Tag Archives: Logan County Kentucky

Brown Family Buried in Maple Grove Cemetery – Logan County

I found little information on this family, other than obituaries.  They are listed in the 1880 Logan County census.  Robert R. Brown is 48, a farmer.  Mary, his wife, is 47.  Two sons are listed – Robert W., 17; and Joseph A., 14.  It is possible this family moved to Logan from Hardin County since the father lived there when the couple married in 1864, or Breckinridge County since that was where the mother lived before marriage.  Even though both sons were married, their wives are not buried in this cemetery.

Sacred to the Memory of Robert R. Brown, born January 29, 1832, died May 8, 1894.  ‘Servant of God, well done.’  Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.

Sacred to the memory of Mary E. A. Brown, born October 8, 1828, died February 24, 1910.  ‘One little hour and then the glorious crowning.’

The Breckinridge News, Cloverport, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, March 2, 1910

Venerable Mother

of Robert W. Brown Is Summoned – Was a Member of the Old Lewis Family of Breckinridge

Mrs. Mary E. A. Brown, the mother of R. W. Brown, managing editor of The Louisville Times, and of Joseph A. Brown, of Nashville, Tennessee, died at the home of the latter Thursday evening February the twenty-fourth.  Her final illness started from the pricking of her thumb with a needle last Friday.  Erysipelas developed and caused her death.  Mrs. Brown was nearly eighty-three years of age and her life was beautiful and interesting.  In her early womanhood days she lived in Breckinridge County with Dr. Thomas J. Lewis, the father of the Rev. James T. Lewis, of Basin Springs.  In 1864 she married Robert R. Brown of Hardin County.

Mrs. Brown was a woman remarkable in many ways and was greatly talented in music and literature.  She was a member of the Broadway Methodist Temple Church of Louisville.

It is said, during the last twenty-five years her older son, Robert, never failed to spend Christmas with her.

Robert W. Brown, born November 13, 1862, died December 28, 1924.

The Owensboro Messenger, Daviess County, Kentucky

Tuesday, December 30, 1924

Joe A. Brown, born December 9, 1866, died January 22, 1939.

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee

Monday, January 23, 1939

 

 

‘The Godfather of Muhlenberg County’

A few days ago, I introduced you to Henry Rhoads, known as the ‘Godfather of Muhlenberg County’.  In 1913 Otto A. Rothert published his A History of Muhlenberg County, and gives us much information on the early settlers and up to the present day – that is, 1911 present day.  Most of my information is taken from that book.

As mentioned in the earlier blog, Henry Rhoads came to America, with his brothers, from Germany.  He fought in the Revolutionary War under General John Peter Muhlenberg, who commanded soldiers mostly from Germany and Holland, and in whose honor, Henry Rhoads later named the county in which he lived.

At first the Rhoads families settled in what is today Calhoun in McLean County, and was originally called Vienna, but the title to the land was lost by the brothers in a court case.  They moved to what is now Browder in Muhlenberg County.  ‘When Henry Rhoads came to this part of the Green River country he stopped at Barnett’s Fort, on Rough River, above Hartford.  He first located his claim for land at the site of the present town of Calhoun and laid out a town in 1784 and called it Rhoadsville.  When Rhoads was defeated by Captain John Hanley, agent for the Dorsey’s, of Maryland, the name of the town was changed to Vienna.  Rhoads then went back to Barnett’s Fort for a short time and soon after located in Logan County, the bounds of the present county of Muhlenberg, five miles from Paradise on Green River and a mile for the present town of Browder on the Louisville & Nashville Railroad.

‘Simultaneously with the departure of the Germans to the south side of the river, they erected a fortification about five miles south from Rumsey for refuge in case of Indian attack.  This was called “Pond Station.”  This was in Muhlenberg until the territory embracing it was made a part of McLean County.  About the same time such of the residents of Fort Vienna as owned slaves quit the fort and opened up farms north of the river, where some of their descendants are still to be found.’

After a long struggle with the courts Henry Rhoads received 2,000 acres of a 7,000-acre tract he had surveyed for General Alexander McClanahan.  Not until October of 1801 did he receive a deed to his property.  It was on this tract that the family lived, and the farm was passed from father to son for more than a century.  The graveyard for the Rhoads family is near the historic house.  The small stone for Henry Rhoads reads – H. R., B. J. 5, 1739, D. M. 6, 1814.

We all having those interesting tidbits handed down through the generations, and the Rhoads family is no different.  The following story is from Mr. Rothert’s book – ‘When Henry Rhoads settled on his tract of land, Muhlenberg was practically an unbroken wilderness.  Many wild animals, large and small, held sway.  A number of stories are told about the game that roamed over these hills in olden times.  I here repeat two of these stories, because they are characteristic of life in the wilderness and because they are incidents from the life of Muhlenberg’s first great pioneer, handed down by local tradition.

‘When Henry Rhoads was building his log house his neighbors were few and far between, but all came with a helping hand and a happy heart to take part in his “house-raising.”  These old-time house-raisings were attended as much for the sake of their social features as for the purpose of building a house.

‘One afternoon, while the crowd was busily engaged on the roof of this building, a large bear leisurely wandered into sight.  When the men saw the animal, they stopped work and immediately started on a bear chase.  Some ran after hmi with axes and others with guns.  The women of the wilderness always lent a helping hand.  In this instance one woman followed in the bear chase with a pitchfork.  After an exciting time, old Bruin was finally killed.  That night a large bearskin was stretched on the new log wall and barbecued bear meat was served in abundance at all the other meals prepared for the house-raising party.

‘But the noise made by the bear-chasers evidently did not scare all the wild animals out of the neighborhood.  About a year after that event Henry Rhoads, while walking in his wood, which is still standing a short distance north of the old house, espied a large drove of wild turkeys.  He slowly raised his flint-lock rifle for the purpose of shooting a fine gobbler strutting under a white oak within close range.  When he was about ready to pull the trigger, he heard a rustling in the dry leaves behind him.  Rhoads looked around, and to his great surprise saw a huge panther preparing to spring upon him.  Without stopping to take sure aim he fired at the threatening beast.  Luckily the bullet hit the animal between the eyes and killed it instantly.  A half-hour later Rhoads walked back home with the panther skin on his arm and his trusty flint-lock on his shoulder.

‘These old flint-locks were, as a rule, fine-sight and unerring.  They were slow but sure, although they did not kill every panther they were aimed at.  Compared with modern rifles they were slow in all the operations that preceded and resulted in the discharge of the bullet.’

In the July 12, 2002, edition of The Messenger-Inquirer, of Owensboro, Kentucky, an article mentions that Henry Rhoads father was Heinrich Rhoads, who came to this country from Germany, ‘and was a German gunsmith, who is credited with inventing the Pennsylvania long rifle that he made for frontiersmen such as Daniel Boone, a Rhoads family friend.  The weapon was later called a Kentucky long rifle.’

Henry Rhoads was a member of the State Legislature from Logan Count when, in 1798, Muhlenberg was formed, and he was the first man to represent the new county in the House of Representatives.  In addition, he is credited with drawing plans for the first courthouse of the county.  In his later years Henry Rhoads spent most of his time on his farm, until his death in 1814.

In 1839, in Logan County, Elizabeth Linton, daughter of Benjamin Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson, and granddaughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, married Jacob Vaught Rhoads.  Jacob’s father was David Rhoads, born in Pennsylvania in 1777.  He married Elizabeth Vaught, also from Pennsylvania.  I cannot say that Jacob Vaught Rhoads is a grandson of Henry Rhoads, but it is possible; otherwise he would be a great-nephew.

DAR Application Based On Captain John Linton

Today I share with you the original National Society, Daughters of the American Revolution working sheet for application of Adelaide Linton Cartier.  She is a cousin, along with being a cousin of Garwood Linton, my good friend (and cousin!) from Logan County and Jefferson County.  He brought Adelaide’s boxes of research to me several years ago.  Adelaide, of course, entered the DAR through our mutual great-great-grandfather, Captain John Hancock Linton, lieutenant and then captain of the Loudoun Militia.  He was born in Prince William County, Virginia, in 1750, before the county of Loudoun was formed.  John married Ann Mason, a daughter of Benjamin Mason and Elizabeth Berkeley.  During the last few years of the 18th century and the first few years of the 19th century, several of John and Ann’s children (along with a few of her brothers and sisters) came to Kentucky.  The Masons settled in Nelson County, along with Moses Linton.  The rest of the Linton’s made roots in neighboring Washington County.  In 1818, the remaining children came with the Captain.  I can just see that long line of children, grandchildren, slaves, packhorses, coming through the Cumberland Gap!  John Linton lived to the grand age of 86, his wife, 82.  They, along with other family members, are buried in the Linton Cemetery on Hwy 555.

Now for Adelaide’s application.

Mrs. Adelaide Linton Cartier, wife of Roderic Walter Cartier, descendant of Captain John Linton.

  1. I am the daughter of Hugh Walter Linton, born February 22, 1883, at Logan County, Kentucky, died at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, on March 21, 1945, and his only wife, Lydabel Garnett, born on October 12, 1891, at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, married on February 5, 1913.
  2. The said Hugh Walter Linton was the child of John Wesley Linton, born on November 14, 1843, at Logan County, Kentucky, died at Russellville, Kentucky, on July 4, 1930, and his only wife Emma Adelaide Proctor, born on October 11, 1850, at Logan County, Kentucky, died at Russellville, Kentucky, on May 10, 1928, married on November 11, 1869.
  3. The said John Wesley Linton was the child of Benjamin Burkett Linton, born on April 29, 1821, died at Logan County, Kentucky, on July 23, 1894, and his first wife, Nancy Jane Newman, born on March 6, 1822, at Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, died at Logan County, Kentucky, on July 7, 1879, married February 2, 1843.
  4. The said Benjamin Burkett Linton was the child of Rev. Benjamin Franklin Linton, born on June 10, 1777, at Virginia, died at Springfield, Kentucky, in 1861 and his wife Lucy Crewdson, born in 1785, died at Logan County, Kentucky, on August 13, 1837, married 1800.
  5. The said Benjamin Franklin Linton was the child of Captain John Linton, born in 1750, at Prince William County, Virginia, died at Springfield, Kentucky, December 4, 1836, and his wife Ann Mason, born in Virginia, died at Springfield, Kentucky, in 1832, married about 1770.

Details showing the family descent.  Give reference to verify the above statement of birth, marriage and death, by volume and page of reference is made to published work, and a duplicate certified or attested copy of facts where reference is made to Family Bible, tombstone, or other unpublished authority.  Statements based upon tradition cannot be considered.

File Case of John Linton, Virginia and Kentucky

2nd generation – Birth, death and marriage dates from Family Bible, shown in affidavit No. I.  Marriage is also shown in Logan County Court Records, Book 3, Page 100.

3rd generation – Birth, death, marriage dates from Family Bible and on tombstones at Bibbs Chapel Cemetery, sworn to in affidavits I and II.

4th generation – Birth place and date on B. F. Linton found in St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal, January and February issue 1867.  His death date on tombstone near Springfield, Kentucky, sworn to in affidavit No. II.  His wife’s birth and death dates found on tombstone at Kennerly Chapel in affidavit No. II.  Affidavit No. I shows B. B. Linton was son of B. F. Linton.

Ancestor’s Services

The said Captain John Linton was lieutenant in Militia for Loudoun County, Virginia.  Commissioned in February 8, 1779, recommended August 1778.  Commissioned Captain of the Militia in Loudoun County, Virginia, April 10, 1781, recommended February 1781.  He was Lieutenant in the Third Continental Dragoons.  The said Captain John Linton is the ancestor who assisted in establishing American Independence, while acting in the capacity of lieutenant in the Militia for Loudoun County, Virginia, from February 8, 1779, to April 10, 1781, when he was commissioned captain of the Militia for Loudoun County, Virginia.

State authority for service claimed by volume and page – Order Book ‘G’, Folio 130, page 134-135.  History of Loudoun County, Virginia, Vol. 9, Page 22, 54, Virginia County Records.

I need to research the Third Continental Dragoons before I could positively say that John Linton was a part of that group.  Today I sent an email to the Loudoun County Clerk for more information.  I will let you know what I find.

Deaths In Logan County

The following is a list of deaths from Logan County, Kentucky, including age, birth, death, cemetery, spouse, father, mother and additional comments.  All parties born in Kentucky unless otherwise mentioned.

  • Mary Darby Jenkins, age 73, born April 4, 1857.  Died July 26, 1930, buried in Darby Cemetery, Logan County.  Husband W. W. Jenkins; father, Dathan Darby; mother, Irene Milliken.
  • Mary E. Jenkins, age 84, born February 17, 1844.  Died January 23, 1929, buried in Allensville Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.  Widowed; father, Benoni Dawson; mother, Margaret Hogan.
  • Mary Elizabeth Jenkins, age 64, born December 16, 1871.  Died March 1, 1936, buried in Porter Cemetery, Logan County.  Husband, Isaac Jenkins; father, Ben Turner; mother, Fleenor Paaradine.
  • Nancy Emaline Jenkins, age 69, born December 10, 1859, in Tennessee.  Died, August 30, 1929, buried in Dripping Springs Cemetery, Logan County.  Husband, Reuben Jenkins; father, Steven Ayers, born Tennessee; mother Rachel Jenkins, born Tennessee.
  • Richard R. Jenkins, age 77, born November 10, 1845.  Died August 11, 1923, buried in Allensville Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.  Father, John Jenkins; mother, Jane Shackleford.  Died in Bowling Green, Kentucky.
  • Rilla Campbell Jenkins, age 83, born July 12, 1866.  Died January 10, 1950, buried in Berea Cemetery, Logan County.  Husband, Robert Tyler Jenkins, deceased; father, Peyton Campbell.
  • Reuben D. Jenkins, age 77, born December 19, 1861, in Tennessee.  Died August 2, 1939, buried in Dripping Springs Cemetery, Logan County.  Wife, Louisa Belle; father,  William Jenkins, born Tennessee; mother, Mary Goad.  Farmer.
  • Russell Darby Jenkins, age 45, born October 23, 1883.  Died January 10, 1929, buried in Allensville Cemetery, Todd County, Kentucky.  Wife, Luella Thomas Jenkins; father, W. W. Jenkins; mother, Mary Darby.  Merchant.
  • William Wood Jenkins, age 79, born November 14, 1857.  Died, April 16, 1936, buried in Darby Cemetery, Logan County.  Wife, Mary Darby, deceased; father, Ben Jenkins; mother, Irene Weldon.
  • Annie B. Jennings, age 79, born December 26, 1861, in Tennessee.  Died March 1, 1940, buried in Russellville Cemetery.  Husband, W. T. Jennings; father, Robert Moss, born in Tennessee; mother, Sallie Wiseman, born in Tennessee.  Died in Bowling Green, Kentucky.
  • Charles Jennings, age 68, born September 2, 1875.  Died September 28, 1943, buried in Logan County.  Wife, Deanie Hadden; father, Thomas Jennings, born in Tennessee; mother, Lucy Grinter.  Farmer.
  • Deanie Hadden Jennings, age 85, born February 14, 1873, in Todd County, Kentucky.  Died March 8, 1958, buried in Riverside Cemetery, Hopkinsville, Kentucky.  Husband, Charles Jennings, deceased; father, Samuel W. Hadden; mother, Adilicia Hardy.
  • James Monroe Jennings, age 71, born August 12, 1865.  Died June 18, 1937, buried in Grinter Cemetery, Logan County.  Wife, Mattie Head; father, William Jennings, born in Tennessee; mother, Rebecca Gibson, born in Tennessee.  Farmer.

Round Steak Supper – Recipe From the 1950’s

I am so excited to share a page from a notebook I found in the ‘drawer’ of photos and writings at the Linton house in Logan County.  This is the notebook of Mrs. Thomas Densmore Linton – Sallie Ruth Price, the daughter of Edward C. Price and Cora Hutchinson.

Sallie was a teacher – and you can see her lovely handwriting in the recipe above.  I remember teaching my second-graders cursive, watching them grow in their abilities, and now there is talk of doing away with cursive in schools.  Such a shame!

The Round Steak Supper listed above sounds so good I set out to re-create this recipe from years ago.  As a true cook, used to making her meals daily, there are not exact directions.  Just a jot of the important steps.

I had a great tenderized round steak from my sister, who keeps me supplied with tasty meat.  I cut the steak into hand size pieces, added salt and pepper, and lightly floured before putting into a hot skillet with a little olive oil.  It browned beautifully.  I added the onion soup mix, a can of tomatoes and almost a can of vegetable broth.  I covered the skillet, turned it down low, and let it cook about two hours, checking every 20 minutes or so.  The aroma was wonderful!

After two hours I added carrots and potatoes and cooked another 25 minutes until tender.

Oh, my!  Was Ritchey a happy man!  The steak was fork tender, the carrots sweet and potatoes yummy!  A meal in a skillet!  Some lovely bread and we had a feast.

I love finding recipes used by my ancestors and others.  Just looking at this recipe gave me such a sense of the woman who used it.  Such love must have gone in to every dish, such planning.  This is what family love is all about!  Try something new – or old – today!

Let Me Introduce You to the Linton Family!

While visiting the Linton house in Logan County, my cousin, Garwood Linton, let me look through all the old family photographs.  As with most, few were named.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy them!  Today I share a few with you from Garwood’s collection – with my guesses for who they may be.

This is a beautiful photograph of an older woman.  Notice her fine features, her sweet face – and her hands!  She holds her spectacles in one, and a book in another.  They look like they’ve worked hard during her years of life.

This photograph is a cabinet card – 6.5″ x 4.25″.  It was made in Bowling Green, Kentucky, not far from Russellville, by Bettison’s Studio.  This is an early cabinet card, no frills, that I would date to about 1872.  If we check the family tree, this could possibly be Garwood’s 3rd great-grandmother, Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1822, died 1879, who married Benjamin Burkett Linton.

Isn’t this a beautiful woman?  This is a tintype photo, taken about 1885, my guess.  Tintypes do not have the name of the photographer listed.

A handsome gentleman is next.  This is a carte de visite, 2.5″ x 4″.  The photographer was L. D. Robertson, South Side Public Square, Franklin, Kentucky.  The Linton family lived in Logan County between the towns of Russellville and Franklin (in Simpson County).  Due to the large sleeves and lapels of the coat, this photo was most likely taken in the 1860’s.   Could this be a young Thomas Alney Linton?

This is an 1870’s gent – the lapels of his coat are smaller, and buttoned at the top.  He wears a very  nice watch chain!  Another tintype, but I can’t say who this man might be.

Here we have a photo of a handsome couple.  The bustle lets us know this is from the 1870’s.  The man wears a slightly larger jacket than this time period, but it could have been held over from previous years.  This tintype has just a bit of color added to the cheeks.

Next we have this cherub!  What adorable sweetness!  The tiny feet and hands, hair sticking up – and sitting in a tiny chair!  This is a very old carte de visite, perhaps taken in 1862.  There is no border or photographer’s name on the card.  This child is obviously a year of age or younger.  Checking the data base for Linton descendants from the patriarch, Benjamin Franklin Linton, one child does fit this age – his granddaughter, Louella C. Linton, daughter of Benjamin Burkett Linton – and sister to John Wesley Linton who owned this home.  Unfortunately Louella lived only a year or two.  If this is her photo, it’s probably the only one taken of her.

What a treat to look through a large drawer of photos from another time period!  Thank you, Cousin!

A Victorian Woven Hair Mourning Shadowbox

During our visit to Logan County a few weeks ago, my cousin, Garwood Linton, was there the first weekend, and we were fortunate to spend Sunday afternoon with him and his cousin Tracy, looking through the treasures of the Linton house.  The first thing he shared was amazing – a Victorian woven hair shadowbox.  It was complete with a photo of four people – husband, wife, son and daughter – and flowers and leaves made from human hair.  I’ve seen something similar in the old state capital in Frankfort, or one of the museums.

It is definitely a work of art, and was very popular during the Victorian Era.  I read that even short strands of hair could be incorporated into making the flowers, it wasn’t necessary to have long strands.

Garwood was interested in knowing the people in the tintype photo.  We knew it wasn’t John Wesley Linton and Emma Adelaide Proctor, his gr-great grandparents, who owned the large Linton house.  A genealogy mystery – I was on a mission and in research mode!  It was decided to open the shadowbox and check the back of the tintype for names.  The box was very gently opened, but no names were listed.  But it was a good time to take more photos without the glare of the glass top.

If this wasn’t a photo of John Wesley and his family, it must be that of a brother or sister.  I would say this photo was taken about 1875-1885, based mostly on the woman’s dress.  It is definitely not a Civil War era gown.  The gentleman’s large lapels and sleeves of his coat made it look from the 1860’s (which possibly it was), but clothes were worn as long as they were useful, not necessarily thrown out for fashion’s sake.  The smaller lapels of the boy’s coat give us a hint it is more in line with the 1875-1885 timeline. John Wesley Linton was the oldest son of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1843.  Thomas A. Linton was born in 1845.  The next three children died before the time this photo was made.  My bet is this is a photo of Thomas Linton and his family.  As idyllic as it was visiting the Linton homes in rural Logan County, internet service was spotty at best, so I couldn’t make any searches.  But Friday was to be a rainy day, and we went to the Logan County Historical Society in full search mode.

I remembered seeing a photograph of Thomas Linton and his family, standing before their large brick home, very similar to the one owned by John Wesley Linton.  Perhaps a check of that photo would give us an answer.  The Thomas Linton in the photo was much older, 50, and the way the photo was taken it was hard to tell if he was the same man in the tintype.  But the oldest child was similar to the son in the tintype.

A check of the 1870 census gave a clue.  In the census book written by the historical society, little notes were added to the census information.  It said that John Wesley Linton and Thomas A. Linton married sisters in a double wedding on November 11, 1869.  John married Emma Adelaide Proctor, and Thomas married Elizabeth F. Proctor.  The Proctor sisters were daughters of Benjamin Ellis Proctor and Martha Dixon James.  Even though there is a family tradition about the double wedding, the marriage of Thomas and Elizabeth took place February 22, 1870.

The 1880 census proved to be more elusive – a quick Ancestry search gave no Linton’s living in Logan County.  We know this is obviously incorrect.  I went to the actual census records and looked through the Clay District (Linton’s lived here in 1870) and found this census to be a mess.  There were water marks on the pages and some were almost impossible to read.  Did this deter me?  Of course not!  With magnification, and having looked for the Linton name so many times, I finally found the two brothers, John and Thomas, with their families, and their parents, living in household dwellings 135, 136 and 137 on page 18B.  I saved a copy, then edited it to make it somewhat readable.

However, do you notice there are no children listed for Thomas and Elizabeth?  George Browder Linton was born June 28, 1881.  I do not have a birth date for daughter Ada (probably Adelaide after her aunt).  She was likely born a year or two later.  Their first child was born eleven years after their marriage.  That seems a little odd, but perhaps Elizabeth was not very healthy.  Perhaps she had given birth, but the children died shortly afterward.  There is a servant living in the household with them – a black female, aged 17, whose first name looks like Tillison.  Twenty-seven-year-old Elizabeth Proctor Linton most likely would not have a servant unless she was frail or very ill.

This information puts us at the higher end of the prospective date of the tintype.  I do know that Thomas Linton married Mary Susan Duncan, as his second wife, January 5, 1888.  Elizabeth Proctor Linton probably died in late 1886 or early 1887.  If this photo was taken just before her death, her children would have been seven and five.  Little Ada died about the same time as her mother.

For Emma Adelaide Proctor Linton to lose her beloved sister and niece, this memento of a photo and flowers made from family hair, was a way to mourn and remember.  I’m sure it was a labor of love that took many hours.  Garwood remembers seeing this shadowbox when very young, and was told the flowers were in a ‘U’ shape to allow the souls to pass on to heaven.  I want to point out the silver buttons spaced evenly throughout the flowers – perhaps these came from a dress of her sister?  I’m sure it was a treasured remembrance – and thankfully is back in the house today.  I’m sure Elizabeth Proctor Linton is smiling down upon the Linton family!