Tag Archives: Nicholas County Kentucky

Slaughter of Kentuckians at the Battle of Blue Licks

Blue Licks Battlefield – On August 19, 1782.  Pioneers suffered a bitter defeat and were routed by their Revolutionary War enemies.  Captain Caldwell concealed his British and Indian army along the ravines leading from this hilltop to the Licking River.  Advancing into this ambush, the Pioneers were outnumbered and forced to flee across the river.

Earlier in the month Ritchey and I visited Blue Licks Battlefield State Resort Park.  I was most anxious to see the memorial for those who fought and fell during this battle on August 19, 1782.  Some call it the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought ten months after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown.  The battle was fought between about 180 Kentucky settlers and 240 British and Indians.  An attack on Bryan’s Station, Lincoln County, Kentucky, August 15, 1782, by the British and Indians, was led by Captain William Caldwell, loyalist Alexander McKee, Simon Girty and Matthew Elliott.  The Kentucky settlers took shelter within their stockade and fought back with all their might.  The British killed all the settlers’ livestock and destroyed their crops.  When they heard that the Kentucky militia were on the way they retreated.

The Kentucky force was led by Colonel John Todd of Fayette County, assisted by Lieutenant Colonels Daniel Boone and Stephen Trigg.  Plans were formed overnight and on the morning of August 19, 1782, this band of approximately 180 men set out to confront the British and Indians.  The two forces met at the Licking River, today located in northern Nicholas County.  The British and Indians secured for themselves the best spot on the riverbank for battle.  Advancing into this ambush, within fifteen minutes almost half the Kentuckians were killed or captured.  These were men who had fought hard and long with the Indians during their time in Kentucky.  It is said that Daniel Boone wanted to wait for Benjamin Logan, who was bringing enforcements.  He was a day or two behind.  Others thought this would give the enemy time to cross the Licking River and head north, eventually crossing the Ohio River into Indiana and Indian territory.

The Martyrs of the last battle of the Revolution lie buried here.  Dedicated March 14, 1935, by the Kentucky Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

After the battle, those still alive ran through the forest, trying to get back to Bryan’s Station.  Some did, some did not.  When Benjamin Logan’s militia arrived, they found the area littered with corpses.  Many were scalped, many were butchered, cut into pieces.  They were unable to identify anyone.  All were buried in a mass grave.

So valiantly did our small party fight that, to the memory of those who unfortunately fell in the battle, enough of honour cannot be paid.’  Daniel Boone
Colonel – Commandant John Todd Killed
Lieutenant Colonel Daniel Boone
Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Trigg Killed
Major Edward Bulger Died of wounds
Major Silas Harlan Killed
Major Hugh McGary
Major Levi Todd
Captain John Allison
Captain John Beasley Captured
Captain John Bulger Killed
Captain John Gordon Killed
Captain Samuel Johnson
Captain Joseph Kincaid Killed
Captain Gabriel Madison
Captain William McBride Killed
Captain Clough Overton Killed
Captain Robert Patterson
Lieutenant William Givins Killed
Lieutenant Thonmas Hinson Killed
Lieutenant John Kennedy Killed
Lieutenant James McGuire Killed
Lieutenant Barnett Rogers Killed
Ensign John McMurtry Captured
Commissary Joseph Lindsay Killed
Dedicated August 19, 1928
This monument, the gift of a grateful Commonwealth, commemorates the heroic pioneers, who, in defense of Kentucky, here fought and fell in the Battle of the Blue Licks, August 19, 1782.

On August 19, 1928, a granite monument was dedicated to the men who fought and lost their lives in the Battle of Blue Licks – a fitting tribute to these brave men.  If this battle had not been fought, Kentucky may not have been settled until much later.  We owe much to our brave pioneers.

The men who fought the Battle of the Blue Licks were as well qualified from experience to face the Indians as any body of men that were ever collected.’  Robert Patterson
Privates Who Were Killed
Black, Charles
Boone, Israel
Brannon, Samuel
Brown, James Surveyor
Corn, Esau
Cunningham, Hugh
Douglass, John
Eads, William
Farrier, Thomas
Ferguson, Charles
Field, Ezekiel
Folley, John
Foster, Daniel
Fry, John
Graham, ‘Little’ James
Green, Jervis
Greggs, Daniel
Harper, Francis
Harper, Matthew
Harris, William
Jolly, John
Ledgerwood, James captured and killed
Marshall, Gilbert
McBride, Francis
McConnell, Andrew
McCracken, Isaac
Miller, Henry
Nelson, John
Nutt, John
Oldfield, Joseph
O’Neal, John
Polley, Drury
Price, John
Robertson, William
Rose, Matthias
Shannon, William
Smith, James
Smith, William
Stapleton, John
Stephens, William
Stern, Valentine
Stevenson, John
Stewart, William
Tomlinson, Richard
Willson, John
Wilson, Isael
Wilson, John
Woods, Archibald
Wylie, Matthew
Ottawas and Chippewas

Each year a reenactment of the Battle of Blue Licks is held at the battlefield park.

They advanced in three divisions, in good order, and gave us volley and stood to it very well for some time.’  William Caldwell
Privates Who Escaped
Acres, Thomas
Aldridge, William
Allen, Elijah
Allen, James
Barbee, William
Boone, Samuel
Boone, Squire Jr. Wounded
Bowman, Abraham
Bowmar, Robert
Brooks, Thomas
Coburn, James Wounded
Coffman, Jacob
Collins, Joseph
Cooper, Benjamin A.
Corn, Edward
Corn, George
Craig, Jerry
Craig, Whitfield
Custer, William
Davis, Richard
Davis, Theodorus
Dierly, Peter
Ficklin, Thomas
Field, William
French, Henry
Gist, Thomas
Graham, Edward
Graham, James
Grant, Squire
Grider, Henry
Gullion, Jeremiah
Hambleton, John
Harget, Peter
Harrod, James
Hart, John
Hayden, Benjamin
Hays, James
Higgins, Henry
Hinch, John
Hunter, Charles
Hunter, Jacob
January, Ephraim
January, James M.
Kincaid, James
Lam, William
Lea, Wainright
Little, John
May, William
McBride, James
McConnell, James
McCullough, James
Morgan, Andrew
Morgan, James Capture but escaped
Morgan, John
Morgan, Mordecai
Netherland, Benjamin
Nixon, Henry
Norton, James
Patterson, Matthew
Peake, John
Penlin, Alexander
Pitman, John
Poague, Robert
Pruett, Elisha
Ray, James
Reynolds, Aaron
Rose, James
Rose, Lewis Captured
Rule, Andrew
Scholl, Abraham
Scholl, Joseph
Scholl, Peter
Scott, Robert
Scott, Samuel
Searcy, Bartlett
Searcy, John
Shortridge, Samuel
Shott, William
Singleton, Edmund
Smith, George
Smith, John
Sowdusky, Anthony
Steele, Andrew
Stevens, Jacob
Stevenson, Thomas
Stucker, Jacob
Summers, John
Swart, James
Twyman, James
Wilson, Henry
Wilson, Josiah
Woods, James Elijah Captured
Woods, Samuel
Yocum, Jesse Captured
Wyandots and Mingoes

You might enjoy reading History of the Battle of Blue Licks by Bennett Henderson Young.  I downloaded it from Amazon for $1.95.

No historian, who will give a faithful account of the settlement and transactions of this country, will omit to speak of the battle and the place at which it was fought.’  Court of Appeals of Kentucky
To the unknown heroes who took part in the Battle of the Blue Licks
This ‘Last Battle of the Revolution’ was fought between 182 Kentuckians, commanded by Colonel John Todd, on the American side, and about 240 Indians and Canadians, commanded by Captain William Caldwell, on the British side.
Shawnees and Delawares

This memorial was erected to honor those individuals whose names were omitted from the original monument.  New research has provided these additional names and corrected previous information regarding those individuals who so gloriously served Kentucky at the Battle of Blue Licks
Boone, Thomas Killed
Childress, John Escaped
Ledgerwood, James Captured but escaped
Peake, Jesse
Ward, James Escaped

Two Counties, Six Cemeteries, Four Covered Bridges and a Battlefield

Yesterday was a glorious day in Kentucky.  A reprieve from the 90+ temperatures we’ve had in the last several weeks – and no rain!  The high managed to get to 82, the skies were a bright blue, grass and trees wonderful shades of green.  We left at 8:00 a.m.

Our goal was to visit Robertson and Fleming counties and take photos in several cemeteries each.  You know how much Ritchey loves geocaching.  There are four covered bridges in the two counties – those beautiful, historic structures that are slowly dwindling in our country – and they each had geocaches hidden in them!  They were added to the list.  And on the way home, we planned to visit Blue Licks Battlefield State Park – what some have called the last battle of the Revolutionary War, fought in Kentucky on August 19, 1782.  The British and Indian forces slaughtered many of the Kentuckians.  I have posted several wills written by men from Mercer County that did not survive the battle.

We began at Piqua Methodist Church in Robertson County, a small, rural cemetery.  While there, the gentleman who takes care of the cemetery stopped by.  He showed me a list of those buried here, useful since many did not have gravestones, or have long since broken.  He related that the last person buried in this cemetery was his elementary school teacher, Gladys Shepherd, who passed away in 2004 at the age of 104.

Ritchey finding a geocache at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge in Robertson County.

Just about a mile north on Highway 165 was the small church and cemetery of Piqua Christian.  Mt. Olivet Cemetery, just outside the town of the same name, was our last cemetery for this county.  On the way to neighboring Fleming County we stopped at Johnson Creek Covered Bridge, and Ritchey found his first geocache of the day.  Sitting in the middle of the bridge eating a chicken salad and croissant sandwich, the breeze was heavenly.  Butterflies were plentiful, and there was no noise, just an occasional moo or bird chirp.

Top stone – In Memory of Edward Dulin, Sen., Born in Virginia, August 6, 1769, and Died in Kentucky, September 25, 1830.  Lower stone – In Memory of George, twin son of John W. and Elizabeth D. Dulin, Born October 23, 1851, died July 30, 1852, age 9 months and 7 days.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery, Flemingsburg, Fleming County, Kentucky.

In Fleming County we visited Elizaville Cemetery, a lovely small town, only few miles from Flemingsburg, the county seat.  Evergreen Hill Cemetery was quite impressive with its old stones.  I wanted to share this one with you today since it was so unusual.  I don’t believe I’ve ever seen an old above ground stone with writing on the side.  There were at least ten or twelve in this cemetery.  Other beautifully carved stones were for cholera victims in 1833.

Goddard White Bridge

On to the three covered bridges in Fleming County – Goddard White, Grange City and Ringo Mills.  One more cemetery stop in this county – Mt. Pisgah on Oakwood Road.

It was about 6:00 p.m. and we still had one more stop – Blue Licks Battlefield – in Nicholas County.  I was so impressed with the granite monument that names those who fought and died in this battle.  After taking photos we had a picnic supper before starting home.  It was a full day but so much fun!  And think of all the great information I have to share with you!

A Few Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Who Settled in Nicholas County

William Bartlett, son of Samuel and Mercy (Seeley) Bartlett, was born October 11, 1750 in New Canaan, Connecticut.  He lived for some years in Orange County, New York.  In Volume 1, page 48 of Associators of the 4th Militia Company of Brookham is shown William Bartlett – June 8, 1775 – Data taken from:  Calendar of Historical Manuscripts relating to the Revolutionary War in the office of the Secretary of State, Albany, New York, in two volumes – published in 1868.

He probably first married in Virginia and had the following children: Joseph Bartlett; Polly Bartlett married Ashford Prather; Marcie Bartlett married James Buchanan; Dorcas Bartlett married George Swarts; Samuel Bartlett; Ebenezer Bartlett and William Bartlett.  He came to Kentucky very early and is shown as a tax payer in Nicholas County in 1800.  In 1820 he died in Nicholas County.

Major George Michael Bedinger was born in Shepherdstown, Virginia, December 10, 1756.  He served in the Militia in the siege of Yorktown in 1781.  He was a major at the Battle of Blue Licks.  He lived most of his adult life in Nicholas County near Lower Blue Licks Springs.  He was a Kentucky Legislator 1792-1794 and was a representative in Congress 1803-1807.  The first County Seat of Nicholas County was established at his home (Bedinger’s Mill) on Licking River at Elk Creek in 1800.  He died in 1843 and was buried near his home at Blue Licks Springs.

John Caughey was born in Pennsylvania about 1747.  He enlisted in the Revolutionary War in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1776.  He was under the command of Col. William Irvine in the Sixth Battalion.  They first went to St. John’s, Quebec, to reinforce the tired and ragged troops at St. John’s.  At Crown Point he first heard the Declaration of Independence read to the troops.  They left Crown Point with the American withdrawal to Ft. Ticonderoga.  The Sixth Pennsylvania Battalion spent the winter there, but the lack of food, medicine and bedding tormented the troops, but when the enlistment was up in January, they did not return to their homes but chose to continue to guard the northern gate until replacements came in spring.  He came to Kentucky between 1782 and 1790.  In 1800 he leased 100 acres of land on the Licking River and not only raised food for his family but assisted in surveying and building roads in that section of Nicholas County.  He died in 1826 and lies buried in a grave no longer marked, in that vicinity.

Andrew House was born December 1, 1747/48 in Frederick County, Maryland, but spent his early life in Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania.  It was here that he married Hannah Snap, daughter of George Snapp, in 1783.  He entered service at Montour’s Bottom on the Ohio River, 11 miles below Pittsburgh about the year 1779, as an Indian Spy under the command of Captain David Ritchie and as private in Captain Nathan Ellis’ company and Colonel Broadhead’s regiment, during which time he marched up the Allegheny River and was in an engagement with the Indians, many of their number being killed.  The summer following, he served one month as a private in Captain David Ritchie’s company between Pittsburgh and Wheeling.

After his marriage, he moved from Pennsylvania to Harrodsburg, Kentucky, and was again drafted to go with George Rogers Clark for three months on the Wabash Campaign, but he hired a substitute to take his place, paying him $20.00, saying that he had to raise a crop to support his family and could not get anyone to do his plowing, but could hire a man to fight without difficulty.  He applied for a pension in Bourbon County but later moved to Nicholas County where he died in August 1843.  In 1855 his wife, at the age of 94, made application and received 160 acres of Bounty Land.

David Kennedy was born in Scotland July 22, 1764 and died in Nicholas County September 8, 1824.  When quite young, he came to Virginia and served in the Revolutionary War for about three years.  About 1790 he migrated to that part of Virginia that later became Nicholas County, and bought a ½ interest in 545 acres of land, which today is located between Headquarters and Mt. Carmel.  He married Hannah Kassaneur of Aberdeen, Ohio.  Their children were James, William Elizabeth Cassandra, Thomas, Sarah, Harriet, Polly and Clairborne.  He and his wife and some of his children are buried on the farm that he owned.

History of Nicholas County, Joan Weissinger Conley, 1976.

1805-1807 Marriages in Nicholas County

  • George Sparks married Rachel McClenehan, by John Parsons, 18th April 1805
  • Henry Mann married Rachel Jones, by John Barnett, 14th March 1805
  • Elijah Dazey married Milley M. Barkett, by Tull, 20th December 1804
  • Samuel Earlick married Delilah Burdin, by John Barnett, 12th September 1805
  • Solomon Ritchey married Rachel Danz, by John Barnett, 8th September 1805
  • Archibald McMinch married Elizabeth Arnold, by John Barnett, 1st August 1805
  • George Harrison married Prudence Gamble, by John Barnett, 25th November 1805
  • Frederick Potts married Elizabeth Oliver, by John Barnett, 26th September 1805
  • William Hamilton married Mary McIntire, by John Barnett, 6th March 1806
  • James Ellis married Fanny Doughty, by John Barnett, 20th March 1806
  • David Bagby married Lucy Collier, by Anderson, 30th August 1806
  • David Myers married Frances Foster, by John Parsons, 19th June 1806
  • Robert Ewing married Nancy Metcalfe, by Richard Tilton, 1st May 1806
  • Overton Cosby married Susannah Hyser, by Richard Tilton, 17th June 1806
  • Henry Howard married Jane Saunderson, by George Ashin, 12th January 1806
  • Thomas Guppin married Arcady Thomson, by John Barnett, 24th July 1806
  • William Wheeler married Margaret Rolston, by John Barnett, 29th July 1806
  • Hugh Smith married Mary Wilson, by John Barnett, 4th September 1806
  • William Fuller married Mary Wilson, by John Barnett, 4th September 1806
  • Henry Hastings married Ann Patchel, by George Tarvin, 4th August 1806
  • Robert Kennady married Rebecca Carnahan, by George Tarvin, 15th September 1806
  • Robert H. Kunbrough married Sally Baskell, by John Barnett, 14th April 1807
  • George W. Murphy married Sally Dean, by John Barnett, 2nd April 1807
  • Stephen Peyton married Nancy Doughty, by John Barnett, 16th April 1807
  • Aaron Carnahan married Elvira Mitchell, by Bartholomew W. Stone, 18th December 1806
  • James Carson married Isabella Mathers, by Bartholomew W. Stone, 22nd January 1807
  • Tolliver Hughes married Susannah Gamble, by John Parsons, 17th May 1807
  • David Gamble to Polly Sloop, by John Parsons, 1st January 1807
  • John Irvin married Sarah Ishmael, by John Parsons, 14th May 1807

War Memorial in Carlisle Cemetery

War Memorial at Carlisle Cemetery, Nicholas County, Kentucky.

Ritchey and I visited the Carlisle Cemetery in Nicholas County about three and one-half years ago.  It is a beautiful cemetery, with an exceptionally nice War Memorial to the veterans of the World Wars and Korean War.

World War I soldiers buried here are:

  • Ernest Harmon, 1894-1918, died at Camp Meade, Maryland
  • James W. McCracken, 1894-1919, died at Coblenz, Germany
  • William H. Brooks, 1892-1918, killed in action, St. Die Sector, Vasges, France
  • James F. Delaney, 1893-1920, died at Carlisle, Kentucky
  • Eddie Roy McGinley, 1892-1918, killed in action, Argonne Forest, France
  • Samuel F. Watkins, 1892-1918, died of wounds, Aimes Hts., France
  • James Spencer Huffstetter, 1890-1918, died at Cruthe, France
  • Walter Purcell, 1893-1918, died at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky
  • Orville Edward Mann, 1896-1918, died at Camp Funston, Kansas
  • Aquilla D. Stone, 1897-1918, died at Great Lakes, Illinois
  • Michael Bryan Laughlin, 1897-1918, died at league Island Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • George Rector Clark, 1892-1918, died at Part Clinton, Ohio

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Saturday, October 12, 1918

Ernest Harmon, Milltown

Carlisle, Ky., Oct. 11 – Relatives at Milltown, this county, of Ernest Harmon, who died of influenza at Camp Meade, Maryland, have been notified that his body will be shipped home for burial.  The burial will take place in Carlisle beside the three Nicholas County boys who have heretofore died of that disease.  A lot has been provided here for a burial place of all young men from this city and county who die in the country’s service.

A newspaper article from 1919 gives more information, including a few names not listed above.  These men were from Nicholas County, but not all buried in Carlisle Cemetery.  Of the fourteen listed, eleven died of disease.

The Richmond Daily Register, Madison County, Kentucky

Tuesday, June 8, 1920

German Gas Kills

James Delaney, 27 years old, son of Robert E. Delaney, died at his home in Carlisle.  He became ill Saturday after setting tobacco all day and never rallied.  Mr. Delaney was a captain in the 801st pioneer infantry during the war.  While serving in France he was severely gassed and never recovered from the effects.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Sunday, May 9, 1926

At a meeting of the members of Nicholas Post, No. 17, American Legion, last night, it was decided to hold Memorial Day services at the graves of the soldier dead in the Carlisle Cemetery Sunday, May 30.  The graves of the twelve soldiers who died during the World War, and who are buried in graves around the $10,000 memorial erected to their memory in the Carlisle Cemetery, will be decorated.

World War II soldiers buried in Carlisle Cemetery:

  • Ollie C. Bussell, 1921-1945, killed in action, Germany
  • William L. Morris, 1925-1944, killed in action, Italy
  • Edgar L. (Jack) Ham, 1921-1945, killed in action, Italy
  • Howard J. Ritchie, 1918-1944, killed in action, Layte Island
  • William L. Jenkins, 1911-1944, killed in action, Italy
  • Lloyd J. George, 1919-1943, killed in action, North Africa Area
  • Marion M. Letcher, 1924-1944, killed in action, France
  • Leslie B. McVey, 1913-9144, killed in action, France
  • Lloyd F. Duncan, 1914-1945, killed in action, Belgium
  • Robert T. George, 1916-1944, killed in action, Normandy
  • Ollie Guthrie, Jr., 1926-1945, killed in action, Iwo Jima
  • Cecil Kenneth Jolly, 1924-1944, killed in action, Italy
  • Andrew B. Metcalfe, 1920-1945, killed in action, Italy
  • Everett S. Cook, 1915-1945, killed in action, Belgium
  • Lloyd Waugh, 1918-1944, lost in action, Invasion of Normandy, France

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Wednesday, May 2, 1945

Kentucky Navy Dead

Gutherie, Marine Pfc. Ollie, Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ollie Gutherie, Sr., Sharpsburg.

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky

Friday, May 4, 1945

Bussell, T/Sgt. Ollie C., son of Mrs. Annie B. Bussell, Moorefield.

More information on WWII soldiers from Nicholas County.

Nicholas County Deaths – 1855 – Part 1

Listed below are deaths in Nicholas County from 1855.  Birth and deaths were located in the county unless otherwise stated.

  • James Crow, age 3 months, son of William and Nancy Crow, died December 55, 1855, cause unknown.
  • Nancy Ann Wilson, age 2 years, daughter of Harry and Hester Wilson, died July 15, 1855, cause unknown.
  • Tolney Foster, age 34, farmer, born in Fayette County, son of Henry and Esther Foster, died September 20, 1855, of cholera.
  • Esther Foster, age 59, born in Ohio, daughter of John and Sarah Whittington, died September 20, 1855, of cholera.
  • John W. Bishop, age 5, son of Silas and Rose Ann Bishop, died November 12, 185, of whooping cough.
  • Charlotte E. Bishop, age 1, daughter of Silas and Rose Ann Bishop, died October 4, 1855, of whooping cough.
  • Patrick Brady, age 82, born in Stafford County, Virginia, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Brady, died September 30, 1855, of cancer.
  • Sarah O. Redman, age 1, daughter of Washington and Rachel Redman, died September 23, 1855, of whooping cough.
  • Alexander Dampier, age 22, son of Henry and Martha Dampier, died October 6, 1855, by arson.
  • Thomas J. McCormick, age 12, slave of Thomas J. McCormick, died February 15, 1855, of consumption.
  • John H. McCormick, age 26, born in Bourbon County, son of Thomas J. and Sarah McCormick, died September 24, 1855, of diarrhea.
  • James Fulton, age 1, son of John L. and Elizabeth J. Fulton, died August 21, 1855, of whooping cough.
  • Hetty F. Brewer, age 2, daughter of John and Levinia Brewer, died November 20, 1855, of whopping cough.
  • Joseph Evans, age 48, son of John and Margaret Evans, died October 13, 1855, of cholera.
  • William H. Canon, age 2, son of Thomas and F. Canon, died April 13, 1855, cause unknown.
  • Mary Jane Marion, age 31, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca Hord, died April 22, 1855, ?
  • Christopher Kimes, age 12, son of Stephen and Mary Kimes, died November 5, 1855, of typhoid fever.
  • Columbus W. Congleton, age 5, son of Columbus and Walker Congleton, died August 15, cause unknown.
  • Agnes Haus, age 46, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Johnson, died October 3, 1855, of consumption.
  • Harrison Dale, age 35, born in Virginia, son of Solomon and Mary Dale, died August 10, 1855, cause unknown.
  • Joseph B. Bramble, age 3, son of John Mason and Mary Jane Bramble, died December 22, 1855, cause unknown.
  • Mary Collier, age 65, born in Montgomery County, daughter of Eliza Wells, died August 17, 1855, of congestive fever.
  • William Thomas, age 15, son of James and Nancy Thomas, died July 15, 1855, of typhoid fever.
  • Elizabeth Wilson, age 10 months, daughter of John and Elizabeth Wilson, died April 8, 1855, of pneumonia.
  • Preston Talbott, age 15, slave of Preston Talbott, died February 15, 1855, of typhoid fever.
  • Mary Ann Wilson, age 29, daughter of John and Rachel Rogers, died September 16, 1855, of disease of the lungs.
  • Wilson Branch, age 22, son of Abner and Ellen Branch, died August 6, 1855, of typhoid fever.

Nicholas County Marriages

Nicholas County Marriages

1802-1805

  • Robert Stephenson married Martha McAnully, by John P. Campbell, on April 6, 1802.
  • John McNide married Susannah Barnett, by John Barnett, December 15, 1803.
  • John Swinny married Priscilla Potts, by Bartholomew W. Stone, November 24, 1803.
  • Sampson Archer married Polly Kineart, by Bartholomew W. Stone, December 22, 1803.
  • James Collins married Mary McDowell, by John Barnett, September 29, 1803
  • John Benson married Sally Musich, by John Barnett, November 3, 1803.
  • Peter Ireland married Ann Allen, by Bartholomew W. Stone, September 28, 1804
  • Robert McCune married Phoebe Ray, by Bartholomew W. Stone, December 27, 1804
  • Gaven Mathers married Peggy McCune, by Bartholomew W. Stone, February 21, 1805.
  • John Scott  married Elizabeth Caldwell, by Bartholomew W. Stone, July 4, 1805.
  • Aaron Wiggins married Elizaeth Inard, by Caleb J. Taylor, September 23, 1804.
  • Alexander Allerson married Elizabeth Taylor, by Caleb J. Taylor, June 2, 1805.
  • John Ellis married Lucrece Wells, by Caleb J. Taylor, June 20, 1805.
  • Thomas Harney married Mary Grosvenor, by John Barnett, December 19, 1804.
  • Andrew Burns married Hannah Adams, by John Persons, September 20, 1804.
  • James Ishmael married Mary McFerrin, by John Person, June 21, 1804
  • Parker Brown married Sarah Bell, by John Barnett, January 17, 1805.
  • William Landers married Rebecca Plugh, by John Persons, January 5, 1804
  • George Eidson married Mary Lilly, by John Barnett, October 11, 1804.
  • Abraham Dorlan married Sally Brown, by John Barnett, November 29, 1804.
  • Thomas Davis married Elizabeth Grosvenor, by John Barnett, July 5, 1804.
  • Samuel Long married Susannah Barlow, by John Barnett, March 15, 1804.
  • Jacob Fight married Peggy Cotrill, by John Barnett, June 6, 1805.