Sunday morning in learning of the death of Mr. J. E. Keith, who had been ill such a short time.  Wednesday night about one o’clock Mr. Keith was seized with a severe convulsion which was followed one after another until death came at ten o’clock Saturday night.

Mr. Keith was nearly seventy-three years old and was born in Breckinridge County, but was reared in Meade County where he was as well known.  He came to this city in 1856.  Last August Mr. and Mrs. Keith celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, and little did they believe their happiness would so soon be shattered.

In the death of Mr. Keith, Cloverport loses not only one of her best and oldest citizens, but one of the most active and decided men.  He was never on the fence on any question that came up for the welfare of the town, especially for the temperance cause did he stand firm.  He was a member of the Baptist church and his life as a christian was an example to both young and old.  Everybody had faith in Mr. Keith and his character was highly esteemed.

Mr. Keith was engaged in the monument business here with his youngest son, Proctor Keith.

Besides Mrs. Keith he is survived by one daughter, Mrs. William Lusk, of Stonewall, Mississippi, and three sons, Clarence Keith of Elizabethtown, Sam Keith and Proctor Keith of this city.  The latter three were at his bed-side during the last moments of his illness and had entire care of him.

Albert Keith of Florida, was an own brother of the deceased and George Keith of Evansville was a half-brother.  Mrs. Jennie King of Brandenburg, and Mrs. Fannie Hemstetter of Leitchfield, were half-sisters.

Mrs. Lusk arrived from Stonewall, Mississippi, in time to attend the funeral.  Misses Ola and Janie Keith and Robert Keith, of Owensboro; Miss Pauline Moorman, Lonnie and Marion Keith, grandchildren of the deceased were also here yesterday.

The funeral was held from the Baptist church at 2 o’clock yesterday afternoon.  The services were conducted by Rev. Lewis and beautiful music was rendered by friends.  The interment took place in the Cloverport Cemetery.  The pall-bearers were:  Charles Hall, John A. Barry, Charles Lightfoot, Robert Willis, Joe Allen and Marion Weatherholt.

William B. and Mary Angeline Handley

 Mary A., wife of W. B. Handley, born August 23, 1840, died December 28, 1930.  William B. Handley, born January 24, 1836, died December 24, 1904.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Sunday, December 25, 1904

An Aged Citizen Dies – W. B. Handley, Ill Only Three Days At St. Lawrence

W. B. Handley, sixty-eight years of age, died at his home at St. Lawrence, at 2 o’clock Saturday afternoon  He had been ill for only three days of pneumonia.  The funeral will be held from St. Martin (s/b St. Lawrence) Church at 8 o’clock Monday morning, and interment will be made in the church cemetery.  He is survived by a widow and three children.  They are Mrs. Kate Wood, Mrs. Belle Connor and Mrs. Annie Henning.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 27, 1904

Knottsville – Mr. W. B. Handley, one of the most prominent and highly esteemed citizens of the eastern part of the county, was buried from St. Lawrence Church Monday morning at 9 o’clock.  Father Clements paid a most eloquent tribute to his character as a father, a husband, a citizen and a Christian.  Mr. Handley was in his sixty-ninth year and is survived by his wife and three daughters, Mrs. J. W. Wood, of Owensboro; Mrs. Lee Henning and Mrs. Thomas Connor, of St. Lawrence.  Mrs. J. C. Blandford, of West Louisville, was a sister.  he was stricken with pneumonia on Tuesday afternoon and died the following Saturday at 4 o’clock.

William B. Handley married Mary Angeline Russell in 1860.  The couple had eight children, two boys who died as infants, Martin Kendrick and Charles J., and six girls – Mary Catherine, Isabella Florence, Anna Elizabeth, Rosa Alice, Maria Josephine and Ida J.  Josephine died in 1892 at the age of 17, and Ida died in 1900 at the age of 22.  Rosa died in 1903, aged 32; I’m not sure if she married.  Three married daughters are survivors at the time of their father’s death in 1904.  However, two of those sisters died in 1906 – Mary Catherine Handley Wood, September 9th, of complications of diseases, leaving five children; and Anna Elizabeth Handley Henning, November 18th, of typhoid; she left three children.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1930

Mrs. William B. Handley – Mrs. Mary Angeline Handley, 90 years old, the oldest and one of the best-known women of the St. Lawrence section, died at 11:45 o’clock, Sunday night.  Mrs. Handley had exceptionally good health until a week ago when she contracted bronchial pneumonia.  She was born at Lebanon, Kentucky, August 23, 1840, the daughter of Joseph and Catherine Russell.  In 1861, she was married to the late Esq. William Handley, and to this union eight children were born, all deceased.  she is survived by eleven grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren.  For the past ten years, Mrs. Handley made her home with her granddaughter, Mrs. M. A. Henderson.  The funeral will be held at 9 o’clock this morning at St. Lawrence Catholic Church with a Requiem High Mass offered by Rev. F. X. Laemmle.  Burial will be in the church cemetery.

Joseph and Catherine Russell, parents of Mary Angeline Russell Handley, are buried in St. Charles Catholic Cemetery in Marion County.

Watson Gibson Obituary

Watson Gibson, October 15, 1829 – October 23, 1914.  Martha J. Gibson, November 9, 1833 – December 27, 1892.  Shawnee Run Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, October 30, 1914

After many months illness Mr. Watt Gibson, aged eighty-five years. died last Saturday night at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lucy Welch, who had so faithfully cared for her aged father in the last days and very helpless condition. “Uncle” Watt had been a faithful member of the Baptist church at Burgin for years. The funeral was conducted at Shawnee Run Monday at 11 o’clock by Brother W. D. Moore, followed by burial in the adjacent cemetery.

 

 

Death of Dr. Curran Cassius Smith

Curran C. Smith, eldest son of J. Speed and Eliza Smith, born Jun 12, 1822, entered into rest, August 13, 1896.  ‘And his children rise up and call him blessed.’  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, August 19, 1896

The fearfully sudden death on last Thursday, August 13th, of Dr. Smith again demonstrates that in the midst of life we are in death.  Just before noon he was on the streets in apparently good health, but remarked that he felt a pain in his chest.  At dinner, he passed away without the slightest . . . the Second Presbyterian Church, the remains being deposited in the family lot in the cemetery.  Rev. Owsley Goodloe, brother-in-law of the deceased, and Rev. Dr. McCown, pastor of the Baptist Church, were the ministers.  A long procession followed the remains to the grave.

Sallie W. Goodloe, wife of Dr. Curran C. Smith, November 8, 1834 – December 18, 1909.

Curran Cassius Smith was born in Richmond, Kentucky, on June 12th, 1822.  His father was a distinguished member of Congress and Grand Master of the Masonic Lodge of Kentucky.  His mother was a daughter of Brig. Gen. Green Clay, of the War of 1812, and a sister of Gen. Cassius M. Clay, Mr. Lincoln’s Minister to Russia.  Rev. Green Clay Smith, recently deceased, Ex-Governor of Montana and Brigadier General of the U.S. Volunteers, and Ex-Representative J. Speed Smith, this place, were brothers, Mrs. Goodloe, mother of the late William Cassius Goodloe, Minister to Belgium, and Major Green Clay Goodloe, U.S. Marines, was a sister.  Dr. Smith married in 1854 a daughter of Judge William Goodloe of the Madison Circuit Court, she survives.  Their six children survive him, never having lost one.  They are Mrs. Alma Rogers, of Ohio, Mrs. Bessie Benton, of Winchester, Misses Mary Spencer, Willie C. and Curraleen, of Richmond, and J. Speed Smith, of the U.S. Pension Service, now stationed at Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Smith graduated at St. Mary’s, then a noted school; thereafter from the Louisville Medical College of which faculty the subsequently celebrated Dr. Gross was a member.  He practiced 53 years, mostly in Madison County.  For a brief period he lived at Lebanon where he was Collector by appointment of Andrew Johnson, which was the only office he ever held, except when Pension Examiner by appointment of Harrison.

During the war, it was the effort of the Confederates to capture Dr. Smith and others to hold as hostages in lieu of several men who had been carried away to northern prisons.  The Federal commandant at Lexington sent an officer with men who rescued the men in hiding.  At the battle of Richmond, Dr. Smith volunteered on the staff of Gen. Manson, as surgeon, and placed in charge of the Mt. Zion Hospital.  Among the wounded, he found the captain who had rescued him.  Him, with two others, he took to his home and treated free of charge until able to go home.

Dr. Smith was utterly devoid of egotism and vanity.  He was a true man, courageous but quiet, and in every respect a good citizen.

To the memory of J. Speed Smith, born July 31, 1792, married July 31, 1815, died June 6, 1854.  Erected by his widow, Eliza L. Clay Smith, born March 29, 1798, died October 14, 1887.

‘Uncle Billy’ Moredock Summoned

One feat accomplished on our western Kentucky trip – we found the Lewis Cemetery in Hancock County!  We tried to find it in June, with no success.  But with the help of Google Earth and a page from Glenn Hodges book, Daybreak On Old Fortification Creek, we pinpointed the location!  This was another cemetery back a gravel road, onto farmland.  It is a small cemetery, just for family, about 35 people are thought to be buried here.

William Moredock married Hannah Amanda House, granddaughter of the John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown that moved from Loudoun County, Virginia, to what was then Breckinridge County, Kentucky (later Hancock County).  John Lewis was a brother to William Joseph Lewis, who married Captain John Linton’s sister, Catherine Jennings Lewis.  Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis’ son, William Linton Lewis, also moved to Hancock County, and is buried in this cemetery.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 20, 1908

“Uncle Billy” Moredock Summoned

Genial Man And Aged citizen Dies At Hardinsburg – Respected And Loved By Young And Old

Once Lived In Hancock

Hardinsburg, Ky., May 18 – (Special) –

After an illness of several weeks, William T. Moredock, one of our aged and most highly respected citizens quietly breathed his last at two o’clock Wednesday morning, May 13.

Mr. Moredock was born near Hardinsburg, March 5, 1834.  After learning the trade of cabinet maker with the Hon. G. W. Beard and Judge Eskridge, he moved to Hancock County, where his life was spent, with the exception of the last two years here with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Evans, at the Commercial Hotel.

A part of the time he was a farmer in Hancock County, the other part found him in business at Lewisport.

In 1856 he was married to Miss Hannah A. House, of Hancock County, and for fifty years they lived happily together, a happiness broken only by his death.  Besides his wife he is survived by these children:  James William, of Macon, Georgia; Samuel H., of Tampa, Florida; B. H. Moredock, of Louisville; and Mrs. Evans, of Hardinsburg.

He was noted for his social, genial disposition.  His home was ever open to his friends and crowds of young people loved to visit there and enjoy the hospitality and sunshine within its walls and nothing pleased him more than to know that he was adding to the pleasures of others.

He was a Methodist, a Christian gentleman, a man whose citizenship enriched the neighborhood in which he lived.

The remains were laid to rest at Lewisport on Thursday.

Mrs. Moredock goes to Louisville where she will remain for some time with her son.

William T. Moredock, March 5, 1834 – May 13, 1908.  Hannah A. Moredock, February 24, 1840 – October 21, 1909.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

18 Counties/36 Cemeteries/3,000 Plus Gravestone Photos

Melissa Williams, born October 25, 1851, died February 17, 1923.  ‘Gone to a brighter home where grief can not come.’  Stoney Point Cemetery, Allen County, Kentucky

The past eleven days have been more epic than I ever thought possible.  Ritchey and I traveled to western Kentucky for genealogy research.  We visited 18 counties, 36 cemeteries and took more than 3,000 gravestone photos.

James Jolly, 1828-1905, 77 years, 8 days.  Martha J. Jolly, 1831-1890, 58 years, 11 months, 25 days.  Landrum Cemetery, Livingston County, Kentucky.

Number one on our list was a visit to Livingston County to find out more about his Jolly family, and to photograph gravestones of all family members.  That was accomplished!

Drury Boyd, born May 6, 1827, died January 13, 1891.  Martha Boyd Cemetery, Christian County, Kentucky.

Number two was to visit cemeteries in as many of the surrounding counties as possible.  In addition to Livingston we visited 17 others – Allen, Butler, Caldwell, Christian, Clinton, Cumberland, Hancock, Logan, Lyon, McCreary, Monroe, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Simpson, Todd, Trigg, Warren and Wayne!

Father, Abner R. Terry, February 10, 1807 – November 29, 1847.  Mother, Eleanor Dyer, February 6, 1805 – December 9, 1892.  Daughter, Susan Emaline, wife of Judge John R. Crace, May 5, 1835 – January 20, 1860.  Infant daughter, Mary.  Terry-Pioneer Cemetery, Trigg County, Kentucky.

When we left Harrodsburg on Saturday morning, the 21st of October, we enjoyed breakfast at the Bluebird Cafe in Standford.  Then headed south to cover the southern counties that share a border with Tennessee – McCreary, Wayne, Clinton and Cumberland.

Joshua F. Bell, Pvt. Co. D., 30 Regt.  Ky Vol. Inf.  1844-1930.  Alexander Cemetery, Wayne County, Kentucky.

Our home base was Logan County, staying in Garwood Linton’s beautiful cottage farm house – large old trees surrounded the house, leaves of gold, green and red, many fluttering down with the breeze.  The old, old cedars that his gr-gr-grandfather, John Wesley Linton, planted after the Civil War, in memory of his company that didn’t make it home.  The farm house is so comfortably decorated, but with great style and pizazz!  Across the road is Corinth Country Market, with homemade bread, pies and cakes, sandwiches, canned goods, and many other yummy things (we stopped by quite often).

Aquilla M. Starks, December 28, 1799 – September 13, 1855.  Antioch Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.

From Logan County we fanned out to the other counties, generally visiting three counties per day.  One day was spent at the Logan County Historical Society.  Most of the towns we visited were small, with restaurants that concentrated on good food, and people that were so very friendly.  It was a wonderful trip – and now I have so much to share with you!

Frank W. Armstrong Obituary

Frank W. Armstrong, born October 9, 1841, died December 3, 1894.  Maysville Cemetery, Mason County, Kentucky.

The Evening Bulletin, Maysville, Mason County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 4, 1894

Frank Woodland Armstrong died at Battle Creek, Michigan, at 12:45 p.m. Monday.  A telegram during the afternoon brought the sad news to relatives and friends at this point.

He had been in feeble health for many years and had used every effort, with an ample fortune at his command, to stay the dread malady, having visited the noted resorts for invalids on both continents.

Deceased was the son of the late John Armstrong, who was one of the most successful business men in the early history of Maysville, and who did as much to build up the town as any citizen of his time.  Many monuments of his enterprise are extant among the best business houses and residences of our city.

Frank W. Armstrong spent his boyhood days in Maysville; attended the Maysville Seminary under Rand & Richeson; subsequently attended school at or near Louisville, under the charge of the late Bishop Smith; then about the time of the breaking out of the war he went to Paris, France, where he had a brother, and pursued his studies there for several years.  Coming back to this country after the war, he engaged in some commercial enterprises at Cincinnati, but in later years his failing health forbade close attention to any business.

He was a man of fine intelligence, great urbanity of manner, a true friend and a man of a high order of integrity – his word was as good as his bond.  In his death a happy family circle loses an affectionate and loving husband and a fond and devoted father.  He was as thoroughly equipped for the enjoyment of life as any man the writer has ever known – barring, of course, his poor health.  His friends and relatives will miss him.  His genial manner, bright and vivacious in spite of the depressed condition of his health, made him always a welcome companion and a cherished friend.

He was most happily married to Miss Trimble, of Hillsboro, Ohio, who survives him.  He leaves but one child, a daughter, who is the wife of Robert Sweigert, Esq., of Lexington, Kentucky.

His funeral will occur at Cincinnati on Thursday afternoon, December 6th.