Happy Fourth of July – Let Us Always Remember

Francis Coomes, Private, Virginia Militia, Revolutionary War, 1726-1822.  St. Michael Catholic Cemetery, Nelson County, Kentucky

Let me introduce you to the most recent Revolutionary War soldiers we have found.  We visited St. Michael Catholic Cemetery yesterday, and photographed Francis Coomes’ gravestone.  As you can see, the original stone is almost impossible to read, only the cross at the top is visible.  Thanks to the DAR and SAR for adding plaques to the veterans’ graves!

Proctor Ballard, Kentucky, Sergeant, Clark’s Illinois Regiment, Revolutionary War, 1760-1820.  Pioneer Cemetery, Bardstown, Nelson County, Kentucky.

Proctor Ballard’s grave is another recent find.  He was a native of Virginia and served with the state militia.  He came to the Falls of the Ohio River with General George Rogers Clark in 1779.  He initially settled on Corn Island at the falls near Louisville, but moved to Bardstown in 1782.

To the memory of William Coomes, Sergeant, 8th Virginia Regiment, 1730-1820.  William Coomes, Jr., Virginia Militia, 1769-1834.  Walter A. Coomes, Virginia Militia, Battle of Blue Licks, Kentucky.  Soldiers of the American Revolution.  St. Lawrence Catholic Cemetery, Daviess County, Kentucky.

These Coomes veterans could be related to the first Coomes who is buried in Nelson County.  William Coomes, Sr., married Jane Greenleaf.  She was a pioneer doctor and teacher.

Let us celebrate all those who have fought for our country over the years – from the beginning, the first war, for our independence – to those who continue to fight to keep our country safe.  Happy Fourth of July to all of you!

One thought on “Happy Fourth of July – Let Us Always Remember”

  1. Hi cousin Phyllis – Your post re the veterans of the Revolutionary War are timely and deserved, and so is your ending note the praises also the veterans of all the wars the USA has had since 1776. Without the service and sacrifice by those veterans we would not be a free people today.
    Happy 4th to you,
    cousin Dick Linton

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