Tag Archives: Logan County Kentucky

Round Steak Supper – Recipe From the 1950’s

I am so excited to share a page from a notebook I found in the ‘drawer’ of photos and writings at the Linton house in Logan County.  This is the notebook of Mrs. Thomas Densmore Linton – Sallie Ruth Price, the daughter of Edward C. Price and Cora Hutchinson.

Sallie was a teacher – and you can see her lovely handwriting in the recipe above.  I remember teaching my second-graders cursive, watching them grow in their abilities, and now there is talk of doing away with cursive in schools.  Such a shame!

The Round Steak Supper listed above sounds so good I set out to re-create this recipe from years ago.  As a true cook, used to making her meals daily, there are not exact directions.  Just a jot of the important steps.

I had a great tenderized round steak from my sister, who keeps me supplied with tasty meat.  I cut the steak into hand size pieces, added salt and pepper, and lightly floured before putting into a hot skillet with a little olive oil.  It browned beautifully.  I added the onion soup mix, a can of tomatoes and almost a can of vegetable broth.  I covered the skillet, turned it down low, and let it cook about two hours, checking every 20 minutes or so.  The aroma was wonderful!

After two hours I added carrots and potatoes and cooked another 25 minutes until tender.

Oh, my!  Was Ritchey a happy man!  The steak was fork tender, the carrots sweet and potatoes yummy!  A meal in a skillet!  Some lovely bread and we had a feast.

I love finding recipes used by my ancestors and others.  Just looking at this recipe gave me such a sense of the woman who used it.  Such love must have gone in to every dish, such planning.  This is what family love is all about!  Try something new – or old – today!

Let Me Introduce You to the Linton Family!

While visiting the Linton house in Logan County, my cousin, Garwood Linton, let me look through all the old family photographs.  As with most, few were named.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy them!  Today I share a few with you from Garwood’s collection – with my guesses for who they may be.

This is a beautiful photograph of an older woman.  Notice her fine features, her sweet face – and her hands!  She holds her spectacles in one, and a book in another.  They look like they’ve worked hard during her years of life.

This photograph is a cabinet card – 6.5″ x 4.25″.  It was made in Bowling Green, Kentucky, not far from Russellville, by Bettison’s Studio.  This is an early cabinet card, no frills, that I would date to about 1872.  If we check the family tree, this could possibly be Garwood’s 3rd great-grandmother, Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1822, died 1879, who married Benjamin Burkett Linton.

Isn’t this a beautiful woman?  This is a tintype photo, taken about 1885, my guess.  Tintypes do not have the name of the photographer listed.

A handsome gentleman is next.  This is a carte de visite, 2.5″ x 4″.  The photographer was L. D. Robertson, South Side Public Square, Franklin, Kentucky.  The Linton family lived in Logan County between the towns of Russellville and Franklin (in Simpson County).  Due to the large sleeves and lapels of the coat, this photo was most likely taken in the 1860’s.   Could this be a young Thomas Alney Linton?

This is an 1870’s gent – the lapels of his coat are smaller, and buttoned at the top.  He wears a very  nice watch chain!  Another tintype, but I can’t say who this man might be.

Here we have a photo of a handsome couple.  The bustle lets us know this is from the 1870’s.  The man wears a slightly larger jacket than this time period, but it could have been held over from previous years.  This tintype has just a bit of color added to the cheeks.

Next we have this cherub!  What adorable sweetness!  The tiny feet and hands, hair sticking up – and sitting in a tiny chair!  This is a very old carte de visite, perhaps taken in 1862.  There is no border or photographer’s name on the card.  This child is obviously a year of age or younger.  Checking the data base for Linton descendants from the patriarch, Benjamin Franklin Linton, one child does fit this age – his granddaughter, Louella C. Linton, daughter of Benjamin Burkett Linton – and sister to John Wesley Linton who owned this home.  Unfortunately Louella lived only a year or two.  If this is her photo, it’s probably the only one taken of her.

What a treat to look through a large drawer of photos from another time period!  Thank you, Cousin!

A Victorian Woven Hair Mourning Shadowbox

During our visit to Logan County a few weeks ago, my cousin, Garwood Linton, was there the first weekend, and we were fortunate to spend Sunday afternoon with him and his cousin Tracy, looking through the treasures of the Linton house.  The first thing he shared was amazing – a Victorian woven hair shadowbox.  It was complete with a photo of four people – husband, wife, son and daughter – and flowers and leaves made from human hair.  I’ve seen something similar in the old state capital in Frankfort, or one of the museums.

It is definitely a work of art, and was very popular during the Victorian Era.  I read that even short strands of hair could be incorporated into making the flowers, it wasn’t necessary to have long strands.

Garwood was interested in knowing the people in the tintype photo.  We knew it wasn’t John Wesley Linton and Emma Adelaide Proctor, his gr-great grandparents, who owned the large Linton house.  A genealogy mystery – I was on a mission and in research mode!  It was decided to open the shadowbox and check the back of the tintype for names.  The box was very gently opened, but no names were listed.  But it was a good time to take more photos without the glare of the glass top.

If this wasn’t a photo of John Wesley and his family, it must be that of a brother or sister.  I would say this photo was taken about 1875-1885, based mostly on the woman’s dress.  It is definitely not a Civil War era gown.  The gentleman’s large lapels and sleeves of his coat made it look from the 1860’s (which possibly it was), but clothes were worn as long as they were useful, not necessarily thrown out for fashion’s sake.  The smaller lapels of the boy’s coat give us a hint it is more in line with the 1875-1885 timeline. John Wesley Linton was the oldest son of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1843.  Thomas A. Linton was born in 1845.  The next three children died before the time this photo was made.  My bet is this is a photo of Thomas Linton and his family.  As idyllic as it was visiting the Linton homes in rural Logan County, internet service was spotty at best, so I couldn’t make any searches.  But Friday was to be a rainy day, and we went to the Logan County Historical Society in full search mode.

I remembered seeing a photograph of Thomas Linton and his family, standing before their large brick home, very similar to the one owned by John Wesley Linton.  Perhaps a check of that photo would give us an answer.  The Thomas Linton in the photo was much older, 50, and the way the photo was taken it was hard to tell if he was the same man in the tintype.  But the oldest child was similar to the son in the tintype.

A check of the 1870 census gave a clue.  In the census book written by the historical society, little notes were added to the census information.  It said that John Wesley Linton and Thomas A. Linton married sisters in a double wedding on November 11, 1869.  John married Emma Adelaide Proctor, and Thomas married Elizabeth F. Proctor.  The Proctor sisters were daughters of Benjamin Ellis Proctor and Martha Dixon James.  Even though there is a family tradition about the double wedding, the marriage of Thomas and Elizabeth took place February 22, 1870.

The 1880 census proved to be more elusive – a quick Ancestry search gave no Linton’s living in Logan County.  We know this is obviously incorrect.  I went to the actual census records and looked through the Clay District (Linton’s lived here in 1870) and found this census to be a mess.  There were water marks on the pages and some were almost impossible to read.  Did this deter me?  Of course not!  With magnification, and having looked for the Linton name so many times, I finally found the two brothers, John and Thomas, with their families, and their parents, living in household dwellings 135, 136 and 137 on page 18B.  I saved a copy, then edited it to make it somewhat readable.

However, do you notice there are no children listed for Thomas and Elizabeth?  George Browder Linton was born June 28, 1881.  I do not have a birth date for daughter Ada (probably Adelaide after her aunt).  She was likely born a year or two later.  Their first child was born eleven years after their marriage.  That seems a little odd, but perhaps Elizabeth was not very healthy.  Perhaps she had given birth, but the children died shortly afterward.  There is a servant living in the household with them – a black female, aged 17, whose first name looks like Tillison.  Twenty-seven-year-old Elizabeth Proctor Linton most likely would not have a servant unless she was frail or very ill.

This information puts us at the higher end of the prospective date of the tintype.  I do know that Thomas Linton married Mary Susan Duncan, as his second wife, January 5, 1888.  Elizabeth Proctor Linton probably died in late 1886 or early 1887.  If this photo was taken just before her death, her children would have been seven and five.  Little Ada died about the same time as her mother.

For Emma Adelaide Proctor Linton to lose her beloved sister and niece, this memento of a photo and flowers made from family hair, was a way to mourn and remember.  I’m sure it was a labor of love that took many hours.  Garwood remembers seeing this shadowbox when very young, and was told the flowers were in a ‘U’ shape to allow the souls to pass on to heaven.  I want to point out the silver buttons spaced evenly throughout the flowers – perhaps these came from a dress of her sister?  I’m sure it was a treasured remembrance – and thankfully is back in the house today.  I’m sure Elizabeth Proctor Linton is smiling down upon the Linton family!

18 Counties/36 Cemeteries/3,000 Plus Gravestone Photos

Melissa Williams, born October 25, 1851, died February 17, 1923.  ‘Gone to a brighter home where grief can not come.’  Stoney Point Cemetery, Allen County, Kentucky

The past eleven days have been more epic than I ever thought possible.  Ritchey and I traveled to western Kentucky for genealogy research.  We visited 18 counties, 36 cemeteries and took more than 3,000 gravestone photos.

James Jolly, 1828-1905, 77 years, 8 days.  Martha J. Jolly, 1831-1890, 58 years, 11 months, 25 days.  Landrum Cemetery, Livingston County, Kentucky.

Number one on our list was a visit to Livingston County to find out more about his Jolly family, and to photograph gravestones of all family members.  That was accomplished!

Drury Boyd, born May 6, 1827, died January 13, 1891.  Martha Boyd Cemetery, Christian County, Kentucky.

Number two was to visit cemeteries in as many of the surrounding counties as possible.  In addition to Livingston we visited 17 others – Allen, Butler, Caldwell, Christian, Clinton, Cumberland, Hancock, Logan, Lyon, McCreary, Monroe, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Simpson, Todd, Trigg, Warren and Wayne!

Father, Abner R. Terry, February 10, 1807 – November 29, 1847.  Mother, Eleanor Dyer, February 6, 1805 – December 9, 1892.  Daughter, Susan Emaline, wife of Judge John R. Crace, May 5, 1835 – January 20, 1860.  Infant daughter, Mary.  Terry-Pioneer Cemetery, Trigg County, Kentucky.

When we left Harrodsburg on Saturday morning, the 21st of October, we enjoyed breakfast at the Bluebird Cafe in Standford.  Then headed south to cover the southern counties that share a border with Tennessee – McCreary, Wayne, Clinton and Cumberland.

Joshua F. Bell, Pvt. Co. D., 30 Regt.  Ky Vol. Inf.  1844-1930.  Alexander Cemetery, Wayne County, Kentucky.

Our home base was Logan County, staying in Garwood Linton’s beautiful cottage farm house – large old trees surrounded the house, leaves of gold, green and red, many fluttering down with the breeze.  The old, old cedars that his gr-gr-grandfather, John Wesley Linton, planted after the Civil War, in memory of his company that didn’t make it home.  The farm house is so comfortably decorated, but with great style and pizazz!  Across the road is Corinth Country Market, with homemade bread, pies and cakes, sandwiches, canned goods, and many other yummy things (we stopped by quite often).

Aquilla M. Starks, December 28, 1799 – September 13, 1855.  Antioch Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.

From Logan County we fanned out to the other counties, generally visiting three counties per day.  One day was spent at the Logan County Historical Society.  Most of the towns we visited were small, with restaurants that concentrated on good food, and people that were so very friendly.  It was a wonderful trip – and now I have so much to share with you!

Children of Daniel Dunscombe Duncan and Frances Rosetta James

Today I went to the boxes of genealogy information brought to me by my cousin, Garwood Linton, originally of Logan County.  Garwood’s Linton family descends from Benjamin Franklin Linton, son of Captain John Linton; I descend from son William Linton and daughter Nancy Linton.  

This list of information on the family of Daniel Dunscombe Duncan and Frances Rosetta James is in the handwriting of Louis B. Linton.  I believe he was another Linton cousin my great-grandmother, Frances Linton Montgomery, corresponded with during the 1920’s and 30’s.  Louis B. Linton’s mother is the Susan Mary Duncan on this list.  She married Thomas Alvey Linton.  And Thomas Alvey Linton is a brother to John Wesley Linton, Garwood’s 2nd great-grandfather.  Wow!  Those complicated Linton lines – but then all family lines usually are!

We plan to visit Logan County and western Kentucky later in the fall, and will stay at Garwood’s airbnb farm cottage – it is lovely and the scenery is breathtaking!  We will rest and relax – and I’m sure there will be some genealogy research involved.

Daniel Dunscombe Duncan, August 23, 1833 – February 28, 1910, married Frances Rosetta James, September 28, 1854.  She was born December 15, 1833, and died December 22, 1915.  Their children are as follows:

  1. Ida Elizabeth Duncan, July 20, 1855 – 1919.
  2. Sam Henry Duncan, March 29, 1857 – September 27, 1944
  3. Susan Mary Duncan, January 17, 1859 – August 3, 1907
  4. William Edward Duncan, November 28, 1860 – June 27, 1898
  5. Isaac Lunsford Duncan, December 25, 1862 – March 19, 1936
  6. Lennie (Fanny Ann) Duncan, February 15, 1864 – January 17, 1928
  7. Robert Lee Duncan, August 24, 1866 – October 12, 1915
  8. Walter Duncan, October 12, 1868 – March 12, 1941
  9. Charles James Duncan, October 17, 1870 – May 25, 1898
  10. D. D. Duncan, Jr., October 13, 1872 – August 30, 1936
  11. Thomas Price Duncan, May 24, 1875 – December 11, 1957

 

George Browder Linton Obituary

George Browder Linton was a son of Thomas Alvey Linton and Elizabeth F. Proctor.  He married Elizabeth Milton Johnson in 1904, with whom he had three children – John Browder, Milton Victor and Nell Proctor Linton.  Unfortunately all three children died within a few years.  He and Elizabeth moved to Denver, Colorado, where she also died within a year.  He married Annie Lee McLean in 1912.  I believe this obituary was saved by George’s brother Louis B. Linton – I recognize the handwriting!

George Linton, Pomona Farm District

George Browder Linton, 90, of the Pomona district, died at 12:15 p.m. Friday in the Lower Valley Nursing Home in Fruita.

Mr. Linton was born June 28, 1881, in Russellville, Kentucky, where he spent his childhood.  His first wife and three small children died in a typhoid epidemic in Kentucky.

He married Annie Lee Mclean, who survives him, on December 24, 1912.  They moved to Hotchkiss in 1912 and to the Grand Valley area in 1917, where Mr. Linton farmed in the Clifton area.  They moved to another farm in the Pomona district in 1918.

Mr. Linton was president of the Mesa County Tomato Growers Association in 1930.  He was president and secretary of the Grand Junction Forum Club and was given an honorary life membership in 1951 for being a member for 20 years.

In June 1936, he was selected as one of nine directors to organize the Grand Valley Rural Power Lines, Inc., and was president and vice president for this organization for 11 years.  He was also secretary of the Colorado Ute Electric Association.

Mr. Linton was a member of the Farmer’s Union, Mesa County Union Oil Co., Western Colorado Producers Co-op and was director and secretary of the Fruita Bean Growers Association.

He was a member of the First United Presbyterian Church of Grand Junction and served as area director of the Rural Electric Agency from 1936 to 1955 and was on the board of directors for 15 years.

Surviving in addition to his wife who resides in the Lower Valley Nursing Home are two brothers, Louis B. Linton, Russellville, Kentucky; and Thomas A. Linton, Indian Lakes Estates, Florida.

John Wesley Linton Family Photo

Today I share with you a photo of John Wesley Linton and wife Emma Adelaide Proctor, and two of their children.  With a bit of thought and research I believe I can tell you which of their five children are in the photo.  Let’s start with a little history.

John Wesley Linton’s grandfather was Benjamin Franklin Linton, who was born June 16, 1777, in Loudoun County, Virginia, the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.  Benjamin F. Linton married Lucy Crewdson, April 12, 1805, in Fluvanna County, Virginia.  Even though his parents and other brothers and sisters moved to the Washington/Nelson County area in Kentucky, Benjamin settled in Logan County, Kentucky.

Benjamin and Lucy had twelve children – Mildred L., Moses Lewis, Nany M., John, Thomas Crewdson, William Crewdson, Elizabeth, Benjamin Burkette, John Newman, Lucy Crewdson, Burkette Lewis and George Thomas Linton.  Most of the older children moved away from Logan County, the younger ones stayed in Logan County.

Mildred married her cousin John L. Edwards, who lived in Washington County, Kentucky.  They are buried in the Linton Cemetery, along with the Captain and other members of the family.

Moses Lewis Linton married Ann Rachel Booker, from Washington County, became a doctor and moved his family to St. Louis, Missouri.  He taught at the university and was very widely known for his medical skills, as well as his charitable work.  In the new St. Louis Cathedral he is memorialized on the ceiling as a founding member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

Nancy Mason Linton married John Mize and lived in Logan County.

John Linton, also a doctor, moved to Iowa and lived among the Indians of that area, treating them and learning their ways.  He is featured in the Garnavillo Iowa Museum, with many of his doctor’s tools, vials, medicines, and other items.

I’m not sure where Thomas Crewdson Linton lived, or who he married.

William Crewdson moved farther than any of his siblings.  He kept moving west, finally making it to California, where he lived until his death.

The other children all lived in Logan County.  Benjamin Burkette Linton married Nancy Jane Newman.  They are the parents of John Wesley Linton, featured in the photo.  John Wesley Linton was born November 14, 1843.  He joined the southern cause during the Civil War, and was part of the Orphan Brigade.  So many members of his company died that he vowed if he returned home he would plant cedar trees for each and every one who did not return.  True to his word, John Wesley did plant those trees – and many are still growing on his farm today!

After the war, John Wesley Linton married Emma Adelaide Proctor on November 11, 1869.  The couple had five children, Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.  Unfortunately, Lucy died at the age of 22 in 1903.  The four sons lived until the 1940’s – Benjamin Proctor Linton died January 19, 1941; the other three brothers died in 1945 – the youngest, Hugh Walter Linton, died March 21; James Thomas Linton died November 13; and two weeks later John Warder Linton died November 27.

Now, back to the photo.  Looking at the clothing and examining the card leads me to believe this photograph was taken about 1883-1885.  The card has an uneven scalloped edge which is appropriate to that time period.  There is no image printed on the back, but a small, photo-like image is glued to the back.  If you look careful you can see Genelli, St. Louis, printed under the photo of the woman.  I found Genelli, Hubert Brothers, Proprietors, running a photographic studio at 923 Olive Street from 1885.

John Wesley Linton and his family lived in Logan County, Kentucky, near the town of Russellville.  But they had family who lived in St. Louis!  Dr. Moses Lewis Linton had died by this date, but his children lived there.  I’m convinced this was taken during a visit to cousins.

Our next obstacle – which two children are shown in the photo?  My guess would be James Thomas and Lucy.  If you enlarge the photo you can definitely see the child standing with her hand on her father’s shoulder is a little girl.  She wears a ring on the middle finger of her right hand, and a small necklace, and her hair is styled very similar to her mother’s.  The little boy looks a few years older.  In 1885 Lucy would have been five and Thomas, eight.  It could also be that the photo was taken a year or two earlier.  There is no photographer’s name at the bottom of the card, and that could be due to setting up shop.  Either way, I feel very confident in naming the two wee ones.  The older boys could have been left at home with relatives; and Hugh, who was born in February of 1883, may have been too young to travel.  Another reason to date this photo to 1884 was the death of Ann Rachel Booker Linton, Moses’ wife, March 5, 1884.

Always check the small clues that may help you date photographs.  They will help you get close to the date.