Tag Archives: Pioneer Cemetery

Bartholomew Wood – Patriot, Pioneer, Frontiersman, Farmer, Tavern Keeper

Anytime one hears the name ‘Pioneer’ cemetery it should be visited!  And the same can be said for the Pioneer Cemetery in Hopkinsville in Christian County.  A small park where many of the original citizens of Christian County are buried, it is nicely maintained and contains lots of history in one small area.  Today I would like to concentrate on Bartholomew and Martha Wood and their family.

This pioneer graveyard was used from 1812 to 1858.  Within this enclosure are buried 185 named persons, and many more unknown, all early settlers of Christian County.  The land for this cemetery was donated in 1812 by Bartholomew Wood, the first settler in Hopkinsvile.  He also donated land and timber for the first public buildings 1797.  He died in 1827 and was buried here.

Bartholomew Wood was the town founder – in 1796, frontiersman, a farmer, a tavern keeper in the town of Hopkinsville.  The Christian County Court House was built in 1797 upon land supplied by Bartholomew and with his lumber.  The town was originally known as Elizabeth in 1799, but was later changed to Hopkinsville in 1804.  Bartholomew Wood died here November 26, 1827.

A soldier in in the South Carolina Militia during the war, Bartholomew Wood was part of Colonel Robertson’s Regiment in 1779.

Martha Ann was the wife of Bartholomew Wood.  She was born in Virginia June 27, 1763, married in Jonesborough, North Carolina (now Tennessee) July 20, 1780, and died at Hopkinsville, Kentucky, November 9, 1846, outliving her husband by almost twenty years.

Children of Bartholomew and Martha Ann Wood were Elizabeth Wood Douglass, Mary (Polly) Wood Gist, Sarah (Sally) Wood Cornelius, Temperance (Tempy) Wood Roberts, Patsy Wood Millholland, Bartholomew T. Wood, Carter T. Wood, Curtis Davenport Wood, William J. Wood, Letitia Charlotte Wood and Hardin J. Wood.

Happy Fourth of July – Let Us Always Remember

Francis Coomes, Private, Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War, 1726-1822.  St. Michael Catholic Cemetery, Nelson County, Kentucky

Let me introduce you to the most recent Revolutionary War soldiers we have found.  We visited St. Michael Catholic Cemetery yesterday, and photographed Francis Coomes’ gravestone.  As you can see, the original stone is almost impossible to read, only the cross at the top is visible.  Thanks to the DAR and SAR for adding plaques to the veterans’ graves!

Proctor Ballard, Kentucky, Sergeant, Clark’s Illinois Regiment, Revolutionary War, 1760-1820.  Pioneer Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Proctor Ballard’s grave is another recent find.  He was a native of Virginia and served with the state militia.  He came to the Falls of the Ohio River with General George Rogers Clark in 1779.  He initially settled on Corn Island at the falls near Louisville, but moved to Bardstown in 1782.

To the memory of William Coomes, Sergeant, 8th Virginia Regiment, 1730-1820.  William Coomes, Jr., Virginia Militia, 1769-1834.  Walter A. Coomes, Virginia Militia, Battle of Blue Licks, Kentucky.  Soldiers of the American Revolution.  St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery, Daviess County, Kentucky.

These Coomes veterans could be related to the first Coomes who is buried in Nelson County.  William Coomes, Sr., married Jane Greenleaf.  She was a pioneer doctor and teacher.

Let us celebrate all those who have fought for our country over the years – from the beginning, the first war, for our independence – to those who continue to fight to keep our country safe.  Happy Fourth of July to all of you!

Memorial Acre at Fort Harrod

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Isn’t it amazing when you find something in your own back yard that you never knew existed?  I had been to the Pioneer Cemetery at Fort Harrod in my hometown of Harrodsburg several times, but didn’t realize there was an addition at the back!

It’s known as Memorial Acre, dedicated on June 16, 1930, by The Kentucky Society Daughter’s of the American Revolution.  The plaque reads ‘A sacred spot of ground adjoining the first cemetery of Kentucky, for pioneers whose graves are being destroyed by the effects of time.  Immortals of the wilderness whose moccasin feet have impressed themselves on the destiny of America.  The Love of Liberty, With Life Is Given.’

Let me share with you the stones that were erected here:

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Garrett Terhune, New Jersey, Sergeant, Seely’s Regiment, New Jersey Militia, Revolutionary War.  July 25, 1756 – February 8, 1821.

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George Buchanan, born 1744 in Augusta County, Virginia, died May 5, 1813, Mercer County, Kentucky.

George Buchanan was a son of James Buchanan and his second wife, Mary Reside.  He married Margaret McAfee, daughter of James and Jane McMichael McAfee, about 1765 in Washington County, Virginia.  George moved his family to Mercer County, Kentucky, in 1780.  He was an elder at New Providence Church and was a veteran of the Revolutionary War.

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James Ray, Captain, Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War, 1758-1810

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Three members of the McGohon family – the stones have not weathered well.

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Mark McGohon, Jr.  Revolutionary War soldier, Kentucky pioneer, Christian patriot.  Born in Ireland in 1750, died in Kentucky, 1848.  first to be buried in Memorial Acre in 1930.  When a lad he emigrated to America and fought in the Battles of Paoli, Boundbrook, Brandywine and Germantown.  Served under General George Rogers Clark and General Josiah Harmer; also in other campaigns against the Indians.  A defender of Fort Harrod in the westward seep of advancing civilization.

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Elizabeth Dunn McGohon.  Sacred to the memory of the wife of Mark McGohon, Jr.  born in Pennsylvania, emigrated to Kentucky with her husband following the Revolutionary War.  Pioneer woman who heroically met the toil and danger of the frontier, and nobly did her part in maintaining domestic life within For Harrod, when surrounded by peril and attacks from Indians.  Her efforts aided in establishing the Presbyterian Church at Harrodsburg.

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Nancy McGohon, daughter of Mark McGohon, Jr., and Elizabeth Dunn McGohon.  Born in Fort Harrod.  Buried in Memorial Acre in 1930.

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These three stones for the Rose family are much easier to read.

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Captain Lewis Rose, born October 11, 1749, in Bingen, Germany, died February 20, 1829, Harrodsburg, Kentucky.  Buried on Old Rose Farm, three miles east of Harrodsburg,  Came to America in 1764.  Christian patriot, devout elder of the Presbyterian Church, donated five hundred dollars to Centre College in Danville, Kentucky.  War Record – Soldier in Revolutionary War, 4th Virginia, 1777.  In Indian Wars, famous Battle of Blue Lick, taken prisoner, August 9, 1782.  Run gauntlets, exchanged and returned July, 1783.  Fought Shawnees, 1786.  Wea Indians on Wabash. Erected July 16, 1937, by Leslie M. Rose, Yakima, Washington, sponsored by Jane McAfee Chapter, D.A.R.

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Mary McMurtry Rose, wife of lewis Rose, born February 4, 1779, in Mercer County, Kentucky; died November 24, 1865, in Mercer County, Kentucky.  A true pioneer mother.  Lived where Shakertown, Kentucky, now is, defending self and children against Indians while her husband held war captive.  Erected by Leslie M. Rose.

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Charlie S. Rose, son of Lewis Rose, born October 6, 1778, died February 28, 1845.  Was prominent in civic work, an elder in the Presbyterian Church.

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To Honor and Commemorate the Men Who Fought in the American Revolution and Sleep in Mercer County, Kentucky.

  • General James Ray
  • General John P. Van Nuyce
  • Colonel John Bowman
  • Colonel Thomas P. Moore
  • Lt. Colonel James Robinson
  • Major Thomas Allin
  • Major William Ver Bryck
  • Captain William Alexander
  • Captain John Armstrong
  • Captain Abram Chapline
  • Captain Michael Humble
  • Captain John Lillard
  • Captain Lewis Rose
  • Captain John Smock
  • Captain James Stagg
  • Lt. James McAfee
  • J. P. Board
  • John Bohon
  • William Bowles
  • Daniel Brewer
  • Nathaniel Burrus
  • James Cardwell
  • Robert Coleman
  • General Coovert
  • Henry Comingore, Sr.
  • John Comingore
  • Joseph Debaun
  • Lawrence Demott
  • Peter Demott
  • William Deshazer
  • Thomas Graham
  • Peyton Graham
  • Thomas Green
  • Edward Houchins
  • Peter Huff
  • Dominic Thomas Kyle
  • Peter Leyster
  • George McAfee
  • Samuel McAfee
  • James McCowan, Sr.
  • James McCowan, Jr.
  • John McGee
  • Mark McGohon
  • John Meaux
  • William Nourse
  • Augustine Passmore
  • James Sandifer
  • Abraham Sharp
  • John Sharp
  • Abraham Tharp
  • Cornelius Vannice
  • Cornelius A. Van Arsdale
  • Cornelius O. Van Arsdale
  • Peter Van Arsdall
  • Tobias Wilhoite

How fortunate to live in a county that appreciates and applauds the actions of our forebears.  And to live in one that has such a long history!

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To the wilderness dead, those without graves, unknell’d, uncoffin’d, and unknown.  This cenotaph here placed by a not forgetful commonwealth.