Tag Archives: Spring Hill Cemetery

George C. Keller – Well Known Citizen – Passes Away

George C. Keller, March 11, 1834 – August 28, 1909.  Nannie E. Keller, November 23, 1835 – August 28, 1916.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, September 3, 1909

Last Saturday evening Mr. George C. Keller passed away at his home on Chiles Street. The end came unexpectedly at about seven o’clock. He had been in failing health for some time, and had been much broken in the last few weeks, but death was unlooked for at the hour it came. Mr. Keller had been suffering with asthma and during a violent coughing spell broke a blood vessel, and expired in a few moments. His funeral took place at 3 o’clock Monday afternoon at the Methodist church, conducted by Rev. Lon Robinson, and the remains were interred in Spring Hill Cemetery. Mr. Keller was one of the best known citizens in this community, having been in business here most of his life, first in the mercantile business and for the last twenty-five years a member of the staff of the First National Bank. In recognition of his efficient work all the banks in town closed during his funeral. He was one of the oldest members of the Methodist church, being a steward in the congregation, and devoted to church work. He was also a member of Montgomery Lodge of Odd Fellows, and was held in high esteem by everyone. A number of people were here from Danville to attend the funeral which was one of the largest here in many years. Mr. Keller was in his 76th year. He is survived by a wife, who was Miss Nannie Mullins, to whom he was married 51 years ago, and by three children, Mrs. Sam McDowell, of Danville, Mr. George Keller, Jr., of Orlando, Florida, and Mr. Henry Keller of this city.

Sarah J. Thomas Died at 75

Sarah J. Thomas, 1824-1899.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Wednesday, July 12, 1899

Mrs. Sarah E. Thomas, aged 75, a highly respected citizen and life-long resident of this place, died, Wednesday morning, July 5th, at four o’clock, at her late home on Factory Street. She had been a sufferer from a complication of diseases for a long time, but bore her sufferings with the true christian fortitude that had marked her long and useful life, and passed peacefully from time into eternity. She was the descendant of an illustrious pioneer family, her grand-parents, who came from Pennsylvania and Maryland, and were relatives of the McAfees, having settled at the Old Fort, here, more than a hundred years ago, while her father and mother were native-born Kentuckians. When a child, she united with the Methodist church and was a faithful and consistent member for 60 years. Over 50 years ago she was united in marriage to Mr. John H. Thomas, of Anderson County, who was also of pioneer descent, and who died about four years ago. Six children, four sons and two daughters, blessed this happy union, all of whom are living, save Robert, who died about ten years ago: Mrs. J. D. Bryant, Miss Margaret Thomas and Mr. John T. Thomas, being residents of this place, while Mr. W. R. Thomas lives in Stockton, Cal., and Mr. James P. Thomas in Hot Springs, Ark. The funeral services were conducted at the residence, Thursday, at 2:30 o’clock p.m., by Dr. W. O. Goodloe, after which a long cortege of sorrowing friends and relatives followed the remains to their last resting place in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Brothers and Sister Obituaries – John Thompson Thomas, James Thomas, and Margaret McAfee Thomas Obituaries

John T. Thomas, 1860-1901.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Thursday, July 18, 1901

After an illness of two weeks of typhoid fever complicated with Bright’s disease, Mr. John Thompson Thomas departed this life, Monday afternoon at 4:45 o’clock, aged 40 years. Short services were held at the home of his sister, Mrs. J. D. Bryant, where he died, Tuesday afternoon at 4:30 o’clock, Rev. C. J. Nugent officiating, and interment took place in Spring Hill Cemetery. Two sisters – Mrs. J. D. Bryant and Miss Maggie Thomas, of this city, and a brother, Mr. William Thomas, of Fresno, California, survive to mourn his loss. At the time of his death, Mr. Thomas was in the employ of F. G. Curry & Co., Cincinnati, Wooden and Willow Ware, and made them an efficient and faithful worker. They showed their appreciation of his worth by sending a lovely floral design. A beautiful design was also sent by the Elks Lodge of Cincinnati, of which deceased was a member. John Thomas was universally liked and his many friends will be sorry to hear of his untimely death. He was a jovial, pleasant companion, a devoted friend and brother and a useful citizen. The pall-bearers were: Fred G. Currey, J. W. Mitchell, Charles Geffinger, D. M. Hutton, T. H. Hardin and F. P. James.

James P. Thomas, 1857-1899.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Wednesday, November 29, 1899

Mr. James H. Bryant and Miss Margaret Thomas have received the sad intelligence of the death of their brother, Mr. James Thomas, in Hot Springs, Arkansaa.  The remains, we learn, will be brought here for interment.

Margaret McAfee Thomas, 1860-1930.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, September 5, 1930

There was a feeling of sadness in the community when it became known that Miss Margaret McAfee Thomas had passed away after a few days’ serious illness at the A. D. Price Memorial Hospital at six o’clock Saturday morning.

Miss Thomas was the youngest daughter of the late John H. and Sarah Neeld Thomas and the last of the family that represented two lines of distinguished ancestry, which was reflected in the life of this woman of acknowledged high ideas of honor and integrity.

One sister, Mrs.James D. Bryant, and four broth­ers, William, James, Robert and John H. Thomas, preceded her to “the Land Beyond the Blue.”

Miss Thomas was a woman of unusual brilliance of intellect and unselfish­ness of spirit. She was an honor graduate of Daughters College, a charter member of the College Street Club, the Harrodsburg Woman’s Club, the Harrodsburg Public Library director­ate, the local Red Cross Chapter and the Jane McAfee Chapter of the D. A. R.

Especially does the Harrodsburg Public Library owe Miss Thomas a debt of gratitude, she being one of the women responsible for its existence and high degree of efficiency. She was a member of the board of Managers for twenty-six years, Li­brarian for eight years, secretary and chairman of the book-buying committee for a long period.

She was a member of the Methodist church, useful in its activities until a break in health caused her to relinquish many duties, but not her support and interest.

Mrs. Eugene Mitchell, Louisville; Mrs. Lewis Bond, Chicago; Mrs. Harold VanArsdale, Cincinnati, and Mrs. Washington Reed, Lexing­ton, were with their aunt during her last hours. Other surviving relatives are two nephews, Dr. Montgomery Thomas, Fresno, Calif.; Harry Thomas, San Fran­cisco, and a niece, Miss Mary Thomas, also of San Francisco, and several grandnieces and nephews.

According to her written wishes a simple service was held at the family lot in Spring Hill Cemetery, conducted by her pastor, the Rev. E. K. Arnold. A quartet sang “O Love That Wilt Not Let Me Go.” Passages of Scripture were read and the church burial ritual followed. A tender prayer closed the services.

She was left sleeping beneath a wealth of lovely flowers telling their story of the love and esteem of relative and friends.

Catherine McMurtry Receives Portion of Bequest from Father’s Will

Captain Lewis Rose, born October 11, 1749, and died February 20, 1829, left a will naming several children.  He married first Barbara Thair, and, secondly, Mary Todd Hutton McMurtry, her first husband being Captain John McMurtry.

At the Historical Society in Harrodsburg, Mercer County, there are filing cabinets full of pieces of paper the county clerk was going to get rid of.  Thank goodness the society realized the importance these papers would be to genealogists!

I used this particular one today since it concerned his daughter, Catherine Rose, who married her step-brother, Joseph McMurtry.  Many of the Rose family members are buried in a family cemetery in the little town of Burgin, also in Mercer County.  Catherine is buried in Spring Hill Cemetery in Harrodsburg.

Catharine, wife of John McMurtry and daughter of Captain Lewis Rose, born November 21, 1780, died September 1, 1867.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Little scraps of paper can be very important and give little clues about our families.  My great-grandmother was diligent about saving old tax receipts and other pieces of family information!

Received of Robert B. McAfee, Executor of Lewis Rose, deceased, five hundred dollars in part of my share of the price of his land sold by said Executor according to the directions of his will.  Witness my hand this 14th day of May 1842.

                                                          Catherine McMurty

Test.  A. H. Alexander

NB $200 of the above said money from the land.

Leslie C. Riker Obituary

Leslie C. Riker, 1882-1940, Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, June 21, 1940

In the sudden passing of Leslie Condit Riker on Sunday evening, June 16, 1940, at his home on College street, the community of Harrodsburg lost one of its best loved citizens. He was born July 8, 1882, at the family home on Danville Pike, in Mercer County and has always lived in Harrodsburg. He was the son of Lee Riker and Marie Rue Riker, both deceased. He was one of five children of which three are still living; Carrie R. Michel, of Oak park, Ill., Frank C. Riker, of council Bluffs, Iowa, and Charles N. Riker, of Harrodsburg. In 1934 he married Amelia Craig who survives him.

The funeral was at 3 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, June 18, at the Presbyterian church with the pastor, Dr. John W. Carpenter conducting the services. Burial was in Spring Hill cemetery.

The bearers were Otto Redwitz, J. E. Brown, George Rue, Oran Stagg, Harrodsburg; Frederick Mickel, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Bennett Bean and Lawrence Brewer, Lexington; and Herbert Robertson, Henderson.

He was a trustee of the United Presbyterian church, a member of the A. D. Price Memorial Hospital Board, director of the Mercer County National Bank and one time City Commissioner.

He was associated with the London Assurance Company for nearly thirty years as special agent for Kentucky and Tennessee, which position he held at the time of his death. The high esteem in which he was held throughout the states was manifested by the floral offerings, the expressions of praise and the attendance at the funeral by Chris D. Shefe, assistant manager of the New York office, as well as agents from many places.

From childhood he has been a part of the community of Harrodsburg. Its problems, its joys and its sorrows were a part of his life. Many friends, white and colored, will remember his wise counsel, his practical advice in their affairs, and his generous financial help in their extremities. They will remember and continue to work, with his ideals in mind for the best interests of his community.

 

Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., Obituary

Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., 1856-1924.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Mercer County, Kentucky.

Mr. Buckner Allin, Sr., was a descendant of Thomas Allin, the first county clerk for Mercer County, and his wife, Mary Jouett.  Thomas Allin was born in Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, and afterwards came to Mercer County – Virginia at that time! – where he married Mary Jouett in 1789.  The couple had ten children.  Thomas and Mary died two days apart in June of 1833 during the cholera epidemic.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, January 25, 1924

Mr. Buckner Miller Allin, Sr., aged 67 years, died Tuesday night after a gradual decline of health for several years caused by a partial stroke of paralysis. Mr. Allin was a native of Mercer County, a son of the late George Allin and Susan Miller Allin, and is a descendant of a line of pioneers promi­nent in the development of Mercer County from its first settlement. Mr. Allin was personally popular with all who knew him. He was a man of upright principles and a warm heart, and was always on the side that favored the ad­vancement of community interests. For many years he was a prominent merchant here, being engaged in the grocery business, later he was in the internal revenue service for a long time, and after that was City School Tax Collector and Vital Statistician up to the time his failing health forced him from active business.

He was twice married, first to Miss Mattie Hudson and second to Miss Annie May Nooe, who survives him, together with three children, Mrs. Eben Hardin and Miss Mattie Miller Allin, by the first union, and Mr. B. M. Allin, Jr., by the second marriage. His funeral was held Thurs­day morning at 10:30 at his home on Chestnut Street, conducted by his pastor, Rev. S. S. Daughtry, of the Presby­terian Church, and Rev. L. E. Sellers, of the Christian Church. The interment was in Spring Hill Cemetery.

Stephen and Nancy Brown Lucas of Mercer County

Charlotte Olson was kind enough to share photos and information for this post!  Stephen Lucas and Nancy Brown are her second great-grandparents.

stephen-nancy-brown-lucas-1This is the earliest photo of Stephen and Nancy Brown Lucas.  In the 1880 Census of Mercer County, Kentucky, Stephen is 40, a farmer, Nancy is 38, Leonard is 13, Mary 82 12, Irene is 10, Brown is 7, Sallie is 5, William is 3 and Bohon is 1.  They originally lived in Scott County, that being the place of birth of Stephen.  In the 1900 Census of Mercer County Stephen is 60, and couple has been married 40 years.  Nancy is 57, she had 9 children and 8 are still living.  Most of the older children have married and moved away, but the young ones still living with their parents are Bohon, 20; Virginia, 16; and Nannie B., 13.

Stephen Lucas fought with the Confederates during the Civil War.  He was a member of John Hunt Morgan’s band.  Stephen and his brother were both captured and taken prisoner to Camp Douglas, in Chicago, Illinois.  The brother died there, Stephen was held prisoner for many months, but finally released.

stephen-and-nancy-lucas-0012-1Another photo of the couple, yes, they have aged, but they have sweet faces, and I’m sure were an inspiration to their children and grandchildren.  Stephen was the son of William Lucas and Priscilla Boyle.

stephen-and-nancy-lucas-001-3Another photo of Nancy Brown Lucas sitting on her front steps.  It mentions the home is on Dry Branch Pike outside of Danville.  I have driven this road many times, in fact the Old Mud Meeting House Cemetery is on this road, closer to Harrodsburg.  Charlotte has such treasures in these photos!

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Stephen Lucas, January 31, 1840 – April 28, 1905.  Nancy, his wife, August 18, 1842 – March 1, 1926.  Spring Hill Cemetery, Harrodsburg, Mercer County, Kentucky.

This is Charlotte’s photo – taken several years ago.  Mine, taken more recently, was harder to read.

stephen-lucas-obituary-001-2Stephen Lucas’ obituary in The Harrodsburg Herald, Thursday, May 4, 1905.

STEPHEN LUCAS.

A Good Citizen Passes to His Eternal Rest.

Mr. Stephen Lucas, one of the best known and most highly respected men in the county, died Friday night after a short illness of black erysipelas. He was about 65 years of age, and man of sterling character. The funeral services were held Saturday afternoon at his home, the old Nelson Rue farm on Dry Branch, by Rev. Vaughn. Mr. Lucas was one of the band of Confederate soldiers who are fast answering the last roll call. He was a member of Morgan’s command and was with him on the Indiana and Ohio raid. He and his brother were both captured and taken to Camp Douglas, where the latter died, and Mr. Lucas himself was held a prisoner for many months. On his release he returned to this county, his native home, where he married and settled down as a farmer. During his lifetime he perhaps owned more farms than any man in the county. He would purchase a desirable place, live on it a few years and improve and build up the land, and then sell at an advanced figure. This dealing in real estate was successfully managed and there are few purchasable farms in the county which have not at one time passed under his ownership. He was the father of a large family, and carried throughout his domestic life the same kindly and indulgent traits that marked his dealings with the outside world. With two exceptions, this family, now grown men and women and all excellent citizens, still survive him, as well as a devoted wife. It is the taking off of such good men and true citizens that impoverishes our citizenship.

This is a beautiful tribute to Stephen Lucas, one most deserving of these kind words.

nancy-b-lucas-dc-1The most important piece of information we gather from the death certificate of Nancy Brown Lucas is her parents – Greenup Brown and Mary Aldridge, both born in Kentucky.

from The Harrodsburg Herald, Mercer County, Kentucky

Friday, March 6, 1926

The many friends here of Mrs. Nancy Brown Lucas, widow of the late Ste­phen Lucas, of this county, are grieved at her death Monday after­noon, after a brief illness, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. E. Durham, in Danville. Mrs. Lucas was eighty- four years old. She kept house with her son, Mr. Brown Lucas, until his death about four years ago. She then went to Danville to reside, after living all her life in Mercer County. She was a member of the Methodist Church, a splendid woman, who was loved by all who knew her. The funeral was held Wednesday at the residence of Mrs. Dur­ham, conducted by the Rev. Fuqua, of the Danville Methodist Church. The burial was at Spring Hill Cemetery in this city. Mrs. Lucas is survived by three sons and four daughters: Mr. Leonard Lucas, Louisville; Mr. William Lucas, Lexington; Mr. Bohon Lucas, Harrods­burg; Mrs. C. A. Roy, Brownsville, Texas; Mrs. W. E. Durham, Danville; Mrs. E. P. Terhune, Harrodsburg; Mrs. Chas. Smith, Miami, Florida. Besides the children she is survived by one sister, Mrs. Sallie Robinson, of this city, twenty-four grandchil­dren and ten great- grandchildren. Mrs. Roy and Mrs. Smith were unable to be here for their mother’s funeral.

Another beautiful tribute – how quickly lives flit by – let us make the most of it while we are here.  And thank you, Charlotte, for sharing your family with us – it was a delightful meeting!