Tag Archives: Loudoun County Virginia

‘Uncle Billy’ Moredock Summoned

One feat accomplished on our western Kentucky trip – we found the Lewis Cemetery in Hancock County!  We tried to find it in June, with no success.  But with the help of Google Earth and a page from Glenn Hodges book, Daybreak On Old Fortification Creek, we pinpointed the location!  This was another cemetery back a gravel road, onto farmland.  It is a small cemetery, just for family, about 35 people are thought to be buried here.

William Moredock married Hannah Amanda House, granddaughter of the John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown that moved from Loudoun County, Virginia, to what was then Breckinridge County, Kentucky (later Hancock County).  John Lewis was a brother to William Joseph Lewis, who married Captain John Linton’s sister, Catherine Jennings Lewis.  Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis’ son, William Linton Lewis, also moved to Hancock County, and is buried in this cemetery.

The Breckinridge News, Breckinridge County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 20, 1908

“Uncle Billy” Moredock Summoned

Genial Man And Aged citizen Dies At Hardinsburg – Respected And Loved By Young And Old

Once Lived In Hancock

Hardinsburg, Ky., May 18 – (Special) –

After an illness of several weeks, William T. Moredock, one of our aged and most highly respected citizens quietly breathed his last at two o’clock Wednesday morning, May 13.

Mr. Moredock was born near Hardinsburg, March 5, 1834.  After learning the trade of cabinet maker with the Hon. G. W. Beard and Judge Eskridge, he moved to Hancock County, where his life was spent, with the exception of the last two years here with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Evans, at the Commercial Hotel.

A part of the time he was a farmer in Hancock County, the other part found him in business at Lewisport.

In 1856 he was married to Miss Hannah A. House, of Hancock County, and for fifty years they lived happily together, a happiness broken only by his death.  Besides his wife he is survived by these children:  James William, of Macon, Georgia; Samuel H., of Tampa, Florida; B. H. Moredock, of Louisville; and Mrs. Evans, of Hardinsburg.

He was noted for his social, genial disposition.  His home was ever open to his friends and crowds of young people loved to visit there and enjoy the hospitality and sunshine within its walls and nothing pleased him more than to know that he was adding to the pleasures of others.

He was a Methodist, a Christian gentleman, a man whose citizenship enriched the neighborhood in which he lived.

The remains were laid to rest at Lewisport on Thursday.

Mrs. Moredock goes to Louisville where she will remain for some time with her son.

William T. Moredock, March 5, 1834 – May 13, 1908.  Hannah A. Moredock, February 24, 1840 – October 21, 1909.  Lewis Cemetery, Hancock County, Kentucky.

1824 Receipt of John L. Edwards

‘Received of John L. Edwards the amount of my account against Edward Edwards except nine dollars 25 cents for which he has given me his note March 27, 1824.  C Rice’

This is another of the precious little pieces of paper saved by my great-grandmother Frances Barber Linton Montgomery.  Edward Barber Edwards, mentioned in the above note, was Frances’ great-grandfather, my 4th.  Edward Barber Edwards was born in Maryland, April 21, 1768, the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber.  He married Nancy Linton, daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.

Edward, Nancy and family arrived in Washington County, Kentucky, from Loudoun County, Virginia, in November 1816, two years before the Captain and other members of the family made the move.  We know this because November 27, 1816, Edward B. Edwards made oath ‘he removed to Kentucky with intention to become a citizen, that he brought with four slaves named Stephen, Hannah, Poland and Charles, and not with intention to sell, testified by S. D. Roman, Washington County Justice of the Peace.’  Every man who brought slaves into Washington County had to make this statement.  Captain John Linton made the same statement two years later.

Edward and Nancy had six children when they made the trek from Virginia, all born in Loudoun County, Virginia – Susan Clark, John Linton, Catherine Kitural, Jonathan Joseph, Benjamin Mason and Mary Jane Edwards.  Two daughters were born in Kentucky – Martha Linton in 1817 and Sarah Barber in 1822.  This was a family that used family surnames when naming their children!

Edward Barber Edwards died two years after his youngest child was born.  His will was written January 16, 1824, and proved in court March 8, 1824.  I do not know the cause of his death.  He was 55 years.  In his will Edward gives Nancy the land that he lives on, with all the stock and Negroes, and household and kitchen furniture, except for 100 acres of land he gives to his eldest son, John Linton Edwards, at the expiration of seven years from the date of the will.  At Nancy’s death the rest of the land is to go to son Benjamin, the rest of the estate to be equally divided between his daughters and son Jonathan.  Wife Nancy, and son, John, were named executrix and executor.  The will was witnessed by William Caldwell, John Linton and John Linton.  One of the John Linton’s was Captain John, the other his son.

This note of 1824 is only one piece of the settlement of the estate of Edward Barber Edwards.  I can only be thankful that these small pieces of paper from so long ago were treasured through the years and kept as part of our family heritage.  What do you have that is a family treasure?

 

 

Two Examples of Ambrotype Photographs

The second type of early photographs were ambrotype photos.  Ambrotypes look very similar to the later tintype photos.  An easy way to test them is to use a magnet – even through the case you can fell the attraction of the magnet with the iron used for the tintype.  The glass of the ambrotype feels no pull from the magnet.

An ambrotype was created on a piece of glass – and looked like a negative until a black background was added.  Begun about 1855, the earlier ambrotypes had the photograph on one piece of glass, with an additional piece of glass covered with a tar-like pitch.  About 1858 the varnish covers the back of the glass with the photo on front or sometimes a colored class was used.  In 1859 the clear glass has a black cloth at the back of the image.  I have one with the double glass and one with the black varnish on back of the photo.

This photograph of my 4th great-grandmother, Nancy Linton Edwards, was probably taken about 1855.  There are two pieces of glass in the case – one with the photo, and another with the black pitch on back.  Unfortunately, the glass containing the photograph was broken, but it still gives us a good idea of her features.  Nancy was the daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason, born in Loudoun County, Virginia, in 1778.  She married Edward Barber Edwards, with whom she raised a large family.  On the way through the Cumberland Gap, from Virginia to Kentucky, her horse was spooked by a cougar or bobcat, causing her to fall and break her leg.  She traveled in a litter the rest of the way to Washington County, and never walked again.

Nancy’s cotton cap was used by older women during the 1850’s, younger women using a bonnet.  She wears the older fashions of the 1840’s.  Looking at her white hair, face and neck you could easily guess her age of about 77.  But look at her fingers – they look long and very elegant.  There is just a hint of color in her cheeks.

As you can tell from this photo, the scan is not generally good unless you remove the photograph from the case, but I wanted you to see the mat that is used with this photograph.  It is called a nonpareil mat, due to the shape, and was used between 1850 and 1859.  The preserver (around the edge) is still rather simple, but a little more decorative than with the daguerreotype photos.

The case is lined with red velvet and is decorated on front and back with the same design.  The case is 3 ¼ x 3 ¾.

This next ambrotype is a great photo of a youngish man with great hair and beard!  His collar and tie are from the 1850’s – as are the wide lapels of his coat and the overall larger look of the suit.  I believe this to be Edward Edwards Taylor, son of John Compton Taylor and Susan Clark Edwards, my 3rd great-grandparents.  Edward was a brother to my Catherine Elizabeth Taylor who married Edward Edwards Linton – a little confusing with those middle names!  This photo has only one piece of glass, with the varnish on back, so we can date this photo to about 1858.  In that year Edward, or ‘Ned’ as he was called, would have been 27 years of age.  Also, his ears look very much like those of his father, John Taylor.

The mat with this photo is oval, with much decoration.  The preserver, not shown in this photo, is also more decorated, with semi-reinforced corners.  The case is similar to Nancy Edwards’ case, but the photograph is smaller – 2 3/8 x 2 7/8.

Next up, tintypes!

A Day at the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort

Wednesday, I visited the Kentucky History Center in Frankfort, with two specific goals in mind.  I have tried to find a copy of the book Daybreak on Old Fortification Creek by Glenn Hodges.  It is a history of the John Lewis family – specifically John Lewis, the son of John Lewis and Elizabeth Brown, and grandson of Vincent Lewis and Ann Longworth of Loudoun County, Virginia; and his wife, Hannah Lewis, daughter of William Joseph Lewis and Catherine Jennings Linton (my Captain John Linton’s sister), and granddaughter of Vincent Lewis.  Yes, John Lewis, Jr., and wife Hannah Lewis were first cousins.

Kentucky was quite a call for the inhabitants of Loudoun County, Virginia, and especially for the Lewis, Linton, Mason, Hancock and Berkeley families that make up my lines.  John Lewis, Jr., was surveying in Kentucky about 1780, and finally moved his family in 1799.  The Mason family was in Nelson County in the 1790’s.  Captain John Linton and his children and grandchildren moved to Washington County in 1818, although several sons had come to Kentucky earlier.

One of the Lewis family members I am very interested in is William Linton Lewis, son of William Joseph and Catherine Linton Lewis – and nephew of Captain John Linton.  I was introduced to this man through Dorothy Thrawley, a lovely woman and exceptional genealogist, with whom I corresponded in the 1970’s and 80’s.  She told me of the horse hair trunk that William Linton Lewis used to carry important papers, and that it is now in the collection of Duke University.  Ritchey and I visited Duke University, made a few copies of the old letters and other paper in the collection – and the copier stopped working!  We must return.

My second goal was to find more information about Ritchey’s Thomas Jewell who married Grissell Fletcher about 1640.  Thomas Jewell arrived from England in the Planter in April 1635.  He settled in Braintree, Massachusetts.  Lands were assigned him December 24, 1639-40, for three heads – bringing that many settlers to the new world.  He and wife Grissell had the following children:  Joseph, born February 24, 1642; Thomas, December 27, 1643; Hannah, December 27, 1643; Nathaniel, February 15, 1648; Grissell, born January 19, 1651; and Mercy, born February 14, 1653.  Thomas died in 1654, and Grissell, with six very young children, quickly married Humphrey Griggs.  After Griggs death she married John Burney, Henry Kibbe and John Burge.  Interesting that they lived in Braintree – the home of John and Abigail Adams.  Could later descendants possibly have met the famous Adams?

Ritchey and Linton are camping in the White Mountains of New Hampshire later this year.  How could they just ‘happen’ to choose a campsite, nine miles from a cemetery in Whitefield, where John Jewell, Ritchey’s fourth great-grandfather is buried?  He wanted to be found!

My goals were accomplished.  But, of course, they just lead to other goals!  Happy researching!

John Wesley Linton Family Photo

Today I share with you a photo of John Wesley Linton and wife Emma Adelaide Proctor, and two of their children.  With a bit of thought and research I believe I can tell you which of their five children are in the photo.  Let’s start with a little history.

John Wesley Linton’s grandfather was Benjamin Franklin Linton, who was born June 16, 1777, in Loudoun County, Virginia, the son of Captain John Linton and Ann Mason.  Benjamin F. Linton married Lucy Crewdson, April 12, 1805, in Fluvanna County, Virginia.  Even though his parents and other brothers and sisters moved to the Washington/Nelson County area in Kentucky, Benjamin settled in Logan County, Kentucky.

Benjamin and Lucy had twelve children – Mildred L., Moses Lewis, Nany M., John, Thomas Crewdson, William Crewdson, Elizabeth, Benjamin Burkette, John Newman, Lucy Crewdson, Burkette Lewis and George Thomas Linton.  Most of the older children moved away from Logan County, the younger ones stayed in Logan County.

Mildred married her cousin John L. Edwards, who lived in Washington County, Kentucky.  They are buried in the Linton Cemetery, along with the Captain and other members of the family.

Moses Lewis Linton married Ann Rachel Booker, from Washington County, became a doctor and moved his family to St. Louis, Missouri.  He taught at the university and was very widely known for his medical skills, as well as his charitable work.  In the new St. Louis Cathedral he is memorialized on the ceiling as a founding member of the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

Nancy Mason Linton married John Mize and lived in Logan County.

John Linton, also a doctor, moved to Iowa and lived among the Indians of that area, treating them and learning their ways.  He is featured in the Garnavillo Iowa Museum, with many of his doctor’s tools, vials, medicines, and other items.

I’m not sure where Thomas Crewdson Linton lived, or who he married.

William Crewdson moved farther than any of his siblings.  He kept moving west, finally making it to California, where he lived until his death.

The other children all lived in Logan County.  Benjamin Burkette Linton married Nancy Jane Newman.  They are the parents of John Wesley Linton, featured in the photo.  John Wesley Linton was born November 14, 1843.  He joined the southern cause during the Civil War, and was part of the Orphan Brigade.  So many members of his company died that he vowed if he returned home he would plant cedar trees for each and every one who did not return.  True to his word, John Wesley did plant those trees – and many are still growing on his farm today!

After the war, John Wesley Linton married Emma Adelaide Proctor on November 11, 1869.  The couple had five children, Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.  Unfortunately, Lucy died at the age of 22 in 1903.  The four sons lived until the 1940’s – Benjamin Proctor Linton died January 19, 1941; the other three brothers died in 1945 – the youngest, Hugh Walter Linton, died March 21; James Thomas Linton died November 13; and two weeks later John Warder Linton died November 27.

Now, back to the photo.  Looking at the clothing and examining the card leads me to believe this photograph was taken about 1883-1885.  The card has an uneven scalloped edge which is appropriate to that time period.  There is no image printed on the back, but a small, photo-like image is glued to the back.  If you look careful you can see Genelli, St. Louis, printed under the photo of the woman.  I found Genelli, Hubert Brothers, Proprietors, running a photographic studio at 923 Olive Street from 1885.

John Wesley Linton and his family lived in Logan County, Kentucky, near the town of Russellville.  But they had family who lived in St. Louis!  Dr. Moses Lewis Linton had died by this date, but his children lived there.  I’m convinced this was taken during a visit to cousins.

Our next obstacle – which two children are shown in the photo?  My guess would be James Thomas and Lucy.  If you enlarge the photo you can definitely see the child standing with her hand on her father’s shoulder is a little girl.  She wears a ring on the middle finger of her right hand, and a small necklace, and her hair is styled very similar to her mother’s.  The little boy looks a few years older.  In 1885 Lucy would have been five and Thomas, eight.  It could also be that the photo was taken a year or two earlier.  There is no photographer’s name at the bottom of the card, and that could be due to setting up shop.  Either way, I feel very confident in naming the two wee ones.  The older boys could have been left at home with relatives; and Hugh, who was born in February of 1883, may have been too young to travel.  Another reason to date this photo to 1884 was the death of Ann Rachel Booker Linton, Moses’ wife, March 5, 1884.

Always check the small clues that may help you date photographs.  They will help you get close to the date.

Edward Barber Edwards Account With Elias Davison

Such a simple piece of browned paper, but one so very important to me.  This is a receipt given to my fourth great-grandfather, Edward Barber Edwards, by Elias Davison, after paying the amount due on his account.

Elias Davison was on the list of Springfield town lot owners in 1817, in the post that was published yesterday.  He owned one lot at a valuation of $6,000.  In the diary of Hugh McElroy he states that he engaged to keep store for Mr. Elias Davison, beginning in 1814.  An old plat of Springfield was found and mentions the lot owned by Mr. Davison, and that it was known by the appellation ‘Davison’s brick corner.’  At least this gives us an idea of why it was valued at $6,000.  I so wish we had just a little more information about what Edward Edwards was paying for!

Edward Barber Edwards was born in Maryland April 21, 1768, the son of Jonathan Edwards and Sarah Barber.   Edward moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, before 1795, when he sold land to George Smith.  Perhaps this was about the time he married Nancy Linton, daughter of Captain John Linton and Ann Nancy Mason.   Edward and Nancy’s first child, my ancestor, Susan Clark Edwards was born in 1797.  All but one of their children was born in Loudoun County – John L., Catherine Kitural, Jonathan Joseph, Benjamin M., and Mary Jane.  The family moved to Washington County, Kentucky, in 1816, and daughter Sarah was born in 1822.

Edward died in 1824, in Washington County.  Nancy lived another 37 years.

Received this 5th day April 1821 of Mr Edward B. Edwards sixteen dollars fifty cents, it being the full amount of his account up to this date.

                                for Elias Davison, Sr., by Elias Davison, Jr.

 

 

Susan Lewis Book

In response to yesterday’s post about the last piece of the puzzle found in the Susan Lewis Book – bible – I thought I would share the actual information in this book – births, deaths, marriages, family information.

Susan Lewis Book

February 1837 . . . . . $4.50

Family Register

Read/Brown Line:

  • Coleman Read, son of Andrew Read and Elizabeth his wife, was born December 2, 1686.
  • Coleman Read and Ruth, his wife, were married the 1st of July, 1712.  Before marriage, Ruth Bragg.
  • Elizabeth Read, their daughter, born 17th June, 1713, who intermarried with Thomas Brown, and Elizabeth Brown, their daughter intermarried with John Lewis; they were the father and mother of Dan Lewis.

Lewis Line:

  • William Lewis emigrated from Wales and settled in Northumberland County, Virginia.  His son William moved to the south, and his son, Vincent, moved to Loudoun County, Virginia, [at the time Stafford County], and intermarried with Ann Longworth, and their oldest son, John Lewis [above] intermarried with Elizabeth Brown, father and mother to Daniel Lewis.
  • Joseph Lewis, son of Vincent Lewis, intermarried with Catherine Linton, and their daughter Susan Lewis intermarried with Daniel Lewis on the 5th day of April, 1793, whose names and births are on the other side of this leaf.  Catherine Linton’s mother before marriage, Susan Hancock.

Daniel and Susan Lewis:

  • Daniel Lewis was born the 2nd day of August, 1770; married the 5th April, 1793; died the 13th September 1852.
  • Susan Lewis, his wife, was born 10th March 1773; died 16th September, 1845.

Children of Daniel and Susan Lewis:

  • Linton Lewis was born 19th of April 1794; died August, 1796.
  • Matilda Brown Lewis was born 23rd October, 1795; died 28 May, 1855.
  • Jonathan Davis Lewis was born 5th September 1797.
  • Alfred Linton Lewis was born 28th May, 1800.
  • Mary Rebecca Lewis was born 19th of November, 1802; died 5th of April, 1846.
  • Elizabeth Catherine Lewis was born 31 December, 1805; died 6th of April, 1814.
  • John Joseph Daniel Lewis was born 28 May, 1811; married 6th of March, 1838; died July 2125, 1885.  Emmorine Minor Brewer Lewis, his wife, was born 7th of December, 1813; died 10th of February, 1871.
  • Susan Frances Lewis was born 30th July, 1841.
  • Fannie Lewis, born July 30th, 1841; married February 8th, 1860; died September 4th, 1902.  Jonathan Wood Berkeley was born April 5th, 1833; died March 9th, 1887.  Infant son of J. Wood and Fannie L. Berkeley born November 8th, 1870; died November 8th, 1870.  Infant son of J. Wood and Fannie L. Berkeley born February 19th, 1873; died February 19th, 1873.  Emma Lewis Berkeley, daughter of J. Wood and Fannie L. Berkeley, born March 22nd, 1878; died November 2nd, 1879.

Minor Family:

  • John Minor was born November 16, 1785.
  • Fannie Minor, his wife, was born December 7, 1787.  [born Fannie Sandford]
  • Louisa R. Minor was born April 1, 1811.
  • Emmorine Minor Lewis died February 10th, 1871.
  • John H. Minor was born December 7, 1815.
  • Elizabeth Minor was born May 24, 1818.
  • William E. Minor was born March 28, 1823.
  • James H. Minor was born July 6, 1825.
  • Fannie E. Minor was born January 20, 1827.
  • Ben F. Minor was born January 28, 1829.