Tag Archives: John Taylor

Charles Blount Sullivan Biography

from Mercer County, Kentucky – Biographies

Charles Blount Sullivan was born July 23, 1851, at Elkton, Kentucky, where he was reared until 1866, when he was appointed a cadet to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, which position he resigned at the end of six months, and attended the Agricultural and Mechanical College at Lexington two and a half years.  In 1870 he lived at Henderson; in 1871 at Louisville, in 1873 he removed to Woodford County, where he engaged in farming two years, and in December, 1874, he located on the old John Taylor farm, two miles south of Pleasant Hill, Mercer County, where he has since resided.  His father, John P. Sullivan, a native of Woodford County, was born in 1813, and removed to Elkton about 1830, where he engaged in merchandising and hotel-keeping.  He is the son of Lewis Sullivan, a native of Virginia, a farmer, who died about 1820.  He had married Miss Collins, and their offspring were Silas H., Robert, John P., James, Obadiah, Luther and C. T. Benjamin.  John P. married Sarah B., daughter of Fielding and Adelaide (Halliard) Bush, of Clark County (died April 11, 1865, aged thirty-six years), and from their union sprang Fielding L., John B., Silas H. and Charles B.  John P.’s second wife is Mrs. Mollie S. Garnett (nee Arnold), of Woodford County.  January 14, 1874, Charles Blount Sullivan was united in marriage to Miss Leah M., daughter of John W. and Catherine E. (Garnett) Arnold, of Woodford County (born February 10, 1852), and to them have been born Katie Grooms, Sarah Baker (deceased), Charles B., Jr., Garnett Arnold and Ethel (deceased).  Mr. Sullivan is a farmer and trader, and owns 225 acres of good land.  He deals largely in mules, and raises registered shorthorn cattle.  He is also employed, at an annual salary, by Meguire, Helm & Co., Louisville, as an agent in soliciting consignments, and making advances on tobacco in Mercer and adjoining counties.  Mr. Sullivan is a member of the Christian Church, and is identified with the Democratic party.

Death of Mrs. E. L. Springer

Death of Mrs. E. L. Springer

Preached on the occasion of the death of Mrs. E. L. Springer, of Vicksburg Baptist Church, by the Pastor, Rev. D. S. Snodgrass, Feb. 20th, 1859, and requested by Judge Springer and the Church for publication.

Elizabeth L. Taylor was the daughter of John Taylor and Mary Ann “Molly” Hawkins, born in Loudoun County, Virginia, about 1796.  Elizabeth married Judge Benjamin Springer, in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on February 10, 1829.  Judge Springer was the dear friend of my great-great-great-grandfather, John Cotton Taylor, brother to Elizabeth.  In fact, he named his son Benjamin Springer Taylor, after his dear friend.

As many times happened in those early days of our country, one sibling went one way, and one the other way.  John Cotton Taylor left the family home in Loudoun County and headed west over the Appalachian Mountains to Washington County, Kentucky.  Elizabeth moved south to Mississippi.  John Cotton remained in Kentucky for almost 40 years, married and raised a family, buried one wife and after 12 years married a second time.  At this point in his life the call of new lands was too much.  John Cotton moved his family to Cape Girardeau, Missouri, except for daughter Catherine Elizabeth who at that time was married to Edward Linton and had a new baby girl, Alice – they remained in Washington County, Kentucky.

Cape Girardeau is located on the Mississippi River, just two hours south of St. Louis.  Perhaps John Cotton Taylor was able to take a steamboat down the Mississippi River to visit his sister Elizabeth and husband Benjamin Springer.  If not before, perhaps he was able to attend her funeral – and this publication of the sermon I have was brought back from that sad time.  “Mother Springer is at rest!  She is at last with that Savior whom she loved and labored to glorify on earth.  O!  that her mantle may fall upon her dear friends who survive.”

John Cotton Taylor did not find Missouri to be the glorious place he hoped – within 12 years, five of the original eight who make the trip were dead, including John Cotton Taylor.  Four children of his son, Benjamin Springer Taylor, and wife, Martha Jane Janes, were born in Missouri – two of whom died while infants.  Three adults and two children made the trip back to Washington County and the family they had left behind.

Today we take for granted the sacrifices our forebears made in moving on to new lands, the harsh life of settlement on the prairies and the sadness and heartache they endured.  Life was not easy, but they persevered and continued on with life – though sometimes, undoubtedly, with a very heavy heart.

Elizabeth L. Taylor Springer must have held a very special place in the hearts of her family.  This copy of her funeral sermon has been passed down through the generations for 153 years – I treasure it.

Henry Taylor, Sr., Will

Henry Taylor was my gr-gr-gr-gr-great-grandfather.  I found this will during my research last week.  Henry’s first wife was Mary Cork, with whom he had all but his youngest son, John, my ancestor.  His second wife, Susanna Compton, was John’s mother.  Susanna was the widow of Robert Whitely when she married Henry.  Henry’s parents were John Taylor and Mary Bumbury.

Loudoun County, Virginia, Will Book A

pp. 318-319

In the name of God, amen.  I, Henry Taylor, Sr., in the parish of Cameron, County of Loudoun, Colony of Virginia, Planter, being at this time weak of body but of a sound and perfect memory and understanding, make and ordain this my last Will and Testament.  First and principally I recommend my soul to God who gave it me, and my body to the earth, to be decently interred at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named.  And as to my temporal estate I bequeath and dispose of in the following manner.  My mind and will is that all my just debts together with my funeral expenses be first paid and discharged out of my estate.

Item.  I give and devise to my well beloved wife Susanna Taylor the lot of land I now live on and the half of my movable estate (except what I bequeath to my former wife’s children) during her life.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Walter Taylor the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Joshua Taylor the lot of land whereon he now lives to him and his heirs.

Item.  I give and devise to my son Henry Taylor five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law William Cotton the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law Thomas Harden the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my son-in-law Notley Williams the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia.

Item.  I give and devise to my youngest son, John Taylor, all the rest and residue of my movable estate to be immediately possessed with it after my death.  I further devise to my said son John Taylor, the plantation (or lot of land) I now live on and all the movable estate I bequeathed to my wife Susanna to be immediately in his possession after the death of his mother, to him and his heirs lawfully begotten.

Lastly and finally I do make, ordain and appoint my well beloved wife Susanna Taylor and my son John Taylor executors of this my last Will and Testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty-ninth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy.

                                                 Henry Taylor, Senior

In the presence of us who subscribed our names in presence of the said Testator and of each other – Mary Sutton, John Burk, Rhoda Burk

At a court held for Loudoun County August 12th 1771

This will was proved by the oaths of Mary Sutton, John Burk and Rhoda Burk, witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded, and on the motion of Susanna Taylor, Executrix, and John Taylor, the Executor, therein named who made oath according to law, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form giving security.  Whereupon they together with Thomas Lewis and William Smith, Gentlemen, their securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of one thousand pounds current money with condition as the law directs.

Will of Cornelius Bodine

Loudoun County, Virginia, Will book B, pp. 372-373

In the name of God, amen.  I, Cornelius Bodine, being sick and weak but in perfect sense and memory, doth make this my last will and testament in the manner and form following.  My will and desire is first that my lawful debts and funeral expenses be paid. Item.  I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Ida Bodine all my estate real and personal for and during her life and at her decease to be equally divided between my seven children, that is to say Jacob Bodine, Isaac Bodine, John Bodine, Orrionehe Rightmire, Sarah Bodine, Mary Bodine and Elizabeth Bodine, and in case any of them should die without heir my will and desire is that the same shall be equally divided between them or either of them aforesaid.  I do hereby nominate and appoint my beloved wife Ida Bodine and my son Jacob Bodine executors of this my last will and testament hereby declaring this to be my only last will and testament.  In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this thirteenth day of September one thousand seven hundred and seventy nine.                              Cornelius Bodine

In the presence of John Carter, Morris Carter and John Taylor

At a court held for Loudoun County the 13th day of August 1781.

This will was proved by the oath of John Taylor, a subscribing witness and ordered to be recorded and on the motion of Ida Bodine and Jacob Bodine, the executors therein named, who made oath according to law, certificate is granted them for obtaining a probate thereof in due form, they giving security.  Whereupon they together with Jacob Moore and Isaac Vandeventer their securities entered into and acknowledged their bond in the penalty of five hundred pounds, conditioned as the law directs.

Today In Genealogy History – February 10, 2012

George Taylor was born 301 years ago – February 10, 1711.  George was the son of James Taylor, II, and Martha Thompson.  George married Rachel Gibson.  They had 7 children:  Edmund, Richard, John, Francis, Rueben, James and Jonathan Taylor.  George Taylor died in Orange County, Virginia, in 1792.

Today In Genealogy History – November 25, 2011

Susan Clark Edwards and John Cotton Taylor were married 183 years ago – November 25, 1828 – in  Washington County, Kentucky.  Susan was the daughter of Edward Barber Edwards and Nancy Linton.  John was the son of John Taylor and Molly Hawkins.  Susan and John had 4 children:  Catherine Elizabeth, Edward Edwards, Benjamin Springer and Margaret Ann Taylor.