Tag Archives: Elizabeth Jones

1800-1801 Marriage Returns By Rev. Thomas Hill – Pulaski County

Friday, since it was so hot and humid, instead of a cemetery Ritchey and I chose to visit two courthouses – Casey County in Liberty, and Pulaski County in Somerset.  Casey County’s courthouse was old and beautifully built in 1888.  Pulaski County boasts a new courthouse built in 1975.

I share a page of marriage returns by Rev.Thomas Hill, dated 1800-1801.  I don’t believe these are original records.  The handwriting throughout is the same and doesn’t look like it was written in 1800.  Perhaps the originals were in such bad shape they decided to write down the information.  I’m just happy we have this.  Many of the early marriage bonds were lost, some pages looked like they were nibbled by mice – and these were dated in the 1880’s.

Later more information on the two courthouses we visited.

Pulaski County

I hereby certify that

  • on the 30th day of December 1800, I joined together Barnard Housman and Elizabeth Couchran
  • on the 19th day of February 1801, Charles Walker and Matilda Stephens, likewise John Taylor and Sally Harmon
  • on the 9th day of April 1801, John Wolverton and Anna Hanks
  • on the 21st day of August 1801, John Blackridge and Minah Newby
  • on the 6th day of October 1801, John Eastham and Polly Dunham
  • on the 7th day of October 1801, John Cooper and Polly McCown and also John Macninth and Patsy Cooper
  • on the 19th day of August 1801, Abner McWhorter and Polly Spencer
  • on the 17th day of December 1801, Amos Spencer and Polly Meek
  • on the 19th day of January 1801, William Allen and Polly Burns
  • on the 23rd day of February 1801, Thomas Jarvis and Nancy Ingram
  • on the 5th day of March 1801, Thomas Scott and Elizabeth Jones

Thomas Hill

The foregoing lists of marriage was returned to my office as Clerk of the Pulaski County Court by the Reverend Thomas Hill and the same has been duly recorded in my office.

Att. Will Fox, C.P.

1846 Will of William A. Jones – Livingston County

William A. Jones is the fourth great-grandfather of my husband.  Unfortunately, I do not know the name of his first wife.  Ritchey descends from his son Thomas who married Rachel Margaret Walker.

This is a fantastic will because it names all the children – and tells us the wife, Mariah Jones, is a second wife.  Why didn’t everyone be so thoughtful?

Livingston County Will Book B, Page 117

In the name of God, amen.  I, William A. Jones, of the County of Livingston and State of Kentucky, being sick and weak in body, but of sound mind and disposing memory, for which I thank God, and calling to mind the uncertainty of human life and being desirous to dispose of all such worldly estate as it has pleased God to bless me with, I give and bequeath the same manner following, that is to say I give –

1st.  I desire that so much of my perishable property to be immediately sold after my decease and out of the money arising therefrom all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid.

2nd.  After the payment of my debts and funeral expenses, I give to my wife, Mariah Jones, the balance of my perishable property after the above named debts being paid and the tract of land I now live on I give to my wife during her natural life or remains my widow, and at her death or marriage the said tract of land to be equally divided between David Jones and Patsy Allen and Sarah Jones, James Jones and Isaac Jones, Edmond Jones and Elizabeth Jones, all of the above being the children I have by my last wife.

3rd.  I give to Thomas Jones and Jesse Jones and Joshua Jones and Fanny Gazaway and William W. Jones and Olive Barr, six hundred acres of land lying in Trigg County in this state, near the mouth of Little River.

And lastly, I do hereby constitute and appoint my son Thomas Jones and my son David Jones executors of this, my last will and testament.  I do not request my executors to give security, hereby revoking all other or former wills or testaments by me heretofore made.  In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this the 27th day of December in the year 1846.

William A. Jones

Signed, sealed and published and declared as the last will and testament of the above-named William A. Jones, in presence of us.  Witness, Jesse Wills, Jonathan McCandless, Elisha Biggs.

Kentucky, Livingston County

I, James S. Dallam, Clerk of the Court for the County aforesaid, hereby certify that the foregoing last will and testament of William A. Jones was on this day produced in open court and proven by the oaths of Jonathan McCandless and Elisha Biggs, two subscribing witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

Thereupon I have truly recorded the same and this certificate in my said office.  Given under my hand this 1st day of February 1850.

James S. Dallam

William A. Jones, born June 17, 1784, died December 29, 1847.  Landrum Cemetery, Livingston County, Kentucky.

Woosley Family of Butler County

Today I would like to share information about the Woosley family, originally of Edmonson County, later Butler County.  The Woosley Cemetery is in the most northeastern tip of Butler County, on Hwy 411, near the small community of Decker.  The two oldest graves for the Woosley family are those of Curtis and Elizabeth Jones Woosley.  And that is where we begin our story.

Curtis Woosley is the son of Samuel Woosley, 1802-1865, and Rebecca Blakley, 1808-1890.  In the 1850 census of Edmonson County Samuel and Rebecca are listed as 47 and 43, respectively.  Children listed were Curtis, 17; George, 15; Samuel, 12; Thomas J., 10; and Martha J., 8.  Another individual living in the household is David Woosley, 75, who was born in Virginia.  Quite possibly this is Samuel’s father.  Samuel and Rebecca Blakley Woosley are buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Edmonson County.

Curtis B., husband of Elizabeth Woosley, January 26, 1833 – June 13, 1906.  Woosley Cemetery, Butler County, Kentucky.  ‘He died as he lived – a Christian.’

Curtis Woosley must have been the first of his family to move to Butler County.  We find him there in 1880 with the following children – James S., 24; Winston D., 20; Rody K., 17; Joseph L., 17; Jacob D., 13; Arpy S., 11; and Reason A., 6.  Son John H. Woosley was listed next in the census, 26; with wife Kitty E., 20; and children Solomon, 1; and William B., 7/12.  Son Thomas Jefferson Woosley was listed next, 22, with wife Louisa, 19, and baby son William A., 8/12.  Unfortunately, Louisa A. Cummins Woosley, died the next year.

Elizabeth, wife of C. B. Woosley, October 4, 1830 – July 26, 1918.  ‘A tender mother and a faithful friend.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley next married Dora Alice Wilson, daughter of Solomon and Polly Wilson, with whom he had Estella Pearl, 1885-1918; Rebecca, 1887-1891; Thomas, 1888-1889; McCary Fieldon, 1896-1983; and Janie Alice, 1898-1953.  The 1900 census of Butler County reveals two additional daughters – Willie C., 10; and Polly, 7.  I think one of the most confusing parts of the census is names – in one census the child was called by his first name, the next census he was called by his middle name – or sometimes a nickname!  I try to match ages – how old would that child be ten years from 1880?  That is not an exact science since parents could confuse ages and make the child a little older or a bit younger.  But we try!

Dora A., wife of T. J. Woosley, born April 24, 1862, died April 11, 1907.  ‘Come ye blessed.’

Dora Alice Wilson Woosley died April 11, 1907, age the age of 44, of pneumonia.  Thomas Woosley married Nancy Ann Bryant after her death.  He and Nancy had three children – a son named Goldie, a daughter, Edra, and a son, Clayton.

Nancy Ann Woosley, March 1, 1877 – September 17, 1964.  ‘The Lord is my shepherd.’

Thomas J. Woosley, September 25, 1857 – October 2, 1951.  ‘he was beloved by God and man.’

Thomas Jefferson Woosley lived a long life – 94 years!  He is buried in the Woosley Cemetery along with many other members of his family.  In addition to his gravestone, there is a sandstone stile block.  The plaque on the stone reads ‘Handmade by father and son, T. J. Woosley, 1857-1951, W. G. Woosley, 1900-1994.’

Sandstone stile block.

Sandstone stile block from back, between Thomas and Dora Woosley’s gravestones.

I thought this was so impressive – and such a wonderful place to put this stone in the cemetery – otherwise it may be lost and forgotten.  What a wonderful tribute to father and son.  And do you know which son this is?  The one named Goldie in the census!