Tag Archives: Battle of Blue Licks

Two Counties, Six Cemeteries, Four Covered Bridges and a Battlefield

Yesterday was a glorious day in Kentucky.  A reprieve from the 90+ temperatures we’ve had in the last several weeks – and no rain!  The high managed to get to 82, the skies were a bright blue, grass and trees wonderful shades of green.  We left at 8:00 a.m.

Our goal was to visit Robertson and Fleming counties and take photos in several cemeteries each.  You know how much Ritchey loves geocaching.  There are four covered bridges in the two counties – those beautiful, historic structures that are slowly dwindling in our country – and they each had geocaches hidden in them!  They were added to the list.  And on the way home, we planned to visit Blue Licks Battlefield State Park – what some have called the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought in Kentucky on August 19, 1782.  The British and Indian forces slaughtered many of the Kentuckians.  I have posted several wills written by men from Mercer County that did not survive the battle.

We began at Piqua Methodist Church in Robertson County, a small, rural cemetery.  While there, the gentleman who takes care of the cemetery stopped by.  He showed me a list of those buried here, useful since many did not have gravestones, or have long since broken.  He related that the last person buried in this cemetery was his elementary school teacher, Gladys Shepherd, who passed away in 2004 at the age of 104.

Ritchey finding a geocache at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge in Robertson County.

Just about a mile north on Highway 165 was the small church and cemetery of Piqua Christian.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, just outside the town of the same name, was our last cemetery for this county.  On the way to neighboring Fleming County we stopped at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge, and Ritchey found his first geocache of the day.  Sitting in the middle of the bridge eating a chicken salad and croissant sandwich, the breeze was heavenly.  Butterflies were plentiful, and there was no noise, just an occasional moo or bird chirp.

Top stone – In Memory of Edward Dulin, Sen., Born in Virginia, August 6, 1769, and Died in Kentucky, September 25, 1830.  Lower stone – In Memory of George, twin son of John W. and Elizabeth D. Dulin, Born October 23, 1851, died July 30, 1852, age 9 months and 7 days.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

In Fleming County we visited Elizaville Cemetery, a lovely small town, only few miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery was quite impressive with its old stones.  I wanted to share this one with you today since it was so unusual.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen an old above ground stone with writing on the side.  There were at least ten or twelve in this cemetery.  Other beautifully carved stones were for cholera victims in 1833.

Goddard White Bridge

On to the three covered bridges in Fleming County – Goddard White, Grange City and Ringo Mills.  One more cemetery stop in this county – Mt. Pisgah on Oakwood Road.

It was about 6:00 p.m. and we still had one more stop – Blue Licks Battlefield – in Nicholas County.  I was so impressed with the granite monument that names those who fought and died in this battle.  After taking photos we had a picnic supper before starting home.  It was a full day but so much fun!  And think of all the great information I have to share with you!

A Few Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Who Settled in Nicholas County

William Bartlett, son of Samuel and Mercy (Seeley) Bartlett, was born October 11, 1750 in New Canaan, Connecticut.  He lived for some years in Orange County, New York.  In Volume 1, page 48 of Associators of the 4th Militia Company of Brookham is shown William Bartlett – June 8, 1775 – Data taken from:  Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to the Revolutionary War in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany, New York, in two volumes – published in 1868.

He probably first married in Virginia and had the following children: Joseph Bartlett; Polly Bartlett married Ashford Prather; Marcie Bartlett married James Buchanan; Dorcas Bartlett married George Swarts; Samuel Bartlett; Ebenezer Bartlett and William Bartlett.  He came to Kentucky very early and is shown as a tax payer in Nicholas County in 1800.  In 1820 he died in Nicholas County.

Major George Michael Bedinger was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia, December 10, 1756.  He served in the Militia in the siege of Yorktown in 1781.  He was a major at the Battle of Blue Licks.  He lived most of his adult life in Nicholas County near Lower Blue Licks Springs.  He was a Kentucky Legislator 1792-1794 and was a representative in Congress 1803-1807.  The first County Seat of Nicholas County was established at his home (Bedinger’s Mill) on Licking River at Elk Creek in 1800.  He died in 1843 and was buried near his home at Blue Licks Springs.

John Caughey was born in Pennsylvania about 1747.  He enlisted in the Revolutionary War in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1776.  He was under the command of Col. William Irvine in the Sixth Battalion.  They first went to St. John’s, Quebec, to reinforce the tired and ragged troops at St. John’s.  At Crown Point he first heard the Declaration of Independence read to the troops.  They left Crown Point with the American withdrawal to Ft. Ticonderoga.  The Sixth Pennsylvania Battalion spent the winter there, but the lack of food, medicine and bedding tormented the troops, but when the enlistment was up in January, they did not return to their homes but chose to continue to guard the northern gate until replacements came in spring.  He came to Kentucky between 1782 and 1790.  In 1800 he leased 100 acres of land on the Licking River and not only raised food for his family but assisted in surveying and building roads in that section of Nicholas County.  He died in 1826 and lies buried in a grave no longer marked, in that vicinity.

Andrew House was born December 1, 1747/48 in Frederick County, Maryland, but spent his early life in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.  It was here that he married Hannah Snap, daughter of George Snapp, in 1783.  He entered service at Montour’s Bottom on the Ohio River, 11 miles below Pittsburgh about the year 1779, as an Indian Spy under the command of Captain David Ritchie and as private in Captain Nathan Ellis’ company and Colonel Broadhead’s regiment, during which time he marched up the Allegheny River and was in an engagement with the Indians, many of their number being killed.  The summer following, he served one month as a private in Captain David Ritchie’s company between Pittsburgh and Wheeling.

After his marriage, he moved from Pennsylvania to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and was again drafted to go with George Rogers Clark for three months on the Wabash Campaign, but he hired a substitute to take his place, paying him $20.00, saying that he had to raise a crop to support his family and could not get anyone to do his plowing, but could hire a man to fight without difficulty.  He applied for a pension in Bourbon County but later moved to Nicholas County where he died in August 1843.  In 1855 his wife, at the age of 94, made application and received 160 acres of Bounty Land.

David Kennedy was born in Scotland July 22, 1764 and died in Nicholas County September 8, 1824.  When quite young, he came to Virginia and served in the Revolutionary War for about three years.  About 1790 he migrated to that part of Virginia that later became Nicholas County, and bought a ½ interest in 545 acres of land, which today is located between Headquarters and Mt. Carmel.  He married Hannah Kassaneur of Aberdeen, Ohio.  Their children were James, William Elizabeth Cassandra, Thomas, Sarah, Harriet, Polly and Clairborne.  He and his wife and some of his children are buried on the farm that he owned.

History of Nicholas County, Joan Weissinger Conley, 1976.

Some Members of the Todd Family Interred in the Lexington Cemetery

Today I would like to share with you a few photos taken at the Lexington Cemetery in Fayette County, Kentucky.  These are members of the Todd family, beginning with David Todd and wife, Hannah Owen.

David Todd, born April 8, 1723, died February 3, 1785.

David Todd was born in Ireland in 1723.  He served as a private in the Pennsylvania State troops, 6th and 9th battalions, 4th and 5th Lancaster County PA militia, 1775-1780.  He died in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.

Hannah Owen, wife of David Todd, born June 3, 1729, died May 16, 1805.

David Todd married Hannah Owen in 1749.  She was born in 1729 and died in Lexington in 1805.

General Levi Todd, born October 4, 1756, died September 6, 1807.  ‘A youthful adventurer to Kentucky, and active in its defense in the most perilous times.’

General Levi Todd was the son of David Todd and Hannah Owen.  He first married Jane Briggs, in 1779.  After her death, in 1800, he married Jane Holmes.

Levi Todd was a defender of the fort at Harrodsburg; was in the battle of Blue Licks and aide to General George Rogers Clark.  He was born in Montgomery County, PA; died in Lexington, Kentucky.

Jane Briggs, wife of General Levi Todd, born June 3, 1761, died July 22, 1800.

Jane Holmes, wife of General Levi Todd, born August 7, 1770, died March 19, 1856.

James Clarke Todd, born August 9, 1802, died June 15, 1849.

James Clarke Todd was the son of Levi Todd and Jane Holmes.  He married Maria Blair August 6, 1829.  Before her death in 1834 they had two sons – Lyman Beecher Todd and Levi Holmes Todd (1834-1834).

Maria Blair, wife of James C. Todd, died March 8, 1834, aged 30 years; also, Levi Holmes, her infant son.

Lyman Beecher Todd, M.D.  April 1832 – May 1902.  In loving memory of a life that was a constant inspiration to truth and honor.

Lyman Beecher Todd was evidently a beloved human being.  When he died in 1902, The Kentucky Advocate, from Danville, Boyle County, gave the following information:

Dr. Lyman Beecher Todd, aged 70, senior physician of Lexington, died Tuesday night.  He was a first cousin of President Lincoln’s wife and was present both when Lincoln was short and at his deathbed.  He was a member of the Filson Club, of Louisville, and had in articles made valuable contributions to Kentucky history.  He was the former postmaster of this city.

Happy Fourth of July – Let Us Always Remember

Francis Coomes, Private, Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War, 1726-1822.  St. Michael Catholic Cemetery, Nelson County, Kentucky

Let me introduce you to the most recent Revolutionary War soldiers we have found.  We visited St. Michael Catholic Cemetery yesterday, and photographed Francis Coomes’ gravestone.  As you can see, the original stone is almost impossible to read, only the cross at the top is visible.  Thanks to the DAR and SAR for adding plaques to the veterans’ graves!

Proctor Ballard, Kentucky, Sergeant, Clark’s Illinois Regiment, Revolutionary War, 1760-1820.  Pioneer Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Proctor Ballard’s grave is another recent find.  He was a native of Virginia and served with the state militia.  He came to the Falls of the Ohio River with General George Rogers Clark in 1779.  He initially settled on Corn Island at the falls near Louisville, but moved to Bardstown in 1782.

To the memory of William Coomes, Sergeant, 8th Virginia Regiment, 1730-1820.  William Coomes, Jr., Virginia Militia, 1769-1834.  Walter A. Coomes, Virginia Militia, Battle of Blue Licks, Kentucky.  Soldiers of the American Revolution.  St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery, Daviess County, Kentucky.

These Coomes veterans could be related to the first Coomes who is buried in Nelson County.  William Coomes, Sr., married Jane Greenleaf.  She was a pioneer doctor and teacher.

Let us celebrate all those who have fought for our country over the years – from the beginning, the first war, for our independence – to those who continue to fight to keep our country safe.  Happy Fourth of July to all of you!

Will of William McBride – Killed At the Battle of Blue Licks

William McBride was born January 5, 1744, in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died August 19, 1782, in Blue Licks, Nicholas County, Kentucky.  He was the son of William McBride, Sr., and Sarah ?  He married Martha Lapsley October 17, 1765, in Augusta County, Virginia.  William McBride made his will in October of 1781, and died a year later, almost to the day, at the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War – after Lord Cornwallis had surrendered in October 1781 at Yorktown.

Lincoln County, Virginia (Kentucky) Will Book 1, Pages 7-9

In the Name of God amen.  I, William McBride, of Lincoln County and Commonwealth of Virginia, being in perfect health and of sound mind and memory, but calling to mind the mortality of my body and that it is appointed for all men once to die, and first I recommend my body to the earth to be buried in a Christian manner at the discretion of my Executors, hereafter to be appointed, and my soul I Commend into the hands of almighty God, who gave it me, and as to which worldly goods God has been pleased to bless me with in this life I give and devise in manner following.  To wit, and first, I require that all my just debts be paid or discharged.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto Martha McBride, my well beloved wife, one Negro wench due to me from Hubbert Taylor and one good mare to be 20 pounds value old rate, a good side saddle and feather bed and furniture and all the ? furniture as also an equal third of my cattle and further she is to have all the utensils for husbandry and privileges of supplying the plantation I now live on to enjoy during her widowhood, as also a Negro man due to me from said Taylor.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto my two

beloved sons, William and Lapsley McBride, all singular my lands not otherwise devised to be equally divided between them, as also all the horses and cattle not already bequeathed and all the utensils for husbandry together with the Negro men and the plantation at the said Martha McBride’s death or marriage, whichever may happen first, as also the above said wench and her increase, if any, to be equally divided between said William and Lapsley McBride at their mother’s death and provided either of said sons should die before they come of age the survivor to be heir to the deceased.  I further require that my Executors do sell 300 acres of land (for the best advantage) this due me from John McEntire as will more plainly appear by a bond on said McEntire for said land the money arising from said sale to be applied in purchasing cattle and other necessarys for my daughter hereafter named.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto each of my beloved daughters, Sarah, Martha, Elizabeth and Mary, a good feather bed and furniture, a silk gown and other clothing suitable so as to make up one decent suit to each, four cows and a good horse and saddle each, with dresser furniture proportionable to each, also a new Bible and Confession of Faith to each, these legacies to be paid to each of my daughters when they come to twenty years of age or at their marriages as they be arrived at eighteen years, to be paid by my sons William and Lapsley McBride, or by my Executors out of said estate, and I do hereby constitute and appoint my well-beloved wife Martha McBride, John Lapsley and James Davis, Executors of this my last Will and Testament and to see to it that my children may be properly educated and brought up in a Christian manner, hereby revoking and disannulling all former wills, testaments and bequests heretofore made, ratifying and declaring this to be my Last Will and Testament, in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 3rd day of October 1781.  Sealed and declared in presence of James Curd, John Marshall, James Calley.

William McBride

At a Court held for Lincoln County 21st January 1783 this instrument of writing was exhibited into Court as the last Will and Testament of William McBride, deceased, and proved by the oaths of James Curd and John Marshall, two of the witnesses and ordered to be recorded.

Joseph Timberlake – Member of Washington’s Guard

IMG_5277Flag and Gravestone for Joseph Timberlake – Hammonsville Cemetery, Hart County, Kentucky

IMG_5276Joseph Timberlake, born in Virginia in 1752, of English parents.  Died in Hart County, Kentucky, in 1841.  Married Annie Douglas December 11, 1784.

IMG_5275Joseph Timberlake, Virginia, Sergeant, Seventh Virginia Regiment, Revolutionary War.  1752-1841.

IMG_5267On Washington Guard, Sergeant Joseph Timberlake, born in Virginia, 1752; buried here, 1841.  Revolutionary soldier.  One of the members of General Washington’s body guard.  All were chosen as being sober, young, active and well built, men of good character that possess pride of appearing soldier like, those having family connections in this country, and men of some property.

Joseph Timberlake enlisted in 1776 from Louisa County, Virginia, and in 1777 was transferred to the Commander-in-Chief’s guard under Captain Caleb Gibbs.  He served as sergeant at the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, Connecticut Farms and Yorktown, and served to the close of the war, when he held the rank of sergeant.  He was born in Caroline County, Virginia, and died in Hart County, Kentucky.

1790 Will of John McMurtry

Scan151John McMurtry wrote his will September 6, 1790, and it was proved in the Mercer County Court in April of 1791.  He fought at the Battle of Blue Licks in Kentucky in 1782, and was captured by the Indians and held captive for about a year.  In October of 1790 he was killed during the Miami Campaign against the northern Indians – evidently wrote this will due to his leaving for battle.  Three years later his widow, Mary Todd Hutton McMurtry, married Lewis Rose, who fought with her husband at the Battle of Blue Licks.  If you missed yesterday’s post about Memorial Acre at Fort Harrod you can find out more about the McMurty and Lewis families.

Will Book 1, Mercer County, Pages 52-53

In the name of God, amen.  I, John McMurtry, of Mercer County and state of Virginia, being in perfect health praised be God, do make this my last will and testament as followeth.

I do give my son James seventy-five acres of land on the west of my father-in-law and north of John Simmons land.  I give my son Alexander McMurtry seventy-five acres of land joining the Widow Woods on the south and also from

Scan152the north-east corner of my survey, and to extend west and south for quantity so as not to take any of the improvement where I now live.  Also to Samuel I give one hundred acres joining on the west of my survey and to include a spring on that side and to my son William I give a mulatto boy called Lige and to my son John I give seventy-five acres of land on the east side of Seder Run and to my son Joseph I give the place where I now live, beginning at the east end and including the improvement and to my daughter Mary I give a Negro girl called Anny and to my wife, Mary, I give a Negro woman and the movable estate and also the house and improvements for the raising and schooling of the children till Joseph is of age and the half of the improvement during her life and my wife I make sole executor of this my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 6th day of September in the year of our Lord 1790.

                                                                   John McMurtry

William McKee, William Gordon, Henry Bishong

Mercer County                        April Court 1791

This last will and testament of John McMurtry, deceased, was exhibited into court and proved by the oaths of William McKee and William Gordon, two subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

                                                Teste. Thomas Allin, C. C.