Tag Archives: Nancy Jane Newman

Let Me Introduce You to the Linton Family!

While visiting the Linton house in Logan County, my cousin, Garwood Linton, let me look through all the old family photographs.  As with most, few were named.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy them!  Today I share a few with you from Garwood’s collection – with my guesses for who they may be.

This is a beautiful photograph of an older woman.  Notice her fine features, her sweet face – and her hands!  She holds her spectacles in one, and a book in another.  They look like they’ve worked hard during her years of life.

This photograph is a cabinet card – 6.5″ x 4.25″.  It was made in Bowling Green, Kentucky, not far from Russellville, by Bettison’s Studio.  This is an early cabinet card, no frills, that I would date to about 1872.  If we check the family tree, this could possibly be Garwood’s 3rd great-grandmother, Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1822, died 1879, who married Benjamin Burkett Linton.

Isn’t this a beautiful woman?  This is a tintype photo, taken about 1885, my guess.  Tintypes do not have the name of the photographer listed.

A handsome gentleman is next.  This is a carte de visite, 2.5″ x 4″.  The photographer was L. D. Robertson, South Side Public Square, Franklin, Kentucky.  The Linton family lived in Logan County between the towns of Russellville and Franklin (in Simpson County).  Due to the large sleeves and lapels of the coat, this photo was most likely taken in the 1860’s.   Could this be a young Thomas Alney Linton?

This is an 1870’s gent – the lapels of his coat are smaller, and buttoned at the top.  He wears a very  nice watch chain!  Another tintype, but I can’t say who this man might be.

Here we have a photo of a handsome couple.  The bustle lets us know this is from the 1870’s.  The man wears a slightly larger jacket than this time period, but it could have been held over from previous years.  This tintype has just a bit of color added to the cheeks.

Next we have this cherub!  What adorable sweetness!  The tiny feet and hands, hair sticking up – and sitting in a tiny chair!  This is a very old carte de visite, perhaps taken in 1862.  There is no border or photographer’s name on the card.  This child is obviously a year of age or younger.  Checking the data base for Linton descendants from the patriarch, Benjamin Franklin Linton, one child does fit this age – his granddaughter, Louella C. Linton, daughter of Benjamin Burkett Linton – and sister to John Wesley Linton who owned this home.  Unfortunately Louella lived only a year or two.  If this is her photo, it’s probably the only one taken of her.

What a treat to look through a large drawer of photos from another time period!  Thank you, Cousin!

A Victorian Woven Hair Mourning Shadowbox

During our visit to Logan County a few weeks ago, my cousin, Garwood Linton, was there the first weekend, and we were fortunate to spend Sunday afternoon with him and his cousin Tracy, looking through the treasures of the Linton house.  The first thing he shared was amazing – a Victorian woven hair shadowbox.  It was complete with a photo of four people – husband, wife, son and daughter – and flowers and leaves made from human hair.  I’ve seen something similar in the old state capital in Frankfort, or one of the museums.

It is definitely a work of art, and was very popular during the Victorian Era.  I read that even short strands of hair could be incorporated into making the flowers, it wasn’t necessary to have long strands.

Garwood was interested in knowing the people in the tintype photo.  We knew it wasn’t John Wesley Linton and Emma Adelaide Proctor, his gr-great grandparents, who owned the large Linton house.  A genealogy mystery – I was on a mission and in research mode!  It was decided to open the shadowbox and check the back of the tintype for names.  The box was very gently opened, but no names were listed.  But it was a good time to take more photos without the glare of the glass top.

If this wasn’t a photo of John Wesley and his family, it must be that of a brother or sister.  I would say this photo was taken about 1875-1885, based mostly on the woman’s dress.  It is definitely not a Civil War era gown.  The gentleman’s large lapels and sleeves of his coat made it look from the 1860’s (which possibly it was), but clothes were worn as long as they were useful, not necessarily thrown out for fashion’s sake.  The smaller lapels of the boy’s coat give us a hint it is more in line with the 1875-1885 timeline. John Wesley Linton was the oldest son of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman, born in 1843.  Thomas A. Linton was born in 1845.  The next three children died before the time this photo was made.  My bet is this is a photo of Thomas Linton and his family.  As idyllic as it was visiting the Linton homes in rural Logan County, internet service was spotty at best, so I couldn’t make any searches.  But Friday was to be a rainy day, and we went to the Logan County Historical Society in full search mode.

I remembered seeing a photograph of Thomas Linton and his family, standing before their large brick home, very similar to the one owned by John Wesley Linton.  Perhaps a check of that photo would give us an answer.  The Thomas Linton in the photo was much older, 50, and the way the photo was taken it was hard to tell if he was the same man in the tintype.  But the oldest child was similar to the son in the tintype.

A check of the 1870 census gave a clue.  In the census book written by the historical society, little notes were added to the census information.  It said that John Wesley Linton and Thomas A. Linton married sisters in a double wedding on November 11, 1869.  John married Emma Adelaide Proctor, and Thomas married Elizabeth F. Proctor.  The Proctor sisters were daughters of Benjamin Ellis Proctor and Martha Dixon James.  Even though there is a family tradition about the double wedding, the marriage of Thomas and Elizabeth took place February 22, 1870.

The 1880 census proved to be more elusive – a quick Ancestry search gave no Linton’s living in Logan County.  We know this is obviously incorrect.  I went to the actual census records and looked through the Clay District (Linton’s lived here in 1870) and found this census to be a mess.  There were water marks on the pages and some were almost impossible to read.  Did this deter me?  Of course not!  With magnification, and having looked for the Linton name so many times, I finally found the two brothers, John and Thomas, with their families, and their parents, living in household dwellings 135, 136 and 137 on page 18B.  I saved a copy, then edited it to make it somewhat readable.

However, do you notice there are no children listed for Thomas and Elizabeth?  George Browder Linton was born June 28, 1881.  I do not have a birth date for daughter Ada (probably Adelaide after her aunt).  She was likely born a year or two later.  Their first child was born eleven years after their marriage.  That seems a little odd, but perhaps Elizabeth was not very healthy.  Perhaps she had given birth, but the children died shortly afterward.  There is a servant living in the household with them – a black female, aged 17, whose first name looks like Tillison.  Twenty-seven-year-old Elizabeth Proctor Linton most likely would not have a servant unless she was frail or very ill.

This information puts us at the higher end of the prospective date of the tintype.  I do know that Thomas Linton married Mary Susan Duncan, as his second wife, January 5, 1888.  Elizabeth Proctor Linton probably died in late 1886 or early 1887.  If this photo was taken just before her death, her children would have been seven and five.  Little Ada died about the same time as her mother.

For Emma Adelaide Proctor Linton to lose her beloved sister and niece, this memento of a photo and flowers made from family hair, was a way to mourn and remember.  I’m sure it was a labor of love that took many hours.  Garwood remembers seeing this shadowbox when very young, and was told the flowers were in a ‘U’ shape to allow the souls to pass on to heaven.  I want to point out the silver buttons spaced evenly throughout the flowers – perhaps these came from a dress of her sister?  I’m sure it was a treasured remembrance – and thankfully is back in the house today.  I’m sure Elizabeth Proctor Linton is smiling down upon the Linton family!

Family Group Sheet – George William Linton

Family Group Sheet for George William Linton

Husband: George William Linton
Birth: 10 Jan 1865 in Logan County, KY
Death: 27 Jul 1910
Burial: Bibbs Chapel, Logan Co., KY
Marriage: 16 May 1894 in Logan Co., KY
Mother: Nancy Jane Newman
Father: Benjamin Burkett Linton

Wife: Etta Mortimore
Birth: Jun 1871 in Logan County, KY
Death: 1940
Burial: Bibbs Chapel, Logan Co., KY

Children:

Name: Ruby Linton
Birth: 1895
Marriage: 02 Sep 1916 in Logan Co., KY
Spouse: Willie Lyon

Name: Harold Linton
Birth: 05 Jan 1896 in Logan County, KY
Death: 14 Mar 1911 in Logan County, KY
Burial: 15 Mar 1911 in Bibbs Chapel, Logan County, KY

John Wesley Linton’s Old Kentucky Home

IMG_7736

John Wesley Linton, the son of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman, was born November 14, 1843, in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky.  He was the grandson of Benjamin Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson, who married April 12, 1805, in Fluvanna County, Virginia; and the great-grandson of Captain John Linton, a Revoluationary War soldier, and his wife, Ann Nancy Mason, of Loudoun County, Virginia.

IMG_6770

When the Civil War began John Wesley entered on the Confederate side, in Company B, 1st Kentucky Cavalry, Benjamin Hardin Helm’s Regiment, later called The Orphan Brigade.  John was captured January 3, 1863, in Muhlenberg County and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was imprisoned until March 27, 1863.  It is said that he walked home to Logan County, Kentucky, from the prison camp.

IMG_6766

I suppose that gave him a long time to think about the war, his family and the soldiers that would never come back.  Many of the men in his unit were killed.  When he returned home he planted cedar trees on the Linton farm, one for each fallen Confederate.  Many of those trees still stand today.  When Ritchey and I were researching in Logan County last week we were fortunate to be able to photograph the line of cedars – and the home where John Wesley lived!  Tall, old cedar trees line both halves of the front of the property, and follow the gravel drive to the house.

IMG_7738

After the war John married Emma Adelaide Proctor, November 11, 1869.  They had 5 children:  Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.  If you will remember, my great-grandmother, Frances Barber Linton Montgomery, corresponded with her cousin Hugh during the 30’s and 40’s.

IMG_7747

The house was passed down to Benjamin Proctor Linton and down through the line until several years ago it was sold out of the Linton family.

IMG_6773

We were hopeful to get a photo of the house, and when we knocked on the door were warmly welcomed by the new owner – one of the Linton family, Garwood Linton!  He graciously allowed us to take photos both outside and inside – sharing his knowledge of the family and the house.  We even took photos of the family bible and a picture of John Wesley and Emma Adelaide Linton!

IMG_7749

John and Emma, and other Lintons, are buried in Pleasant Run Cemetery, located a mile or so to the back of the house.  John Wesley Linton, November 14, 1843 – July 4, 1930.  Emma Adelaide Proctor Linton, October 11, 1850 – March 3, 1928.  The little shrub beside the stone had grown since our last visit in 2004 – Ritchey had to push it to the side to get the photograph!

IMG_7777

Our trip to Logan County was wonderful in many ways, but this, I must say, was my favorite!  And I have found a new cousin!

IMG_7732

Today In Genealogy History – March 14

Harold Linton died 102 years ago – March 14, 1911 – in Logan County, Kentucky.  Harold was the son of George William Linton and Etta Mortimore; the grandson of Benjamin Burkett Linton and Nancy Jane Newman.  Harold was born January 5, 1896 – making him only 15 at the time of his death.  He had one sister, Ruby Linton.  Harold is buried in  Bibbs Chapel Cemetery in Logan County.

Today In Genealogy History – November 14, 2012

John Wesley Linton was born 169 years ago – November 14, 1843 – in Logan County, Kentucky.  John was the son of Benjamin Burkette Linton and Nancy Jane Newman.  He married Emma Adelaide Proctor in 1869.  John and Emma had 5 children:  Benjamin Proctor, John Warder, James Thomas, Lucy N. and Hugh Walter Linton.

Today In Genealogy History – April 29, 2012

Benjamin Burkett Linton was born 193 years ago – April 29, 1819 – in Kentucky.  Benjamin was the son of Benjamin Franklin Linton and Lucy Crewdson.  Benjamin married Nancy Jane Newman.  They raised 11 children in Logan County, Kentucky – John Wesley, Thomas Alvey, Jame Newman, Lucy Ann, Susan C., Benjamin Franklin, Fountain P., Adaline, Louella C., George William and Lillian Mae Linton.