Category Archives: Genealogy Ramblings

From The Bourbon News – Dr. Wash and Lucinda Fithian Obituaries

Dr. Wash Fithian, 1825-1904.  Paris Cemetery, Bourbon County, Kentucky.

The Bourbon News, Paris, Kentucky

Friday, June 17, 1904

Dr. Wash Fithian, the oldest and most beloved physician of Paris, died at his home on Pleasant Street, Wednesday afternoon, at 5:25, after three weeks of illness.  His death is mourned by the entire community, for he was loved, honored and respected by all.  It can truly be said that his death ended a useful life and the world has been made better that he lived in it, for he leaves a character for us to emulate.

There are sad hearts in many homes in Paris and Bourbon County, where this faithful and loving physician has. For over a half century, administered in the tenderest way to relieve pain.  Surely the horrors of death should vanish when such a man as Dr. Wash Fithian is called to his eternal home.  It is not death but a peaceful, restful sleep.

Dr. Washington Fithian was born in Salem County, New Jersey, January 8th, 1825, which made him 79 years old last January.  His parents were Dr. Joel and Sarah Dick (Sinickson) Fithian.  His father was a native of New Jersey, and moved to Oxford, Ohio, in 1831, and followed his profession through life.  Dr. Wash Fithian graduated at Miami University, at Oxford, in 1845.  In that year, he began the study of medicine and prepare for his profession under his father.  He attended lectures regularly and graduated in the Ohio College of Medicine, at Cincinnati, in 1848.  In the same year, he located at North Middletown, Bourbon County, Kentucky, and entered upon the practice of his profession, remaining there for fifteen years.  In 1864 he moved to Paris, where he has since resided, after a short stay in preceding year at Shelbyville.  He gave his time and energies to his profession, to which he was greatly attached, and in which he always occupied an enviable position.  He had contributed with his pen to medical literature, and his practice and life was an advocate of the most elevated standard for the noble profession.  He was a veteran of two wars – Mexican and the late Civil War – a surgeon for a time in both.

For many years he and his brother, the late Dr. Joseph Fithian, were partners, and the love of these two brothers for each other was beautiful to behold.  It has often been remarked that Dr. Wash had never been the same man since the death of Dr. Joe several years ago.  It can also be truly said that there never lived in this community two men more beloved and highly respected than these two brothers – Dr. Wash and Dr. Joe Fithian.

His home life was all that characterizes a noble, Christian gentleman – an affectionate and devoted husband and a loving, indulgent father and grandfather.

His long life has been distinguished for his great integrity of character, and his exceptional personal, social and professional habits.

He was married September 18, 1850, to Miss Lucinda Hutchcraft, who survives him with two children – Charles Fithian and Mrs. F. M. Faries.

He was a Mason and Odd Fellow for over fifty years and an officer for many years in the Methodist church.

His funeral will be held at the Methodist church, this (Friday) morning at 10 o’clock, conducted by his pastor, Rev. J. L. Clark, assisted by Rev. Dr. E. H. Rutherford.  The services will be concluded at the grave by the Masons and Odd Fellows.

The pall bearers are:  Dr. F. J. R. Tilton, Dr. B. E. Bean, Dr. Silas Evans, H. A. Power, James McClure, A. Shire, John N. Davis, H. O. James.

Mrs. Wash Fithian, 1829-1909.

The Bourbon News, Paris, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 24, 1909

Mrs. Lou Hutchcraft Fithian, wife of the late Dr. Wash Fithian, entered into eternal sleep Friday morning at 11:30 o’clock, at her home on Pleasant Street, where she has resided for nearly half a century.

She had been confined to her bed for several weeks, when a week ago she was stricken with paralysis.  She was born in Bourbon County on June 7, 1829, being in the eighty-first year of her age.  In September 1850, she married Dr. Wash Fithian, of North Middletown, and several years afterwards located in Paris.

She was the eldest daughter of Reuben Hutchcraft, and is survived by one son, Dr. Charles N. Fithian; one daughter, Mrs. Frank Fairies; one sister, Mrs. Richard Harris, and her brothers, Messrs. R. B. Hutchcraft and William H. Hutchcraft, all of Paris, except the last named, who resides in Missouri.  She is also survived by eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

Mrs. Fithian was a remarkable woman in many respects, noted for her vitality and industry to the very last, although she had been an invalid for a number of years.  She had a bright mind, probably could give more correct dates of notable events that had occurred in Bourbon during her long and useful life than any other person in the county.

She was in fact a mother in Israel, always ready and anxious to do some loving act of kindness for a neighbor, friend or acquaintance.  She idolized her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.  A loving, trusting and devoted mother, a kind neighbor, a true friend.  A noble Christian woman has passed from our midst in the death of Mrs. Wash Fithian.  She is not dead, but has only entered into that calm, peaceful and restful sleep that is the reward for all such women as the deceased.

Her funeral Sunday afternoon at the Methodist church, at three o’clock, was one of the largest ever witnessed in our city, and the many beautiful floral designs were but a slight tribute of love and affection that is held by the people of this community for the deceased.

The services were conducted by her pastor, Rev. M. T. Chandler, assisted by Rev. R. S. Litsinger, of the Episcopal church.  Mrs. Fithian had from early life been a consistent member of the Methodist church.  She was laid to rest in the Paris Cemetery by the side of her honored and much loved husband, Dr. Wash Fithian, who had preceded her to the grave.  The pall bearers were:  Mr. W. H. McMillan, Mr. J. W. Davis, Mr. John N. Davis, Mr. James McClure, Mr. H. A. Power, Mr. H. O. James, Mr. F. P. Lowry, Dr. F. L. Lapsley.

Brothers and Sister Obituaries – John Thompson Thomas, James Thomas, and Margaret McAfee Thomas Obituaries

John T. Thomas, 1860-1901.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 18, 1901

After an illness of two weeks of typhoid fever complicated with Bright’s disease, Mr. John Thompson Thomas departed this life, Monday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock, aged 40 years. Short services were held at the home of his sister, Mrs. J. D. Bryant, where he died, Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock, Rev. C. J. Nugent officiating, and interment took place in Spring Hill Cemetery. Two sisters – Mrs. J. D. Bryant and Miss Maggie Thomas, of this city, and a brother, Mr. William Thomas, of Fresno, California, survive to mourn his loss. At the time of his death, Mr. Thomas was in the employ of F. G. Curry & Co., Cincinnati, Wooden and Willow Ware, and made them an efficient and faithful worker. They showed their appreciation of his worth by sending a lovely floral design. A beautiful design was also sent by the Elks Lodge of Cincinnati, of which deceased was a member. John Thomas was universally liked and his many friends will be sorry to hear of his untimely death. He was a jovial, pleasant companion, a devoted friend and brother and a useful citizen. The pall-bearers were: Fred G. Currey, J. W. Mitchell, Charles Geffinger, D. M. Hutton, T. H. Hardin and F. P. James.

James P. Thomas, 1857-1899.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Wednesday, November 29, 1899

Mr. James H. Bryant and Miss Margaret Thomas have received the sad intelligence of the death of their brother, Mr. James Thomas, in Hot Springs, Arkansaa.  The remains, we learn, will be brought here for interment.

Margaret McAfee Thomas, 1860-1930.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, September 5, 1930

There was a feeling of sadness in the community when it became known that Miss Margaret McAfee Thomas had passed away after a few days’ serious illness at the A. D. Price Memorial Hospital at six o’clock Saturday morning.

Miss Thomas was the youngest daughter of the late John H. and Sarah Neeld Thomas and the last of the family that represented two lines of distinguished ancestry, which was reflected in the life of this woman of acknowledged high ideas of honor and integrity.

One sister, Mrs.James D. Bryant, and four broth­ers, William, James, Robert and John H. Thomas, preceded her to “the Land Beyond the Blue.”

Miss Thomas was a woman of unusual brilliance of intellect and unselfish­ness of spirit. She was an honor graduate of Daughters College, a charter member of the College Street Club, the Harrodsburg Woman’s Club, the Harrodsburg Public Library director­ate, the local Red Cross Chapter and the Jane McAfee Chapter of the D. A. R.

Especially does the Harrodsburg Public Library owe Miss Thomas a debt of gratitude, she being one of the women responsible for its existence and high degree of efficiency. She was a member of the board of Managers for twenty-six years, Li­brarian for eight years, secretary and chairman of the book-buying committee for a long period.

She was a member of the Methodist church, useful in its activities until a break in health caused her to relinquish many duties, but not her support and interest.

Mrs. Eugene Mitchell, Louisville; Mrs. Lewis Bond, Chicago; Mrs. Harold VanArsdale, Cincinnati, and Mrs. Washington Reed, Lexing­ton, were with their aunt during her last hours. Other surviving relatives are two nephews, Dr. Montgomery Thomas, Fresno, Calif.; Harry Thomas, San Fran­cisco, and a niece, Miss Mary Thomas, also of San Francisco, and several grandnieces and nephews.

According to her written wishes a simple service was held at the family lot in Spring Hill Cemetery, conducted by her pastor, the Rev. E. K. Arnold. A quartet sang “O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go.” Passages of Scripture were read and the church burial ritual followed. A tender prayer closed the services.

She was left sleeping beneath a wealth of lovely flowers telling their story of the love and esteem of relative and friends.

H. A. and Adrian Heston Oelze Obituaries

H. A. Oelze, 1848-1915.  Cloverport Cemetery, Breckinridge County, Kentucky. Continue reading H. A. and Adrian Heston Oelze Obituaries

William M. Irvine Obituary

William M. Irvine, born June 1, 1825, died February 23, 1891.  Also his wife, Elizabeth S., born May 6, 1829, died November 25, 1920.  Richmond Cemetery, Madison County, Kentucky.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, February 25, 1891

William M. Irvine died in Richmond, Kentucky, on Monday afternoon, February 23rd, 1891, aged 65 years and 8 months.  The exact nature of his disease has not been announced by his physicians, but a marked decline in his physical condition had been noticeable for several months.  The funeral will take place in Richmond Cemetery tomorrow at 3 p.m.

William M. Irvine was born in Richmond June 1st, 1825, was educated at Transylvania, and took the junior law course in that school under the tutelage of Robertson, Wooley and Marshall.  He also studied law at Harvard, and obtained license to practice, but became interested in farming and declined to practice law.  Was elected cashier of the Farmers National Bank, which he left to organize the First National, then the Second National, acting as its President for a number of years, returning to the First.  Took an active part in the affairs of Central University and became a curator.  He was a successful financier and leaves a large fortune.  Was a consistent member of the First Presbyterian Church, and a progressive and valuable citizen and a Democrat.  Was a grandson of William Irvine, a native of Virginia, who was desperately wounded at the so-called Estill’s Defeat, 1782, carried from the field by Joe Proctor, and afterwards became a member of the Constitutional Convention of 1799, and the first County and Circuit Clerk of Madison County.  The deceased leaves no children, but his wife survives him.

The Richmond Climax, Madison County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 4, 1891

A Lesson In War

The writer will never forget his first meeting with Col. William M. Irvine, whose death occurred last week.  On the morning of the 31st of August 1862, the writer, a mere boy, left his home out in the country, and came to Richmond to see about the battle that was fought the day before between the Confederates under Kirby Smith, and the Federals under Nelson.  Coming across the country, we reached the battle-field near where the last stand was made.  At this moment, several citizens came up on horseback and paused a moment in conversation.  One of them, a fine-looking man with a pathetic cast of countenance, remarked: ‘Gentleman, something must be done.  There are several hundred dead men lying around here!’  This was a startling revelation to us.  We had seen pictures of battles in which a dozen or more fallen could be counted, but to think that we had come upon a scene of carnage where three or four hundred men lay dead and promiscuously scattered about, was, to say the least, startling.  But we took in the field from Richmond to Mt. Zion Church, and it was a day never-to-be-forgotten.  Upon inquiry, we learned that the gentleman who made the remark that gave us an idea of war, was Col. William M. Irvine, a man whose self-possession, dignity and consideration of others were marked characteristics.

Encapsulate – Not Laminate!

I think I used the wrong term when writing about the old marriage records at Washington County Courthouse, and what the clerk has done with the older marriages to preserve them.  I said they were laminated – that was wrong.  Laminating, as one kind person brought to my attention, would be the wrong avenue to saving a record.  It could not be recovered since the lamination would stick to the record itself.  The records at Washington County are encapsulated – enclosed within  two sheets of Mylar film.  The top could easily be cut off and the record taken out if need be.  I wanted to correct my statement before any damage was done to any of your old, precious records!  Happy researching!

George Browder Linton Obituary

George Browder Linton was a son of Thomas Alvey Linton and Elizabeth F. Proctor.  He married Elizabeth Milton Johnson in 1904, with whom he had three children – John Browder, Milton Victor and Nell Proctor Linton.  Unfortunately all three children died within a few years.  He and Elizabeth moved to Denver, Colorado, where she also died within a year.  He married Annie Lee McLean in 1912.  I believe this obituary was saved by George’s brother Louis B. Linton – I recognize the handwriting!

George Linton, Pomona Farm District

George Browder Linton, 90, of the Pomona district, died at 12:15 p.m. Friday in the Lower Valley Nursing Home in Fruita.

Mr. Linton was born June 28, 1881, in Russellville, Kentucky, where he spent his childhood.  His first wife and three small children died in a typhoid epidemic in Kentucky.

He married Annie Lee Mclean, who survives him, on December 24, 1912.  They moved to Hotchkiss in 1912 and to the Grand Valley area in 1917, where Mr. Linton farmed in the Clifton area.  They moved to another farm in the Pomona district in 1918.

Mr. Linton was president of the Mesa County Tomato Growers Association in 1930.  He was president and secretary of the Grand Junction Forum Club and was given an honorary life membership in 1951 for being a member for 20 years.

In June 1936, he was selected as one of nine directors to organize the Grand Valley Rural Power Lines, Inc., and was president and vice president for this organization for 11 years.  He was also secretary of the Colorado Ute Electric Association.

Mr. Linton was a member of the Farmer’s Union, Mesa County Union Oil Co., Western Colorado Producers Co-op and was director and secretary of the Fruita Bean Growers Association.

He was a member of the First United Presbyterian Church of Grand Junction and served as area director of the Rural Electric Agency from 1936 to 1955 and was on the board of directors for 15 years.

Surviving in addition to his wife who resides in the Lower Valley Nursing Home are two brothers, Louis B. Linton, Russellville, Kentucky; and Thomas A. Linton, Indian Lakes Estates, Florida.

Cornelia VanArsdall Obituary

Cornelia B. VanArsdall, August 27, 1861 – March 20, 1919.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, March 28, 1919

VANARSDALL

Thursday night, after several weeks of suffering from a complication of diseases, death laid his hand upon Miss Cornelia VanArsdall at her home on  College Street in this city. She had been for a long time a member of the Christian church and had lived faithfully according to the Master’s teaching. She was of a retiring disposition, a woman who loved her home and her friends, big hearted, hospitable and thoughtful of others, and she will be greatly missed by those nearest and dearest with whom she was content to spend her life. The funeral service was held at her home Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, conducted by her pastor, Rev. E. B. Bourland, assisted by Rev. M. S. Clark, of the Methodist church and she was laid to rest in the family lot in Spring Hill Cemetery beneath a wealth of flowers, sent by sympathetic friends of the family. None will miss her more sadly than the mother whom she leaves, whose constant companion she has been. The brothers and sisters who survive are Messrs. J. F., John I., Muscoe, E. Buford and D. P. VanArsdall, all of this city; Mrs. Thomas VanArsdall, Mrs. Abe Sharp and Mrs. Margaret Owens, of Wichita, Kansas; Mrs. J. B. Anderson, of Chanute, Kansas, and Miss Minnie VanArsdall, of this place.