Tag Archives: Jessamine County Kentucky

Will of Ann Duncan of Jessamine County

Ann, wife of James B. Duncan, died March 20, 1849, aged 48 years. ‘god shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.’

I’m always excited to see the will of a woman back in the early days!  From her gravestone, located in the Duncan family cemetery in Nicholasville, we know that Ann was the wife of James B. Duncan.  At the time of her death in 1849, Ann has three children, Charles, Julia who married a Brown, and Margaret Ann, unmarried.  Notice there is no date on the will – an unusual fact.  I love the descriptions of silver table spoons, tea spoons, tongs, dessert spoons, etc.  This gives an idea of the type of life this family led.  When Ann Duncan talks about securing these items ‘with the property’ I suppose she means they must be handed down as family heirlooms, and not sold.

Feeling myself daily declining and believing that my end is near I wish to make some distribution of the little worldly goods I possess.  After my just debts are paid I give to my second daughter, Margaret Ann Duncan, a piece of land containing about fifty acres, lying in Mason County, four miles from Maysville on the Flemingsburgh Turnpike, and also the hire of my old man Billy while she remains single.  She is to have the whole benefit, but if she marry, then it is to be divided in three equal parts and entailed on their posterity made secure so that they cannot spend it.  I also wish that at my death a division of my bed clothing and furniture.  I have already given to Charles Duncan and Julia Brown a share of each, therefore I wish Margaret Ann to have the largest share in this last division.  I also give her my bed stead, my dressing bureau and a pair of poster tables that are now in my house.  I give Charles Duncan a half dozen silver table spoons, a half dozen silver tea spoons, they are to be secured with the property so that he cannot spend them.  I give Julia Brown my silver cream spoon, she now has a half dozen silver table spoons of mine in her possession.  I wish them also to be secured with the balance.  I give Margaret Ann Duncan, my daughter, a half dozen silver dessert spoons, a half dozen silver

tea spoons, a pair of silver sugar tongs, two salt shakers(?), one mustard spoon, one silver soup spoon, two silver butter knives, all to be secured as spoken of before.  I also give Margaret Ann, my daughter, my gold watch in consideration of her kindness and attention to me during my illness.  I had omitted to mention that I have four hundred and fifty dollars in the hands of Mr. Ely Anderson, living in Maysville, which will be due the second day of June; that I also give to Margaret Ann my daughter, and wish it secured with the rest.

Ann Duncan

Attest – J. Asline, William Duncan

State of Kentucky              Jessamine County April Court 1848

I, Daniel B. Price, Clerk of the County Court for the County of Jessamine, do certify that this writing was at the court aforesaid, produced and proven in open Court according to law by the oaths of William Duncan and J. Asline, the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the last will and testament of Ann Duncan, deceased, and ordered to be recorded and a certificate of probate granted, whereupon the same together with this certificate has been duly entered of receipt in my office.

Attest.  Dan B. Price

Will Book G, Pages 415-416 – Jessamine County Clerk’s Office

The Wallace Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

The Wallace family is represented in Maple Grove Cemetery, on Main Street in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, with several gravestones.  The two oldest are for Joseph and Sarah Wallace.  You can see them beside/slightly behind the large Wallace stone.

Joseph Wallace was born March 9, 1779, and died February 19, 1855.  Joseph’s parents were John Wallace and Jane Finley.  John Wallace was an ensign in 1776, in Captain James Moore’s company, 5th Pennsylvania regiment, Col. Anthony Wayne’s command.  He was born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and died in Fayette County, Kentucky.

In Joseph Wallace’s will, dated April 21, 1853, he gives his daughter, Mary J. Brown, ‘undivided interest in and to three slaves, namely Sam, Eliza and Solomon, purchased of Briers Heirs and now in the hands of Mary J. Brown, administrator of Thomas J. Brown, deceased, my interest in said slaves being one fifth part of the same, also her note executed by her as administrator for one hundred and fifty dollars, together with whatever interest may be due thereon, at the time of my death.  Also, one thousand dollars in cash.’

Son James Wallace received his father’s tract of land in Jessamine County, where the father resided, about four hundred and sixty acres, also four Negroes, his selection, out of all the slaves.

Two Negroes are given in trust to his executor, for the use and benefit of my daughter, Margaret Harris, Emily and Nancy, 13 and 7 years old, respectively, who are now with the said Margaret in Boyle County, also one half of a tract of land in Boyle County, containing about one hundred and eighty one acres, upon which Nathaniel Harris now lives, land and Negroes to remain in the hands of my executor for the use and benefit of daughter Margaret – perhaps he didn’t trust his son-in-law.

All slaves, land, chattel, etc., are to be sold and the money divided between my daughter, Mary J. Brown, and the share to my executor, in trust for my daughter Margaret Harris.  Thomas E. West was named executor.

Sarah Barr, wife of Joseph Wallace, was born February 1, 1780, and died September 16, 1852.  She and Joseph married June 23, 1809, in Fayette County, Kentucky.

James Wallace, son of Joseph and Sarah, left a very impressive monument in the cemetery – or it could have been his children since there is ‘Our Father’ and ‘Our Mother’ above their names on the stone.  James married Margaret Mays, May 2, 1850.  Due to the date of marriage, tiny Anna Wallace must have been their first child.

James Wallace was a rather wealthy man.  In the 1860 Census of Jessamine County he is listed as a farmer, with real estate valued at $27,000, and personal estate at $15,000.  In the census James is 48, Margaret is 36, Joseph is 7, Sarah is 4, and Virginia is 8/12.  Mother-in-law Anna Mays, 67, is living with the family.  She was born in North Carolina.

In the 1870 census James is 58.  His property is valued at $34,000, with personal estate of $10,000.  Margaret is 44, Joseph is 17, Sidia (Sarah) is 15, and Virginia is 12.

James died in 1875 and, Margaret, less than a year later.

James Wallace, born February 8, 1812, died June 25, 1875. Margaret Mays Wallace, born September 29, 1826, died April 10, 1876. Maple Grove Cemetery, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

 

Russell and Marian Porter Die of Smallpox

A beautiful memorial stone sits in Maple Grove Cemetery in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky, marking the graves of two children, siblings, who died on the same day, August 1, 1894, of smallpox.  Evidently an epidemic was wide-spread, not only in Kentucky, but throughout the country.

Russell, May 8, 1891 – August 1, 1894.

Russell Porter, aged 3, and his sister Marian, aged 5, only children of Walter R. and Bessie Porter, were victims claimed by the epidemic.  I cannot imagine a parent losing one child, much less two.

Marian, October 20, 1889 – August 1, 1894.

‘Fold them, O Father, in thine arms, and let them henceforth be a message of peace between our hearts and thee.’

 

Duncan Cemetery On Main Street In Nicholasville

The small, iron fence-enclosed Duncan Cemetery on the corner of Main Street and Duncan Street reminds me of the Linton family cemetery in Washington County – just a simple family cemetery, but one with lots of stories and history.

William Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.

William Duncan and Nancy Blackford married in Jessamine County, Kentucky, December 22, 1813.  Between the twenty year span of 1814 and 1834, the couple had nine children.  A family Bible gives births, marriages and deaths, which came in handy since a few of the stones were difficult to read.

Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Nancy Blackford Duncan’s parents are also buried in this cemetery – Benjamin Blackford and Catherine Sadowski.

In memory of Benjamin Blackford, born February 19, 1762, died November 21, 1842, aged 80 years, 8 months and 2 days.

In memory of Catherine Blackford, born October 6, 1770, died February 8, 1832, aged 62 years, 3 months and 2 days.

Rion Duncan was born November 6, in the year of our Lord 1814.  Departed this life September 5, 1849.

Rion Duncan was the eldest son of William and Nancy.  He married Louisa Tompkins.

Louisa Duncan, born February 26, 1816, died April 19, 1853.

In memory of Margaret Duncan, born January 14, 1817, departed this life January 3, 1848, aged 30 years, 11 months and 2 days.

Margaret was the oldest daughter of William and Nancy.

James Blackford Duncan, born February 7, 1824, died August 16, 1854, son of William and Nancy.

Charles W. Duncan, born April 28, 1831, died January 14, 1852, son of William and Nancy.

Alexander Crockett Duncan, born in Russell County, Virginia, June 30, 1787, died May 10, 1857, aged years, brother to William Duncan.

Ann, wife of James B. Duncan, died March 20, 1849, aged 48 years. 

This Ann cannot have been married to the James B. Duncan in this cemetery due to the age difference.  They are not buried side by side.

Information taken from the Bible of William and Nancy Duncan:

  • William Duncan was born January 15, 1788, and died September 6, 1863.  He married Nancy Blackford December 22, 1813.
  • Nancy Blackford Duncan was born December 17, 1791, and died June 24, 1860.

Children:

  • Rion Duncan was born November 6, 1814, and died September 5, 1849, from cholera.  He married Louisa Tompkins June 20, 1837.
  • Margaret Duncan was born January 14, 1817, and died January 3, 1848.
  • Catherine Duncan was born July 27, 1819.  She married James Bourn January 21, 1847.
  • Sally Ann Duncan was born October 21, 1821.  She married Robert Carlisle April 9, 1851.
  • James Blackford Duncan was born February 7, 1824, and died August 16, 1854.
  • Robert Duncan was born September 8, 1826.  He married Virginia Nave November 28, 1865.
  • Benjamin Sandusky Duncan was born February 13, 1829.  He married Lucy A. Funk May 22, 1856.
  • Charles William Duncan was born April 28, 1831, and died January 14, 1852.
  • Mary Deziah Duncan was born September 25, 1834.  She married James Carlisle October 5, 1854.

Nancy’s parents:

  • Benjamin Blackford was born February 19, 1760, and died November 21, 1842.
  • Catherine Sadowski Blackford was born October 6, 1770, and died February 8, 1832.

 

James McClellan and Susanna Ammon Marriage Bond

scan237Know all men by these present that we, James McClellan and Thomas Ammon are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esq., Governor of Kentucky and his Excellency, in the sum of fifty pounds current money of the state aforesaid, to which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 6th day of September 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James McClellan and Susanna Ammon for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct said marriage then the above obligation to be void or else to remain in full force and virtue.

James McClellan, Thomas Ammon

Witness Samuel H. Woodson, Clerk

Jessamine County, Kentucky

The Cleveland Family of Jessamine County

from Kentucky – A History of the State, Perrin, 1887

Jessamine County

The Cleveland Family

George Cleveland was born in Virginia in 1760; came to Kentucky in 1781, and settled on what is now known as the Keene and South Elk Turnpike in Jessamine County.  He purchased about 400 acres of land, married Esther Sherwood, of Culpeper County, Virginia, and became the father of seven children – three sons and four daughters; the sons were John, William S., and George, the daughters, Polly, Sallie, Hannah and Esther.  George Cleveland, the third son of George the pioneer, was born November 29, 1804, and died February 24, 1867; married Serena Craig, daughter of Hawkins Craig, of Jessamine County, and to this union were born two children:  George H. and Martha E., who married Dr. J. W. Holloway, also of Jessamine County.  After the death of Mrs. Serena Cleveland in 1840, George Cleveland married Parthenia Walker, of Henry County, and to this marriage were born seven children:  Horace W., born April 3, 1844 (he married Miss Fannie Haydon, daughter of Whitfield Haydon, to whom have been born four children:  George, Haydon, Ernest and Bessie); Amanda H., born August 21, 1846, married William Simpson, of Jessamine County; J. Leslie Cleveland, the third child, born March 17, 1849, married Miss Emma Felix, daughter of Josiah and Jane (Shouse) Felix (the four children born to this married are William F., Lena May, Jennie Lee and J. Estell); Warner H. Cleveland, born April 4, 1851, died March 14, 1853; Serena M. Cleveland, born March 2, 1853 (in March, 1870, was married to William Lyne by whom she had four children:  Irene, Maggie (deceased), George and Clarence); George W., the sixth child, was born November 30, 1855, and married Miss Annie C., daughter of J. E. Applegate, of Scott County, Kentucky (to this union were born two children:  Dora B. and Bertha); the seventh child, John L., was born September 11, 1858, married Miss Louella Hughes (she bore him one child which died in infancy).  John L., died in Denver, Colorado, June 18, 1879.

1799 Sagacer/Bruner Marriage

The following marriage bond is from Jessamine County, Kentucky.  At the courthouse in Nicholasville all early marriage records have been scanned and can be brought up on the computer a moment’s notice.  Unfortunately this one was not lying flat – there is a crease at the bride’s first name!  It looks like Hetty, but I cannot be sure.  Evidently it was her brother or father that was the bondsman.  Within the bond he is listed as Henry Bruner, but when he signed at the bottom it doesn’t look exactly like Henry – and notice the word Dutch in parenthesis.

scan029Know all men by these presents that we Frederick Sagacer and Henry Bruner are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esq., Governor of Kentucky, and his successors in the sum of fifty pounds to which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs and firmly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our hands and dated this 28th of September 1799.  The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Frederick Sagacer and Hetty(?) Bruner.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then the above obligation to remain in full force and virtue, otherwise to be void.

Frederick Sagacer

(Dutch)               Henry Bruner (?)

Jessamine County, Kentucky