Tag Archives: Lincoln County Kentucky

Louise Fabry and August Abt – From Germany and Switzerland to Lincoln County

A year or so ago Ritchey and I visited three small cemeteries in Ottenheim, Kentucky.  Ottenheim is a small town in rural Lincoln County settled by German and Swiss immigrants.  There is the German Reform Church Cemetery, the Lutheran Church Cemetery and St. Sylvester Catholic Church Cemetery.  I believe at one time Ottenheim was a bustling little town and community, but today you could drive through without realizing you missed it!

Today I want to share with you information about the Abt family – August Abt and Louise Fabry – and some of the photos we took in St. Sylvester Cemetery.

At home, with a little research, I’ve found much more about this immigrants to Lincoln County.  Louise Fabry came from Germany with her parents and siblings in 1886, leaving from the port of Le Harve, France, on the steamship St. Laurent.  They arrived in New York on March 18, 1886.  Included in the family were the parents – Pierre, 50, and Madeline, 42.  The children were Michael, 17; Pierre, 11; Louise, 7; Emile, 3; and Marie, 1.  The family came to Kentucky and settled in the little town of Ottenheim.

According to the census records August Abt and his family came from the Aargau Canton, Rottenschwil, Switzerland, in 1884.  His parents, Leonz Plezidus Abt and Verena Huber, were both from the Aargau Canton of Switzerland – he from the town of Rottenschwil and she from Unterlunkhofen – about a twenty-five-minute walk from each other.  Leonz and Verena married February 15, 1863.  They had eight children – Kaspar, August, Maria, Joseph, Johann, Adolf, Anna and Joseph.

Louise Fabry married August Abt on September 27, 1899, in Lincoln County, at Oppenheim.  In the 1910 Census of Lincoln County August is 44, Louise is 33.  Children are Celia, 10; Elsie, 8; and Charles, 6.  Daughter Elfredia was born in 1912.

Louise Abt, May 24, 1878 – September 5, 1918, St. Sylvester Catholic Cemetery, Ottenheim, Lincoln County, Kentucky.

Unfortunately, a terrible accident took place on August 30, 1918.  Louise caught her fingers in the gear of a fruit press.  She died six days later of lock-jaw, a form of blood poisoning.  What a sorrow for the family.  Elfredia was only six.

Cecelia Abt, June 18, 1906 – November 3, 1923.

Daughter Cecelia died at the young age of of 23.  I believe there must be a mistake for her birth year on her gravestone.  She was ten in the 1910 census, and 19 in the 1920 census.  Cecelia must have been older than the seventeen years it shows on her stone.

August Abt, February 8, 1865 – September 11, 1844.

Four years later August Abt married Wilhelmine ‘Minnie’ Jedamzik.  She also had children from a previous marriage.  They lived happily together until August’s death on September 11, 1944.

James Berry Will – Lincoln County

I, James Berry, of Lincoln County and state of Virginia, being weak in body, but of sound mind and memory, do make and dispose this my last will and testament. First, I recommend my body to the Earth to be buried in decent order, and my spirit I recommend to God that gave it, nothing doubting but I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God, and touching such worldly estate

wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this life, I give and devise in manor following, first of all I give to my daughter Elizabeth, two hundred acres of land being the half of a four hundred acre tract I have lying on Gilbert’s Creek, the other two hundred acres I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Christina, during her life and if no other heirs at her death belonging to James Berry, my daughter Elizabeth is to possess the whole four hundred acres.  My roan horse I give and bequeath to my beloved wife, Christina, one third part of all my other movable state, excepting my sorrel horse, saddle and bridle, and that I give and bequeath to my step-son John Wilson.  And I appoint my beloved wife Christina Berry and Ebenezer Miller and John Smith, withall, executors of this my last will and testament, confirming this and none other to be my last will and testament.  In witness I have set my hand and seal this 10th of March 1781.

James Berry, Christina Berry, Ebenezer Miller, John Smith

Teste.  John Kearnel, Samuel Dennie, Thomas Dinton

At a Court held for Lincoln County the 16th January 1782

This instrument of writing was exhibited in Court as the last will and testament of James Berry, deceased, and proved by the oaths of Samuel Dennie and Thomas Dinton and ordered to be recorded.

Teste.  William May, Clerk, Lincoln County

Will Book 1, pages 9-10

French-Callaway 1783 Lincoln County Marriage

James French and Keziah Callaway received their marriage bond on June 19, 1783, in Lincoln County, Virginia – later, Kentucky.  At this time, there were three counties – Jefferson, Fayette and Lincoln – of what was once Kentucky County, Virginia.  It has been said their wedding was the first celebrated at Fort Boonesborough. 

Quite interesting to share this particular marriage with you today since I just finished reading Sue Kelly Ballard’s My Blessed, Wretched Life, Rebecca Boone’s Story.  I heartily recommend this book.  Ms. Ballard gives us personalized characters and clear descriptions of the life lived during those tumultuous years.  I didn’t search for this marriage – just pulled it out of the file.

James French was born in November 1756 in Prince William County, Virginia, and died in April 1835 in Montgomery County, Kentucky.  Keziah ‘Cuzza’ Callaway was born August 8, 1768, in Bedford County, Virginia, and died September 26, 1845, in Montgomery County, Kentucky. She was the daughter of Col. Richard Callaway of Boonesborough, and Elizabeth Hoy, his second wife.  Two of their daughters, along with Jemima Boone, were captured by the Indians near Fort Boonesborough.  Richard Callaway and Daniel Boone left immediately to rescue the girls, which they did within two days.  Richard was killed in 1780 by a party of Shawnee Indians.  Elizabeth then lived with her daughter and son-in-law.  It was said that on May 24, 1840, Keziah was the honored guest of a reunion at Boonesborough where more than seven thousand residents of Madison and Clark counties, along with the Governor, attended the event.

James and Keziah had at least seven children – Catherine, Richard, Susannah, Stephen, Keziah, Theodosia and Livia French.

Notice the lovely handwriting of Elizabeth Callaway – a learned woman!

Know all men by these presents that we, James French and John Holly, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, the Governor of Virginia, for the time being, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment whereof to be made to the Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 19th day of June 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James French and Cuzza Callaway, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void or else to remain in full force.

James French, John Holly

Sealed and delivered in presence of Willis Green

Sir,

You have my approbation of, and request to issue a marriage license to Mr. James French and Miss Cuzza Callaway.  I am, sincerely yours.

Elizabeth Callaway, June 16, 1783

To the Clerk of Lincoln Court

1783 Marriage of James Stevens and Susannah Haydon

James Stevens was born in Orange County, Virginia, July 23, 1757, and died September 3, 1832, in Warren County, Kentucky.  He was a veteran of the Revolutionary War, enlisted in Orange County, and served in the Second Virginia Regiment.  Susannah Haydon, his wife, was born in Virginia, March 25, 1768, and died January 9, 1839, in Warren County.  They were married in Lincoln County, Kentucky (Virginia at the time), July 9, 1783.

I will mention that it was not Thomas Harrison that was Governor of Virginia at this time, but Benjamin Harrison.  He lived at his plantation home known as Berkeley. 

Ritchey and I visited this home last year while in Virginia – it is quite beautiful and commands a majestic view of the James River.  We had afternoon tea under the huge trees of the yard.

Know all men by these presents that we, James Stevens and Richard Beale, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors.  We bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 9th day of July 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound James Stevens and Susannah Haydon, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

James Stevens, Richard Beale

Sealed and delivered in presence of Willis Green

Lincoln County

Sir,

Please to grant Mr. James Stevens his license to marry my daughter, Susannah Haydon, and oblige, sir, your humble servant.

John Haydon, July 9th 1783

Mr. Willis Green

Test. John Conner, Abner Haydon

McDougal and Farquhan 1783 Marriage Bond and Consent

I do apologize for no post yesterday.  Saturday I planned this marriage bond and consent for Sunday, even scanned both.  I’m working on a cookbook and because so engrossed Saturday I worked until about 10:00 at night – it was just too late for a blog.  Life sometimes happens.

This marriage bond does not contain the day of the month it was written, but the consent gives the date of November 10th.  Lincoln County was still a part of Virginia at the time – notice the governor is Benjamin Harrison.

Know all by these presents that we, Charles McDougal and Stephen Archer, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Benjamin Harrison, Esquire, Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money to the payment whereof well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this day of November 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound Charles McDougal and Elizabeth Farquhan, for which a license has issued.  Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage then this obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

Charles McDougal, Stephen Archer

Sealed and delivered in the presence of Willis Green

Whereas Charles McDougal and my daughter, Elizabeth, being inclined to join in matrimony, you will please therefore grant license and in so doing you will oblige your servant.  Given under my hand and seal this 10 day of November 1783.

Robert Farquhan

Test.

Stephen Archer, Hugh Edmonson, Ash Edmonson

Mumony-Linn 1783 Lincoln County Marriage

Know all men by these presents that we, William Mumony and Thomas Denton, are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency, Thomas Harrison, Esq., Governor of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money, to the payment whereof to be made to the said Governor and his successors, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals and dated this 10th day of September 1783.

The condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be solemnized between the above bound William Mumony and Susannah Linn, for which a license has issued.  Now, if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said intended marriage then the obligation to be void, or else to remain in full force.

William Momoney, Thomas Denton

Sealed and Delivered in presence of Willis Green

This is to certify to all people it may concern, that I, Hannah Welch, does give William Momoney my consent to obtain a license according to law to marry my daughter, Susannah Linn, September the tenth one thousand seven hundred eighty three.  Signed, sealed and delivered in presence of Thomas Denton and Sarah Denton

Hannah Welch

Will of William McBride – Killed At the Battle of Blue Licks

William McBride was born January 5, 1744, in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died August 19, 1782, in Blue Licks, Nicholas County, Kentucky.  He was the son of William McBride, Sr., and Sarah ?  He married Martha Lapsley October 17, 1765, in Augusta County, Virginia.  William McBride made his will in October of 1781, and died a year later, almost to the day, at the Battle of Blue Licks, one of the last battles of the Revolutionary War – after Lord Cornwallis had surrendered in October 1781 at Yorktown.

Lincoln County, Virginia (Kentucky) Will Book 1, Pages 7-9

In the Name of God amen.  I, William McBride, of Lincoln County and Commonwealth of Virginia, being in perfect health and of sound mind and memory, but calling to mind the mortality of my body and that it is appointed for all men once to die, and first I recommend my body to the earth to be buried in a Christian manner at the discretion of my Executors, hereafter to be appointed, and my soul I Commend into the hands of almighty God, who gave it me, and as to which worldly goods God has been pleased to bless me with in this life I give and devise in manner following.  To wit, and first, I require that all my just debts be paid or discharged.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto Martha McBride, my well beloved wife, one Negro wench due to me from Hubbert Taylor and one good mare to be 20 pounds value old rate, a good side saddle and feather bed and furniture and all the ? furniture as also an equal third of my cattle and further she is to have all the utensils for husbandry and privileges of supplying the plantation I now live on to enjoy during her widowhood, as also a Negro man due to me from said Taylor.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto my two

beloved sons, William and Lapsley McBride, all singular my lands not otherwise devised to be equally divided between them, as also all the horses and cattle not already bequeathed and all the utensils for husbandry together with the Negro men and the plantation at the said Martha McBride’s death or marriage, whichever may happen first, as also the above said wench and her increase, if any, to be equally divided between said William and Lapsley McBride at their mother’s death and provided either of said sons should die before they come of age the survivor to be heir to the deceased.  I further require that my Executors do sell 300 acres of land (for the best advantage) this due me from John McEntire as will more plainly appear by a bond on said McEntire for said land the money arising from said sale to be applied in purchasing cattle and other necessarys for my daughter hereafter named.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto each of my beloved daughters, Sarah, Martha, Elizabeth and Mary, a good feather bed and furniture, a silk gown and other clothing suitable so as to make up one decent suit to each, four cows and a good horse and saddle each, with dresser furniture proportionable to each, also a new Bible and Confession of Faith to each, these legacies to be paid to each of my daughters when they come to twenty years of age or at their marriages as they be arrived at eighteen years, to be paid by my sons William and Lapsley McBride, or by my Executors out of said estate, and I do hereby constitute and appoint my well-beloved wife Martha McBride, John Lapsley and James Davis, Executors of this my last Will and Testament and to see to it that my children may be properly educated and brought up in a Christian manner, hereby revoking and disannulling all former wills, testaments and bequests heretofore made, ratifying and declaring this to be my Last Will and Testament, in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 3rd day of October 1781.  Sealed and declared in presence of James Curd, John Marshall, James Calley.

William McBride

At a Court held for Lincoln County 21st January 1783 this instrument of writing was exhibited into Court as the last Will and Testament of William McBride, deceased, and proved by the oaths of James Curd and John Marshall, two of the witnesses and ordered to be recorded.