Tag Archives: Captain John Linton

New Kindle Book – Pleasant Grove Presbyterian Cemetery List – Washington County, Kentucky

This has been a five year project, taking photos beginning in the fall of 2008 and through 2012, although I’ve just recently put the list together. This project is dear to me because my fifth great-grandfather, Captain John Linton, helped build this church. Many of my Linton, Moran and Edwards family members are buried here. Also, many of the early settlers of Washington County were laid to rest here. In a more modern happenstance, my husband’s father was minister of this church in the early 1960’s. Who knew we would share this common piece of history?

Included is an alphabetical listing of those buried at Pleasant Grove, including birth and death dates, and sometimes additional information. There are 856 names on the list.  Within a few weeks I will make this into a CD that includes photos of most of the gravestones and can be purchased on my website through Paypal.

Do you have anyone buried in this cemetery?

How Can City Directories Help Genealogy Research?

William Franklin Linton standing in front of his grocery store about 1899.

 

City directories are a marvelous source of genealogy information.  Not only do they list who lives in a particular city, and their residential address, but it lists their place of work and that address as well!  I have used city directories in several instances, not only to prove where people lived, but to prove they weren’t living in a particular city.

The following examples are from Louisville, Kentucky.  This was research complied for my dear friend Richard Linton about ten years ago.

The Linton’s listed below are the grandsons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Moses was the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, and came to Kentucky a few years before his father made the move from Loudoun County, Virginia, to Washington County, in 1818.  Moses moved to neighboring Nelson County, but later in life moved back to Washington County, although his children remained in Nelson and raised their families.  In the book I’m reading on Frankfort, Kentucky, they spoke about how the Depression of 1893 hit the state hard.  Perhaps these men who had worked as farmers for years, with their fathers, felt a new location and a different job would help them support their families.

The cast of characters:  William Yerby Linton, Moses Fillmore Linton and Benjamin Clark Linton – all sons of Moses Linton and Nancy Pead.  Those who moved to Louisville, Kentucky:

  • James Monreo Linton – son of William Yerby Linton
  • William Franklin Linton, John Kennedy Linton, Joseph F. Linton – sons of Moses Fillmore Linton.
  • James Fenton Linton – son of Benjamin Clark Linton

Now let’s see how jobs and home addresses change throughout this six year period.

1894 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. and James Fenton Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Fenton Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 226 7th
  • James Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 511 22nd
  • James Monroe Linton, engineer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 226 7th
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 2401 Slevin

1895 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton), grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • Joseph Fenton and James Monroe Linton (J.F. & J. M. Linton) grocers, 2401 Slevin
  • James Monroe Linton (J. F. and J. M. Linton) business 2401 Slevin
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1898 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • Linton Brothers (William F. Linton) grocers, 1324 W. Broadway
  • James Monroe Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove, residence 1816 Todd
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, driver, Bridge-McDowell Company, residence 2828 Cleveland Avenue
  • William F. Linton (Linton Brothers) residence 1324 W. Broadway

1899 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, porter, Robinson-Pettet Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, grocer, 1628 W. Madison
  • William F. Linton, grocer, 1324 W. Broadway

1900 City Directory – Louisville, Kentucky

  • James M. Linton, packer, Louisville Tin and Stove Company, residence 2136 Duncan
  • John Kennedy Linton, packer, Carter Dry Goods Company, residence 511 22nd
  • Joseph Fenton Linton, clerk, W. F. Linton, residence 1851 Lytle
  • William F. Linton, grocer, residence 1322 W. Broadway

1819 Tax Receipt For Edward Barbour Edwards

Today I have an original 1819 tax receipt for Edward Barbour Edwards to share with you.  Edward was my fourth great-grandfather, the eldest son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber, born in Maryland, April 21, 1768.  The family moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, where Edward sold purchased from Elizabeth Pitzer in 1792, to George Smith in 1795.  This was about the time he married Nancy Linton, daughter Captain John Linton and his wife Ann Mason.

Edward B. Edwards moved with his family to Washington County, Kentucky, in November of 1816 – two years before his father-in-law, John Linton, makes the move.  On November 27, 1816, Edward B. Edwards made oath ‘he removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with him four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Poland and Charles, and not with intent to sell.’  These must be the four Negro slaves he paid taxes on in the above tax receipt.

When Edward and Nancy Edwards moved to Washington County in 1816, they brought six children with them – Susan ( my third great-grandmother), the eldest, was 19, John was 16, Catherine was 12, Jonathan was 11, Benjamin was 7, and Mary Jane was 2.  Two more children were born in Kentucky, Martha, the next year, 1817, and Sarah five years later.

Now let’s examine the tax receipt.  There are three tithes at 62 1/2 cents each – Edward, son John and ?  Perhaps a brother or nephew of Edward came to Kentucky with them.  Edward owns four horses that are taxed, and 1,706 acres of 3 rate land.  I’m not sure what that means – good or bad!  A middle of the road standard?  The total valuation is 18,960 dollars.  I wish this number were broken down a bit more, but the total tax due was 13 dollars and 75 cents.  Thomas Hind, D.S.W.C. signed the receipt for A. E. Gibbons, S.W.C.

On February 4th of last year I shared a tax receipt of Edward Barber Edwards from 1816 – for Loudoun County, Virginia.  Click here to view that post.

 

Who Reads the Western American Newspaper In 1805?

np1Who reads The Western American Newspaper in 1805?  What today sounds like someone from California, or at least Arizona, in 1805 we are talking about Bardstown, Kentucky – Nelson County!  How times change, and talk of western lands in one century is definitely not the same in another! Personal information was found in ads that were run in the paper.  Most of the other written words were about the laws of Kentucky, items concerning the court, and in one, the second Inaugural Address of Thomas Jefferson!  In 1805 it wasn’t quite as easy to visit Washington for the inauguration, or watch it on television!

I found this newspaper while searching for something else, but couldn’t believe my luck!  Several extended family members are mentioned!

np4-1On page four of the January 11, 1805, paper is an advertisement to be inoculated for the ‘Cow Pox’ by Dr. Burr Harrison.  He has ‘just received the genuine infection from Philadelphia.’  Notice the insertion of ‘f’ for ‘s’ – makes it a bit difficult to read.  Burr Harrison was a descendant of the family of Susannah Harrison who married Moses Linton.  I descend from his second marriage with Susannah Hancock.

np4-2On the same page is a list of letters remaining in the Bardstown Post Office.  If they are not collected by April 1st they will go to the dead letter file.  Benjamin Mason, Joseph Lewis, Mrs. Anne Lewis, are all in my lines.  I can’t imagine why they didn’t pick up their mail.  Getting a letter was a rare treat in those days.  News from loved ones was a treasure to read and re-read many times.

np3-3On page three is a notice of leave by George Berry and Willis Hairgrove, to lay out a town on their land in Logan County, on big Muddy Creek, a branch of Green River.  I found Muddy Creek on the map.  It is rather long, but the only town on it today is where it starts on the Green River, a little town called Mining City, now in Butler County.  I can’t say if this is the town, or if Mr. Berry and Mr. Hairgrove were able to sell lots in their town, or if the project fell through.  Some of my Linton family went to Logan County.

np3-2David McClellan was in need of lots of butter in 1805.  Was he starting a bakery?  ‘I will contract for any quantity (not exceeding 2000 weight) of good Butter to be delivered in this place, any time between this and the first of April next, for which I will give a generous price in Cash or Merchandize – Any person on whose punctuality I can rely, that will contract for 100 weight or upwards, may receive their pay at any time, by giving their obligations to deliver the Butter in the time above specified.’

np3-1 Benjamin Mason, nephew of my fifth great-grandmother, Ann Mason, who married Captain John Linton, is requesting to hire a Negro woman for one year.  He lives 3 1/2 miles from Bardstown.

np2-2On page one was this advertisement wanting furs.  William King, located at Mr. J. McMeekin’s Store, is going to open a furriers business in Bardstown, and offers the highest prices in merchandise for skins that will be used in his business – bear, black and red foxes, martins, minks, fishers (?), wolverines, raccoons, wild cats, black and spotted tame cats, rabbits, etc.

np2-1Several ads like this were on the first page.  Plum Run is located near Fairfield in northern Nelson County close to the Spencer County border.  Nicholas Minor, who was a Justice of Peace for Nelson County, was married into the Linton/Mason families.  It is so interesting to find these little tidbits to make the lives of our ancestors come alive.  Each time we find a little piece of information that person becomes more of a real person, that lived, worked and loved just as we do today.

 

Actual Will of Captain John Linton – With His Signature

The last time I was at Washington County Courthouse doing research, I pulled out the original wills of citizens of the county, and among those was that of my fifth and fourth great-grandfather, Captain John Linton.  There is previous post that lists the will and its contents, and you may click here to read that information.  I am more interested today to share with you photos of the actual will – yes, an Iphone has many uses!

img_0866The first page of the will starts with the usual ‘being or sound and disposing mind,’ and starts the list of bequests.  At the bottom of the page is the bequest to his daughter, Nancy Edwards, my fourth great-grandmother.  Nancy married Edward Barbour Edwards in Loudoun County, Virginia, before the family made the trip to Kentucky in 1818.

img_0867More bequests on this page, especially to daughters.  I notice when the husband is still living the Captain writes, ‘to my daughter, Susan Moran, and her husband, William Moran,’ if the husband is still living.  Sadly, with the case of Nancy Edwards in the previous page, her husband Edward was deceased.

img_0868Page three lists the bequest to my third great-grandfather William Linton.  As mentioned before, he was somewhat of an embarrassment to the Captain as he seemed to spend money like there was no end to it.  The assets that would have been his were left in trust to son John H. Linton for the use of William’s wife and children.  Even at the great age of 84 Captain John Linton was a wise man and knew to set this agreement in writing.  Unfortunately the Captain died two years later, and John H. Linton, two years after his father.  William’s son, Edward, my second great-grandfather, was born in 1824, and soon after John H. Linton’s death in 1838, he took over the management of his father’s money and property.  It seems young to be given such a task, but he must have been up to it, as he continued throughout the lives of his parents.

img_0869I love the last page!  It bears the signatures – two – of Captain John Linton!  The first seems a bit unsure – but I notice now that if the arthritis is acting up my handwriting is not as neat, and I am not the great age of the captain.  The second signature is after a codicil concerning two of his Negroes – Dick and Conny, a very old couple – who are to be ‘permitted by my executor to go where they please and that they do not suffer.’  These slaves came with him from Virginia, as they are listed in the affidavit containing the list of slaves brought with John Linton from Virginia, dated November 5, 1818, and that he had no intention of selling them.

img_0870

Jonathan Wright Revolutionary War Pension Application

As you know, I cannot resist a mention of Loudoun County, Virginia – someone who may have known Captain John Linton when he lived there!  There is also the mention of Lewis brothers, Isaac and Jacob, who also lived there.  Captain John Linton’s sister married a Lewis.

from Pioneer History of Washington County, Kentucky, by Orval W. Baylor, 1930’s

Jonathan Wright, Hannah Wright – W. 11803 Virginia

Shelby County, Kentucky, September 12, 1833.

Affidavit of Isaac Lewis, age 73, and Jacob Lewis, age 67, made in Shelby County, Kentucky, who state that they used to live in Loudoun County, Virginia, a near neighbor to his [Jonathan Wright] father.  They were all boys together.  They have no doubt but that he did serve as a soldier, knowing that he was away from home and are well satisfied that he enlisted in the spring of 1782.

Washington County, Kentucky, October 29, 1833.

Personally appeared Jonathan Wright, age 70, states that he was born in Prince George County, Maryland, August 12, 1762, as copied from his father’s registrar, that he was drafted in the county of Loudoun, state of Virginia, May, 1781, in the Virginia Militia under Captain John Henry Newman.  Marks Lt. at John Moore’s Tavern in said county.  We marched from there to Fredericksburg, having served three months was discharged in the spring of 1782.  I volunteered in Captain James Linville’s Company.  He said he could prove his services by Isaac and Jacob Lewis of Shelby County, Kentucky.  States that he moved to Washington County, Kentucky, where he now lives in 1815.

Hannah Wright, his widow, made application for pension in Washington County, Kentucky, 1846, age 81, states that she was married to him July 22, 1783, in Fauquier County, Virginia, by Parson Thompson and that her husband died 27th day of January 1845.  States that she has records of her children in a book which her brother John Lewis wrote in about 30 years previous.

Records as Follows:

  • Warren Wright, born July 26, 1784
  • Laben Wright, born October 27, 1786
  • Fendley Wright, born April 9, 1789
  • Sally Wright, born December 1, 1791
  • Elizabeth Wright, born April 4, 1794
  • Nancy Wright, born July 2, 1796
  • Kitty Wright, born August 20, 1799

Deposition of Kitty (Wright) Dunn, made in Washington County, Kentucky, 1846, states that she is the daughter of Jonathan Wright and wife.

1941 Letter From Hugh Walter Linton to Frances Barber Linton Montgomery – Cousins!

Hugh Walter Linton and Frances Barber Linton were cousins – both had a love of family and love of genealogy.  Frances was my great-grandmother and I feel she passed that love of genealogy and research directly down to me!  I know of no one else in the family who is quite so thrilled to walk through a cemetery or visit a basement full of old wills and marriage records!
Hugh was the son of John Wesley Linton and Emma Adelaide Proctor; the grandson of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy J. Newman; the great-grandson of Benjamin  Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson; and the great-grandson of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Nancy Mason.  He lived in Christian County, Kentucky, where he married Eliza “Lydabel” Belfield Garnett.  Hugh and Lydabel had 3 children:  Hugh Walter, Jr., Mary Adelaide and Frances Garnett Linton.
Frances was the daughter of Edward Edwards Linton and Catherine Elizabeth Taylor; the granddaughter of William Linton and Elizabeth Lyon Moran; and the great-granddaughter of Captain John Hancock Linton and Ann Nancy Mason.  She lived in Washington County, Kentucky, where she married Robert E. Lee Montgomery.  Frances and Robert had 7 children:  Mary Alice, Anna Margaret, Laura Frances, Lillian Catherine, Robert Lee, Edward Linton and Benjamin Montgomery.
I know of at least nine letters written by Hugh to my great-grandmother from October 5, 1934 to February 8, 1945 – I’m sure there were probably more that were not saved.  On April 11, 1945, Hugh’s wife, Lydabel, wrote to “Cousin Frances” to inform her of Hugh’s death on March 21.  Frances died in August of that year.  Their fascination with family history lasted until the very end!  This one was written November 18, 1941 – after a visit from Hugh and family to Frances and Robert in Springfield.

Dear Cousin Frances,

We arrived home about 5:30 to 6 Sunday afternoon, in good shape and having had a wonderful trip there.

I don’t know which one of us three had the best time; we were all treated to royally by you and your good family, and even the weather was perfect for us.  It was a most enjoyable trip and visit for us, and we want to thank you, Cousin Margaret and Cousin Bob and both the boys for it.  We have really found home folks in your family; and it reminds us of the days when we would go back to the home of my father and mother in Logan County, when they had time to talk and live in the unhurried atmosphere, different from that of last few years.

It was a treat to get all the information you had for us.  We enjoyed the old traditions that you and Cousin Maggie O’Bryan told us of the old Captain and his home life, and to see your old treasures in the corner cabinet there.

Lydabel was very much taken with your husband, and kept talking about what a kind expression he had and the twinkle in his eye, and was distressed that he had difficulty with his hearing  and recalled her mother’s same trouble for many years.

We trust you all keep well and enjoy life.  Let as many of you as can get off, come down to visit us, and we will take you to see the Logan County kin, who by the way live some 40 miles closer to Springfield than we in Hopkinsville do.

With love from Lydabel and Frances and thanks for your many hospitalities.

Your Cousin,

Hugh