Tag Archives: Jessamine County Kentucky

Curd Cemetery at Gates of E. W. Brown Generating Station on Dix River – Mercer County

Reuben Curd Family Graveyard, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Reuben Curd family graveyard is located at the gates of the E. W. Brown Generating Station on Dix River Road in Mercer County.  In the 1960’s this property was known as the University of Kentucky Experimental Farm, formerly the Henry Ison farm on the Dix River.  Since one side of the driveway slopes down rather far, it wasn’t obvious where the graveyard was located.  We drove to the gate to ask, thinking it was perhaps inside the gate, not realizing this was a restricted area.  Thankfully we were allowed to turn around and drive out and found the cemetery down the hill by the drive.

Only four gravestones are in this small cemetery, surrounded by a wire fence.  Reuben J. Curd, husband, and Susannah M. Curd, wife, and two infant children are buried here.  But, as always, there’s more to the story.

In the 1850 census of Mercer County, Reuben, 13, is living with his parents, John and Mary Curd, and siblings Susan, 15; Joseph, 11; Rebecca, 6; Jeremiah, 3; and Edward, 1.  All family members are listed as born in Missouri.  But in later census Reuben is said to have been born in Kentucky.  A little more research will be needed.

Reuben and Susannah, both with last name Curd, possibly cousins, married in Jessamine County, Kentucky, May 23, 1855.  Jessamine and Garrard counties are just across the Dix River, where it runs into the Kentucky River, a short distance from the old cemetery.

Susannah M. Curd, wife of Reuben J. Curd, born November 11, 1836, died May 23, 1865.

In the 1860 census of Mercer County, Reuben and Susannah are both 23; one daughter, Frances, 4, is listed in the household.  Susannah died May 23, 1865, possibly due to childbirth since daughter Ella Nora was born that year.

December 17, 1867, Reuben Curd marries again, this time to Susan Belle Cook, of Mercer County.  She is a daughter of Rev. Strother Cook and Lucy Jenkins.

Amy, daughter of R. J. and S. B. Curd, born August 14, 1878, died December 31, 1878.

In the 1870 census Reuben is 33 and Susan B. is 23.  The daughter by his first wife, Ella Nora, is 6 and Strother Cook, a son of six months, are listed.  In 1872 a son, Luther Truehart Curd is born, and daughter Lucy Belle Curd in 1874.  Son Reuben Munday Curd, known as Reubie, was born in 1877.  The youngest daughter, Amy Ruby Curd, was born in August 1878, and had died by the end of December of that year.

Reuben J. Curd, born March 12, 1837, died July 3, 1879.

Two family members are listed in the 1880 Mercer mortality schedules, a list of those persons who died during the year ending May 31, 1880.  Many people are confused by this and assume 1880 is the death date.  Reuben Curd, aged 42, died in July 1879 of tuberculosis, seen by Dr. Price.  In October of the same year Reubie, aged 2, died of croup, also seen by Dr. Price.  These deaths occurred in 1879, as listed on the gravestones.

Reubie, son of R. J. and S. B. Curd, born April 28, 1877, died October 5, 1879.

Of the eight children of Reuben Curd, only John C. and Ella Nora, from his first wife, and Strother Cook, Luther Truehart and Lucy Belle, from his second wife, lived past childhood.  John Coleman Curd lived long enough to marry and have a son, Lawrence, before his death in 1881.  He is buried in the Curd Cemetery with his grandfather.

Ella Nora Curd married William David Scrogham, and Lucy Belle Curd married John William Ison.  Strother Cook Curd married Mary Jane King and had two children – Hannah Bell and Reuben Davis Curd.  Luther Truehart Curd married Amanda Ellen Smith and had four children – Mary Bell, Ella Truehart, Nowlin Moore and James Garr Curd.  Susan Belle Cook Curd remained a widow for 42 years, raising the children and keeping the family together.  She died March 28, 1921, and is buried in Shawnee Run Baptist Cemetery with her parents, near Burgin.

Susan B. Curd, November 13, 1846 – March 27, 1921.  Shawnee Run Baptist Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

There are many members of the Curd family located in Mercer County.  Curdsville Road in the Burgin area is named for them.

Mithlin – Thornton 1799 Marriage Bond – Jessamine County

I’ll have to admit the writing of the groom’s name is a little confusing.  The first time the clerk writes it at the top of the bond it looks like ‘Miller’, the second time perhaps ‘Milter’.  The groom’s signature looks like Mithlin or Mithlin.  What do you think?

Know all men by these presents that we, Frederick Mithlin and Benjamin Scott are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esq., Governor of Kentucky, and his successors, in the just and full sum of fifty pounds good and lawful money of Kentucky, to which payment well and truly we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 14th day of November 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above Frederick Mithlin and Elizabeth Thornton.  Now if there should be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

Friederich Mithlin, Benjamin Scott

Teste.  John McMurry, Jr.

Jessamine County, Kentucky

Dickerson – Covington 1799 Marriage Bond – Jessamine County

Know all men by these presents that we, John Dickerson and James Dudgeon, are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esquire, Governor of Kentucky, and his successors in the just and full sum of fifty pounds good and lawful money of Kentucky, to which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 22nd day of July 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas a marriage is shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound John Dickerson and Polly Covington.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

John Dickerson and James Dudgeon

Teste.  Sam. H. Woodson

Samuel S. and Henrietta Gregg Buried In Maple Grove Cemetery Jessamine County

Samuel S. Gregg, born September 7, 1844, died December 5, 1885, aged 41 years, 2 months and 28 days.  Henrietta B. Gregg, born July 19, 1844, died October 12, 1895.  Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

This family seems to have more than its share of troubles. Samuel and Henrietta Gregg died at fairly young ages.  They had two children, a son named Luke, and a daughter, Bessie, who lived only two years past her father’s death.  After Henrietta’s suicide, Luke was raised by his grandfather, James Gregg.  Luke experienced a few trials of his own.  Four years previous to his marriage to Viola Soper on January 11, 1900, a tornado ripped the chimney off his home.  In 1920 Luke was driving an automobile, his son James a passenger in the front seat, and two men who had helped with cutting tobacco in the back seat.  It was hit by a train, killing the two men in the back seat and injuring father and son.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, December 7, 1885

Fatal Effects of a Fall

Nicholasville, Kentucky, December 6 – Col. S. Gregg died at his house near this city last night, about 8 o’clock, aged about 40 years.  A few nights since he was walking through his house when he fell over a chair and broke two ribs and injured himself internally otherwise, which caused his death.  He was a great friend of Ex-Gov. Blackburn, and was a member of his staff during his term of office.  He leaves a wife and two children and a nice fortune.  The funeral services will take place at the home tomorrow morning at 11 o’clock, and will be conducted by Revs. D. B. Cooper and B. Noland, after which the remains will be interred in the cemetery at this place.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Monday, October 14, 1895

Left a Large Estate

No Cause For the Suicide of Mrs. Henrietta Gregg

Nicholasville, Kentucky, Oct. 13 – The funeral of Mrs. Henrietta Gregg, who ended her life by hanging, took place today from her late residence, three miles from Nicholasville.  It was learned that several days ago Mrs. Gregg had threatened to commit suicide, but her nearest friends thought it was only talk.  Last Thursday afternoon at 5 o’clock she secured a clothesline, went to the top of an old stairway, fastened the rope to a rafter, and swung out into open space.  She had not been hanging more than five minutes when she was discovered by her father-in-law, Mr. James Gregg.  The body was taken down, a physician summoned, and everything possible done to bring her back to life, but to no purpose, she breathing her last Saturday morning.

Mrs. Gregg had been brooding over money matters for some time, although she was in good circumstances, owning several thousand dollars worth of real estate in Nicholasville.  Her son, Luck, who is now sixteen years old, will come into possession of $25,000 when he becomes of age, left him by his father.  Mrs. Gregg was just finishing a handsome home in Nicholasville, into which she would have moved next month.

Harris-Mitchell 1799 Marriage Bond and Consent – Jessamine County

Know all men by these presents, that we, Zephaniah Harris and Merriman Hightower, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, James Garrard, Esq., Governor of Kentucky, and his successors, in the just and full sum of fifty pounds good and lawful money of Kentucky, to which payment well and truly to be made.  We bind ourselves, heirs, severally and firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 18th day of December 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Zephaniah Harris and Joann Mitchell.  Now if there should be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force and virtue.

Zephaniah Harris, Merriman Hightower.

Teste.      Sam. H. Woodson

I do hereby certify that I am of lawful age and am willing that you should grant Zephaniah Harris a license for he purpose of solemnizing a marriage between us and sufficient warrant given under my hand this 18th day of December Anno Domini 1799.

Joann Mitchell

Test. Daniel Mitchell, Sr., Merriman Hightower

Glover – Young 1799 Jessamine County Marriage Bond and Consent

Know all men by these presents that we, John Glover and James Johnston, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, James Garrard, Esquire, Governor of Kentucky, in the sum of fifty pounds current  money of Kentucky, which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 11th day of July 1799.

The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound John Glover and Sary Young, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void or else to remain in full force and virtue.

John Glover, James Johnston

Teste.  Sam H. Woodson, County Clerk

This is to certify that I am willing that a license should issue for an intermarriage between myself and John Glover, given under my hand this 11th day of July 1799.

Sary Young

Teste. Abner Young, Ambrose Young

Jessamine County, Kentucky

William H. Hoover and Sallie Evans Hoover Obituaries

William H. Hoover, 1821-1906.  Sallie E. Hoover, 1841-1914.  William H. Hoover, 1858-1929.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Thursday, November 22, 1906

Wealthy Farmer Dead

Nicholasville, Kentucky, Nov. 21 – The funeral services of William H. Hoover, Sr., were held at 10 o’clock this morning at the residence in the county.  Rev. E. G. B. Mann, of Lexington, Rev. F. M. Fuqua, of the Centenary Methodist Church, and Dr. E. W. McCorkle officiated.  Mr. Hoover was eighty-five years old and was a wealthy farmer.  His wife and two sons, Judge E. B. Hoover and William H. Hoover, Jr., survive him.

Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, Battle and Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

William H. Hoover is the son of Peter Hoover, who was of German descent and born near Hagerstown, Maryland, in 1789, immigrated to Kentucky with his parents in 1800 and settled in Jessamine County just west of Nicholasville.  In 1811 he married Miss Eva Nave, removed to the southern portion of the county, and settled in what was then a wilderness, on Hickman Creek.  About this time he was drafted in the War of 1812, which was soon ended.  He resided nearly three-quarters of a century at this same place, making for himself a good name for all that was honorable, truthful and upright, and accumulated a considerable fortune for his children.  He died in 1872, a true and honored member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  Eva Nave Hoover, the mother of William H. Hoover, was a native of Estill County, Kentucky, born in 1790, and like her husband lived to a ripe old age, dying in 1876, having made for herself a character for purity and sweetness of disposition seldom equaled.

William H. Hoover is the fourth of eight children, and was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky, August 17, 1821.  He spent his youth and early manhood as a teamster, driving a train of wagons from Nicholasville to Louisville, Kentucky, and in assisting his father in partially subduing the great forest that surrounded them.  For many years he had charge of his father’s saw and grist-mill.  When a young man he became a member of the Masonic order and rapidly rose to the high positions of that fraternity, of which he is still a worthy member.  His opportunities for receiving an education were exceedingly limited, there being practically no schools in this then sparsely settled district of Kentucky.  But, being a practical and industrious man, he made the best of his opportunities and gathered knowledge by observation and experience, and today he is a man of good practical education.  He has always been a Democrat in politics, and for more than thirty years a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South.  He has accumulated a nice estate, given his two children good education and a nice start in life, and is now taking his old age quietly and pleasantly on his beautiful blue-grass farm, near his children and grandchildren.

He married Miss Sarah J. Evans, of Garrard County, Kentucky, November 26, 1857.  She was the daughter of Dr. Hezekiah and Nancy (Cole) Evans, and born November 18, 1841.  Her father was assassinated in 1862 on account of his strong Southern sympathy, near his home in Garrard County; her mother died in 1882, aged about seventy years.  To William H. Hoover and wife were born three children: William H. Hoover, Jr., the first, was born September 5, 1858, and received his early training at the district schools, Bethel Academy, Nicholasville, Kentucky, and at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, where he entered in 1877 and remained until he completed his education; he then returned to his father’s farm, where he assumed control until November 10, 1885, when he married Miss Mattie R. Vince, of Jessamine County; he then removed to his own farm adjoining that of his father, where he is now farming and breeding thoroughbred and trotting horses.  Thomas D. Hoover, the second son, was born in 1859, and died in infancy; Everett B. Hoover, the third and youngest child, was born October 21, 1860, and like his brother received his early education in the free schools and at Bethel Academy; in 1877 he entered the Wesleyan College at Millersburg, Kentucky, where he remained until 1879; then entered Vanderbilt University, where he took a special course of study, preparatory to studying law.  In 1880 he entered the Columbia College Law School, New York City, where he remained two years, taking the full law course, graduating in June 1882.  He at once returned to his home and received his license to practice law in August 1882, and has been a continued practitioner ever since.  He married Miss Ella Burnett, of Boyle County, Kentucky, November 21, 1882.  To this union was born Elizabeth Hoover, the first grandchild of William H. Hoover, January 31, 1884.  In April 1886, Everett B. Hoover was elected judge of the city court of Nicholasville, Kentucky, and was re-elected the following year, of which office he is the present incumbent.

The Central Record, Lancaster, Garrard County, Kentucky

Thursday, April 2, 1914

Well Known In This County

Mrs. Sallie Hoover died at her home in Jessamine County on last Saturday.  Her death was an unexpected blow to her friends and relatives, as she had been in her usual good health.  She is the mother of Hon. Everett Hoover, the well-known Jessamine County politician.  She was a sister of Dr. Elijah Evans of Lancaster, and was ell known in Garrard County.  She was a most estimable lady.