Tag Archives: Jessamine County Kentucky

A List of Marriages – Jessamine County – 1799-1800

A List of Marriages

  • March the 6th day 1799 married James Tockett to Polly Howard
  • March 21st day 1799 married William Drake to Agnes Cunningham
  • April the 9th day 1799 married Joseph Kennedy to Eleanor Sellars
  • April the 11th day 1799 married William Moore to Patsy Boles
  • July the 14th day 1799 married Benjamin Williams to Nancy Williams
  • October the 21st day 1799 married Alexander Wilson to Polly Johnson
  • December 31st day 1799 married Charles Kain to Jane Holm
  • January the 9th day 1800 married Joseph Smith to Peggy Johnson
  • February 13th day 1800 married John Kennedy to Sarah McCoun

George Smith, Minister

Jessamine County Clerk’s Office

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery

Brown Family Plot – Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

George I. Brown was born in Virginia in 1784.  He bought property in Jessamine County, Kentucky – quite a lot since his real estate was valued at $54,000 in 1850.  George married Sarah Perry, November 17, 1809, in Woodford County, Kentucky.  They had two sons, George and Moreau Brown.

Sarah, wife of G. I. Brown, born September 30, 1789, died May 6, 1832.

Sarah Brown died in 1832, and the next year George married Catharine W. McKinney, June 6, 1833, in Woodford County.  Since both wives came from this county perhaps there were family members living there.

In the 1850 census of Jessamine County George, 65, is listed as a farmer, born in Virginia.  Wife Catherine is 46.  Their three children are Mary Hannah, 15; William, 12; and Sally, 9.

George I. Brown, born December 11, 1784, died March 14, 1856.

Catherine lived another nine years before dying in 1867.

Catherine W., wife of G. I. Brown, born October 25, 1802, died October 2, 1867.

From this angle you can see son Moreau Brown’s gravestone on the right – with the statue at the top – and son George Brown’s would be on the left, next to the beautiful gravestone of his wife, Anne Hemphill.  A better view is in the first photo of this article.

 

 

Major Daniel Branch Price Buried in Lexington Cemetery

Major Daniel B. Price, born May 1, 1789, died October 20, 1860.  Lexington Cemetery, Fayette County, Kentucky.

Major Daniel Branch Price was the son of John Price and Frances Branch, born May 1, 1789, in Powhatan County, Virginia.  His father came to Kentucky in the early years of the state, bringing his family with him.  At an early age Daniel Price was appointed deputy clerk for Samuel H. Woodson, Jessamine County Clerk.  Woodson resigned in 1816, and Daniel Price held the office until 1851 – a record of 35 years!

In 1813, Daniel Price married Eliza Crockett, a daughter of Col. Joseph Crockett.  Eliza died in the 1832 cholera epidemic.  Daniel married Mary Jane Stuart, daughter of Rev. Robert Stuart and Hannah Todd, in 1836.  He had several children from both marriages.  One son, by this first wife, Eliza, was Samuel Woodson Price (1828-1918).  Samuel was a Civil War Union Brevet Brigadier General, a commander of the 27th Kentucky Volunteer Infantry.  In the 1850 census of Jessamine County is listed as 22, an artist.  After the war, he became noted as a painter of portraits.

In the 1860 census of Jessamine County, Daniel B. Price is listed as 71, a farmer, born in Virginia.  His wife, Mary J., is 56.  They have the following children living with them:  Daniel B., 21; Eliza V., 19; Robert S., 17; and Margaret, 14.

Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge said of him, ‘Probably no citizen of Jessamine County was ever more favorably known, and certainly no one was ever more thoroughly respected.’  Daniel Price died October 20, 1860, and is buried in the Lexington Cemetery, in Fayette County.

Duncan Family of Jessamine County

In an earlier post I shared photos of the small Duncan Cemetery located on Main Street in Nicholasville.  Today I share more information about the family, from one of the biographies gathered and written by W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, published in 1887.   Biographies were written and accumulated over the state and country during this time period, to save the historical information of local, ordinary people.  I have found these to be useful not only in my Kentucky research, but also in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.  Remember to use these biographies as a beginning point, going back to original research to back up what is written in these biographies from over a century ago. 

To see more photographs of this cemetery go to the Duncan Cemetery blog written in April of this year.

from Kentucky – A History of the State; Perrin, Battle, Kniffin, 1887

Jessamine County

Duncan Family

It has been truly said, ‘Those lives that are without striking incidents are nevertheless worthy of record.’  That portion of history which is denominated biography has particular claims upon the historian, and truth is but a matter of common honesty.  Rev. William Duncan was born in Perthshire, Scotland, January 7, 1630.  He fell a martyr during the religious troubles that afflicted Scotland at the time Charles II was restored to the throne of his ancestors.  Rev. William Duncan had a grandson, William Duncan, who was born in Scotland, April 19, 1690, and settled in the colony of Virginia in the year 1719.  He was married to Ruth Rawley February 11, 1722.

Rawley Duncan, born in Culpeper County, Virginia, November 23, 1724, was the grandfather of the late William Duncan of Jessamine County, who died in 1863, and was born in Jessamine County, January 1, 1788.  William was married to Miss Nancy Blackford, daughter of Benjamin Blackford, in 1813.  The following are the names of his children in their order:  Ryan, born November 6, 1814; Margaret, January 14, 1817; Catherine, July 17, 1819; Sally Ann, October 21, 1821; James B., February 7, 1824; Robert, September 8, 1826; Benjamin S, February 13, 1829; Charles W., April 28, 1831, and Mary D., September 25, 1834.  Robert and Benjamin are the only sons now living.  Mrs. Kate Bourn and Mrs. Sallie Scott, the only daughters.

William and Nancy Blackford Duncan’s stones are the two taller ones in the middle row.  William  Duncan, born January 1, 1788, died September 6, 1863.  Nancy, wife of William Duncan, born December 17, 1791, died June 24, 1860.

Robert Duncan was married to Miss Virginia Nave, youngest daughter of Jonathan Nave, in 1865.  The names of his children are Maggie Florence, Robert Jacob, Lizzie, Miranda and Emma Besueden.  Benjamin S. Duncan was married to Lucy A. Funk, youngest daughter of John Funk, May 22, 1856.  His children are:  Allen B., Carrie B. and John W. Duncan.  Allen B. Duncan married Miss Georgia Proctor, daughter of J. W. Proctor, cashier of the First National Bank of Danville, Kentucky.  Carrie B. Duncan married David Bell, son of Dr. Bell and grandson of the late Judge Robertson, both of Lexington, Kentucky.  J. W. Duncan is not married.

Charles Duncan, the grandfather of Robert and Benjamin, was born at Culpeper C. H., Virginia, October 8, 1762.  He settled in Jessamine County in 1787, where he reared a large family, and died during a visit he made to Washington, Indiana, July 12, 1829.  Sallie A. Duncan, daughter of William and Nancy Duncan, was married to Robert Carlisle, in 1851; he was a native of Fayette County, Kentucky.  His father was Robert Carlisle, who was born in Virginia, and John G. Carlisle is a nephew of Robert Carlisle, Sr.  R. G. Carlisle was a school-teacher in this county about 1850.  He was born in 1820, and his death occurred in 1864.  One child born to Robert G. Carlisle survives, Lizzie G., married to James A. Hulett, of Jessamine County.  Sallie A. Duncan’s second marriage was to Willaby S. Scott, who was born in Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1815, died in 1882, leaving three children, Sallie, Carlisle and Eliza.  Mrs. Scott owns seventy acres of fine land in Nicholasville Precinct.  B. S. Duncan owns 380 acres in the same precinct.

 

Robert Minor and Martha Skeen 1799 Marriage Bond and Consent

Robert Minor and Martha Skeen married in Jessamine County in October of 1799.  Their marriage bond was signed on October 7th and the marriage probably took place that day or shortly thereafter.

Elloner Skeen, Martha’s mother, gave consent for her daughter to marry Robert Minor.

Know all men by these presents that we, Robert Minor and John Moore, are held and firmly bound unto James Garrard, Esquire, in the sum of fifty pounds current money to which payment well and truly to be made to the said Governor or his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 7th day of October 1799.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Robert Minor and Martha Skeen, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then the above obligation to be void, else to remain in full force.

Robert Minor, John Moore

Test. S. H. Woodson, Clerk

This is to certify that Elloner Skeen, do with my consent and will, allow my daughter, Martha Skeen to marry Robert Minor.

As witness my hand, please to give license, will oblige.  Elloner Skeen

Test. William Sheehan, John Moore

George Brown and Anne Hemphill Buried In Maple Grove Cemetery

George Brown, February 28, 1819 – October 30, 1897, aged 78 years, 8 months.  Maple Grove Cemetery, Nicholasville, Jessamine County, Kentucky.

from The History of Jessamine County, Kentucky, Young, 1898

George Brown was born in Nicholasville, Jessamine County, February 28, 1819, and died October 30, 1897.  He first attended school at St. Joseph’s, Bardstown, Kentucky, afterward at Centre College, Danville, and finally at Transylvania University in Lexington.  Upon leaving college he at once engaged in the business of the manufacture of hemp.  His father had been one of the pioneers in hemp manufacture in Lexington and the son acquired a practical knowledge of the business early in life.  Owning a large number of slaves, which he used in his business, he made it extremely profitable and he continued in the manufacture of hemp for many years.  In the fall of 1853 he moved to a farm on Jessamine Creek, about two miles from Nicholasville, and in conjunction with his farm operated a hemp manufactory.  He married Anne M. Hemphill in 1843, who proved to him an affectionate, faithful and helpful wife.  She was one of the model housekeepers of Jessamine County and as neighbor and friend had no superior.

Mr. Brown was a man of intense activity; domestic in his taste, he loved his home and added to it those things which made it attractive.  He was a model husband and father.  When twenty-two years of age, he united with the Nicholasville Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which he continued to the end of his life, and at his death he was the oldest living member of the organization.  He was converted under the preaching of Rev. David Todd.  He was efficient and earnest in his Christian work and was always one of the liberal and helpful members of the congregation.  He was a pure, good man; long president of the Jessamine County Bible Society, he was not only active but useful in the Bible work and has left behind him no enemies and host of friends.

While in Maple Grove Cemetery in Nicholasville, earlier this year, we came across the beautiful stone for Anne Hemphill Brown.  This is one of the most beautiful stones I’ve encountered. 

Buried between her husband, and son, Victor, the carving of the image of the woman is amazing.  The flowers, lace, details of the dress and cross she wears around her neck is extremely vivid and clear.

In memory of Anne M. Hemphill, wife of George Brown, June 9, 1826 – March 29, 1888.  ‘A kind and true wife, a dear and fond mother and a faithful friend.  We cherish her memory.’

The love and regard held for Anne is definitely evident in the carving on the front of the stone.  The sentiment on the back of the stone just reinforces this.

Will of Ann Duncan of Jessamine County

Ann, wife of James B. Duncan, died March 20, 1849, aged 48 years. ‘god shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.’

I’m always excited to see the will of a woman back in the early days!  From her gravestone, located in the Duncan family cemetery in Nicholasville, we know that Ann was the wife of James B. Duncan.  At the time of her death in 1849, Ann has three children, Charles, Julia who married a Brown, and Margaret Ann, unmarried.  Notice there is no date on the will – an unusual fact.  I love the descriptions of silver table spoons, tea spoons, tongs, dessert spoons, etc.  This gives an idea of the type of life this family led.  When Ann Duncan talks about securing these items ‘with the property’ I suppose she means they must be handed down as family heirlooms, and not sold.

Feeling myself daily declining and believing that my end is near I wish to make some distribution of the little worldly goods I possess.  After my just debts are paid I give to my second daughter, Margaret Ann Duncan, a piece of land containing about fifty acres, lying in Mason County, four miles from Maysville on the Flemingsburgh Turnpike, and also the hire of my old man Billy while she remains single.  She is to have the whole benefit, but if she marry, then it is to be divided in three equal parts and entailed on their posterity made secure so that they cannot spend it.  I also wish that at my death a division of my bed clothing and furniture.  I have already given to Charles Duncan and Julia Brown a share of each, therefore I wish Margaret Ann to have the largest share in this last division.  I also give her my bed stead, my dressing bureau and a pair of poster tables that are now in my house.  I give Charles Duncan a half dozen silver table spoons, a half dozen silver tea spoons, they are to be secured with the property so that he cannot spend them.  I give Julia Brown my silver cream spoon, she now has a half dozen silver table spoons of mine in her possession.  I wish them also to be secured with the balance.  I give Margaret Ann Duncan, my daughter, a half dozen silver dessert spoons, a half dozen silver

tea spoons, a pair of silver sugar tongs, two salt shakers(?), one mustard spoon, one silver soup spoon, two silver butter knives, all to be secured as spoken of before.  I also give Margaret Ann, my daughter, my gold watch in consideration of her kindness and attention to me during my illness.  I had omitted to mention that I have four hundred and fifty dollars in the hands of Mr. Ely Anderson, living in Maysville, which will be due the second day of June; that I also give to Margaret Ann my daughter, and wish it secured with the rest.

Ann Duncan

Attest – J. Asline, William Duncan

State of Kentucky              Jessamine County April Court 1848

I, Daniel B. Price, Clerk of the County Court for the County of Jessamine, do certify that this writing was at the court aforesaid, produced and proven in open Court according to law by the oaths of William Duncan and J. Asline, the subscribing witnesses thereto, to be the last will and testament of Ann Duncan, deceased, and ordered to be recorded and a certificate of probate granted, whereupon the same together with this certificate has been duly entered of receipt in my office.

Attest.  Dan B. Price

Will Book G, Pages 415-416 – Jessamine County Clerk’s Office