Tag Archives: Grove Hill Cemetery

Monument to Col. John Hardin

Monument to Col. John Hardin, erected by his son Mark Hardin.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Col. John Hardin was everything mentioned in the following article – pioneer, soldier, patriot and Christian.  He owned land in what was originally Nelson County, Kentucky, but in 1792 became Washington County.  His will and further information was in a former blog.

The Louisville Daily Courier, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 20, 1856

Monument to Col. John Hardin

Mr. Edgar Needham, marble cutter of this city, has executed for Mark Hardin, Esq., a marble monument 20 feet high and of very fine finish, which is to be erected in the new cemetery at Shelbyville, in this state, to perpetuate the memory of that notable and patriotic pioneer Col. John Hardin, of Shelby.

Col. John Hardin, born October 1, 1755, killed Mary 1792, whilst bearing his country’s flag of peace to the Indians N.W. of the Ohio.

Col. Hardin was one of the most distinguished of that noble band of pioneers who drove back the aborigines from the forests of Kentucky, and founded the glorious institutions of this Commonwealth.  He richly deserves to have his memory perpetuated in marble.

Pioneer

The monument of Col. Hardin is a Doric Pedestal with its capitol surmounted with a blocking course, on which is raised in Alto Relievo, four original and characteristic emblems representing the Pioneer, the Soldier, the Patriot and the Christian.  Upon the blocking course is a column with a capitol of palm leaves, upon which is perched the glorious American eagle.  On the front of the monument is the following inscription:  ‘Col. John Hardin, born 1755; killed May 1792, whilst bearing his country’s flag of peace to the Indians N.W. of the Ohio.’

Soldier

This is unquestionably one of the finest private monuments ever built in Kentucky, and the representation of the ‘old Kentucky Rifle’ with its old-fashioned flint lock has been universally admired by all who have seen the work.  We understand that the blocks containing the emblems can be seen today and tomorrow at the establishment of Mr. Needham, on Jefferson Street, previous to their being boxed up for shipment.

Patriot

We are happy to add that in this instance the designing and the execution of the work has been confided to our own citizens.

Christian

If this policy were more generally adopted by our men of means, we should hear far less about the low state of the mechanic arts in Kentucky.  What our mechanics and artisans need is a fair chance for the work which legitimately belongs here.  This they ought to have and this they must have, if Louisville is to make any progress in manufacturing and mechanical industry.

Jane, wife of Col. John Hardin, died May 31, 1823, the mother of Sarah McHenry, Martin D. Hardin, Mark Hardin, Davies Hardin, Mary Estill, Lydia Ann and Rosanna Field.

 

Col. John F. Wight Obituary

In the 1880 census of Shelby County, John and Martha Wight had the following children:  Duke (Martha), 19; John F., 17; Sarah B., 15; J. Albert, 14; Mary, 12; and William A., 8.

John Fletcher Wight, son of James and Sarah Wight, born in Frankfort, Kentucky, 1832, moved to Shelby County 1836, graduated at Dartmouth College 1853, married to Martha Jane Oglesby in Panola County, Mississippi, 1859, member of Kentucky Legislature 1869-71.  Died in Shelbyville, Kentucky, September 27, 1908.  ‘All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come, though shalt call and I will answer there.’  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, September 28, 1908

Col. John F. Wight Dead

Shelbyville, Kentucky, September 27 – Col. John F. Wight, a wealthy retired farmer, died at 8 o’clock this morning at the King’s Daughters’ Hospital in this city after an illness of bladder trouble.  Col. Wight was prominent in Democratic politics for a number of years and at one time represented Shelby County in the Legislature.  He is survived by his wife and several grown children.  He was a member of the Centenary Methodist Church.  The funeral will take place Tuesday morning and the burial will be in Grove Hill Cemetery at this place.

Martha Jane Wight, daughter of Albert A. and Agnes Abernathy Oglesby, born in Surrey County, North Carolina, February 29, 1840.  In early life removed with her parents, five brothers and three sisters to Panola County, Mississippi, died in Shelbyville, Kentucky, April 1, 1935.  “I give unto them eternal life.’

Gilbert Ratcliff – WWI Soldier Killed Day Before Armistice

All casualties of war are sad, not only for the parents and family, but the rest of the country.  No one wants to lose a child, spouse, sibling, relative or friend.  But to be killed the day before the armistice took effect must have been an extra blow to the loved ones of Gilbert Ratcliff.  Since his parents were not informed until December 6, I’m sure they were ready to welcome their hero home from the war, sure that he had made it through. 

My uncle, Robert Carrico, was killed in Sicily in September of 1943.  My mother, her parents and siblings, never got over his death.  Even in her last years she would tear up talking about Robert.  I’m sure Gilbert Ratcliff’s photograph was hung on the wall, in prominent view, for all to see and remember – I know Uncle Robert’s was.

Gilbert Ratcliff, Co. L, 11th US Infantry, born August 22, 1890, killed November 10, 1918, in Argonne Forest, France.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, December 7, 1918

Six Gold Stars on Shelby’s Honor Roll

Gilbert Ratcliff’s Death Makes Total of 26 Casualties From the County

Shelbyville, Kentucky, December 6th.  Shelby County has given its sixth life to the cause of liberty and freedom.

Mr. and Mrs. Logan Ratcliff were notified by the War Department today that their son, Gilbert, who was in his twenty-seventh year, was killed in battle in France, November 10, the day before the armistice was signed.

Ratcliff went to Camp Zachary Taylor May 28 and sailed overseas the following August.  He was attached to a machine gun company.

Shelby’s other hero sons are:

Corporal Jesse N. Martin, who died April 7.  Private Luther Stevens, whose death occurred some time in July; Sergeant Frank Jesse, death reported July 23; Corporal Aaron Devine, who died in August, and Noah Wilmott who died October 14.

In addition to these six fatalities, four Shelby boys have died in France from disease, fifteen in training camps here and one in an airplane accident, making the county’s honor roll, unofficially, twenty-six.

Calien Crosby Family Buried at Grove Hill Cemetery in Shelbyville

Calien Crosby, 1806-1893.  Eliza Crosby, 1815-1908.  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Calien Crosby and Eliza Mount were married on June 2, 1843, in Oldham County, Kentucky.  Calien was the son of John Uriel Crosby, a veteran of the Revolutionary War, and Nancy Ashby Peters.  Eliza was the daughter of John Mount and Lydia Jennings.  The following license gives much pertinent information.

State of Kentucky

Oldham County Court Clerk’s Office

To any minister of the Gospel, or other person legally authorized to celebrate the rites of Matrimony –

You are hereby authorized to join together in the Holy bond of Matrimony, according to the usages and customs of your church, Mr. Calien Crosby and Miss Eliza Mount, of this county, daughter of John Mount, deceased, she being of lawful age.

The said Calien Crosby having executed Bond with security, in my office, according to law.

Witness my hand as Clerk of said Court, this 29th day of May 1843.

William D. Mitchell, per Brent Hopkins

In 1850 the couple and their children are residing in Shelby County, and that is where they remain for the rest of their lives.  In the 1850 census Calien is 43, a farmer, with parents born in Virginia.  Eliza is 32, her parents also born in Virginia.  Children Mary Frances, 5; Lydia A., 3; and John Mount, 2, are living in the household.  Calien’s parents live with the family, John, 93; and Nancy, 84.

John Uriel Crosby, as mentioned before, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, born in Fauquier County, Virginia, in 1755.  From The History of Shelby County Kentucky, by George L. Willis, Sr., it says that John Crosby and wife, Nancy, were among the thirteen charter members of the Antioch Church, located in Shelby County, about three and one-half miles north of Simpsonville.  John and Nancy are buried in what was called the Crosby Cemetery in that area.  Only two others are buried in this cemetery, son Gnoaeth Crosby, and Andrew Todd.

In the 1860 census there is an additional child, Charles Peters Crosby, who is 5.  In 1870 the two daughters have married, leaving John, 21; and Charles, 15; in the household.

In 1880 Charles, 24, remains with his parents.  Daughter Lydia A. Payne, 32, is also living with them, along with her children – Eliza, 10; Carrie, 8; Lulie, 6; and Robert C., 3.

John Mount Crosby died in 1891, leaving a young wife, Mary.  He is followed two years later by the death of Calien Crosby.

In his will, Calien Crosby left wife Eliza 150 acres and any other land remaining after the children receive their shares.  This included the home residence and outbuildings.  She was also to receive one third of all personal property in addition to 45 head of sheep, 25 head of hogs, 18 head of cattle and 4 head of horses and colts.

Daughter Mary Frances Crosby married Steven Henry McMakin.  She was to receive 101 acres of land to be used by the couple during their natural lives, then return to the original Crosby estate.

Daughter Lydia Payne and her children received 100 acres of land.

The heirs of son John Mount Crosby were to receive 64 acres of land.  This ‘in addition to what I have previously paid for him on his home tract makes him equal with my other children’.  The land will remain in the hands of the executors until the children come of age.

Son Charles Peters Crosby was to receive 115 acres of land, and will be able to purchase the land left to wife Eliza at a private sale after her death.

Son Charles, and son-in-law Steven McMakin, were named executors.  The will was written September 5, 1891, two years before he died.

It was previously mentioned that daughter Lydia, and her children, lived in her parents household during 1880.  She married Jilson H. Payne October 22, 1868.   In the 1910 census she is listed as divorced – perhaps the reason for living with her parents in earlier years.  In 1910 she is 63, living on her own income.  Daughter Eliza is 39, and is a dressmaker.  Son Robert, 32, and brother, Charles Peters Crosby, 54, are both farmers.

Lydia Crosby Payne died September 3, 1923, of tuberculosis.  She was 77 years of age.  Both parents are listed on the death certificate, as well as place of burial, Grove Hill Cemetery.  Son Robert Payne was the informant.  On the death certificate it says she was a widow.

The Crosby family is buried in a beautiful plot in Grove Hill Cemetery.  The trees are tall and old, their branches surrounding part of the gravestone.  Notice the smaller stones in back of the large one – those are for Lydia Crosby Payne, some of her children, and other members of the Crosby family.  With such shade they were too difficult to photograph.

 

Snider Gravestone in Grove Hill Cemetery Shelby County

Dr. Thomas Norton Snider, May 16, 1927 – June 30, 2005.  ‘He cared for all of God’s creatures both large and small.  Lynette Poole Snider, September 20, 1931 – May 20, 1998.  “Essence of grace.’  Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky.

Ritchey and I visited Grove Hill Cemetery in Shelbyville, Shelby County, today.  I was quite impressed with the grounds, and the good care given to the gravestones.

I wanted to share this particular gravestone with you since it was so unusual.  A girl, in full skirt, enjoying the essence of dance.  This is a new stone, and I couldn’t find more other than Dr. Snider was a veterinarian for over 50 years, and was a paratrooper with the 11th Airborne Division during the Korean War.  His wife preceded him in death by seven years, and he was survived by two daughters.

Was his wife or one of his daughters a dancer?  This is the epitome of life and exuberance – and just what a stone should represent!