Tag Archives: Lincoln County Kentucky

Lincoln County Pioneer Families – Woods

Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, July 22, 1952

Lincoln County Pioneer Families

By H. W. Mills

Woods Family

The Woods family of Virginia and Kentucky descends from the immigrant, Michael Woods.  Of him, Rev. Edgar Woods, in his History of Albemarle County, Virginia, states (page 351):  ‘The first Woods who settled in Albemarle was Michael, who was born in the North of Ireland in 1684, and with his wife, Mary Campbell, and most of his children, came to this country sometime in the decade of 1720.  Landing on the banks of the Delaware, he spent some years in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, thence ascended the Valley of Virginia, and crossed the Blue Ridge by Woods’ Gap in 1734.  In 1737 he entered more than 1300 acres on Mechum’s River and Lickinghole, and the same day purchased 2000 acres patented two years before by Charles Hudson and situated on the head waters of Ivy Creek.  It is believed he was the first settler in western Albemarle, and perhaps anywhere along the east foot of the Blue Ridge in Virginia.  His home was near the mouth of Wood’s Gap.  He died in 1762 and was interred in the family burying ground about a hundred yards from the dwelling.  His tombstone was standing just after the Civil War, when it was broken to pieces and disappeared; but a fragment discovered a few years ago indicated the year of his birth.  His will is on record, in which are mentioned three sons and three daughters, Archibald, John, William, Sarah the wife of Joseph Lapsley of Rockbridge, Hannah, the wife of William Wallace, and Margaret, the wife of Andrew Wallace.’

(It is said that Michael Woods, the immigrant, was son of John Woods of Scotland, and his wife, Elizabeth Worsopp, the latter a descendant of Sir Adam Lohos, Archbishop of Ireland.  Tradition is that Mary Campbell, wife of Michael Woods, was of the Duke of Argyle line.)

Captain John Woods (son of Michael, the immigrant), was born February 19, 1712, and died October 14, 1791.  He married Susanna Anderson, daughter of Rev. James Anderson, whom he knew as a child in Pennsylvania.  Their children were as follows:

  1. Michael Woods, married Esther Carothers; removed from Albemarle County to Nelson County, Virginia; children: William M., Mary (married Hugh Barclay); Susan (married Nathaniel Massie); John, James and Samuel.
  2. James Woods (born 1748; died 1823), was an officer in the American Revolution. He married Mary Garland, daughter of James Garland of Albemarle County, and removed to Lincoln (now Garrard) County, Kentucky, where they reared a family of 12 children.
  3.  Susan Woods, married Daniel Miller, and removed to Kentucky.
  4. Mary Woods, married John Reid.
  5. Luty Woods (born February 29, 1752; died March 26, 1823, Garrard County, Kentucky) married on September 9, 1779, to Samuel Reid, born January 25, 1754; died November 26, 1835, in Garrard County, Kentucky. Their children:  1) Alexander; 2) Mary, 3) James; 4) Susanna; 5) John, born October 25, 1783, Hustonville, Kentucky, died there October 3, 1861; married April 10, 1810, Jane Murrell, born October 6, 1787; died September 15, 1850, daughter of Col. George Murrell, member of the Kentucky House of Representatives in 1799 and Kentucky Senate, 1813, and had issue:  Amanda, James, George, Eliza, Sarah, Samuel, William and John.  John Murrell, born November 16, 1823; died March 13, 1895, married Elizabeth Ann Devonshire Hays, born November 26, 1830; died December 18, 1911, and had issue:  Frances, Dr. Hugh, James Campbell, Elizabeth and Mary.

(Authorities:  Woods’ History of Albemarle County, Virginia; Morton’s History of Rockbridge County, Virginia; family notes from a descendant in Kansas; records from Miss Esther Burch, Stanford, Kentucky.)

More on the Wood’s family in the coming days.

Will and Inventory of William Stewart Who Fell at the Battle of Blue Licks

It is quite possible that William Stewart was one of the victims of the Battle of Blue Licks.  He was listed as one of the privates killed, as well as one of his witnesses, Francis McBride.  Clough Overton, another witness, was a captain for this mission, and he, too, died August 19, 1782.  As mentioned in the court records below, only one of the three subscribing witnesses was alive to prove this will.

From the inventory of William Stewart, we can tell he is a single man, no mention of dishes, furniture or other household inventory.  He does not seem to be your average Kentuckian with his wardrobe.  He must have been a man of means, with the number of waistcoats, buckles, handkerchief, stockings, linen shirts, clothes brush, geographical book, etc., that are mentioned.

Terribly sad that he died at such a young age.

Lincoln County, Kentucky (while still part of Virginia)

Will Book 1, Pages 13-14

Appraisement Bill of the Estate of William Stewart, deceased.  Pounds, shillings, pence.

  • One stone horse 35 0 0
  • One roan mare 18 0 0
  • One black horse 18 0 0
  • Three coats 10 0 0
  • Three waistcoats 2 10 0
  • One great coat 2 10 0
  • Three blankets 2 10 0
  • One pair of breeches 0 15 0
  • One pair of drawers 0 6 0
  • One pair of overalls 0 6 0
  • Four linen shirts 2 0 0
  • Four socks 0 12 0
  • One handkerchief 0 1 6
  • Eight pair of stockings 2 3 0
  • Two pair of shoes 2 0 0
  • One clothes brush 0 1 0
  • One pair of saddle bags 0 15 0
  • One geographical book 0 10 0
  • One pair of silver knee buckles 0 10 0
  • One pocket book 0 6 0
  • One saddle and ? 4 0 0
  • One pair of half hand gloves 0 1 0
  • One pair of cloth leggings 0 4 0
  • Thirty-five buttons 0 3 0
  • Sixteen horn buttons 0 0 9
  • Two old gloves 0 1 6
  • One comb 0 2 6
  • One roll of blackball 0 1 0
  • One fill of oker 0 0 6
  • One half pound of gunpowder 0 3 0
  • One pair of leather breeches 0 10 0
  • One pounds of soap 0 0 6
  • One razor 0 1 0
  • One set of Frisons 0 1 6
  • One pair of horse shoes 0 0 6
  • One set of plough irons 2 0 0
  • Two papers of ink powder 0 2 0
  • One box of wafers 0 0 6
  • Part of a beaver trap 0 2 0
  • One pair of harness and part of chain truss 0 2 0
  • One watch 2 0 0

At a Court held for Lincoln County 19th March 1783

This inventory and appraisement was returned to Court and ordered to be recorded.

Teste. William May, Clerk, Lincoln County

Lincoln County, Kentucky (while still part of Virginia)

Will Book 1, Pages 19-20

The Will of William Stewart

In the name of God, amen.  The twenty-fifth day of August 1781.  I, William Stewart of Lincoln County and Commonwealth of Virginia, yeoman, being of perfect health, mind and memory, thanks be give to God therefore, calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament, that is, today, principally and first of all I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of almighty God that gave it and my body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the direction of my executors, nothing doubting but at the resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God, and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give, devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

Imprimis.  I give and bequeath unto my well-beloved father two certain tracts of land on the north side of Kentucky containing two thousand four hundred acres, one tract known by the name of the Trough Spring on the head of Glen’s Creek, the other adjoining as will more fully appear by the records in the surveyor’s office.

Imprimis.  I give unto my beloved brother, Robert Stewart, the sum of five pounds lawful money of the Commonwealth of Virginia, to be paid out of my estate.

Item.  I give and bequeath unto my well-beloved sisters Hanna and Mary all and singular my estate not already bequeathed to be equally divided between them, the said Hanna and Mary, and I do hereby constitute and appoint James Hunter, John Smith and William McBride, Executors, of this my last will and testament and I do hereby utterly disallow, revoke and disapprove all and every other former testaments, wills, legacies and bequests and Executors by me in any will before named, willed and bequeathed.  Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year above written.

Signed, sealed and declared by the said William Stewart as his last will and testament in presence of us the subscribers – N.B. the word Executors underlined before signing.

William Stewart

Clough Overton, Ebenezer Miller, Francis McBride

At a Court held for Lincoln County 21st January 1783.

This instrument of writing was submitted in Court as the last will and testament of William Stewart, deceased, and proved by the oath of Ebenezer Miller, the only surviving witness and ordered to recorded.

Teste.  William May, Clerk, Lincoln County

Slaughter of Kentuckians at the Battle of Blue Licks

Blue Licks Battlefield – On August 19, 1782.  Pioneers suffered a bitter defeat and were routed by their Revolutionary War enemies.  Captain Caldwell concealed his British and Indian army along the ravines leading from this hilltop to the Licking River.  Advancing into this ambush, the Pioneers were outnumbered and forced to flee across the river.

Earlier in the month Ritchey and I visited Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park.  I was most anxious to see the memorial for those who fought and fell during this battle on August 19, 1782.  Some call it the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought ten months after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown.  The battle was fought between about 180 Kentucky settlers and 240 British and Indians.  An attack on Bryan’s Station, Lincoln County, Kentucky, August 15, 1782, by the British and Indians, was led by Captain William Caldwell, loyalist Alexander McKee, Simon Girty and Matthew Elliott.  The Kentucky settlers took shelter within their stockade and fought back with all their might.  The British killed all the settlers’ livestock and destroyed their crops.  When they heard that the Kentucky militia were on the way they retreated.

The Kentucky force was led by Colonel John Todd of Fayette County, assisted by Lieutenant Colonels Daniel Boone and Stephen Trigg.  Plans were formed overnight and on the morning of August 19, 1782, this band of approximately 180 men set out to confront the British and Indians.  The two forces met at the Licking River, today located in northern Nicholas County.  The British and Indians secured for themselves the best spot on the riverbank for battle.  Advancing into this ambush, within fifteen minutes almost half the Kentuckians were killed or captured.  These were men who had fought hard and long with the Indians during their time in Kentucky.  It is said that Daniel Boone wanted to wait for Benjamin Logan, who was bringing enforcements.  He was a day or two behind.  Others thought this would give the enemy time to cross the Licking River and head north, eventually crossing the Ohio River into Indiana and Indian territory.

The Martyrs of the last battle of the Revolution lie buried here.  Dedicated March 14, 1935, by the Kentucky Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

After the battle, those still alive ran through the forest, trying to get back to Bryan’s Station.  Some did, some did not.  When Benjamin Logan’s militia arrived, they found the area littered with corpses.  Many were scalped, many were butchered, cut into pieces.  They were unable to identify anyone.  All were buried in a mass grave.

So valiantly did our small party fight that, to the memory of those who unfortunately fell in the battle, enough of honour cannot be paid.’  Daniel Boone
Colonel – Commandant John Todd Killed
Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Boone
Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Trigg Killed
Major Edward Bulger Died of wounds
Major Silas Harlan Killed
Major Hugh McGary
Major Levi Todd
Captain John Allison
Captain John Beasley Captured
Captain John Bulger Killed
Captain John Gordon Killed
Captain Samuel Johnson
Captain Joseph Kincaid Killed
Captain Gabriel Madison
Captain William McBride Killed
Captain Clough Overton Killed
Captain Robert Patterson
Lieutenant William Givins Killed
Lieutenant Thonmas Hinson Killed
Lieutenant John Kennedy Killed
Lieutenant James McGuire Killed
Lieutenant Barnett Rogers Killed
Ensign John McMurtry Captured
Commissary Joseph Lindsay Killed
Dedicated August 19, 1928
This monument, the gift of a grateful Commonwealth, commemorates the heroic pioneers, who, in defense of Kentucky, here fought and fell in the Battle of the Blue Licks, August 19, 1782.

On August 19, 1928, a granite monument was dedicated to the men who fought and lost their lives in the Battle of Blue Licks – a fitting tribute to these brave men.  If this battle had not been fought, Kentucky may not have been settled until much later.  We owe much to our brave pioneers.

The men who fought the Battle of the Blue Licks were as well qualified from experience to face the Indians as any body of men that were ever collected.’  Robert Patterson
Privates Who Were Killed
Black, Charles
Boone, Israel
Brannon, Samuel
Brown, James Surveyor
Corn, Esau
Cunningham, Hugh
Douglass, John
Eads, William
Farrier, Thomas
Ferguson, Charles
Field, Ezekiel
Folley, John
Foster, Daniel
Fry, John
Graham, ‘Little’ James
Green, Jervis
Greggs, Daniel
Harper, Francis
Harper, Matthew
Harris, William
Jolly, John
Ledgerwood, James captured and killed
Marshall, Gilbert
McBride, Francis
McConnell, Andrew
McCracken, Isaac
Miller, Henry
Nelson, John
Nutt, John
Oldfield, Joseph
O’Neal, John
Polley, Drury
Price, John
Robertson, William
Rose, Matthias
Shannon, William
Smith, James
Smith, William
Stapleton, John
Stephens, William
Stern, Valentine
Stevenson, John
Stewart, William
Tomlinson, Richard
Willson, John
Wilson, Isael
Wilson, John
Woods, Archibald
Wylie, Matthew
Ottawas and Chippewas

Each year a reenactment of the Battle of Blue Licks is held at the battlefield park.

They advanced in three divisions, in good order, and gave us volley and stood to it very well for some time.’  William Caldwell
Privates Who Escaped
Acres, Thomas
Aldridge, William
Allen, Elijah
Allen, James
Barbee, William
Boone, Samuel
Boone, Squire Jr. Wounded
Bowman, Abraham
Bowmar, Robert
Brooks, Thomas
Coburn, James Wounded
Coffman, Jacob
Collins, Joseph
Cooper, Benjamin A.
Corn, Edward
Corn, George
Craig, Jerry
Craig, Whitfield
Custer, William
Davis, Richard
Davis, Theodorus
Dierly, Peter
Ficklin, Thomas
Field, William
French, Henry
Gist, Thomas
Graham, Edward
Graham, James
Grant, Squire
Grider, Henry
Gullion, Jeremiah
Hambleton, John
Harget, Peter
Harrod, James
Hart, John
Hayden, Benjamin
Hays, James
Higgins, Henry
Hinch, John
Hunter, Charles
Hunter, Jacob
January, Ephraim
January, James M.
Kincaid, James
Lam, William
Lea, Wainright
Little, John
May, William
McBride, James
McConnell, James
McCullough, James
Morgan, Andrew
Morgan, James Capture but escaped
Morgan, John
Morgan, Mordecai
Netherland, Benjamin
Nixon, Henry
Norton, James
Patterson, Matthew
Peake, John
Penlin, Alexander
Pitman, John
Poague, Robert
Pruett, Elisha
Ray, James
Reynolds, Aaron
Rose, James
Rose, Lewis Captured
Rule, Andrew
Scholl, Abraham
Scholl, Joseph
Scholl, Peter
Scott, Robert
Scott, Samuel
Searcy, Bartlett
Searcy, John
Shortridge, Samuel
Shott, William
Singleton, Edmund
Smith, George
Smith, John
Sowdusky, Anthony
Steele, Andrew
Stevens, Jacob
Stevenson, Thomas
Stucker, Jacob
Summers, John
Swart, James
Twyman, James
Wilson, Henry
Wilson, Josiah
Woods, James Elijah Captured
Woods, Samuel
Yocum, Jesse Captured
Wyandots and Mingoes

You might enjoy reading History of the Battle of Blue Licks by Bennett Henderson Young.  I downloaded it from Amazon for $1.95.

No historian, who will give a faithful account of the settlement and transactions of this country, will omit to speak of the battle and the place at which it was fought.’  Court of Appeals of Kentucky
To the unknown heroes who took part in the Battle of the Blue Licks
This ‘Last Battle of the Revolution’ was fought between 182 Kentuckians, commanded by Colonel John Todd, on the American side, and about 240 Indians and Canadians, commanded by Captain William Caldwell, on the British side.
Shawnees and Delawares

This memorial was erected to honor those individuals whose names were omitted from the original monument.  New research has provided these additional names and corrected previous information regarding those individuals who so gloriously served Kentucky at the Battle of Blue Licks
Boone, Thomas Killed
Childress, John Escaped
Ledgerwood, James Captured but escaped
Peake, Jesse
Ward, James Escaped

Hogan – Hendrix 1783 Marriage Bond and Consent – Lincoln County

This marriage license is interesting in many ways.  In 1783 Kentucky was still part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and Benjamin Harrison was Governor of said Commonwealth.  It mentions that Edward Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix are both of ‘this Parish’ – I suppose that means Lincoln County.  The consent gives the name of Elizabeth’s father, John Hendrix, and it is also signed by Thomas Hendrix – Elizabeth’s brother or uncle?  In 1783 Kentucky County had been divided into three counties – Jefferson, Fayette and Lincoln.  Lincoln comprised quite a bit of area at that time, not just the county we know today.

Know all men by these presents that we, Edward Hogan and Thomas Henry, are held and firmly bound unto Benjamin Harrison, Esq., Governor or chief magistrate of the Commonwealth of Virginia, in the sum of fifty pounds current money of Virginia, to be paid to the said Benjamin Harrison, Esq., and his successors, for payment of which we bind ourselves, jointly and severally, our, and out of our joint and several heirs, sealed with our seals and dated this twenty-fifth day of March 1783.  The Condition of the above obligation is such that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended to be had and solemnized between said Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix, both of this Parish.  It there shall appear no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage than this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force.

Edward Hogan, Thomas Henry

This is to certify that you should grant license for Edward Hogan and Elizabeth Hendrix.

To Mr. May, this from John Hendrix, March the 22 1783.

Test.  Thomas Hendrix

Lincoln County, Kentucky

Obituaries From the Ottenheim Area of Lincoln County – German Reformed Cemetery

John Jufer, 1856-1932.  Pauline E. Jufer, 1875-1931.  German Reformed Cemetery, Ottenheim, Lincoln County, Kentucky.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 11, 1931

Good Woman Passes

Mrs. Pauline Jufer, aged 65, wife of Mr. John Jufer, died at her home near Ottenheim Friday night, after suffering from heart trouble for some time.  As a member of the Reform Church she was ever willing to do her part for the betterment of the community and in her passing the community is made poorer.  Surviving her besides her husband are three sons and three daughters.  Services were conducted at the Reform Church, Ottenheim, at 10 o’clock Sunday morning, by Rev. Burlap, after which the body was laid to rest in the church cemetery.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, January 19, 1932

Aged Man Dead

Mr. John Jufer, well respected farmer living near Ottenheim, died Thursday morning of a complication of troubles, from which he had suffered for some time.  Burial took place in the cemetery of the Reform Church, Ottenheim, Friday afternoon.

John F. Naef, May 23, 1891 – May 25, 1935. 

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Friday, May 31, 1935

A gloom was cast over our entire community Saturday morning when it became known that the spirit of Mr. John Naef had taken its flight to mansions in the sky.  He saw several months on the battlefields of France. John was big-hearted, kind, honest as the days are long.  He had been a citizen of Ottenheim for some time and this community had none better.  He was liked by all.  He leaves, besides a host of relatives and friends two brothers, Fred, with whom he lived since the death of his parents; another brother, Emil Naef, of Indianapolis; two sisters, Mrs. Jim Purdeci, of Georgetown, and Mrs. Wiseman, of Louisville.  Funeral services were held at the Reform Church here at 2 o’clock Monday afternoon by the pastor, Rev. Burlepp, of Greenheim.  Burial followed in the cemetery near the church.  A very large crowd followed the remains to their last resting place.  In their irreparable loss the brothers and sisters have the sympathy of their many friends.

The Small Area of Ottenheim In Lincoln County

Hanging in the Lutheran Church – old photo of church, postcard from Ottenheim and old photo of the area.

A few years ago, Ritchey and I visited the small area of Ottenheim in Lincoln County.  At one time it was a bustling area with many immigrants from Germany and Switzerland.  It is now a very quiet place, very beautiful, with three churches and cemeteries within sight of each other.  Follow US 127 south of Stanford, take a left onto Hwy 643; this will take you to Ottenheim.

In the 1880’s, Jacob Ottenheimer, of New York, purchased land in Lincoln County, with the intention of drawing immigrants to this Kentucky, as well as Americans from outside the state.  There were originally over one hundred families from overseas.  The occupants of this small area worshiped at the Lutheran Church, the German Reform Church and St. Sylvester Catholic Church (the only church still having weekly worship).

Immanuel Lutheran Church 1886 Ottenheim, Kentucky.

The Lutheran Church was purchased by the historical society and is used for annual gatherings, weddings and other occasions.  Ritchey and I were fortunate to meet the caretaker of the church, who lived across the street.

He showed us inside the beautiful building, with many of its original features.  His relatives lie in the cemetery beside the church.

The Last Supper engraving above the altar is exactly the same as that which hung in my grandmother’s kitchen for as long as I can remember – and now hangs in my kitchen!

A portion of the Lutheran Church Cemetery.

The German church, originally known as the Dutch Reform Church, is no longer used.

Rosa Platzeck, March 17, 1902 – August 15, 1986.

The cemetery for the German, or Dutch, Reform Church, is very small.

St. Sylvester Catholic Church is still used for weekly Mass.

St. Sylvester Catholic Cemetery.

The Interior Journal, Stanford, Lincoln County, Kentucky

Tuesday, August 15, 1911

In 1884, J. Ottenheimer, a German colonization agent, founded Ottenheim.  Here in the solitude of a forest primeval these hardy German pioneers carved out a home and farmlands and now are prosperous.  A nice little town of 109 souls is Ottenheim.  There are three churches, Catholic, Lutheran and Dutch Reformed, Father Leo, pastor of the first named, Rev. C. J. Mehrtens the pastor of the Lutheran church has the nicest library we have ever seen.  The Dutch Reformed has no pastor at present but hopes to get one soon.  Two very good stores here, John Wentzel and the store conducted by W. T. White.  Mr. White is conducting the public school, with an average attendance of fifty pupils, 100 being in the district.  A new addition has recently been built under the supervision of Mr. Wm. Landgraf, which will comfortably accommodate the increasing attendance.  This is one of the best districts in the county.  Mr. W. is teaching a good school and the patrons are satisfied.

Thomas Madison Lillard and Mary Bright

The Advocate-Messenger, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Sunday, April 24, 1983

According to a family history, Thomas Madison Lillard was born December 5, 1815, near the small town of Kirksville on Silver Creek in Madison County.  He was one of five children of Thomas Lillard, a native of Culpeper County, Virginia, and Elizabeth Rider, a native of Madison County, Virginia.  The Lillards moved from Culpeper County to Madison County, Kentucky, in 1808.

When Thomas Madison Lillard was three months old, his father died, then in 1829 his mother died.  He was 14 years old, without patrimony and with no legacy, except a clear head, an honest heart, a good constitution, and well-directed energy and industry.

He as described as six feet tall, weighing about 200 pounds.  He had dark gray eyes, a Roman nose, a good set of teeth and black curly hair.  He was a French Huguenot.  Because he only attended school three months, his reading was poor.

As a young man, Lillard worked as a drover and stock trader, spending winters in Charleston, South Carolina, and summers herding livestock to the markets in New York.

On October 23, 1848, at the age of 33, he married Mary Bright Williams, a young widow of 25 years of age of Stanford.  After spending the winter in Charleston, South Carolina, the couple returned to Kentucky on May 27, 1849.

Eight months later, Lillard purchased 200 acres of land in Boyle County, part of the present homestead.  He later added to the farm to bring it to 500 acres in Boyle and Lincoln counties.  After his marriage he turned to farming.  He raised livestock, hay, and orchard grass seed, his money crop.

The family lived in a log house on the farm un1860 when the new house was ready.

Mary Bright Lillard was born March 16, 1823, on a farm owned by her parents, John Bright and Elizabeth Morrison, in Lincoln County.  Mary Bright Lillard is described as short – about five feet two inches – and stout.  She weighed 120 pounds in her younger days and 20 pounds in her most vigorous days.  Mrs. Lillard had dark brown hair and eyes.  She was one of nine children.

Thomas M. Lillard and his wife, Mary Bright, had 11 children – Elizabeth, Sarah F., John T., Henrietta, Mary T., Pet, Katherine, Thomas, Nannie B., S. J. and William H.

The youngest sons, Thomas and Wiliam acquired Spring Hill farm at their father’s death in 1891 and kept it until 1901.

Thomas Madison Lillard, born in Madison County, Kentucky, December 5, 1815, died in Boyle County, Kentucky, May 7, 1891.  ‘The friend of man, the friend of truth, The friend of age, the friend of youth.  Few hearts like his with virtue warmed, few heads with knowledge so informed.’  His wife, Mary Bright Hillard, March 16, 1823 – April 6, 1907.  Bellevue Cemetery, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky.

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Friday, May 8, 1891

The Kentucky Advocate, Danville, Boyle County, Kentucky

Monday, April 8, 1907